KRWG

NPR News

Please note:  Sometimes, NPR publishes headlines before the story and/or audio is ready; check back for content later if this occurs.  We also publish national/world news on our home page from AP, BBC, and others.

On Wednesday morning, NASA rewarded five members of the public — two doctors, a dentist, an engineer and a product designer — for their creative ideas for how to poop in a spacesuit.

Yes, it sounds a little bit funny. But unmet toilet needs could have life or death consequences for an astronaut in an emergency situation.

That's why thousands of people spent tens of thousands of hours on the "Space Poop Challenge," brainstorming, modeling, prototyping and number-crunching to come up with a crowd-sourced solution to the problem of human waste in a spacesuit.

Feeling Way More Stressed Out? You're Not Alone

Feb 15, 2017

Americans say they're feeling more stress, according to a survey released Wednesday by the American Psychological Association.

Americans rated their stress higher in January compared to last August, increasing from 4.8 to 5.1 on a 10-point scale. That's the first significant increase in the 10 years that the association has been doing these polls.

After two days of round-the-clock work to control water flowing over the Oroville Dam in Northern California, people who live downstream of the structure are allowed to return to their homes, officials announced Tuesday.

Nearly 200,000 people were affected by evacuations after water scoured enormous holes in two of the dam's concrete spillways beginning Sunday, raising concerns that the tallest dam in the country could fail.

There was no end of intrigue at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show this year.

Rumor, the German shepherd who narrowly lost at last year's show, had come close to simply hanging up her leash and retiring. Instead, she stormed back to win her category again this year — and then, to top it all off, beat out more than 2,800 dogs to take Best in Show on Tuesday, as well.

Russian intelligence officials made repeated contact with members of President Trump's campaign staff, according to new reports that cite anonymous U.S. officials. American agencies were concerned about the contacts but haven't seen proof of collusion between the campaign and the Russian security apparatus, the reports say.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In the space of hours, the White House made a statement about President Trump and Russia, and then new information contradicted it. First, let's hear the denial from White House spokesman Sean Spicer, questioned here by ABC's Jonathan Karl.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A New Trick To Get Those VIP Tickets

Feb 15, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIVE FOR THE MOMENT")

THE SHERLOCKS: (Singing) Please don't try and run...

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Updated 11:25 p.m. ET

Malaysian police say they have arrested a second woman in connection with the killing of the North Korean leader's half-brother, Kim Jong Nam. She is 25 years old and a holder of an Indonesian passport. They say she was identified from surveillance TV footage of the airport. Earlier, authorities said they had detained another woman in the death.

There's an experiment underway at a few top universities around the world to make some master's degrees out there more affordable.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for example, says the class of 2018 can get a master's degree in supply chain management with tens of thousands in savings. The university's normal price runs upwards of $67,000 for the current academic year.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

One Republican in Congress is asking just how much he really wants to know about the activities of the Trump White House. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky spoke frankly about this on Fox News.

(SOUNDBITE OF FOX NEWS BROADCAST)

Copyright 2017 Chicago Public Radio. To see more, visit Chicago Public Radio.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Noted aviator and actor Harrison Ford flew his private plane over a jet airliner on the ground at a Southern California airport Monday. It's not the first time the Star Wars and Indiana Jones star has had problems landing.

The 74-year-old Ford was instructed to land on a runway at Orange County's John Wayne Airport but mistakenly landed on a parallel taxiway, passing over a Boeing 737 carrying 110 passengers and six crew members.

Enrique Marquez Jr., 25, of Riverside, Calif., is accused of purchasing the assault-style weapons used in the San Bernardino terrorist attack, and has agreed to plead guilty to federal criminal charges.

Benjamin Gottlieb of member station KCRW tells our Newscast unit:

It's the stuff of spy novels.

With the Trump administration vowing to tighten rules for skilled workers entering the United States, India's software services companies are worried. Indian IT giants outsource tens of thousands of tech specialists to the United States each year, and limiting the visa program that brings them in could disrupt their multibillion-dollar industry.

The White House is narrowing its list of candidates to replace former national security adviser Michael Flynn and has already interviewed former CENTCOM deputy director Robert Harward about the vacancy, according to a senior administration official.

The official said they spoke to Harward last week and again on Monday.

"We've been getting our ducks in a row for a long time," the official said.

If Michael Flynn, President Trump's former national security adviser, was trying to reassure the Russian ambassador about sanctions leveled by the Obama administration, then he may have broken the law.

The events leading to Michael Flynn's resignation as national security adviser accelerated this week, with constant new updates about what he said, to whom and when. But the path to that step has been unfolding since at least last summer. Here's a timeline of key events that eventually led to the resignation of a top presidential adviser less than one month into the Trump administration.

June through November 2016

They say opposites attract. But these days, maybe not so much.

A growing number of singles are adding a clause to their online dating profiles telling either Trump haters or Trump supporters — depending on their political preference — that they need not apply.

"This was like a deal breaker for me," says 50-year-old Elizabeth Jagosz from the Detroit area. "If you are Trump supporter, I'm not even going to consider meeting you for coffee."

It's not just an issue of party politics, Jagosz says. It's about core values. Love, she says, cannot conquer all.

As Gambia's new president Adama Barrow settles into his new role, he is also taking steps to resuscitate international ties cut off by his predecessor Yahya Jammeh, including membership to the International Criminal Court and the Commonwealth of Nations.

The tiny West African nation has now formally informed the United Nations that it is reversing its request to withdraw from the International Criminal Court, made by Jammeh last October.

Lawmakers in Iowa began debating a bill Tuesday to dramatically change how public sector unions negotiate their contracts, part of a wave of legislation in statehouses across the country to roll back union rights.

The bill, similar to a 2011 law in Wisconsin, is high on the state's legislative agenda and comes as Republicans control both chambers of the state Legislature and the governor's mansion for the first time in nearly 20 years.

After multiple public statements from the White House, there are still numerous unanswered questions surrounding Michael Flynn's Monday-night resignation from his position as national security adviser.

Flynn is under fire for a discussion he had with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak on the day that the U.S. announced sanctions for cyberhacking that took place during the U.S. election.

In the world of electric cars, there's a chicken-and-egg problem: More people might buy electric vehicles, or EVs, if they were confident there would always be a charger nearby. And businesses might install more chargers if there were more EVs on the road.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

A version of this story was originally published by member station WAMU.

With the GOP fully in control of the federal government for the first time since 2006, Congressional Republicans are taking their first steps to assert their power over the District of Columbia's local government.

President Trump campaigned on a promise to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he called “unfair” to the United States. At a joint press conference Monday with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, however, Trump said his administration would only be “tweaking” NAFTA.

At President Trump’s last two press conferences with foreign leaders, he’s only taken questions from reporters working for organizations that are viewed as friendly to him. That allowed him to avoid discussing the fate of now former national security adviser Michael Flynn at Monday’s joint press conference with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Pages