NPR News

Highlights from NPR News.

Gawker, Salon, and Vice have all decided to unionize their editorial staffs this summer. Buzzfeed’s owner, however, says collective bargaining wouldn’t be right for his company.

NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik talks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about why unions are making their way into new media, and whether Jonah Peretti is right to say unions wouldn’t be good for his employees.

Des Moines Makes The List

Aug 20, 2015

It seems like every time you log onto Facebook someone has shared a link to one of those lists that rank cities in categories. “The 10 Happiest Cities for Young Professionals” or “America’s Best Cities for Barbecue.” Why are these lists so popular? And more importantly, what’s their impact? Iowa Public Radio’s Sarah Boden went in search of answers.

Is Breakfast Really So Important?

Aug 20, 2015

The debate rages on: Is breakfast the most important meal of your day, or can you skip it without dire consequences? NPR food and nutrition correspondent Allison Aubrey explains that the answer isn’t simple. Although most people do report eating breakfast, the health benefits depend on what you eat and who you are. She discusses the research with Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins.

Guest

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras has announced that he will step down, paving the way for early elections following a bruising battle over austerity measures linked to a European bailout package that caused a major split in the leftist ruling party.

Fleeing to Tijuana? Not from the San Ysidro crossing, you aren't.

As of Wednesday, foreign pedestrians crossing into Mexico between San Diego and Tijuana are required to present a passport, fill out paperwork and, if they are staying for longer than one week, pay a 330-peso fee (about $20).

It's official. Tropical Storm Danny has made the leap, becoming the first hurricane of the Atlantic season as it makes its way toward the eastern Caribbean.

Currently, the storm is centered about 1,200 miles east of the Lesser Antilles and moving west at 10 mph. The National Hurricane Center's "forecast cone" has Hurricane Danny making landfall possibly as far north as Puerto Rico or as far south as St. Lucia.

The storm currently has sustained winds of nearly 75 mph, with higher gusts.

Just about a century ago, an international student at a college in the United States was telling someone what she likes best about the English language: American slang. "I must learn it," she said. "It is so unexpected."

For example, she was surprised to learn — according to a November 1916 edition of the Delta Delta Delta sorority publication, the Trident -- that "brick" was the masculine equivalent of "peach" because the former was a "term of approval" for a man and the latter was a term of approval for a woman.

Former President Jimmy Carter said he and his wife, Rosalynn, are going to "cut back dramatically" on their public schedule as he begins radiation therapy later today.

During a press conference in Atlanta, Carter said doctors found melanoma that had spread to his liver and his brain. Ninety-eight percent of that kind of cancer first shows up on the skin, he said. Two percent develops first inside the body.

Does This Phylum Make Me Look Fat?

Aug 20, 2015

We would all love a simple weight-loss plan. Beyond carbs and fats, some studies have hinted that a key group of gut microbes — from the phylum Firmicutes — might be more common among people who are overweight.

Thinner people, these studies suggest, might have more bacteria from the phylum known as Bacteroidetes. Maybe we just need to reestablish a Bacteroidetes-favoring gut to more easily lose weight, some people have said. A stack of diet books has already jumped on the notion.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

Thai officials are downplaying the possibility that a foreign terrorist group is behind the bombing in central Bangkok this week that killed at least 20 people, including foreign tourists, and wounded dozens of others.

Police also appear to have ruled out a man in a yellow T-shirt seen on a CCTV video leaving behind a backpack moments before the blast at the Erawan shrine as well as another man suspected of being an accomplice.

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

South Korea and North Korea traded artillery and rocket fire on Thursday.

No one was hurt, but it was the first time tensions had escalated into an armed clash between the neighbors in five years, the New York Times reports.

Reporting for NPR from Seoul, Haeryun Kang tells Newscast that:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "THE GOONIES")

COREY FELDMAN: (As Mouth) First, you got to do the truffle shuffle.

JEFF COHEN: (As Chunk) Come on.

FELDMAN: (As Mouth) Do it.

Police used tear gas and arrested nine people during protests in St. Louis on Wednesday.

Demonstrators gathered after police shot and killed an 18-year-old they say pointed a gun at them. Police said protesters threw bottles and bricks at them, so they deployed armored vehicles and teams of officers in riot gear.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports:

Donald Trump's immigration plan is — like the candidate — flashy, strident and headline-grabbing. Fox News called it "an early Christmas gift" for immigration hawks. Conservative commentator Ann Coulter pronounced it "the greatest political document since the Magna Carta."

But some of those in the trenches of immigration reform say it's unrealistic and unworkable.

Donald Trump could write "Immigration Reform for Dummies." He makes a complex issue simple and sexy.

The natural world is abuzz with the sound of animals communicating — crickets, birds, even grunting fish. But scientists learning to decode these sounds say the secret signals of African elephants — their deepest rumblings — are among the most intriguing calls any animal makes.

An unprecedented, class action lawsuit brought against one Southern California school district and its top officials could have a big impact on schools across the country.

On Thursday in Los Angeles, a U.S. District Court judge will preside over the first hearing in the suit against the Compton Unified School District. To understand the complaint, you need to understand Compton.

Robie's Country Store, in Hooksett, N.H., has become an almost ritual stop on the presidential campaign trail — one of those places where anyone who is running is pretty much guaranteed to make an appearance. The business isn't what it once was, but presidential hopefuls keep showing up.

The store has stood on the bank of the Merrimack River, between Concord and Manchester, since 1887. When the candidates get there, most know what's expected.

Copyright 2015 Colorado Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.cpr.org.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Greek Island Of Kos Burdened By Migrant Migration

Aug 20, 2015
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

3 Firefighters Killed In Washington State Wildfire

Aug 19, 2015

Officials say three firefighters have been killed and three to four others have been injured trying to control a wildfire in Washington state.

Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers said the firefighters died near the town of Twisp in the north-central part of the state.

The Associated Press reports the deaths came after the county emergency management department told residents to evacuate the area:

You may see new customer service technology at the airport soon. It's part of an effort by federal agencies to make it easier for people to give the government feedback, according to the Washington Post.

The equipment has a simple design, and it looks more like it belongs in a playroom than in an airport.

While Donald Trump's recent position paper on immigration dominates headlines, a new study of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. digs into the latest numbers.

The Washington, D.C.-based Migration Policy Institute released "An Analysis of Unauthorized Immigrants in the United States by Country and Region of Birth." It's based on U.S. Census Bureau data.

When Washington state legalized recreational marijuana, people wondered if it would mean more stoned drivers on the roads. Two and a half years later, one trend is clear: Police are arresting more drivers with pot in their systems — but what's not clear yet is what that means for traffic safety.

One of the most prestigious names in health care is taking a stand on food.

This week, Cleveland Clinic announced it would sever ties with McDonald's. As of Sept. 18, the McDonald's branch located in the Cleveland Clinic cafeteria will turn off its fryers and close its doors for good. Its lease will not be renewed.

Rand Paul is trying to have it both ways — running both for president and re-election to his Kentucky Senate seat in 2016.

But whether he'll be able to keep that electoral insurance policy rests in the hands of Kentucky Republicans this weekend.

Kentucky law is clear: You can't run for president and U.S. Senate at the same time. But Paul has tried to get around that law, by pushing for the state to hold a nonbinding caucus instead of a primary in the presidential nominating process.

ISIS militants beheaded a renowned Syrian archaeologist in the ancient town of Palmyra, and then hung his body from one of the town's Roman columns.

NPR's Alice Fordham reported on the brutal murder of 81-year-old Khaled al-Asaad:

For now, federal authorities characterize the Justice Department inquiry into Hillary Clinton's private email server as a security situation: a simple matter of finding out whether classified information leaked out during her tenure as secretary of state, and where it went.

Except, former government officials said, that's not going to be so simple.

"I think that the FBI will be moving with all deliberate speed to determine whether there were serious breaches of national security here," said Ron Hosko, who used to lead the FBI's criminal investigative division.

Pages