NPR News

Please note:  Sometimes, NPR publishes headlines before the story and/or audio is ready; check back for content later if this occurs.  We also publish national/world news on our home page from AP, BBC, and others.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

When Sarah Gardner was 34, she started getting worried about whether she'd ever have a baby. So she took a test that aims to measure a woman's fertility.

The results terrified her. They indicated she had the fertility of a woman a decade older — a woman in her mid-40s.

"I was devastated," Gardner says. The news hit her especially hard because she was in the midst of breaking up with her longtime boyfriend.

Summer vacations: We wait for them all year. We pour time, energy and money into planning them. Expectations can run unreasonably high.

On this week's show, a summer edition of Stopwatch Science with Daniel Pink that explores what social science research has to say about vacations: How to make them better and what pitfalls to avoid.

Stopwatch Science

A chaotic first day at the Republican National Convention gave way to an emotional evening centered on national security and capped off by a rousing speech by Donald Trump's wife, Melania.

Feds Investigate Fiat Chrysler Over Car Sales

Jul 18, 2016

U.S. federal authorities are investigating Fiat Chrysler over allegations that it encouraged dealers to falsely report the number of cars sold, the automaker confirmed Monday.

In a statement, the company said it was cooperating with a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation and that the numbers in its financial statements were based on shipments to dealers, not on sales to customers.

A former director of baseball development for the St. Louis Cardinals has been sentenced to 46 months in federal prison for unauthorized access to the Houston Astros' computer systems.

Chris Correa pleaded guilty to the unauthorized access — which involved finding or guessing passwords to the computer system where the Astros store scouting reports — in January.

The first night of the Republican National Convention is focused on national security, with presumptive nominee Donald Trump designating the theme as "Make America Safe Again."

Spacefaring Stamp Sets World Record

Jul 18, 2016

A postage-paid space voyage!

An interplanetary "Ha!"

Or, maybe just a postal metaphor writ large.

However you phrase it, a 29-cent stamp has boldly reached Pluto and then some, making it the farthest-traveling postage stamp, according to the Guinness World Records organization.

A knife and ax attack on a train in Germany has left several people seriously injured.

The attacker was a 17-year-old Afghan, NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi-Nelson reports, citing Joachim Herrmann, interior minister of Bavaria, who was interviewed on the German public broadcaster ARD.

Herrmann says the attacker fled the train and was fatally shot by special forces troops who happened to be in the area and were able to quickly deploy to the site.

There was "no clear reason" for the attack, Herrmann says.

After a man attacked several law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge, La., on Sunday, killing three of them, Baton Rouge Chief of Police Carl Dabadie said the attack demonstrated the need for so-called "militarized tactics" by local police forces.

The shooting involved a man armed with two long rifles and a handgun, police said at a press conference Monday. He appeared to be seeking out officers, officials say, describing the attack as an "ambush" and an "assassination."

He was killed by a member of a SWAT team firing from more than 100 yards away, police officials say.

The man who killed three police officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on Sunday was a former Marine who served in Iraq. Gavin Eugene Long, who is black, carried out the attack on his 29th birthday. Officials say he had no known ties to radical groups and may have acted alone.

Thousands of police officers have been suspended in Turkey following an attempted coup over the weekend.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with security analyst Jim Walsh about what instability in that country could mean for the rest of the world, as well as what we’re learning about the recent terrorist attack in Nice, France.

Interview Highlights: Jim Walsh

On how the international community is reacting to the attempted Turkish coup:

Chaos erupted on the floor on the first day of the Republican National Committee in Cleveland, as forces opposed to Donald Trump tried — and failed — to make one last stand.

Arkansas Rep. Steve Womack brought up the Rules Committee report, which would keep delegates bound to Trump. Anti-Trump forces began shouting and wanting a roll call vote in a last-ditch effort to unbind GOP delegates and let them vote their "conscience."

It's a warm and muggy summer afternoon in Chicago, but that doesn't seem to bother the kids clamoring to ride the Ferris wheel, the Rock-O-Plane and other carnival rides set up in this southwest suburban park.

At the annual Chicago Fraternal Order of Police summer picnic, city cops and their families hauled in coolers and set up grills to enjoy food and bond with brothers and sisters in blue.

But there's something hanging over this picnic: the stress and strain of the job, and the scrutiny that many here say is harsher than ever.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The man who shot and killed three law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge on Sunday was a former Marine who was seeking out police for an ambush attack, officials say.

Police tell NPR the attacker — who died in a shootout with police — was Gavin Eugene Long, of Kansas City, Missouri.

In a press conference Monday, law enforcement officials said the gunman behaved "tactically" and appeared to intentionally target law enforcement officers. Long appeared to have been in Baton Rouge, La., for several days before the attack, they said.

Day one of the Republican National Convention begins in Cleveland today.

Demonstrations are planned in favor of — and against — Donald Trump, who will accept the party’s nomination for president. Cleveland police say they are ready for potential violence, but there is renewed tension in the city after yesterday’s police shootings in Baton Rouge.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd walks us through the scenes of the convention’s first day.

President Obama awarded the Medal of Honor today to a Vietnam War veteran credited in leading a perilous rescue operation half a century ago. Obama called Lt. Col. Charles Kettles an inspiration, especially after " a couple of tough weeks."

If you're a taxpayer, you're in on this system.

We — the U.S. taxpayers — help subsidize farmers by paying part of the premiums on their crop insurance. This helps ensure that farmers don't go belly up, and also protects against food shortages.

A day after three police officers were murdered in Baton Rouge, La., presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton denounced that and the recent attacks on police officers in Dallas, Texas.

"This madness has to stop. Watching the news from Baton Rouge yesterday, my heart broke. Not just for those officers and their grieving families, but for all of us," said Clinton before a meeting of African-American leaders at the NAACP's annual convention in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

The nuclear deal with Iran has been in place for a year now. The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action was the result of complex negotiations between Iran and six world powers — the United States, France, Germany, the U.K., China and Russia. It lengthened the time that Iran would need for "nuclear breakout," ensuring that it could not rush to build a nuclear bomb undetected.

After 12 years as host of Morning Edition, Renee Montagne is stepping back from hosting to focus on more long-form reporting – reporting that is essential to the future of NPR across platforms. She'll be trading her very early mornings at NPR West for an expanded role as Special Correspondent this November, after the presidential elections.

In four months, on the first Friday after the elections in November, Renee Montagne will step away from the host chair on Morning Edition after 12 years.

That's 12 years of arriving at work every weekday at midnight. Montagne works out of the NPR West studio in Culver City, Calif., on the outskirts of Los Angeles. That means at 2 a.m. PT, she's sounding bright and fully caffeinated for Morning Edition's earliest East Coast broadcasts. Her punishing hours were a point of pride — but only to a point.

A Baltimore judge has found Lt. Brian Rice, the fourth of six Baltimore police officers to go on trial in the death of Freddie Gray last year, not guilty of involuntary manslaughter. That's the most serious charge Rice had faced; he was also cleared of lesser charges.

This past month has seen lots of news events with potential consequences to politics — controversial police shootings in Minnesota and Baton Rouge, La., followed by the killing of police officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge. Plus, there was the horrific incident in Nice, France, that saw scores killed when a man drove a truck through a crowd watching fireworks on Bastille Day.

Montrell Jackson, one of three Baton Rouge police officers killed Sunday, had written about tensions he felt following the police killing of Alton Sterling earlier this month, using a Facebook post to tell his community, "Please don't let hate infect your heart."

More than 2 tons of supplies and gear are speeding toward the International Space Station, after a SpaceX Falcon rocket launched early Monday from Cape Canaveral, Fla. The cargo includes a new port that will standardize how spacecraft connect to the station.

Pages