NPR News

The Two-Way
2:09 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

University Of Virginia Dean Sues 'Rolling Stone' Over Discredited Rape Article

The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va. That fraternity was implicated in a now discredited Rolling Stone story about a rape on campus. A dean named in the piece is suing the magazine for $7.85 million. Phi Kappa Psi says it will also sue the magazine.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 5:08 pm

Nicole P. Eramo, an associate dean of students at the University of Virginia who handles reports of sexual assault for the school, is suing Rolling Stone magazine over the way she was depicted in a now discredited story.

Eramo has filed suit against Rolling Stone LLC, parent company Wenner Media LLC, and Sabrina Rubin Erdely, the author of the article called "A Rape on Campus," which painted a harrowing picture of a rape and its coverup at U.Va. The complaint was filed in the Charlottesville, Va., circuit court. Eramo is seeking a total of $7.85 million.

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

'Halal In The Family' Uses Sitcom Humor To Skewer Muslim Stereotypes

"Halal in the Family" is a web series about a Muslim family in America. (Sweet 180)

There’s a new series making waves on the web. “Halal in the Family” centers around the Qu’osbys, an all-American family who also happen to be Muslim.

It’s no coincidence that the family name sounds a lot like “Cosby.” Co-creator Miles Kahn tells Here & Now’s Robin Young that the idea first came from a comment that journalist Katie Couric made, that maybe what American Muslims needed to combat stereotypes was their own “Cosby Show.”

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Why Has It Taken 40 Years To Build A Tennessee Nuclear Power Plant?

In this April 29, 2015 photo, cooling towers for Unit 1, right, and Unit 2, left, are shown at the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant near Spring City, Tenn. (Mark Zaleski/AP)

A new nuclear power plant is nearing completion in Spring City, Tennessee, and it’s expected to be up and running by late summer.

It has taken about 40 years to complete the project.

Associated Press reporter Ray Henry tells Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti that the Watts Bar plant serves as a cautionary tale for America’s nuclear power industry.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Senior Stickball League Brings Retirees Back To Boyhood

Palm Beach Stickball League All Star Game at Village Park. (Luis Hernandez / WLRN)

At Village Park in Wellington, Florida, there’s a group of retirees who get together every week to relive their youth.

A dozen men are lined up in three rows in a parking lot. On one end, a 3-foot fence marks the end of the outfield. About 200 feet in the opposite direction, a square drawn in chalk marks home plate.

Every few seconds, a yellow rubber ball is launched up into the air, and the men laugh and joke as they call out for it. This is the Palm Beach Senior Stickball League.

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The Two-Way
12:47 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Malaysia Says It Will Turn Back Migrant Boats

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 3:29 pm

A regional crackdown on human trafficking in Southeast Asia could have an impact on thousands of Bangladeshi migrants and Rohingya, the ethnic group that has been the target of discrimination in Myanmar.

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The Two-Way
12:44 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Marine Corps Helicopter Helping With Relief Effort In Nepal Still Missing

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 6:36 pm

A Marine Corps helicopter helping with earthquake relief efforts in Nepal has been declared missing, but a Defense Department official said that so far there has been no indication it crashed.

U.S. Army Col. Steve Warren said an Indian helicopter nearby heard radio chatter from the Marine aircraft about a possible fuel problem. NPR's Tom Bowman says the U.S. cannot confirm the Indian account.

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Parallels
12:28 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

A Foot In Africa, A Foot In Europe: Divide Grows Wider In Ceuta

An ancient city at the mouth of the Mediterranean, Ceuta marks its 600th anniversary this year as a European territory. But changing demographics have some people wondering whether the Spanish territory in North Africa should return to local African rule. Here, rooftops in a poor Muslim neighborhood in the city.
Lauren Frayer for NPR

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 5:22 pm

Ceuta is a 7-square-mile chunk of Spain attached to Africa — a peninsula that juts out from Morocco into the turquoise Mediterranean Sea. It's one of two Spanish cities, along with Melilla, that are part of the European Union but physically part of Africa.

To get to the rest of Spain, you have to take a ferry across the Mediterranean.

On a recent trip to Ceuta, the first person I encountered gives you an idea of the type of Europeans who frequent Ceuta these days: security officials.

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NPR History Dept.
12:16 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms

Jennifer Maravillas Ikon Images/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 7:25 pm

Has American English become homogenized? Have our regional ways of saying particular things — sometimes in very particular ways — receded into the past? Or do we talk as funny as ever?

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It's All Politics
11:56 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Reagan Shooter John Hinckley's Lawyers Say He's Ready To Be Free

John Hinckley currently enjoys 17-day visits to his mother's home in Williamsburg, Va., every month. Prosecutors voiced concern over what would happen when his 89-year-old mother dies.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 2:34 pm

A lawyer for John Hinckley told a federal judge Tuesday that it's time to grant the thwarted presidential assassin the power to leave a psychiatric hospital and live full time with his elderly mother in Virginia.

"Every witness agrees that he's ready and every witness agrees that the risk of danger is decidedly low," lawyer Barry William Levine argued.

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Shots - Health News
11:14 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Seasons May Tweak Genes That Trigger Some Chronic Diseases

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 1:26 pm

The seasons appear to influence when certain genes are active, with those associated with inflammation being more active in the winter, according to new research released Tuesday.

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The Two-Way
10:46 am
Tue May 12, 2015

2015 Rankings List Most 'Bicycle Friendly' U.S. States

A cyclist rides through a congested intersection in Portland, Oregon; the state is No. 6 on the League of American Bicyclists' new rankings of U.S. states.
Randy L. Rasmussen The Oregonian /Landov

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 12:53 pm

For the second-straight year, Washington and Minnesota took the top two spots on an annual list of states that are best for cyclists. But the League of American Bicyclists' rankings also show that no state scored higher than 67 points out of 100.

Last on the list was Alabama, which has occupied the No. 50 slot in four of the past eight rankings. The state earned a score of 12.3 points.

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NPR Ed
10:33 am
Tue May 12, 2015

The Future Of Education: Truths, Lies And Wishful Thinking

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 1:55 pm

Part of our series of conversations with leading teachers, thinkers and activists on education issues

Jordan Shapiro's recent post in Forbes in which he laid out four misconceptions about the future of education, caught my attention because, like much of his work, he tries to take a cattle prod to the conventional education narrative.

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The Two-Way
9:38 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Christians In U.S. On Decline As Number Of 'Nones' Grows, Survey Finds

A cross stands above St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 11:14 am

The U.S is home to the most Christians in the world, but the number of Americans who identify as Christian is declining, according to a newly released survey by the Pew Research Center. The survey of more than 35,000 Americans also found the number of people who consider themselves unaffiliated with any religion, or "nones," is growing.

According to Pew:

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Parallels
9:21 am
Tue May 12, 2015

A Report Card On Global Cooperation: Decent On Iran, Lousy In Syria

Kurdish rebels in northern Syria walk near the devastated town of Kobani last November. In a global report card on international cooperation, the failure to halt civil wars, like the one in Syria, was cited as the biggest shortcoming.
Jake Simkin AP

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 1:33 pm

The past year has been a bleak one in global affairs: The relentless carnage in Syria. Russia's annexation of Crimea. The Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

Is there anything to applaud?

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Shots - Health News
9:13 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Free Contraceptives Must Be Free, Obama Administration Tells Insurers

If the Food and Drug Administration has approved a type of prescription contraception, then insurers must cover at least one option at no cost to the consumer.
BSIP Science Source

Originally published on Wed May 13, 2015 8:26 am

Free means free.

The Obama administration said Monday that health plans must offer at least one option for every type of prescription birth control free of charge to consumers. The instructions clarify the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive mandate.

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NPR Story
8:47 am
Tue May 12, 2015

New Hampshire Dems Hope Sanders Will Shake Up Presidential Race

Presidential hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders reacts, as supports cheer him on, before speaking at a house party in Manchester, N.H., Saturday, May 2, 2015. Sanders discussed economic issues facing the country. (Cheryl Senter/AP)

The Democratic presidential primary season is officially underway in New Hampshire.

Hillary Clinton is now facing a challenge from U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, the self-described socialist from Vermont.

And, although he’s a familiar face in New Hampshire, Sanders is a long-shot in this election. But, he is a long-shot with the potential to shake up the race.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Asma Khalid reports.

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NPR Story
8:47 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Michelle Obama Delivers Tuskegee Commencement Speech

First lady Michelle Obama waves towards the crowd just before she delivers the commencement address at Tuskegee University on Saturday.(Brynn Anderson/AP)

This weekend, First lady Michelle Obama addressed the graduating class at Tuskegee University in Alabama – a historically black academic institution.

She recalled to the students how the media covered her during the early days of the Obama presidency.  She was described as “Obama’s baby mama” and one of her husband’s “cronies of color.”

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NPR Story
8:47 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Defense Rests In Penalty Phase Of Tsarnaev Trial

Today saw the final day of testimony from witnesses called on behalf of convicted Boston Marathon bomber Dzhozhar Tsarnaev.

His lawyers are trying to spare him from the death penalty and before wrapping up, the defense called to the stand Sister Helen Prejean.

She’s best known as the central character in the book and movie “Dead Man Walking” and for her long and impassioned opposition to the death penalty.

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The Two-Way
8:33 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Blogger Is Hacked To Death In Bangladesh After Promoting Secular Thought

Secular activists protest the killing of Bangladeshi blogger Ananta Bijoy Das in Bangladesh on Tuesday.
EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 10:35 am

For the third time this year, a blogger has died after a brutal attack on a street in Bangladesh. The writer Ananta Bijoy Das was killed by men wielding machetes. He wrote for the same blog founded by Avijit Roy, a Bangladeshi-American who died in a similar attack in February.

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The Two-Way
7:33 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Vienna Introduces New, Same-Sex Themed Crosswalk Signals

Two women are shown in a crosswalk signal in Vienna.
Vienna Lights

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 8:57 am

Vienna has introduced new same-sex and opposite-sex themed crosswalk signals at 49 intersections across the city.

The signals are a more playful take on traditional signals, which usually portray a single, gender-neutral person. The new signals feature a same-sex couple or an opposite-sex couple united by a little heart. Via the city's municipal lighting department, here are some pictures:

In a statement, the city's mayor said the new signals are "a sign of openness and tolerance."

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The Two-Way
5:24 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Obama's Presidential Library Will Be In Chicago, Foundation Announces

President Obama's presidential library will be in Chicago, his foundation announced on Tuesday.

"The future Presidential Center will include the library, museum, as well as office and activity space for the Foundation to inspire and engage citizens here and globally," the foundation said in a press release.

From Chicago, NPR's Cheryl Corley told our Newscast unit:

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Asia
5:22 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Hong Kong Shoppers Watch A Pig Fly — Or, Rather, Fall From Above

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 8:18 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
4:41 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Another Powerful Earthquake Strikes Nepal

Residents gather in an open area after an earthquake hit in Kathmandu, Nepal, on Tuesday. It was the second major earthquake in less than three weeks.
Bikram Rai AP

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 5:24 pm

A magnitude-7.3 earthquake struck Nepal on Tuesday, just over two weeks after a massive magnitude-7.8 quake killed more than 8,000 people.

The United States Geological Survey puts today's quake as close to the capital, Kathmandu, as the one two weeks ago.

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Sold Out Grateful Dead Chicago Concerts Attract High-End Scalpers

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 6:12 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FRIEND OF THE DEVIL")

GRATEFUL DEAD: (Singing) I set out running, but I'll take my time. A friend of the devil is a friend of mine.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Venezuela Faces Crime Epidemic

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 6:12 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:09 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Report: Inmates With Mental Disabilities Often Subjected To Excessive Force

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 11:24 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Television
3:09 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Fox Announces 'American Idol' To End After 15 Seasons

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 6:12 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

OK, never mind the national political stage. Americans are pausing to mark the passing of a different national stage.

(SOUNDBITE OF CATHY DENNIS SONG, "AMERICAN IDOL THEME SONG")

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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It's All Politics
3:00 am
Tue May 12, 2015

NYC Mayor Seeks National Spotlight, New 'Contract With America'

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is set to step onto the national stage with his progressive "Contract With America."
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 9:17 am

Click the above link to hear Joel Rose's Morning Edition report.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is casting his eye beyond the Big Apple — and is trying to cement his legacy as a progressive champion that could help boost his political future.

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Shots - Health News
1:43 am
Tue May 12, 2015

State Legislatures Quarrel Over Whether To Expand Medicaid

Alaskans attend a rally in Anchorage for Medicaid expansion.
Jonathan Casurella/Alaska Public Media

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 7:22 pm

Five years after the Affordable Care Act passed, the law's provision allowing the expansion of Medicaid coverage to more people is still causing huge fights in state legislatures.

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The Two-Way
6:18 pm
Mon May 11, 2015

Texas Police Were Warned About Gunmen At Muhammad Cartoon Event — And They Weren't

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 6:05 am

In the May 3 "Draw Muhammad" attack in Garland, Texas, there were some loose ends that got cleared up Monday by local police chief Mitch Bates. Elton Simpson and Nadir Soofi from Phoenix were killed by Garland police officers after the two men drove from Arizona and opened fire at the event featuring cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad.

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