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In 1987, the book The Art of the Deal elevated Donald Trump from playboy developer to best-selling author.

From the opening paragraph of Trump's self-portrait as a shrewd and creative dealmaker:

"I don't do it for the money. I've got enough, much more than I'll ever need. I do it to do it. Deals are my art form. Other people paint beautifully on canvas or write wonderful poetry. I like making deals, preferably big deals. That's how I get my kicks."

The government of Peru has declared a state of emergency in the southern Andes after brutally low temperatures killed tens of thousands of alpacas, according to The Associated Press.

The government is promising $3 million in relief to farmers in the region, who live at or around 15,000 feet above sea level and raise the animals, relying on money from selling their lightweight wool.

The NBA will be relocating the 2017 All-Star Game from Charlotte because of HB2, North Carolina's controversial state law limiting civil rights protections for LGBT people.

The league says that the Charlotte Hornets and the city of Charlotte "have been working diligently to foster constructive dialogue and try to effect positive change."

But the local support for LGBT rights couldn't overcome "the climate created by HB2" in North Carolina, the NBA said in a statement.

The league says the city might host an All-Star Game in 2019, if the situation changes.

Ivanka Trump is thought to be one of Donald Trump's most influential advisers, a person who can persuade him to hire or fire someone. She will introduce him Thursday night at the Republican National Convention — perhaps her biggest stage yet.

But in the public eye, she sounds very different from her father. While he is blunt, she is noticeably careful in choosing her words.

Syria's main opposition group is calling for the U.S.-led coalition to suspend its airstrike campaign against ISIS after reports of dozens of civilian deaths close to the Turkish border.

As NPR's Alison Meuse told our Newscast unit, reports suggest the strike near the northern town of Manbij is the "largest civilian death toll since the intervention began." She added that "both the opposition and [Syrian President Bashar] Assad's regime put the death toll above 120 killed." Here's more from Alison:

When you got up this morning, did you dress for the weather? Your wife? Throw on your lucky socks?

NPR's show and podcast Invisibilia has been taking a long look at what we wear — from sunglasses to artist's frocks and hoodies — and asking how much our clothes affect us, sometimes in ways we're not aware of, or might not even like.

Turks survived a chaotic and bloody attempted military takeover on Friday that left more than 260 dead. Since then, the government has suspended thousands of public and private sector employees — everyone from teachers to police officers. Meanwhile, the parliament has ratified a state of emergency that will last up to three months. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says it's necessary to protect democracy. But many Turks are afraid of what's to come.

European leaders hailed what they called the wisdom of mutual defense on Thursday after Donald Trump raised doubts about his commitment to America's NATO obligations if he's elected president.

An African bird called the Greater honeyguide is famous for leading people to honey, and a new study shows that the birds listen for certain human calls to figure out who wants to play follow-the-leader.

The finding underscores the unique relationship that exists between humans and this wild bird.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Silicon Valley’s high tech giants and starts ups have drawn hundreds of thousands of South Asians to the San Francisco Bay Area in recent years. The influx has led to an explosion of Indian arts, especially music and dance.

Rachael Myrow of Here & Now contributing station KQED explores the growing scene.

Read more on this story via KQED.

Clevelanders used to cringe every time someone mentioned that the polluted Cuyahoga River caught fire in June 1969. But a new generation is embracing the “Burning River” name.

Elizabeth Miller from Here & Now contributor WCPN in Cleveland reports.

Read more on this story via WCPN Ideastream.

Two of the biggest beer companies in the world are getting closer to merging. Belgian-based Anheuser-Busch InBev received clearance from the United States Justice Department to take over London-based SABMiller, as long as it meets some specific conditions.

Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Curt Nickisch of the Harvard Business Review about the merger.

Read more on this story via the Harvard Business Review.

The Republican National Convention has received plenty of media coverage, but what has the experience been like for convention delegates?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young met with delegates from New Jersey, Tennessee and California to get their views on how this unpredictable convention has gone.

Hear more of Here & Now‘s coverage from the Republican National Convention.

Follow the Here & Now election road trip on Tumblr.

French authorities say they believe the man who killed 84 people when he plowed a truck into a crowd in Nice, France, had multiple accomplices and planned the attack for months.

French anti-terrorism prosecutor Francois Molins announced the developments in the investigation during a news conference Thursday. He added that more than 400 people across multiple agencies have been working on the probe.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

They were gathered in a warehouse just outside downtown Cleveland.

Hundreds of feet of canvas was piled on the floor and some of it — painted to look like a brick wall — was hung from the ceiling for it to finish drying.

I write novels for a living, and novels are about how characters deal with the intrinsic conflicts that make them who they are — and their efforts to overcome them. Sometimes characters are able to overcome their conflicts and sometimes, in tragedies, they succumb to them, which results in ruin. This is why it troubled me so much to witness recent events unfold like something out of a book.

Psychotherapy Helps People Tune Out The Din Of Tinnitus

Jul 21, 2016

About three years ago, a high-pitched "eeeeeeeee" sound started ringing in Linda Gray's ears. Sometimes, the ring would suddenly turn into a roar, sending Gray into panic mode. Her heart would speed up. She'd try to find a quiet room. "You're trying to escape it. It's like, 'Turn this off!' " she says.

A lot of people experience ringing, roaring or buzzing, also known as tinnitus. It can be maddening.

Toddlers make their fair share of noise. But they also have a lot of noise to contend with — a television blaring, siblings squabbling, a car radio blasting, grownups talking.

Amid all that clatter, toddlers must somehow piece together the meanings of individual words and start to form their own words and sentences.

Less than 12 hours after he was booed for not endorsing GOP nominee Donald Trump during his late-night speech before the Republican National Convention, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz wasn't backing down.

At an emotional event with the Texas RNC delegation Thursday morning, Cruz defended his decision to withhold his endorsement at a time when Republicans are trying to rally around their nominee ahead of the general election.

Donald Trump's presidential fundraising produced its first strong numbers for a big-budget fall campaign last month, but the financial powerhouse backing Hillary Clinton continued to hold a strong lead.

Team Clinton outraised Team Trump $146.3 million to $81.1 million. Cash-on-hand totals were also lopsided: $139.2 million to $61.4 million. These totals include activity by the candidate committees, national party committees, joint fundraising committees and supporting superPACs.

The mandatory monthly reports were filed last night at the Federal Election Commission.

In a "Carpool Karaoke" segment that will surely mortify her daughters, Michelle Obama drives around the White House grounds enthusiastically singing and dancing with Late Late Show host James Corden.

Take a look this summer inside some of America's garages, museums and libraries and you'll see that the "maker movement" is thriving.

This hands-on, DIY culture of inventors, tinkerers and hackers is inspiring adults and children alike to design and build everything from sailboats and apps to solar cars.

And this fall, more of these chaotic workspaces, stocked with glue guns, drills and hammers, will be popping up in schools, too.

But the maker movement faces some big hurdles as it pushes into classrooms.

Here's the first big one:

The fourth and final night of the Republican National Convention is all about the GOP's presidential nominee: Donald J. Trump.

Trump has been a presence every night of the convention. He introduced his wife, Melania, on Monday; briefly addressed delegates via video Tuesday; and helicoptered into Cleveland on Wednesday to appear on stage with vice presidential nominee Mike Pence — and, of course, stare down rogue Republican Ted Cruz.

The circumstances of the video seem stark: In bright daylight, an unarmed black man lies next to a patient with autism whom he was trying to help, holding his hands up and telling police he is a therapist at a group home in an effort to assure officers that they aren't a threat.

But the police later shot and wounded that man, in a case that has renewed discussions of officers' use of force.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

When Donald Trump takes the stage in Cleveland to accept the Republican nomination Thursday, it will be the culmination of decades in the limelight.

From his early days as a New York real estate developer to his entertainment career to his rise in politics, Trump has used his celebrity status to enhance his brand.

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