NPR News

The Two-Way
8:50 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Car Sales, Factory Orders Both Make Gains

In Glendale, Calif., last month, Allen Zimney and Leila Alvarez shopped for a Ford Edge.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 3, 2012 8:52 am

As the Census Bureau was reporting earlier this morning about a 1.3 percent gain in orders for manufactured goods in February from the month before, automakers were saying that March was perhaps their best month in almost four years, The Associated Press says:

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The Two-Way
8:15 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Murdoch Son Stepping Down From Post At BSkyB

James Murdoch, in July 2011.
Warren Allott AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 3, 2012 8:17 am

The hacking scandal that has ripped through Rupert Murdoch's newspapers in the U.K. has now led to son James Murdoch's decision to step down as chairman of the satellite broadcast giant BSkyB.

NPR's David Folkenflik tells our Newscast Desk that:

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The Two-Way
7:25 am
Tue April 3, 2012

What Happened In Vegas Costs Federal Properties Manager Her Job

The Las Vegas Strip: sometimes what happens there does come back to bite you.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

An inspector general's report about "excessive and wasteful" spending on a 2010 conference in Las Vegas hosted by the federal government's General Services Administration has cost GSA administrator Martha Johnson her job.

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It's All Politics
6:59 am
Tue April 3, 2012

As Wisconsin Heads To Polls, Romney And Santorum Vie For Last-Minute Support

Campaigning in Wisconsin Monday, Rick Santorum hopes he'll come out ahead in the cheese state.
Jeffrey Phelps EPA /Landov
  • Listen to Ari Shapiro on Morning Edition
  • Listen to David Welna on Morning Edition

Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum have been fighting it out in Wisconsin for the past week. And Tuesday night they'll see the results of their labors. Republicans will also cast votes Tuesday in Maryland and Washington, D.C., primaries, though the candidates have not spent much time there.

In all three contests, polls show Romney with a wide lead. Yet Santorum continues to campaign as relentlessly as ever. On Tuesday's Morning Edition, NPR's Ari Shapiro and David Welna filed reports from the trail.

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It's All Politics
6:58 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Five Things To Watch For Tuesday In Wisconsin, Maryland, DC

Mitt Romney should have a very good day Tuesday in the Wisconsin, Maryland and District of Columbia GOP primaries.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Tue April 3, 2012 2:28 pm

Once the Republican presidential primaries entered April, leaving behind March with its run of several Southern contests, the electoral terrain was expected to start looking much better for Mitt Romney.

That seems the case Tuesday, as Wisconsin, Maryland and the District of Columbia hold the first primaries in April, with a total of 98 delegates at stake. The front-runner for the GOP presidential nomination is expected to have a very good day. Just how good remains to be seen.

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Shots - Health Blog
6:46 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Medicare Boosting Coverage For Mental Health Issues

Medicare coverage for mental health services will reach 80 percent in 2014.
DElight iStockphoto.com

Medicare coverage for people with depression used to be, well, depressing. But that's starting to change.

In October, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services began covering screening for depression without any cost-sharing when Medicare beneficiaries visit their primary care doctor.

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The Two-Way
6:30 am
Tue April 3, 2012

U.S. Puts $10 Million Bounty On Mumbai Terror Suspect's Head

An April 2011 file photo, taken in Islamabad, of Hafiz Mohammad Saeed.
Aamir Qureshi AFP/Getty Images

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, the suspected mastermind behind the 2008 attacks in Mumbai, India, that left 166 people dead, now has a $10 million bounty on his head from the U.S. State Department's "Rewards for Justice" program.

Six American citizens died in the Mumbai massacre.

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The Two-Way
6:05 am
Tue April 3, 2012

In Women's Title Game, Baylor Goes For History

Baylor's Brittney Griner (42) blocking a shot by Georgia Tech's' Sasha Goodlett on March 24.
Nati Harnik AP

Kentucky is now in the record books as this year's NCAA Division I men's basketball champion after its 67-59 win over Kansas last night.

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The Two-Way
5:30 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Carnage In Oakland: 'People Started Running, And He Started Shooting'

Police descended on Oikos University in Oakland, Calif., Monday after the shootings that left at least seven people dead.
Noah Berger AP
  • NPR's Richard Gonzales on 'Morning Edition'

Survivors are telling harrowing tales about what happened Monday morning at Oikos University in Oakland when a man who police say once attended the small Christian school allegedly ordered the dozen or so people in a classroom to line up against a wall, drew a handgun and started firing.

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Sports
2:00 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Wildcats Roll To 8th NCAA Title, Coach Calipari's 1st

Anthony Davis of the Kentucky Wildcats puts up a shot over Jeff Withey of the Kansas Jayhawks in the NCAA Division I men's basketball final Monday night at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 12:01 pm

The Kentucky Wildcats beat the Kansas Jayhawks 67-59 Monday night in New Orleans, claiming their eighth NCAA men's basketball title and head coach John Calipari's first.

The Jayhawks trailed by 14 at halftime, and just 5 points separated the teams with about a minute left in the game. But Kansas couldn't get any closer to beating Kentucky, a team stacked with young talent that had dominated the whole tournament.

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Around the Nation
1:39 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Oakland Police: Former University Student Kills 7

Oakland Mayor Jean Quan and Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan address reporters after a gunman allegedly killed seven people at a California religious college. The suspect, identified as One Goh, is a 43-year-old Korean who has been living in the United States.
Kimihiro Hoshino AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 12:01 pm

Oikos University is housed in a nondescript single-story industrial building in a business park near the Oakland International Airport.

The university's website says it trains men and women "for Christian leadership, both lay and clerical." But it doesn't say how many students attend. It offers courses in nursing, music, biblical studies and Asian medicine. And now it's the site of one of the deadliest mass shootings in California in recent memory.

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Space
1:05 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Earth Has Just One Moon, Right? Think Again

The last lunar eclipse of 2011 as seen from the San Gabriel Valley east of Los Angeles on Dec 10, 2011.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 12:01 pm

Everybody knows that there's just one moon orbiting the Earth. But a new study by an international team of astronomers concludes that everybody is dead wrong about that.

"At any time, there are one or two 1-meter diameter asteroids in orbit around the Earth," says Robert Jedicke, an astronomer at the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii.

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National Security
1:03 am
Tue April 3, 2012

A Prosecutor Makes The Case For Military Trials

Brig. Gen. Mark Martins, the chief prosecutor at Guantanamo Bay, graduated first in his class at West Point, studied as a Rhodes scholar, and attended Harvard Law School. Here he speaks during a press conference at the military facility on Jan 18. following a hearing against Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, the main suspect in the bombing of the USS Cole in 2000.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 12:01 pm

The chief prosecutor for the military commissions at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is arguing a difficult case: that the commissions are not only fair, but can take pride of place alongside the civilian criminal justice system.

Brig. Gen. Mark Martins is the chief prosecutor for the commissions, the courts at the naval base that try high-profile terrorism suspects.

He has been called Guantanamo's detox man largely because he has made it his mission to show that the military commissions system at Guantanamo is no longer a toxic version of victor's justice.

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All Tech Considered
1:00 am
Tue April 3, 2012

Who Has The Right To Our Facebook Accounts Once We Die?

At least two states are considering laws to require social networking sites to grant loved ones access to the accounts of family members who have died.
Gunay Mutlu iStockphoto.com

When Loren Williams died in a motorcycle crash in 2005, his mother used his Facebook password to read posts on his wall.

"These were postings from personal friends that [said] he meant a lot to them in their lives, and it was very comforting," Karen Williams told KGW television in Portland, Ore. "There were pictures that I had never seen before of his life and just evidence of the wonderful relationships that he had established."

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The Two-Way
5:33 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

PHOTO: The First Woman To Enter The Boston Marathon

Kathrine Switzer of Syracuse found herself about to be thrown out of the normally all-male Boston Marathon when a husky companion, Thomas Miller of Syracuse, threw a block that tossed a race official out of the running instead.
AP

We had never read about Kathrine Switzer, but then we saw this astonishing picture cross our social streams:

That's Switzer, of Syracuse, being pushed off the Boston Marathon course by Jock Semple, one of the race organizers. The year was 1967 and as Switzer tells it, Semple jumped off the media truck and began yelling at her.

"Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers," she says he told her.

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The Two-Way
4:11 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

American Senior Citizens Still Owe $36 Billion In Student Loans

Americans 60 years and older are still paying off $36 billion in student debt. That's according to research from Federal Bank of New York, the Washington Post parses today.

The story is worth a read, but here is the gist:

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It's All Politics
3:35 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Obama Administration Officials Tripped Up By Clown, Comedian, Mindreader

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 3, 2012 9:03 am

A mind reader, a clown and a comedian walk into a bar.

Actually, we don't know about a bar. But we do know they walked into a conference of federal workers held outside Las Vegas in October 2010.

And though it sounds like the start of a joke, it isn't. Someone at the General Services Administration, the federal agency charged with managing government property, actually approved using taxpayer money to pay the three to appear at the meeting.

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It's All Politics
3:26 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

As A Politician, Romney's Long Had Trouble Talking Cars

Mitt Romney has had issues in this campaign with cars.

You may remember his "two Cadillacs" comment in February, immediately characterized as a gaffe for a candidate who has often seemed to struggle with how to address his wealth on the trail.

"I like the fact that most of the cars I see are Detroit-made automobiles," said Romney in Michigan. "I drive a Mustang and a Chevy pickup truck. Ann [his wife] drives a couple of Cadillacs, actually."

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Around the Nation
3:10 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

America's First Celebrity Robot Is Staging A Comeback

Musician Lois Kendall plays the bass while the robot Elektro "conducts" on stage as part of a Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing demonstration at the 1939 World's Fair in New York.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 5:32 pm

Before IBM's Watson and Deep Blue, there was another celebrity robot: Elektro.

The first robot introduced to Americans, Elektro was the 7-foot-tall man who greeted millions of visitors who streamed through the gates of the 1939 World's Fair. He even appeared on film, in The Middleton Family at the New York World's Fair.

The robot was built as a showpiece for the manufacturer Westinghouse, which made clothing irons and ovens in Mansfield, Ohio, at the time.

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The Two-Way
3:08 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

George Zimmerman's Attorney: 'This Is Not A Race Issue'

George Zimmerman, in a 2005 mug shot provided by the Orange County (Fla.) jail, via The Miami Herald.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 3:38 pm

The attorney of the man accused of shooting 17-year-old Trayvon Martin says "this is not a race issue."

During an interview with Tell Me More's Michel Martin (no relation), attorney Craig Sonner said his client George Zimmerman had black friends, who he's talked to and they have vouched for him.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:29 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Most Americans Are Getting Enough Vitamins, CDC Says

Just because we're eating our vitamins doesn't mean our diets are as healthful as they should be.
gerenme iStockphoto.com

Here's some good news about Americans' diets: Most of us are getting sufficient amounts of key vitamins and minerals. That's the finding of a nutrition report just out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

Vitamins A and D, folate, iron and iodine are just a few of the nutrients assessed in the nationwide survey, which uses data collected between 1999 and 2006. Overall, less than 10 percent of the population appeared deficient in each nutrient.

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Environment
2:15 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Gold Miners Dig Deep — To The Ocean Floor

A robotic arm breaks off a chunk of mineral-rich rock deep underwater. Nautilus Minerals of Australia hopes to develop and expand undersea mining by extracting copper, gold, silver and zinc from the seafloor.
Nautilus Minerals

Filmmaker James Cameron recently reminded us of the wonders of the sea by diving solo in a submarine to the deepest spot in the ocean. Next year, if all goes as planned, a rather different expedition will take place 1,000 miles south of that dive: An Australian company will start mining for copper, gold, silver and zinc on the seafloor off the shore of Papua New Guinea.

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It's All Politics
2:07 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Mitt Who? State Issues, Governor Eclipse Presidential Politics In Wisconsin

Mitt Romney has campaigned in the shadow of embattled Republican Gov. Scott Walker, who faces a recall vote in June. Here, Romney speaks with Walker supporters at a phone bank during a campaign stop in Fitchburg, Wis., on Saturday.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Tue April 3, 2012 12:25 pm

Voters in Wisconsin's GOP primary Tuesday are poised to help former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney wrap up his dogged, well-financed quest for the Republican presidential nomination.

But the winner-take-all primary and Romney's drawn-out battle with former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum have been overshadowed by the campaign to recall GOP Gov. Scott Walker, whose anti-union efforts since his 2010 election have cleaved the Badger State.

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It's All Politics
2:06 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

'Mad Men' George Romney Swipe Incites Angry Tweet From Grandson Tagg

Mitt Romney with campaign poster for his father, George, in Spartanburg, SC, January 2012.
Charles Dharapak AP

Was Mad Men weighing in on Election 2012 from the year 1966?

That's the question many are asking today after last night's episode of the Emmy Award-winning advertising-world drama on AMC.

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The Two-Way
1:32 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Seven Dead In Shooting At Christian University In Oakland

An Oakland police officer walks outside of Oikos University in Oakland, Calif., Monday.
Noah Berger AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 7:22 pm

A gunman opened fire inside a Christian university in Oakland. Several people were shot and multiple people were dead at the Oikos University campus.

The Oakland Police Department tweeted that a "possible suspect" was in custody so there was "no imminent public safety threat."

Update at 9:19 p.m. Police Identify Suspect:

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Africa
1:12 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Once-Thriving Egyptian Port Suffers After Soccer Riot

Egyptian soccer fans clash with riot police following a match between the hometown Al-Masry team and Cairo's Al-Ahly at the soccer stadium in Port Said, Egypt, on Feb. 1.
AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 3:12 pm

The Egyptian city of Port Said is the northern gateway to one of the world's key shipping lanes, the Suez Canal connecting the Mediterranean Sea with the Red Sea. With its ornate buildings and clean streets, the sprawling city has one of the highest standards of living in Egypt.

But this year, Port Said has become known for something more sinister: It was the site of Egypt's deadliest soccer riot.

Many of the city's officials and residents say the tragedy has destroyed Port Said's reputation and left them in financial trouble.

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The Two-Way
12:35 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

ABC News: Enhanced Video Shows Injury To Zimmerman's Head

From the enhanced version of the video, showing what may be a gash on George Zimmerman's head.
ABC News

Reporting that it has had the video "clarified" by a forensics company, ABC News is now saying that a police surveillance recording of George Zimmerman "shows the neighborhood watch captain with an injury to the back of his head."

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The Salt
12:19 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

French Muslims Ease Cultural Tensions With French-Halal Food

A butcher shop in Paris, which prominently advertises that it sells halal meat.
Michel Euler AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 12:21 pm

On a recent evening, Les Enfants Terribles, a Paris restaurant that serves French cuisine cooked with halal meat, was brimming with customers.

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Middle East
12:05 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Syrian Exiles Seek To Spread Word On Internet Radio

Protests in Syria have carried on despite the crackdown by the government's security forces. New Start Radio, an Internet radio station, has reported on events by speaking to citizen journalists around the country. Here, protesters take part in a March 2 demonstration in northern Syria.
Rodrigo Abd AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 3:12 pm

We can't tell you where Hussam and Rania live, but we can tell you they used to live in Syria's capital, Damascus.

Hussam was a creative director at a small marketing company he founded with a friend. Rania was the morning host for a radio station owned by the cousin of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

Then came the protests all around Syria. Then came the phone call.

"The radio station called me, at home, and they said, 'Rania we have to say the truth,' " Rania says.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:59 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Just A Dirty Diaper, Or Worse? Smelly Urine May Mean Infection

Stinky urine in a feverish child should be a red flag for doctors.
Swilmor iStockphoto.com

If you've spent any time around very young children, you know they can sometimes be pretty stinky. But particularly pungent urine in a child who is fussy or feverish could be a sign of infection.

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