NPR News

Parallels
3:01 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Quadriplegic Israeli Woman Challenges Surrogacy Rules And Loses A Child

Ora Mor Yosef, a quadriplegic Israeli woman, had a surrogate child via a niece who underwent the procedure in India and gave birth in Israel. But Israeli authorities, including the High Court, ruled against Mor Yosef, and the baby has been in foster care for more than two years.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 4:50 am

Ora Mor Yosef, a disabled Israeli woman, challenged her country's rules about surrogate parenting and lost the baby.

Single and in her 30s, her efforts began by asking her traditional Jewish family what they thought.

"I wanted to hear how they would feel if I were a single parent," Mor Yosef says. "To my joy they agreed, and gave their blessing."

The next step was getting pregnant. But Mor Yosef has progressive muscular dystrophy and doctors advised her against using a sperm donor and carrying a child herself.

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Children's Health
2:59 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Nice Kids Finish First: Study Finds Social Skills Can Predict Future Success

Originally published on Sat July 18, 2015 10:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:17 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Official: 4 Marines Killed, Along With Gunman

Police officers enter the Armed Forces Career Center through a bullet-riddled door after a gunman opened fire on the building Thursday, July 16, 2015, in Chattanooga, Tenn. (John Bazemore/AP)

A gunman unleashed a barrage of gunfire at two military facilities Thursday in Tennessee, killing at least four Marines, officials said. The suspect also was killed.

A U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss an ongoing investigation, told The Associated Press the death toll included the four U.S. Marines and the sole gunman believed responsible. Two others, a soldier and a police officer, were wounded, the official said.

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NPR Story
2:17 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

This Nashville Vinyl Factory Is Still Pressing Records

United Record Pressing operates out of the same cinderblock building on Chestnut Street that's been its home since 1962. The company originally opened in 1949, when it was called Southern Plastics. (Stephen Jerkins/Nashville Public Radio)

As vinyl pressing plants around the world shut down in the heyday of CDs, one historic vinyl factory remained operating in the same facility where it pressed The Beatles’ first American single in 1963.

United Record Pressing has presses from the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s – machines the company bought after other vinyl facilities closed shop.

Steve Haruch from Here & Now contributor Nashville Public Radio pays a visit to the United Record Pressing, a working museum of vinyl history.

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NPR Story
2:17 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

A New Threat To Coral Reefs: China's Man-Made Islands

Scientists say the dredging project that created the islands has done massive damage to the coral reefs and aquatic life in the area. (juska/Flickr)

China’s neighbors were alarmed to see it build five islands in the South China Sea earlier this year. They were equipped airstrips, ports and military supplies, and were a clear indication of China’s military ambitions in the disputed region.

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Shots - Health News
1:13 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Home Health Agencies Get Medicare's Star Treatment

Choosing a home health agency can be even more difficult than picking a nursing home.
iStockphoto

The federal government released on Thursday a new five-star rating system for home health agencies, an effort to bring clarity to a fast-growing but fragmented corner of the medical industry where it's often difficult to distinguish good from bad.

Medicare applied the new quality measure to more than 9,000 agencies based on how quickly visits began and how often patients improved while under their care. Nearly half received average scores, with the government sparingly doling out top and bottom ratings.

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Goats and Soda
12:57 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Haters Gonna Hate. Teen Girl Activists Shake It Off And Try Again

Here's the group of "teen advisers" who spoke with Goats and Soda at the 2015 Girl Up conference in Washington, D.C. Top row: Amy Gong Liu, Janet Diaz, Janet Ho, Kennede Reese, Rebecca Ruvalcaba. Middle row: Ruhy Patel, Celia Buckman, Simone Cowan, Jessica Bishai. Bottom row: Sydney Baumgardt, Alexandra Intriago, Anna McGuire, Ishana Nigam
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 7:27 am

Ruhy Patel, 17, lives in Doylestown, Pa. When she was 15 she was planning to run for student council office. "All the other people running were boys," she says, "and people were like, 'Well, you're not going to win.' You feel intimidated because you're the only girl in the room. It makes you question if you'd be OK in the field of politics."

Did she drop out? No.

Did she win? "I did!"

"I feel like it kind of makes you want to try harder when people say no," says Patel.

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The Two-Way
12:41 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

WATCH: Merkel's Awkward Interaction With Tearful Palestinian Girl

German Chancellor Angela Merkel's attempt to explain her country's asylum policy to a young Palestinian whose family is close to deportation reduced the girl to tears.

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NPR Ed
12:01 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Testing Revolt In Washington State Brings Feds Into Uncharted Waters

New Mexico: Dolores Ramos (right), 16, joins dozens of Highland High School students in Albuquerque, N.M., during a walkout to protest a new standardized test.
Russell Contreras AP

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 12:26 pm

Seattle 11th-grader Elijah Falk added it all up and decided: It made no sense to take the tests.

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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Gunman's Motivation Unclear After Shootings At Tennessee Military Sites

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 9:57 pm

Updated at 11:53 p.m. ET

The motivations of the gunman who opened fire at two military centers in Chattanooga, Tenn., are still unknown, officials said late Thursday. Four Marines died in the morning's attack; three other people were wounded.

The gunman is also dead, though it's unclear how he was killed.

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It's All Politics
11:31 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Wisconsin Supreme Court Ends A Political Headache For Walker

Wisconsin's Supreme Court has found that Gov. Scott Walker's campaign had not illegally collaborated with outside conservative groups three years ago.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 12:26 pm

The Wisconsin Supreme Court has ended a probe into Scott Walker's 2012 recall election campaign, sparing the Wisconsin governor a political headache just as he launches his bid for the White House.

The court found that Walker's campaign had not illegally collaborated with outside conservative groups three years ago when the governor faced a recall election following labor backlash over his push to weaken public sector unions.

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The Two-Way
11:24 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Pioneering Journalist Marlene Sanders Remembered

Journalist Marlene Sanders, seen here on Dec. 1, 2005, died Tuesday at the age of 84.
Bryan Bedder Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 12:09 pm

Tributes are pouring in for Marlene Sanders, the television news pioneer who died Tuesday at the age of 84.

NPR's Susan Stamberg tells our Newscast unit:

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Shots - Health News
10:04 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Screaming For Science: The Secrets Of Crying Babies And Car Alarms

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 3:08 pm

It's almost impossible to ignore a screaming baby. (Click here if you doubt that.) And now scientists think they know why.

"Screams occupy their own little patch of the soundscape that doesn't seem to be used for other things," says David Poeppel, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at New York University and director of the Department of Neuroscience at the Max Planck Institute in Frankfurt.

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Shots - Health News
9:19 am
Thu July 16, 2015

'Consumer Reports' Says Laundry Pods Are Too Risky To Recommend

Can you spot the four laundry pods?
CR John Powers and Ariana Salvato/Apotrophe/Courtesy of Consumer Reports

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 3:08 pm

Consumer Reports, the granddaddy of advice-givers on what to buy, won't recommend laundry pods containing liquid detergent anymore. The risks to small kids are just too high, the magazine says.

In its latest tests, eight different single-use packets were rated very good at cleaning. That wasn't a strong enough showing to put any of them among the top three laundry detergents, which got the magazine's recommended check mark.

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Parallels
6:41 am
Thu July 16, 2015

The View From Inside Syria

Saeed al-Batal, a Syrian photographer, posted this image from Douma, Syria, on his Facebook page on March 31.
Courtesy of Saeed al-Batal

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 1:46 pm

Syria's civil war has created the worst refugee crisis in the world, with more than 4 million people fleeing the country. Millions more have been displaced inside Syria, though we rarely hear from them.

Over the past year, NPR's Morning Edition has spoken three times with Saeed al-Batal, a photographer and filmmaker who doesn't use his real name for security reasons.

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The Two-Way
6:26 am
Thu July 16, 2015

IN PHOTOS: Protests Turn Violent In Greece

A protester burns a Greek flag in central Athens, during an anti-austerity protest on Wednesday.
Louisa Gouliamaki AFP/Getty Images

Even before the Greek parliament voted to approve a new bailout deal that includes tough — and controversial — austerity measures, protesters took the streets in Athens.

The demonstrators carried signs and chanted slogans opposing the bailout deal. As the debate heated up in Parliament and the sun set on Greece's capital, the protests turned violent.

We'll let the pictures tell the story:

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The Two-Way
4:34 am
Thu July 16, 2015

George H.W. Bush Falls, Breaks Bone In Neck, But Will Be Fine

Former president George H. W. Bush attends an NFL football game between the Houston Texans and Cincinnati Bengals, in Nov. 2014.
Patric Schneider AP

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 4:51 am

Former President George H.W. Bush, 91, fell at his home in Maine on Wednesday breaking a bone in his neck.

The 41st president was hospitalized, but Jim McGrath, a spokesman, said on Twitter that "his condition is stable — he is fine — but he'll be in a neck brace."

The AP adds:

"Bush was being treated at Portland's Maine Medical Center, where a children's hospital is named for his wife.

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Animals
3:55 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Stab It With A Dinglehopper! Seagull Goes After Eagle In Alaska

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 9:03 am

Seagulls don't get a lot of respect; they seem to be all screeching and scavenging for food. But at least one sea gull showed the guts of a hero recently.

Photographer David Canales caught what he called this "epic aerial battle" while kayaking in Alaska: A bald eagle, one seagull trapped in its talons, under ferocious assault from another gull.

Unfortunately, for all its fellow seagull's daring, the eagle's snack did not appear to escape.

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Politics
3:55 am
Thu July 16, 2015

2016's Campaign War Chests Are Just Jewelry Boxes Next To The Super PACs

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 1:51 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
3:02 am
Thu July 16, 2015

'Buckyballs' Solve Century-Old Mystery About Interstellar Space

Harry Kroto, pictured in 1996, displays a model of the geodesic-shaped carbon molecules that he helped discover.
Michael Scates AP

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 9:03 am

Researchers in Switzerland say they've solved a nearly 100-year-old astronomical mystery by discovering what's in the wispy cloud of gas that floats in the space between the stars.

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World War II Secret Mustard Gas Testing
3:02 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Can The Agent Orange Act Help Veterans Exposed To Mustard Gas?

Alan Oates was exposed to herbicides, such as Agent Orange, while serving in Vietnam in 1968. Decades after returning home, he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, and because Congress passed the Agent Orange Act, he's able to receive VA benefits.
Courtesy of Alan Oates

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 9:03 am

To understand the predicament of World War II veterans exposed to mustard gas, take a look at what happened to another set of American veterans who were exposed to a different toxic chemical.

Last month, NPR reported that some of those World War II vets are still fighting for disability benefits from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs because the agency says they don't have enough proof to substantiate their claims.

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Law
3:02 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Is It Possible To Let More People Out Of Prison, And Keep Crime Down?

Inmates at California's Chino State Prison exercise in the prison yard in 2010. A proposition that was passed in the state last year reclassified certain crimes, releasing thousands of inmates earlier than had been anticipated.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 12:12 pm

President Obama has made incarceration reform a White House theme this week. On Monday, he commuted the sentences of 46 mostly nonviolent drug offenders; and on Tuesday, he spoke about reducing the prison population in a speech to the NAACP.

"The United States is home to 5 percent of the world's population but 25 percent of the world's prisoners," Obama said. "Think about that. Our incarceration rate is four times higher than China's."

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U.S.
3:02 am
Thu July 16, 2015

U.S. Immigration Agency Again Drops 'Family Friendly' Detention Centers

Originally published on Sat July 18, 2015 10:42 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Middle East
3:02 am
Thu July 16, 2015

For Families Of Americans Held Or Missing In Iran, Nuclear Deal Is A Loss

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 9:03 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
5:20 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

Grand Jury Testimony In Cold War-Era Rosenberg Case Released

Harry McCabe (from left), deputy U.S. marshal; Julius Rosenberg and his wife, Ethel; Anthony H. Pavone, deputy U.S. marshal, in New York on March 8, 1951.
AP

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 6:04 pm

Here's what we know: Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were executed in 1953 for selling U.S. nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union after one of the most sensational Cold War-era espionage trials. They were convicted in 1951 owing, largely, to the testimony of David Greenglass, Ethel Rosenberg's brother.

Here's what we don't know: How credible Greenglass' testimony was in court.

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Politics
5:15 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

Greek Parliament Passes Austerity Measures To Move Forward With Bailout

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 7:25 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Race
4:42 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

In The Age Of #BlackLivesMatter, The NAACP Tries To Reach A Younger Generation

(From left to right) Student members of the NAACP Ekow Nana-Kweson, Trinity Towns and Anscia Brown.
Walter Ray Watson Walter ray Watson

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 1:43 pm

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is holding its annual convention in Philadelphia this week. For much of its 106-year history, it has been the nation's preeminent voice for civil rights and social justice. Among the topics of discussion this week: recent events in Baltimore and Ferguson.

But NAACP leaders have also addressed claims that their organization is losing relevance, especially for young people who are coming of age in an era of online activism and new protest movements like Black Lives Matter.

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It's All Politics
4:13 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

Logo Or No Go? When Campaign Logos Look A Little Too Familiar

@CNNPolitics tweeted a combination of Scott Walker's campaign logo with America's Best Eyeglasses logo to show the design similarities.
Via @CNNPolitics/Twitter

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 6:01 pm

The "E" in Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's newly unveiled presidential logo is a stylized American flag — as it turns out, one that looks remarkably similar to the logo for America's Best Contacts & Eyeglasses.

The company's CEO, Reade Fahs, said he doesn't mind but also that it's unlikely the governor hasn't seen the 18-year-old logo. "It's on hundreds of stores across the country. So assuming he's got good vision, he probably would have spotted it in his campaign travels. And we have lots of stores in Wisconsin too."

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Parallels
3:47 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

Beyond A Bailout: Greece Needs Debt Relief, IMF Says

Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos attends a session of Parliament in Athens on Wednesday as lawmakers prepared to vote on reforms demanded by eurozone creditors in exchange for a new bailout.
Aris Messinis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 3:03 pm

Whatever comes of the latest bailout plan for Greece, it may not be enough to save the country's economy, a new report from the International Monetary Fund says.

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Shots - Health News
3:42 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

Should Women Be Able To Treat Bladder Infections Themselves?

If you know what a bladder infection feels like, should you have to go to the doctor every time?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 1:29 pm

When you've got a bladder infection, the word "urgent" means right now.

Not urgent as in, wait two hours at the urgent care clinic. Not urgent as in, wait some more to get the prescription filled.

So when a doctor says that women should be able to self-prescribe antibiotics for simple urinary tract infections, that sounds like an idea whose time has come.

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