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Amid concerns about setbacks in the fight against the Taliban in Afghanistan, the White House has nominated a new commander of international forces in the country.

Lt. Gen. John "Mick" Nicholson, now a top NATO officer in Turkey, has been chosen to take over from the current commander, Gen. John Campbell.

Defense Secretary Ash Carter issued a statement calling Nicholson an accomplished soldier:

The City of Ferguson, Mo., and the Justice Department have released a draft of the consent decree that they have negotiated.

The 127-page proposed agreement creates guidelines for training police officers on issues like when they should use force and how they can "reorient Ferguson's use-of-force policies toward de-escalation and avoiding force." The agreement also requires body-worn cameras and an overhaul of the municipal court system.

As the Islamic State uses social media and the Internet to recruit followers, a group of American Muslim millennials are also using the same tools to clear up misconceptions.

Tired of being called a terrorist, Ranny Badreddine, a youth from Evansville, Ind., joined other young teens to create World Changers, an initiative that uses the cyberspace to combat misconceptions about Islam.

Ray's Sporting Goods in Dallas' Oak Cliff is a neighborhood firearm dreamland.

It's stocked with the latest pistols, shotguns and AR-15 military-style rifles. Chuck Payne, the store's manager, says he has sold to a lot more women recently.

"A lot of married ladies with their husbands, some without, but they've decided that their husband's not home, they need to be able to do something and they need a different gun than what their husband had," Payne says.

The twisted saga of the police officer who staged his suicide to look like a murder continues.

On Wednesday, the already complicated case of suburban Chicago police Officer Lt. Charles Joseph Gliniewicz, who killed himself because he feared his embezzlement of city funds was about to be uncovered, took another dark turn. His wife, Melodie Gliniewicz, was indicted by a grand jury on felony counts of money laundering and misuse of the charitable funds her husband stole.

DeVry University, which has at least 55 locations across the U.S., advertises that 90 percent of its graduates seeking employment found jobs in their field within six months of graduation.

That claim by the for-profit university is coming under fire. The Federal Trade Commission has filed a lawsuit against the university's operators, saying the ads are deceptive.

Acorn TV Streams Shows From Abroad

Jan 27, 2016

After the acclaimed period drama “Downton Abbey” wraps up its final season, what new shows can Anglophiles latch onto? The Acorn TV streaming service brings beloved British programs, along with productions from Canada, Australia and New Zealand, to subscribers’ devices. NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans speaks to Here & Now's Robin Young about Acorn TV's roots and growing popularity.

Guest

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With U.S. stocks off to a dismal start in 2016 and China’s economic growth slowing, Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with Harvard economist Larry Summers. Summers says there’s a 1 in 3 chance the U.S. is heading for a recession. He also says he’s supporting Hillary Clinton for the presidency.

Interview Highlights: Larry Summers

Are you worried about the volatility of the stock market and the direction of the U.S. economy?

Authorities say the armed group occupying the national wildlife preserve in Oregon was given “ample opportunity” to leave peacefully.

Greg Bretzing, the FBI’s Portland special agent in charge, said at a news conference Wednesday that authorities took a deliberate and measured response to those who took over Malheur National Wildlife Refuge on Jan. 2. He says they’re working to safely remove those who are still occupying the site.

At a forum in Iowa this week, an undecided young voter questioned Hillary Clinton’s honesty, while Bernie Sanders was pressed to acknowledge that he’d raise taxes to pay for his universal health care plan.

In the Republican race, Donald Trump continued to discredit Ted Cruz, while Cruz insisted he wouldn’t engage in personal attacks. Here & Now‘s political analysts take a look at the unfolding week in politics, ahead of next Monday’s caucuses in Iowa.

In a sign the armed occupation of a federal wildlife refuge may be winding down, the FBI announced late Wednesday that eight people had left the compound. Five were released and three arrested.

The FBI said in a statement:

"All [three] were in contact with the FBI, and each chose to turn himself into [sic] agents at a checkpoint outside the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. The arrests were without incident.

Same-sex marriage or civil unions are legal throughout Western Europe, including many traditionally Catholic countries. The last holdout is Italy, where the Senate is about to take up a bill on Thursday that would legalize civil unions — though it would not authorize gay marriage.

Tens of thousands of Italians took to the streets last weekend in some 100 cities demanding legalization of civil unions, including those of gay and lesbian couples.

"Italy, it's time to wake up," they shouted.

President Obama and Vice President Biden "have tried to be fair and even-handed" in the primary process, Sen. Bernie Sanders said Wednesday following a meeting with the president at the White House.

Calling the meeting "constructive and productive," Sanders cautiously praised the Obama administration's economic work, saying there is still work to be done. The two also talked talked about foreign and domestic policy and "a little bit of politics," according to Sanders, who spoke to reporters after the meeting.

No country is free of public corruption, a scourge that has wide-ranging effects on the lives of billions of people. But in 2015, more countries saw drops in corruption than those that saw gains, according to the new Corruption Perceptions Index.

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On a typical day at the Capitoline Museum in Rome, a visitor might expect to see classical nude statues like this:

But this was the scene before Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and visiting Iranian President Hassan Rouhani held a news conference this week at the museum:

Out of apparent concern about offending Rouhani, white wooden boxes covered up many of the collection's ancient nudes.

It's a mystery who made the decision to cover up the art. As NPR's Sylvia Poggioli tells our Newscast unit, "The question everyone's asking is, on whose orders?"

As researchers have come to understand how poverty and its stresses influence children's brain development, they've begun untangling how that can lead to increased behavior problems and learning difficulties for disadvantaged kids.

Rather than trying to treat those problems, NYU child development specialists Adriana Weisleder and Alan Mendelsohn want to head them off.

French Justice Minister Christiane Taubira has resigned amid fallout over proposals to strip French citizenship from dual nationals convicted of terrorism.

The controversial measure was proposed in the wake of the November terrorist attacks in Paris that killed 130 people.

"Sometimes to resist is to remain, sometime to resist is to leave," Taubira said in a tweet Wednesday. She opposes the proposed constitutional change.

'Millennial Think-Piece Bingo'

Jan 27, 2016
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Toy Helps Preoccupy Uber Passengers

Jan 27, 2016
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In what police say they believe was a targeted attack, five people were shot in a homeless encampment known as "The Jungle," about a mile south of downtown Seattle. Two men were killed; a man and two women underwent surgery after the attack.

Seattle police detectives "believe the five victims were specifically targeted," the department says.

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Tens of thousands of GED test takers who barely missed the cut may soon receive a diploma, after the company that oversees the test said this week it's lowering the minimum passing score.

Since the new GED was unveiled two years ago this month, complaints have been rising. Students and teachers don't like that the high school equivalency test is now a for-profit venture, that it is more expensive than before and that it is solely computer-administered.

It's a challenge making sure that low-income children who get free- and reduced-priced meals during the school year continue to get fed during the summer.

Government meal programs served 3.8 million children on an average summer day last year — far fewer than the 22 million children who got subsidized meals during the school year.

After centuries of neglect, the world's largest fortification, the Great Wall of China, has a band of modern-day defenders who are drawing up plans to protect and maintain the vast structure.

They're not a minute too soon: Roughly a third of the wall's 12,000 miles has crumbled to dust, and saving what's left of it may be the world's greatest challenge in cultural preservation.

Qiao Guohua is on the front line of this battle. He lives in the village of Jielingkou, not far from where the eastern end of the Great Wall runs into the Yellow Sea.

Clay Hull has a stubborn sense of justice.

After an improvised explosive device blast in Iraq ended his time in the military, he fought the Army and the Department of Veterans Affairs over the amount of compensation they awarded him for his injuries.

"If I'm in the wrong, I'll admit it. But I'm not going to let somebody just push me around, especially the VA," he says.

It was complicated and drawn out, but Hull now gets the maximum the VA pays for disability.

While most of the presidential field descends on Iowa for next week's caucuses, at least one candidate won't be there. Ohio Gov. John Kasich plans to hold a town hall in New Hampshire on Iowa caucus night.

He has held more town halls in the Granite State than any other candidate — 80 to date, with plans to surpass 100.

Kasich is spending so much time in New Hampshire, he's even become comfortable joking about it.

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