NPR News

Code Switch
10:23 am
Tue August 19, 2014

In Ferguson, Mo., A City Meets The Spotlight

Demonstrators protesting the shooting death of Michael Brown listen to rapper Nelly speak.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 2:17 pm

Etefia Umana says that Ferguson, Mo., is in some ways a media fiction.

We're sitting in the offices of Better Family Life, an organization that provides social services to people in the area. Umana chairs its board and lives in Ferguson.

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Goats and Soda
9:53 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Out, Out, Damned Ebola: Liberia Is Obsessed With Hand Washing

NPR's Ebola coverage team brought a lot of cleaning equipment — not because they planned to go into risky places but because you can never be too careful. The boots are very handy and can be washed with chlorine. Wearing surgical gloves reminds our correspondent not to touch her face.
Ryan Kellman NPR

"I feel like Lady MacBeth, constantly scrubbing my hands," says Nurith Aizenman, global health correspondent for NPR. She arrived in Liberia this week as part of a team covering the Ebola outbreak. In the capital of Monrovia, hand washing is an obsession, not just for her but for many of the city's nearly one million residents.

So you've told me that you're hearing lots of hand washing stories.

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The Protojournalist
9:32 am
Tue August 19, 2014

What Exactly Is That Birdlike Thing?

The hummingbird moth — Hemaris thysbe.
Courtesy of Elena Tartaglia

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 1:36 pm

For years I was convinced that there exists among us a strange, unidentified species of animal — something between bug and bird — jetting around gardens and flowers and trees.

Not too long ago one of these natural UFOs buzzed past me in broad daylight. Too big to be a bee, too itty-bitty to be a bird. Slow enough to glimpse, but too fast to identify.

Not exactly a hummingbird ...

Nor a bumblebee ...

What the heck was it?

The mystery was finally solved when a friend told me about ...

... the hummingbird moth.

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The Two-Way
7:47 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Wreck Of World War II-Era U.S. Ship Dubbed 'Galloping Ghost' Is Found

Deputy Chief of Mission (Jakarta, Indonesia) Kristen Bauer (top left), Capt. Richard Stacpoole (top right), and Marine Lt. Col. Miguel Avila pass a wreath to sailors assigned to Mobile Diving Salvage Unit One, during a wreath-laying ceremony for the sunken Navy vessel USS Houston.
Mass Communication Spc. 3rd Class Christian Senyk U.S. Navy

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 1:52 pm

The USS Houston sank during World War II after being hit by the Japanese, killing 700 sailors and Marines. Now, more than 70 years later, U.S. and Indonesian divers have confirmed that a sunken vessel in the Java Sea was the wreck of the ship dubbed "The Galloping Ghost of the Java Coast."

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The Two-Way
6:33 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Israel Resumes Gaza Strikes After Rocket Attacks

Smoke is seen after what witnesses said was an Israeli airstrike in Gaza City on Tuesday. Israel launched attacks in the Gaza Strip and recalled its negotiators from truce talks in Cairo after saying three Palestinian rockets had hit southern Israel, hours before a cease-fire was due to expire.
Suhaib Salem Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 2:05 pm

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

Israel said today that it had resumed targeting "terror sites" across the Gaza Strip after renewed rocket attacks on the Jewish state. The resumption of violence casts doubts about the future of indirect talks in Cairo between Israel and the Palestinians to stop the fighting between the two sides.

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Parallels
6:09 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Europe's Latest Grass-Roots Movement: Cannabis Social Clubs

Eliane Detraz, a 42-year-old Swiss national member of the Sibaratas Med Can club, rolls a joint at the plantation of the association in Spain's Canary Islands in April 2013.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 11:46 am

Gabriela walks into a large, dimly lit apartment, goes to a counter, buys a bag of sativa and sits on the sofa with her friends, joint in hand, like in Amsterdam. Except this is not Amsterdam. This is Barcelona, and the open sale of marijuana is illegal.

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The Two-Way
5:24 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Michael Brown's Family Plans Memorial; National Guard Is In Ferguson

Tear gas is deployed after police were fired upon Monday in Ferguson, Mo.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 12:33 pm

On Monday night, protesters clashed yet again with police in Ferguson, Mo., the St. Louis suburb where Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was shot by police Aug. 9. National Guard troops deployed by Gov. Jay Nixon didn't get involved, and the officer in charge of security in Ferguson said police came under fire and were targeted by Molotov cocktails.

Update at 1:25 p.m. ET: Latest News: Memorial Planned; Number Of Arrested Reportedly Doubles

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Goats and Soda
3:01 am
Tue August 19, 2014

'Shadow' And 'D-12' Sing An Infectious Song About Ebola

Samuel "Shadow" Morgan.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 9:04 am

Ebola has been responsible for many hundreds of deaths, for fear, for panic, for disbelief and anger.

And for a catchy dance song: "Ebola in Town."

The producers behind this unlikely music are Samuel "Shadow" Morgan and Edwin "D-12" Tweh, who grew up in the shadow of war. They both spent time as kids in refugee camps in Ghana after fleeing the civil war back home in Liberia.

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NPR Story
3:01 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Legendary Skateboarder Jay Adams Dies At 53

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:35 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

If you know anything about skateboarding, you know that skaters have lost an icon. Jay Adams is known for taking skateboarding from the streets of LA to the world of extreme sports. Adams died on Friday at the age of 53. NPR's Nathan Rott has this remembrance.

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NPR Story
3:01 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Rare Good News Regarding 5 Ebola Patients In Nigeria

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:35 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:01 am
Tue August 19, 2014

In Ferguson, Family Takes Turns Guarding Front Door

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:35 am

Copyright 2014 KWMU-FM. To see more, visit http://www.stlpublicradio.org.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Owl Flies Into Apartment; Attacks Canary Cage

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:35 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
1:42 am
Tue August 19, 2014

World's Aid Agencies Stretched To Their Limits By Simultaneous Crises

A picture taken with a smart phone shows Syrian refugees queuing at one of the many UNHCR (United Nations Refugee Agency) registration centers in Lebanon. At the same time that civil wars and the Ebola outbreak are plaguing countries in Africa, Syrian and Iraqi refugees are seeking help from agencies.
Joseph Eid AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:35 am

For the first time, the United Nations is handling four major humanitarian crises at once: refugee crises in Syria and Iraq as well as civil wars in the Central African Republic and South Sudan, where millions are at risk of famine. Meanwhile, West Africa is experience a devastating Ebola outbreak.

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Shots - Health News
1:35 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Mental Health Cops Help Reweave Social Safety Net In San Antonio

Officers Ned Bandoske (left) and Ernest Stevens are part of San Antonio's mental health squad — a six-person unit that answers the frequent emergency calls where mental illness may play a role.
Jenny Gold Kaiser Health News

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 10:08 am

It's almost 4 p.m., and police officers Ernest Stevens and Ned Bandoske have been driving around town in their unmarked black SUV since early this morning. The officers are part of San Antonio's mental health squad — a six-person unit that answers the frequent emergency calls where mental illness may be an issue.

The officers spot a call for help on their laptop from a group home across town.

"A male individual put a blanket on fire this morning," Stevens reads from the blotter. "He's arguing ... and is a danger to himself and others. He's off his medications."

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The Two-Way
11:56 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Iconic TV Announcer Don Pardo Dies At 96

Frazer Harrison Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 1:59 pm

Fans of Saturday Night Live and the original versions of The Price is Right and Jeopardy! recognize Don Pardo's voice immediately.

They may not be able to identify his face, but his voice was famous.

Pardo died Monday in Tucson, Ariz. He was 96 years old.

An NBC spokesman confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter that he died in his sleep.

Pardo began working for NBC in 1944 and stayed with the network for 60 years.

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The Two-Way
9:59 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

U.S. Says Syria's Chemical Weapons Stockpile Is Destroyed

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 10:46 pm

The U.S. said Monday that all of Syria's declared chemical weapon stockpile has been destroyed.

The weapons were destroyed aboard the U.S. cargo vessel MV Cape Ray in international waters, The Associated Press reported.

President Obama said it was an important step in preventing the spread of weapons of mass destruction, but added that the government of President Bashar al-Assad must act on pledges to destroy its other weapons production facilities.

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The Two-Way
6:37 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Cease-Fire In Gaza Reportedly Extended 24 Hours

Palestinians look out of a window frame in the northern Gaza Strip city of Beit Hanun on Monday. Media reports say a cease-fire has been extended for 24 hours.
Thomas Coex AFP/Getty Images

A cease-fire in Gaza has reportedly been extended 24 hours. Talks between the two sides have been going on for weeks with mediators in Egypt. The most recent cease-fire lasted five days.

The extension has been reported by Hamas media and Egyptian state media.

"Key issues include fishing rights and access of good and people in and out of Gaza," says NPR's Alice Fordham. She tells our Newscast Desk:

"Unlike on other, recent occasions when cease-fires have expired, there were no reports either of rockets being fired from Gaza into Israel, or of an Israeli response."

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Goats and Soda
5:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Experimental Vaccine For Chikungunya Passes First Test

Marqui Ducarme is aided by his wife after catching chikungunya at his home in Port-au-Prince, May 23. The virus swept through Haiti this spring, infecting more than 40,000 people.
Marie Arago Reuters/Landov

Scientists have taken the first steps to developing a vaccine for chikungunya — an emerging mosquito-borne virus that has infected more than a half million people in the Western Hemisphere this year. About 600 Americans have brought the virus to 43 states.

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Parallels
4:34 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Embattled Yazidis Say They Are Now Enduring Atrocity No. 74

Abbas Soullo, a Yazidi man, shows his bullet wounds at a camp for the displaced in northern Iraq, near the Syrian border. He says he is the only survivor of 58 Yazidi men who were rounded up and shot on Aug. 3 in the town of Jazira.
Peter Kenyon NPR

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 8:55 pm

A massacre of members of the Yazidi minority in the Iraqi town of Kocho made headlines last week. Around 80 men were killed by militants from the so-called Islamic State, the extremist group that has swept through much of northern Iraq.

But that was not the only massacre, according to the Yazidis. In a camp for the displaced near the Syrian border, people call 21-year-old Abbas Khader Soullo a walking miracle. To explain why, he unbuttons his shirt and shows his bullet wounds.

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All Tech Considered
3:21 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

How Long Do CDs Last? It Depends, But Definitely Not Forever

Many institutions have their archives stored on CDs — but the discs aren't as stable as once thought. There is no average life span for a CD, says preservationist Michele Youket, "because there is no average disc."
Sarah Tilotta NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:27 am

Back in the 1990s, historical societies, museums and symphonies across the country began transferring all kinds of information onto what was thought to be a very durable medium: the compact disc.

Now, preservationists are worried that a lot of key information stored on CDs — from sound recordings to public records — is going to disappear. Some of those little silver discs are degrading, and researchers at the Library of Congress are trying to figure out why.

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The Two-Way
3:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Ferguson Police Use Tear Gas, Flash Grenades To Disperse Protesters

Police arrest a demonstrator protesting the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson on Monday. At a news conference, President Obama called for calm. "Let's seek to heal rather than wound each other," he said.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 2:36 am

  • What Washington Can, And Can't, Do In Ferguson

Attorney General Eric Holder will be going to Ferguson, Mo., on Wednesday to meet with federal agents and community leaders there, President Obama said in a news conference Monday.

The Justice Department is conducting its own investigation into the death of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teen who was shot by a police officer and whose death has sparked a week of protests.

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Environment
3:15 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

One Year After Calif. Rim Fire, Debate Simmers Over Forest Recovery

Maria Benech of the U.S. Forest Service surveys a severely burned patch of forest. Almost 40 percent of the burned area looks similar.
Lauren Sommer KQED

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 5:40 pm

Eric Knapp breaks apart a burned pine cone, looking for seeds — in his line of work this is considered a clue.

"Going into an area after a fire, you almost feel like CSI, you know, sleuthing," Knapp says.

He is standing in a part of the Stanislaus National Forest that was severely burned by the Rim Fire. Knapp, an ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service, is studying how forests recover.

"It's completely dead," he says. "These trees won't be coming back to life."

A lot of the forest was charred like this.

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Law
3:14 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

An Account Of The Ferguson Shooting, From The Man Standing Beside Brown

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 12:43 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Around the Nation
3:14 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Amid Continued Chaos In Ferguson, A Second Autopsy Is Released

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 4:18 pm

A preliminary, independent autopsy report has been released in the shooting death of Michael Brown. Requested by the family, the autopsy finds that Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was shot six times by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo. This news follows the most violent night of protests there since the shooting.

Deceptive Cadence
3:14 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Met Opera Tentatively Settles With 2 Major Unions

The Metropolitan Opera has settled labor contracts with two of its largest unions.
Jonathan Ticler Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 4:32 pm

A labor crisis threatening to shut down New York's Metropolitan Opera — the largest opera house in the world — appears to have been averted. Two of the major unions announced a tentative settlement this morning. While agreements with 10 additional unions need to be reached by Tuesday night, this represents a major turning point in a bitter dispute.

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

As Pot Laws Relax, Restrictions On Research Still Tight

A worker cultivates a special strain of medical marijuana known as Charlotte's Web inside a greenhouse, in a remote spot in the mountains west of Colorado Springs, Colo., Feb. 7, 2014. (Brennan Linsley/AP)

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 12:45 pm

Medical marijuana is now legal in nearly half of all U.S. states, but doing research on the drug is harder than one might think. Because of federal laws and regulations, it can take years to get the approval necessary to start a study.

University of Arizona doctor Sue Sisley says she was fired for her research on marijuana. Sisley was leading a federally-approved study on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and medical marijuana, when the university cut ties with her.

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NPR Story
3:12 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Week In Politics: Texas Gov. Perry In Hot Water, Clinton’s Pricey Speaking Perks

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 12:45 pm

President Barack Obama is back in Washington, D.C. to handle the crises in Iraq and Ferguson, Missouri. Governor Rick Perry has been indicted in Texas for allegedly abusing his office and trying to coerce an elected official. And it’s been revealed that Hillary Clinton’s recent contracts require a presidential suite and private jet for her speaking gigs.

NPR’s Charlie Mahtesian speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about this week in politics.

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NPR Story
3:12 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

NH Governor Declares Emergency Over Drug Called 'Spice'

'Smacked' is one brand of so-called "spice" sold in New Hampshire stores. (Manchester Police Department via NHPR)

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 2:19 pm

New Hampshire Governor Maggie Hassan has declared a public health emergency, after more than 40 people suffered serious medical reactions after using a substance called “spice.”

The synthetic marijuana substance is sold in convenience stores and gas stations, and state authorities in New Hampshire and neighboring states are looking at how to ban it.

Ryan Lessard of New Hampshire Public Radio joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti with details.

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NPR Story
3:11 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Colorado Ad Cautions Kids About Marijuana

A new ad campaign in Colorado is aimed at teens who are - or may be thinking about - using pot. (Screenshot via Vimeo)

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 3:12 pm

Colorado marked another milestone last week, in the roll-out of legal recreational marijuana — a first-of-its-kind ad campaign aimed at teens who are — or may be thinking about — using pot.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, John Daley of Colorado Public Radio reports.

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Men In America
3:11 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

More Men Put Ambitions On Back Burner For Their Partners' Careers

Ricky Nussle will move next year to Ohio from Phoenix for his wife, Amanda Saraf, who is training to be a doctor. The couple has moved several times for Saraf's career and it's been difficult for Nussle to find work along the way.
Peter O'Dowd for NPR

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 9:17 am

Ricky Nussle has a map on his living room wall. He can use it to track the moves he has made for his wife, Amanda Saraf, who is training to be a doctor. The first was from Houston to rural Kirksville, Mo. Then to Phoenix. Next year, they'll move again for her fellowship in Columbus, Ohio.

Those moves represent one way families are navigating the American economy today: With more women in the workplace than in previous generations, it's not difficult to find men who are uprooting their careers and moving for their spouses' professional ambitions.

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