NPR News

Animals
2:19 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Chicago-Area Dog Flu Outbreak Rises To Over 1,000 Cases

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 4:52 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Pet owners in the Chicago area are hearing messages like this when they check in with their veterinarians.

(SOUNDBITE OF AUTOMATED MESSAGE)

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Law
1:38 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Former FBI Agent Speaks Out: 'I Was Not Protected'

FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 4:52 pm

Robyn Gritz spent 16 years at the FBI, where she investigated a series of major national security threats. But she says she got crosswise with her supervisors, who pushed her out and yanked her security clearance.

For the first time, she's speaking out about her situation, warning about how the bureau treats women and the effects of a decade of fighting terrorism.

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Shots - Health News
1:21 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Personalizing Cancer Treatment With Genetic Tests Can Be Tricky

Sequencing the genes of a cancer cell turns up lots of genetic mutations — but some of them are harmless. The goal is to figure out which mutations are the troublemakers.
Kevin Curtis Science Source

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 4:52 pm

It's becoming routine for cancer doctors to order a detailed genetic test of a patient's tumor to help guide treatment, but often those results are ambiguous. Researchers writing in Science Translational Medicine Wednesday say there's a way to make these expensive tests more useful.

Here's the issue: These genomic tests scan hundreds or even thousands of genes looking for mutations that cause or promote cancer growth. In the process, they uncover many mutations that scientists simply don't know how to interpret — some may be harmless.

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The Two-Way
12:45 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Postman Carrying Letters For Congress Lands On Capitol Grounds In A Gyrocopter

A gyrocopter sits on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Wednesday. A Capitol Police spokeswoman said its occupant was arrested.
Andrew Harnik AP

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 7:46 pm

Updated at 8:10 p.m. EDT

The U.S. Capitol Police have confirmed that Douglas Mark Hughes of Ruskin, Fla. was the pilot who landed a gyrocopter not far from the capitol building.

Police searched the vehicle, saying "nothing hazardous" was found. The gyrocopter was relocated to a secure location, the department said in a statement.

Shortly after landing, Hughes was quickly named by friends and news outlets as the man who flew low over the reflecting pool to land near the Congressional buildings. He was met by police with their guns drawn.

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Goats and Soda
12:42 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Dog Team Races To Rescue Lost Hiker In The Himalayas

The team with SAR Dogs Nepal performs many search operations in the Himalayas. Last year they rescued five foreign trekkers and about 200 Nepalis.
Courtesy of SAR Dogs Nepal

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 12:17 pm

The night before he disappeared, Dennis Lee Thian Poh called his wife in Kuala Lumpur. They chatted about the bitter cold in Nepal's Annapurna range and he said that dinner in his small lodge had consisted, yet again, of vegetable fried rice.

Lee, 47, had been hiking for six days in Nepal's most visited trekking zone, the Annapurna Conservation Area.

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The Two-Way
12:29 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Documents Show Global Outpouring Of Grief Over Lincoln's Assassination

An engraving of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre in Washington on April 14, 1865. Lincoln died the next day.
De Agostini Picture Library De Agostini/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 2:24 pm

"The exhibition of profound grief was such as I have never seen equalled. Several overcome by their emotion, sat down upon the very ground and wept."

That was how Thomas Nelson, a U.S. minister to Chile, described the reaction of ordinary citizens in Spain to the news of President Abraham Lincoln's assassination in 1865.

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NPR Story
12:21 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

'Institutional Memory' Of U.S. Senate To Retire

Don Ritchie, historian of the U.S. Senate, speaks at the 53rd annual United States Senate Youth Program on Mar. 9, 2015, in Washington, D.C. (Jakub Mosur and Erin Lubin)

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 12:52 pm

On this day in 1861, a day after Fort Sumter fell, President Lincoln ordered up 75,000 troops. Within days, volunteers swarmed to Washington. It was decided that some would stay in the U.S. Senate chamber, which had only been in use for two years. Upwards of 4,000 troops took up residence, and soon the chamber was described as filthy and “alive with lice.”

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NPR Story
12:21 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Not All Almonds Are Equal When It Comes To Water Use

(mynameisharsha/Flickr)

The agriculture industry in California accounts for 80 percent of the state’s total water use, so when Governor Jerry Brown’s recent mandatory water restrictions didn’t include farmers, he got a lot of flak.

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NPR Story
12:21 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

HBO On Trial For 'Fabricating' Child Labor Story

Host Bryant Gumbel speaks onstage during the 'Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel' panel at the HBO portion of the 2015 Winter Television Critics Association press tour at the Langham Hotel on January 8, 2015 in Pasadena, California. (Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 1:14 pm

In a federal court this week, the British sportswear and equipment supplier Mitre Sports International is claiming HBO defamed the company in a 2008 segment of "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel" called "Children of Industry."

The segment portrayed the story of children under the age of 14 hand-sewing Mitre soccer balls for little to no money. Mitre claims that the interviews were edited to be misleading, that parts of the story were fabricated and that the children were coerced to say what they did on camera.

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The Two-Way
11:28 am
Wed April 15, 2015

U.S. Predicted To Be Net Energy Exporter In Next Decade; First Time Since 1950s

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 4:13 pm

The U.S. will reach a new balance in energy trade "sometime between 2020 and 2030," says the Energy Information Administration, which predicts the U.S. could become a net energy exporter in the near future.

The federal agency's prediction cites a rise in domestic natural gas production and changes in energy demands. If it happens, the shift would end a streak of more than 50 years in which the U.S. has been a net importer of energy.

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Who's On The List Of State Sponsors Of Terrorism, And Why

President Obama meets Cuban President Raul Castro at the Summit of the Americas in Panama City on April 11. The White House says it wants to remove Cuba from its list of state sponsors of terrorism.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 1:52 pm

The White House announced Tuesday that President Obama would remove Cuba from the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism. That got us thinking about which other nations are on the list, how they got there, whether any others have been removed, and what happens to countries when they're put on (or taken off) the list.

Who's On The List?

Aside from Cuba, there are three other countries currently on the list:

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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Pentagon To Exhume Remains Of Sailors From USS Oklahoma

A gravestone identifying the resting place of seven unknowns from the USS Oklahoma is shown at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. The Pentagon says it will disinter and try to identify the remains of up to 388 unaccounted for sailors and Marines killed when the ship capsized in the 1941 Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor.
Audrey McAvoy AP

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 1:04 pm

The Pentagon says it will exhume the remains of 388 sailors and Marines who died on Dec. 7, 1941, in the capsizing of the USS Oklahoma during the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor.

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Shots - Health News
10:21 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Some Doctors Still Dismiss Parents' Concerns About Autism

Some doctors aren't up to date on how to assess autism symptoms in very young children.
iStockphoto

Most children with autism get diagnosed around age 5, when they start school. But signs of the developmental disorder may be seen as early as 1 year old.

Yet even if a parent notices problems making eye contact or other early signs of autism, some doctors still dismiss those concerns, a study finds, saying the child will "grow out of it." That can delay diagnosis and a child's access to therapy.

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NPR Ed
10:03 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Real-World Math: A Bit Of Trig And Hay For The Horses

With the math done, student Kendall Hood works the plasma cutter.
Jenny Brundin Colorado Public Radio

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 4:52 pm

Building a giant steel bale feeder is hard. Try it.

Problem No. 1: Unless you live in ranch country, you probably don't even know what it's supposed to look like — regardless of whether you can build one.

Problem No. 2: Arc welding is involved.

Problem No. 3: Getting it right requires some serious math.

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It's All Politics
9:46 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Congress Says It Will Not Tolerate 'Agents Gone Wild'

"I'm very concerned about the public's respect for law enforcement officers and the safety of those they are designed to protect," House Judiciary Chairman Rep. Bob Goodlatte, seen here in 2013, told NPR. "This is a very important issue to me and one I intend to follow closely."
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 3:53 pm

Update at 2:30 p.m. ET

On Wednesday, House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz and fellow committee members released a statement expressing "no confidence" in DEA Administrator Michele Leonhart.

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Parallels
9:38 am
Wed April 15, 2015

A Year After Ferry Disaster, South Koreans Await Answers

Relatives of victims of the Sewol ferry accident stand before a banner featuring victim photos during a protest. More than 300 people, most of them high school students, died in the accident. Nine people remain missing.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 3:39 am

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Shots - Health News
8:08 am
Wed April 15, 2015

When Keeping A Secret Trumps The Need For Care

Will adult children seek care if their parents can find out about it?
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 9:46 am

Dana Lam was insured under her parent's health plan until the end of 2014, thanks to a provision of the Affordable Care Act that allows young adults to stay on family health insurance until they turn 26.

The arrangement worked out well until she needed treatment for depression. Lam knew that if she used her parents' health plan to see a psychotherapist or psychiatrist, her visit would show up on their insurance statements.

She wasn't ready to talk to them about her mental health issues. "I was just so afraid of having that conversation with them," she says.

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Code Switch
6:39 am
Wed April 15, 2015

At Walter Scott's Funeral, An Unexpected Conversation

Mourners arrive for the funeral of Walter Scott at W.O.R.D. Ministries Christian Center in Summerville, S.C., on April 11, 2015.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 10:02 am

This past Saturday morning, my wife, Saadiqa, and I pulled into the parking lot of W.O.R.D. Ministries Christian Center, a little brick church surrounded by lush oak and maple trees in Summerville, S.C., where Walter Scott's funeral was about to begin. Cars were parked all over the grass and lined the surrounding streets. On the lawn, friends and families exchanged warm, tight hugs, fully dressed in sharply pressed suits, dark dresses and elegant hats despite the already blistering heat.

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The Two-Way
5:38 am
Wed April 15, 2015

On 'One Boston Day,' City Marks Marathon Bombings' Anniversary

Flowers were placed at the site of the Boston Marathon finish line on Boylston Street last week. The city will mark the second anniversary of the deadly bombing Wednesday.
Scott Eisen Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 8:31 am

A moment of silence, a call for kindness and the pealing of the city's church bells will be the hallmarks of Boston's events noting the second anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombing on Wednesday.

The moment of silence will be observed at 2:49 p.m. ET, the time when the first of two devastating bombs went off in the crowds gathered to watch the marathon in 2013.

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Around the Nation
5:22 am
Wed April 15, 2015

S.C. Teen's Promprosal Required An Airplane

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 6:11 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Around the Nation
5:00 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Minn. Senators Still May Not Make Eye Contact During Floor Debates

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 6:11 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:10 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Educators Sentenced To Jail In Atlanta Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 12:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:10 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Updated Driving Advice: A Better Way To Grip The Steering

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 6:11 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:10 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Clinton Tours Iowa; Begins Outlining 4 Pillars Of Her Campaign

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 10:33 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
2:04 am
Wed April 15, 2015

A Decade After Blowing The Whistle On The FBI, Vindication

Kobus alerted his managers that a supervisor was allowing favorite employees to take time off for their birthdays, so the government had to pay more for other people at the agency to work overtime. "You know, this is not our money. This is the taxpayers' money, and I want it to be correct," he says.
Courtesy of Robert Kobus

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 8:00 am

Robert Kobus doesn't fit the stereotype of the disgruntled employee. He worked in administrative jobs at the FBI for 34 years, and he says he's seen the bureau at its best.

"My sister Deborah Kobus was a 9/11 victim, and the FBI treated me so well during that time," he says. "You know they really cared. I had a lot of friends, I know how important it is to have a strong FBI."

His sister died in the World Trade Center's south tower. When he helped walk out the last piece of steel at the site, he proudly wore his FBI jacket.

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The Salt
1:42 am
Wed April 15, 2015

The Space Station Gets A Coffee Bar

ESA/NASA

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 12:14 pm

In space, all they have is instant.

"For an instant coffee, it's an excellent instant coffee," says Vickie Kloeris, who manages the space station's food supply for NASA. Astronauts are allotted up to three freeze-dried cups (pouches, actually) a day, and Kloeris says it's "extremely popular."

But, she adds, "Can it compete with brewed espresso? No."

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Around the Nation
1:41 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Radio Connects North Dakota Residents Divided On Gay Rights

Joel Heitkamp smiles while broadcasting in 2009 at AM radio station KFGO in Fargo, N.D.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:09 am

This week, Morning Edition discusses gay rights in North Dakota, one of 13 states that still bans same-sex marriage. Wednesday's story features two men with contrasting ideologies: a liberal radio host and a conservative business owner.

North Dakota is a state where radio reigns supreme. Its communities are far apart, and shopping trips, or just visiting a neighbor, can mean a long drive. Many people have the radio on, and often it's tuned into KFGO-AM, The Mighty 790, out of Fargo.

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Shots - Health News
1:40 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Marathon Bombing Survivors Face A World That Still Feels Out Of Control

Martha and Alvaro Galvis used to travel from New Hampshire to Boston to watch the marathon every year. Both were hurt in the bombing two years ago.
Jesse Costa/WBUR

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 6:10 pm

It's just the crumb of a muffin, but Martha Galvis must pick it up. Lips clenched, eyes narrowed, she pushes it back and forth across a slick table, then in circles.

"I struggle and struggle until," Galvis pauses, concentrating all her attention on the thumb and middle finger of her left hand. She can't get them to close around the crumb.

"I try as much as I can, and if I do it, I'm so happy — so happy," she says, giggling.

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History
1:34 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Who Was John Wilkes Booth Before He Became Lincoln's Assassin?

John Wilkes Booth was the son of prominent, wealthy actors. He, too, became an actor and was so popular, he was one of the first to have his clothes ripped off by fans.
Hulton Archive Getty

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 10:33 am

John Wilkes Booth was the man who pulled the trigger, capping off a coordinated plot to murder President Abraham Lincoln.

But historian Terry Alford, an expert on all things Booth, says that there's much more to Booth's life. His new biography, Fortune's Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth, delves deep into his life — before Booth went down in history as the man who assassinated a president.

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Parallels
1:34 am
Wed April 15, 2015

The All-Work, No-Play Culture Of South Korean Education

Students take the annual College Scholastic Ability Test, or college entrance exam, at a high school in Seoul last November. Students face enormous pressure to do well on the test and get into a top university. Airplanes are grounded on the day of the test so they won't disturb the students.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 1:39 pm

In South Korea, grim stories of teen suicide come at a regular clip. Recently, two 16-year-old girls in the city of Daejeon jumped to their deaths, leaving a note saying, "We hate school."

It's just one tragedy in a country where suicide is the leading cause of death among teens, and 11- to 15-year-olds report the highest amount of stress out of 30 developed nations.

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