NPR News

The Two-Way
11:07 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Mayor Bloomberg: Immigration May Be Only Solution For Crumbling Cities

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
Lucas Jackson AP

For the most part, we don't hear novel arguments in favor or against the controversial issue of immigration. Mayor Michael Bloomberg has been one of the few to take a different view. Last year, he advocated opening the door to new immigrants if they all moved to Detroit.

At the time, it was derided as weird.

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The Two-Way
11:00 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Patrick Fitzgerald, High-Profile Prosecutor, Stepping Down

United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois Patrick Fitzgerald.
John Gress Getty Images

Patrick Fitzgerald, the federal prosecutor who obtained the conviction of Vice President Cheney's chief of staff for lying to authorities about the leaking of a CIA officer's name and who sent former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich (D) to jail on corruption charges, is stepping down from his post.

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Music
10:52 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Remembering Baritone Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau

German baritone Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau performing Benjamin Britten's 'War Requiem' in Coventry Cathedral.
Erich Auerbach Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 12:58 pm

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Election 2012
10:27 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Get Ready For The First Robot President

While American politicians may be scripted, they're not this robotic. But whoever wins the presidency this year will preside over a U.S. economy where automation is becoming increasingly important.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 12:48 pm

As many folks know, Bill Clinton was called the First Black President by Toni Morrison in The New Yorker.

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The Two-Way
10:22 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Challenge: Use The Moog Doodle To Play The 'All Things Considered' Theme

Google's Moog Doodle.
Google.com

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 4:05 pm

You've probably know by now that Google is paying homage to Robert Moog today with a Doodle that's a virtual version of the iconic Moog Synthesizer. Moog died in 2005. Today would have been his 78th birthday.

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Election 2012
9:51 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Does Obama Have A Messaging Problem?

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:46 am

Republicans have pounced on a comment by Newark, New Jersey mayor and Obama re-election surrogate Cory Booker. He called the Obama campaign's attacks on Mitt Romney's time at Bain Capital "nauseating." Host Michel Martin discusses the art of messaging with former presidential speechwriter Mary Kate Cary, and journalism professor Cynthia Tucker.

Race
9:51 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Civil Rights Leader: Equality Means Equality

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:46 am

The NAACP is officially supporting same-sex marriage. The group says marriage equality is a civil right and is encouraging black voters to support the issue if it shows up on state ballots. Host Michel Martin talks with Julian Bond, chairman emeritus of the group.

World
9:51 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Islamists Vs. Mubarak Holdovers In Egypt Elections

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:46 am

Campaign fever is in the air in Cairo and around Egypt. Millions of voters go to the polls, Tuesday and Wednesday, for what many believe to be the country's first free election in its long history. Host Michel Martin discusses what's at stake in this election with Sherine Tadros, the Egypt correspondent for Al Jazeera English.

Mongolia Booms
8:47 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Old Ways Disappearing In The New Mongolia

A baby Bactrian camel is tied up at the edge of the Badam family's small farmstead. Bactrian camels β€” like all Mongolian mammals β€” have thick fur to withstand the winters.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 7:57 pm

Mongolia, the land of Genghis Khan and nomadic herders, is in the midst of a remarkable transition. Rich in coal, gold and copper, this country of fewer than 3 million people in Central Asia is riding a mineral boom that is expected to more than double its GDP within a decade. The rapid changes simultaneously excite and unnerve many Mongolians, who hope mining can help pull many out of poverty, but worry it will ravage the environment and further erode the nation's distinctive, nomadic identity.

Last of four parts

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Music Interviews
8:24 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Jeremy Denk: Playing Ligeti With A Dash Of Humor

Jeremy Denk has recently written for The New Yorker and The New York Times Book Review.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 8:03 pm

Not many classical pianists maintain blogs where they ruminate on everything from eating a terrible bowl of meatballs while on tour with Joshua Bell to seeing Twilight: New Moon (twice) and hearing strains of a Schubert song.

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The Two-Way
8:21 am
Wed May 23, 2012

As Talks Begin, Iran And World Powers Stake Out Positions

As talks opened in Baghdad today, "diplomats from six world powers offered Iran new proposals Wednesday to ease international concerns about its nuclear program, but appeared to reject Tehran's appeals to ease economic sanctions to help move along talks," The Associated Press reports.

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Shots - Health Blog
7:55 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Dangerous Gut Bacteria Move Outside Hospitals, Infect Kids

Colonies of Clostridium difficile look awfully nice, but they're definitely something you'd be advised to keep at a safe distance.
CDC

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:55 am

Infections with the bacterium Clostridium difficile hit record numbers in recent years. Now there's evidence the hard-to-treat infections are becoming a problem for children.

The infections often strike the elderly, especially those who've been taking antibiotics that clear out competing bacteria in people's intestines. People sickened by the bug have persistent diarrhea that can, in severe cases, lead to dehydration.

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The Two-Way
7:35 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Primary Protests: 4 In 10 Say No To Obama; 3 In 10 Say No To Romney

President Obama during a news conference Monday in Chicago.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Though there's no doubt about the nominees, presidential primaries are still being held.

And in both Democratic and Republican contests, some voters continue to register their unhappiness with the choices before them.

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It's All Politics
7:15 am
Wed May 23, 2012

How A College Kid May Have Helped Pick A Congressman

Thomas Massie's opponents were quick to complain that out-of-state money had "stolen" the election for him after he won the GOP nomination in Kentucky's 4th Congressional District.
AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:16 am

Thomas Massie won't be sworn in as a member of Congress until next January, but he has already put one of his supporters at the top of his Christmas card list.

Massie won the Republican nomination in Kentucky's 4th Congressional District, just south of Cincinnati, on Tuesday in large part due to the backing of James Ramsey, a 21-year-old college student in Texas.

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The Two-Way
6:35 am
Wed May 23, 2012

'Morally Repugnant' Behavior Tolerated By Secret Service, Senator Says

In Cartagena, a prostitute stands on a corner in the historical district.
Manuel Pedraza AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:09 am

The first congressional hearing into the scandal involving Secret Service personnel who allegedly cavorted with prostitutes in Colombia last month is set for this morning. As the time for that hearing approaches, a key senator is charging that such "morally repugnant" behavior appears to have been tolerated within the elite agency.

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The Two-Way
5:58 am
Wed May 23, 2012

33 Years In Prison For Pakistani Doctor Who Aided Hunt For Bin Laden

Osama bin Laden.
AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 5:22 pm

Shakil Afridi, a Pakistani doctor who helped in the hunt for Osama bin Laden by trying to collect DNA from the al-Qaida leader and his family members, has been convicted of treason and sentenced to 33 years in prison, according to reports from Pakistan.

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The Two-Way
5:21 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Finally, Egyptians Have Their Say

In Cairo, earlier today, a man cast his ballot.
Marco Longari AFP/Getty Images

"This is definitely the big event" on Egypt's way toward its own form of democracy.

That's how NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson summed up the news earlier on Morning Edition as she reported from Cairo about the opening day of the first free presidential elections in a nation that just a little more than a year ago was in the throes of a revolution that toppled President Hosni Mubarak's regime.

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Around the Nation
4:42 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Construction Crew Works Gingerly Around Elephant

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Oregon officials are trying to ease the stress of road construction, at least for one resident. Two-point-two miles of the Sunset Highway are being repaved. This could disturb Rose-Tu, a pregnant elephant at the nearby Oregon zoo. The Oregonian reports highway crews will move gingerly, letting Rose-Tu grow accustomed to the noise. They hope to avoid stress from vibrations in her feet and sounds captured by those elephant ears. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

World
4:29 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Even Presidents Struggle To Keep Their Dignity

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 4:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Movies
2:41 am
Wed May 23, 2012

65th Annual Cannes Film Festival Opens In France

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 3:09 am

The movie being talked about the most at this year's Cannes Film Festival in the south of France is Michael Haneke's Amour. It's the 65th anniversary of the festival.

Middle East
2:41 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Voting Opens In Egypt's Historical Election

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 3:22 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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NPR Story
2:27 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Afghan Public Protection Force Profile

A U.S. soldier watches members of the Afghan Public Protection Force arrive at the transition ceremony on the outskirts of the Afghan capital Kabul on March 15. The APPF replaces all private security contractors in the country.
Ahmad Jamshid AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 7:54 am

Nearly two years ago, Afghan President Hamid Karzai ordered that gun-toting private security companies in his country be brought under state control. But the Afghan force to replace the foreign-funded contractors is off to a rocky start.

According to the U.S. Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction (SIGAR), the new force will increase security costs for USAID projects and could even shut some of them down, at a loss of about $899 million. USAID in Kabul disagrees, and the dispute has gone public.

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Around the Nation
1:40 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Identity Theft: 'Kids Don't Know They're Victims'

Jennifer Andrushko says she worries about the long-term consequences for her 5-year-old son, Carter, after the theft of his Social Security number.
Courtesy of Jennifer Andrushko

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 2:41 am

Carter Andrushko is 5 years old, and he knows a few things already: He knows how to spell his name. He knows that Crusty, his hermit crab, has 10 legs. And he knows what he wants to do when he grows up: look for dinosaur bones.

According to the Utah Department of Workforce Services, however, Carter already has a job. In fact, according to that office, he's been working since before he was even born. That's what Carter's mother, Jennifer Andrushko, discovered when she applied for Medicaid in 2009 and found out that someone had been using Carter's Social Security number for years.

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London 2012: The Summer Olympics
1:37 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Sprinter Speeds Toward London, And Olympic Gold

Allyson Felix runs in a 200 meter race at the 2011 IAAF World Championships. Felix, who has twice won silver in the race at the Olympics, has not yet announced her event schedule for London this summer.
Adrian Dennis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 2:41 am

The Olympics start in July, but American sprinter Allyson Felix is still deciding which events she'll focus on in London. She's won Olympic silver medals twice in her beloved 200 meters, a distance in which she's also a three–time world champion.

Felix won an Olympic gold in 2008, on the 4x400-meter relay team. But this time around, she wants an individual gold, too.

New Success At 100 Meters

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Middle East
1:26 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Iran In Tough Spot As Sanctions Take Economic Toll

If sanctions continue, Iran's tankers could fill up with surplus oil and leave the country with no place to store its continued production.
Kamran Jebreili AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 2:24 pm

Sanctions have not often worked to get governments to change their behavior, but Iran may prove to be an exception. The country depends on income from oil sales, and the oil sector is highly vulnerable to sanctions.

The United States has stopped buying Iranian oil, and the European Union is set to do so at the end of next month. There are sanctions on Iran's central bank and punishments for companies that help Iran ship its oil.

Jamie Webster, an oil market analyst at PFC Energy, says Iran's oil exports β€” normally about 2.5 million barrels a day β€” are in serious jeopardy.

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Sweetness And Light
1:23 am
Wed May 23, 2012

NBA And NHL Playoffs: Does Anyone Really Care?

Tim Duncan and the San Antonio Spurs have won 18 games in a row as they head into the NBA's Western Conference Finals. But Frank Deford wants to know: Has anyone noticed?
Harry How Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 6:23 am

It's the climax of the hockey and basketball seasons, but both have potential playoff visibility problems. Let me explain.

OK, the NBA first. As you know, basketball is the most individualized, celebrity-ized team game. Like movie stars, the best players are known by their first names: LeBron, Kobe, Dirk. Every basketball superstar wants to take his talents to a hot-dog, big-time market. Or at least marry a Kardashian.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:23 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Health Insurance Cutbacks Squeeze The Insured

Amber Cooper lives in Modesto, Calif., with her son, Jaden, 5, and her husband, Kevin. She had a liver transplant when she was 10 years old and needs daily medication so her body won't reject her liver.
Deanne Fitzmaurice for NPR

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:16 am

Amber Cooper and her husband were doing OK. They had jobs, a healthy 5-year-old son, a house in Riverbank, Calif., and health insurance from her job in the accounting department of a small manufacturing company.

Then one day everything changed.

"We were in a conference room ... and I had heard rumors but didn't know if it was true, and I started crying in front of everyone and actually had to excuse myself to gather myself together and go back in. It was devastating for me," Cooper said.

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The Record
11:58 pm
Tue May 22, 2012

The End Of 'Idol': There Are No More Songs Left To Be Sung

American Idol finalists Phillip Phillips and Jessica Sanchez on stage with host Ryan Seacrest on the Fox TV show Tuesday night.
Michael Becker Fox

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:47 pm

Tonight, when Ryan Seacrest announces who has won the 11th season of American Idol β€” when the confetti falls and Jennifer Lopez sheds a perfect dewy teardrop and Randy Jackson's thought bubble explodes with "Dude, that was a moment moment MOMENT" and Steven Tyler purses his immortal lips in that vampire-connoisseur way he does, smelling the perfume of another sweet young victory β€” I will be out to dinner with friends, far from the agony and ecstasy finalists Jessica Sanchez and Phi

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All Tech Considered
5:24 pm
Tue May 22, 2012

Stolen Phone Beams Photos To Owner, Who Puts Them On Facebook

A month after Katy McCaffrey's iPhone was stolen, photographs began streaming from the phone to her "cloud" account. She used them to create a photo album on Facebook; she called it "Stolen iPhone Adventures."
Facebook

Originally published on Tue May 22, 2012 6:06 pm

There are many ways to find a lost or stolen cellphone. You can call the number and see who answers; you can use "Find My Phone" apps that track your phone's GPS. Or, if your camera phone automatically posts photos to your account in "the cloud," you can simply watch your photo feed and look for clues in the strange new images that start popping up. Just be prepared to see anything β€” like scenes from a cruise ship.

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The Two-Way
4:27 pm
Tue May 22, 2012

Sheriff Arpaio Sends Publicly Funded Deputy To Hawaii On 'Birther' Hunt

Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio in 2011.
Ross D. Franklin AP

It seems there's not a month that goes by that Maricopa (Ariz.) County Sheriff Joe Arpaio isn't involved in one controversy or another.

As we've reported, Arpaio is already facing a federal civil rights lawsuit.

But now there's news that Arpaio is using public money on his quest to investigate President Obama's birth certificate. Both the Arizona Republic and Honolulu Star Advertiser report that Arpaio sent his deputy, Brian Mackiewcz, to Hawaii in part because of what Arpaio said were "security issues," related to the investigation.

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