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The Two-Way
6:17 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Gun Rights Outweigh Gun Control In New Pew Survey

More than half of American women now say owning a gun protects people from becoming victims of crime, according to Pew. Here, a woman carries a rifle at a gun rights rally at the Utah State Capitol last year.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 10:36 am

For the first time in at least 20 years, significantly more Americans say it's more important to protect the right to own guns than to control gun ownership, according to the Pew Research Center.

The survey found that more than half of Americans (52 percent) sided with gun rights compared with the 46 percent who favored gun control.

The findings represent the continuation of a shift that was only briefly interrupted by the Newtown, Conn., school shootings in 2012.

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The Salt
4:39 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

More Drinking, Less Buzz: Session Beers Gain Fans

Chris Lohring founded Notch Brewing in 2010. The company's lineup includes a Czech pilsner, a Belgian saison and an India pale ale. All of the brews are session beers — meaning their alcohol by volume, or A.B.V., is less than 5 percent.
Courtesy of Notch Brewing

Originally published on Thu December 18, 2014 4:33 pm

Tailgating, camping trips and wedding receptions are just some of the occasions when many Americans down a few beers in one sitting. For those who prefer high-alcohol microbrews and other craft beers, that can lead to trouble.

But a growing trend is offering another option: Session beers emphasize craft-beer taste with alcohol as low as or lower than big-brand light beers.

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The Two-Way
4:07 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Stocks Are Battered As Oil Hits Another 5-Year Low

Today was another big day for energy news: Oil prices fell to a new five-year-low, below $61 per barrel on world markets; the U.S. said its supplies of crude oil increased last week; and OPEC said it expected lower demand next year.

The news prompted a selloff on Wall Street. Jim Paulson, chief investment strategist at Wells Capital Management, tells our NPR's Newscast unit investors fear global economic tumult.

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Around the Nation
4:07 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Why Police Departments Have A Hard Time Recruiting Blacks

Police wearing riot gear walk toward a man with his hands raised Aug. 11 in Ferguson, Mo. Renewed calls for police departments to hire more minorities have followed the shooting there of a black man by a white police officer.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Thu December 18, 2014 4:35 pm

Since the Ferguson, Mo., shooting, there have been renewed calls for police departments to hire more minority officers, but it turns out it's not that simple.

Police in the U.S. are more diverse than they were a generation ago. In the 1980s, 1 in 6 officers belonged to an ethnic or racial minority. Now it's about 1 in 4. The challenge these days is finding enough recruits to keep that trend going.

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Around the Nation
4:07 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Some Deportees Return To Mexico But Their Stuff Stays In The U.S.

A woman walks toward the international crossing gate in Nogales, Ariz., in March 2013.
Jahi Chikwendiu Washington Post via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 18, 2014 4:34 pm

Derek Lucas Reyes, 20, went from being undocumented in the U.S. to undocumented in his native Mexico.

He sits at a table after breakfast in a shelter filled with people recently deported from the U.S. to Nogales, Sonora. At his feet is a paper shopping bag the Department of Homeland Security gave him for his belongings. Inside the bag: his deportation paperwork, a toothbrush, toothpaste and some other necessities he got from Mexican aid workers.

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Parallels
4:07 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Brazil's Tearful President Praises Report On Abuses Of A Dictatorship

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff begins to cry as she delivers a speech during the final report of the National Truth Commission on Violation of Human Rights during the military dictatorship from 1964-1985 in Brasilia on Wednesday. She is among the thousands who were tortured during that brutal period.
Ed Ferreira/Agencia Estado Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

Brazil's national truth commission on Wednesday delivered a damning report looking at the abuses committed during that country's military dictatorship, which lasted from 1964 to 1985.

The 2,000-page document details for the first time a history of arbitrary detention, torture, executions and disappearances.

Until now, Brazil has sought to bury its difficult past.

President Dilma Rousseff, who was herself tortured during Brazil's dictatorship period, broke down when she addressed the nation Wednesday. She said the report had fulfilled three important objectives.

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Goats and Soda
4:07 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Boredom On The Border Between Liberia And Guinea

The bright yellow steel truss bridge over St. John's River is the official border crossing between Liberia and Guinea. The Liberian-Guinean border has been closed since the early days of the Ebola outbreak.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

They're from the same ethnic group. They speak the same language. And they live on both sides of the Liberia-Guinea divide in the area around Liberia's eastern border city of Ganta, in Nimba County. The families straddle the border, which is not fenced.

"Right over there is the border," says businessman Prince Haward, directing our attention to some rubber farms not too far away. "Those are the rubber farms you find in Guinea."

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The Two-Way
4:05 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Watch: Navy Ship Uses Energy Weapon In Persian Gulf

A laser weapon system on the USS Ponce, which has been deployed to the Persian Gulf. The Navy released a video showing the system taking target practice.
John F. Williams U.S. Navy

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 8:30 am

It's not Star Wars on the high seas — but the U.S. Navy says it has made a "historic leap" by deploying a laser weapon system for the first time. The Navy released a video showing a LaWS — shorthand for "laser weapon system" — being used by the USS Ponce during target practice in the Persian Gulf.

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The Salt
3:52 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

From Potatoes To Salty Fries In School: Congress Tweaks Food Rules

When it comes to salty french fries or pizza served at lunch, schools may get more time to dial back sodium content, thanks to a provision in the federal spending bill headed for a vote on Capitol Hill.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 15, 2014 9:00 am

The gargantuan budget bill that lawmakers on Capitol Hill are expected to vote on Thursday does more than dole out federal dollars to keep the government running.

It also tweaks federal nutrition rules.

For starters, the bill — aka, the 2015 Omnibus Appropriations Bill — includes a provision that will give school food directors more flexibility when it comes to adopting 100 percent whole grain items, such as pasta and biscuits, in school breakfast and lunch meals.

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National Security
3:05 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Journalist: 'Torture Report' Shows CIA's Failure To Police Itself

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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National Security
2:57 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Former Interrogator Says CIA's Techniques Amounted To Torture

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
2:56 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Debate: Should We Genetically Modify Food?

Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Many plants we eat today are a result of genetic modifications that would never occur in nature. Scientists have long been altering the genes of food crops, to boost food production and to make crops more pest-, drought- and cold-resistant.

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Around the Nation
2:46 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

National Fraternity Leader Says Suspending Frats A 'Knee-Jerk' Reaction

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Africa
2:16 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Restrictive Government Makes Fighting Sexual Assault Hard In Egypt

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Europe
2:16 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

French Hostage Released After Being Held For 3 Years By Al-Qaida

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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A French hostage returned to Paris today after being held for three years by al-Qaida in the Sahara. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports the man's release has revived questions about whether and how governments should deal with hostage takers.

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The Two-Way
1:52 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Nick Denton Steps Down As Gawker's President

Gawker CEO Nick Denton is seen with chief strategy officer Erin Pettigrew (center) and president Heather Dietrick. Denton is stepping down as the president of the media company he founded.
Gawker

Nick Denton says he is stepping down as president of Gawker Media, the company he founded. A new seven-member managing partnership, of which Denton will be a part, will now run the media company, which owns Gawker, Jezebel, Deadspin and other popular websites.

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NPR Story
1:19 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Kathy Gunst's Holiday Favorites

Be sure to make multiple batches of Andrea's Chocolate-Dipped Buttercrunch. (Kathy Gunst)

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 8:17 am

Just in time for the holidays, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst shares recipes for her favorite holiday ham glaze and her favorite food gift: her sister-in-law’s chocolate-dipped buttercrunch (recipes below). She also shares a few of her picks for the year’s great cookbooks. See her full list of cookbook recommendations here.

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NPR Story
1:19 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Training Simulator Leaves Officers Surrounded

Military servicemen use VirTra's training center(Facebook)

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 2:06 pm

A recent rash of police shootings of unarmed black men, and the shooting of a 12-year-old in Cleveland who was holding a BB gun, have raised questions about how police are trained to use their guns.

Today, Here & Now begins an occasional series looking at just that. We start with a look at simulators. A company called VirTra makes this equipment, including a $200,000 firearms training simulator being used by local and national law enforcement agencies.

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NPR Story
1:19 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Madoff Secretary Gets 6 Years For Role In Ponzi Scheme

Annette Bongiorno, age 65, who served as an executive assistant for Madoff Investment Securities, leaves federal court after being found guilty of charges of aiding, assisting and profiting from the Ponzi scheme run by Bernard Madoff on March 24, 2014 in New York City. (Andrew Burton/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 4:04 pm

Employees complicit in Bernie Madoff’s multi-billion dollar ponzi scheme were sentenced Tuesday, including his former secretary who became rich working for her disgraced boss.

Annette Bongiorno earned millions keeping the books as Madoff’s secretary. A federal judge in Manhattan sentenced her to six years in a Florida prison. The judge said Bongiorno wasn’t “fundamentally corrupt,” but she should have recognized the fraud she helped perpetuate. Bongiorno could have faced life in prison.

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NPR Ed
12:56 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Why The President Wants To Give Hundreds Of Millions Of Dollars To Toddlers

Nikki Jones' preschool class at Porter Early Childhood Development Center in Tulsa, Okla.
John W. Poole NPR

Why does public school start at age 5?

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Parallels
12:44 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

For Yazidi Women, Escaping ISIS Doesn't Mean The Ordeal Is Over

Many Yazidis, like the ones shown here, managed to flee the onslaught of the so-called Islamic State and made their way to relative safety, like this camp near the northern Iraqi border crossing of Zakho. However, some 5,000 Yazidis, many of them women, are still being held hostage by the Islamic State.
EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 7:38 am

Barzan is a young Yazidi man, with sad blue eyes. His mother, five of his sisters and his niece are being held by the so-called Islamic State, taken when the extremist group swept through the Sinjar area of northern Iraq in August.

They are seven of some 5,000 Yazidis still being held by the extremist Sunni group. The Iraqi women are enslaved and sold for sex.

His sixth sister is home with him now. She is just 15 and she was raped. To protect her identity we're only using Barzan's first name.

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The Two-Way
12:44 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Alan Rusbridger, Editor Of 'Guardian,' To Step Down

Alan Rusbridger said today that he will step down as editor in chief of the Guardian next summer. Rusbridger oversaw the U.K. newspaper's publication of Edward Snowden's leak of classified material.
Alastair Grant AP

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 12:51 pm

Alan Rusbridger, best known in the U.S. for shepherding the Guardian newspaper through its Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of Edward Snowden's leaks of classified material, will step down as editor in chief of the British newspaper next summer. He said today he will become the chairman of the Scott Trust, which runs the Guardian.

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Shots - Health News
9:31 am
Wed December 10, 2014

Doctors Lag In Adopting Cheaper, Faster Radiation For Breast Cancer

Radiation therapy is effective in treating breast cancer but typically requires dozens of visits over five to seven weeks. A newer protocol takes just three weeks.
Antonia Reeve Science Source

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 6:54 pm

Radiation treatment for breast cancer could take less time and cost less for many women, but doctors aren't putting that knowledge into practice, a study finds.

And one reason is that the doctors in charge of radiation treatment will make less money, according to Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, a study author and chairman of the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania.

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The Protojournalist
9:15 am
Wed December 10, 2014

Begun The Christmas Tree War Has

Artificial Christmas tree.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 12:03 pm

When it comes to Christmas trees, which kind of symbol do you prefer — real or artificial? In recent stat-studded news stories, Americans seem to be conflicted, but leaning toward artificiality.

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The Two-Way
8:55 am
Wed December 10, 2014

Palestinian Minister Dies In West Bank Protest Against Israel

An Israeli soldier pushes Palestinian Cabinet member Ziad Abu Ain (left) during a protest in the village of Turmus Aya near the West Bank city of Ramallah, on Wednesday. Abu Ain died shortly after the protest in which witnesses said Israeli troops fired tear gas at him and dozens of Palestinians marchers. Witnesses also said Abu Ain was beaten by an Israeli soldier.
Majdi Mohammed AP

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 12:15 pm

A Palestinian minister died today following a protest against land confiscations in the West Bank. But it's unclear what caused Ziad Abu Ain's death. Palestinian medics say he died from exposure to tear gas. Some witnesses say he was hit and shoved by Israeli soldiers; others said he was hit in the chest by a tear gas canister.

Linda Gradstein, reporting on the story for NPR's Newscast Unit, says, "There had been clashes in the area for several hours between Palestinians and Jewish settlers. Abu Ain collapsed and was taken to a nearby Palestinian hospital, where he died."

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Shots - Health News
7:21 am
Wed December 10, 2014

A Crowd Of Scientists Finds A Better Way To Predict Seizures

Mathematician Phillip Adkins (left) and Drew Abbot, a software engineer at AiLive. They were members of the winning team.
Courtesy of Phillip Adkins

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 6:12 am

An online contest for data scientists has produced a great leap forward in efforts to predict when someone with epilepsy is going to have a seizure. The winning team used data on electrical activity in the brain to develop an algorithm that predicted seizures 82 percent of the time.

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The Two-Way
6:33 am
Wed December 10, 2014

'Pineapple Express' Forecast To Drench The Parched West Coast

A weather map showing a rain forecast for the next seven days.
NOAA

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 12:49 pm

Weather Underground says a storm moving up the West Coast of the United States is the wettest to hit the region since 2009.

The good news, writes Weather Underground's Jeff Masters, is that the region has been hurt by a historic drought:

"Rainfall amounts of 3 - 8 inches are expected over most of Northern California, with snowfall amounts of 1 - 3 feet predicted in the Sierra Mountains.

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The Two-Way
4:44 am
Wed December 10, 2014

Officials Set To Dismantle Final 'Occupy' Camp In Hong Kong

Pro-democracy activists tents are seen Tuesday on the road outside Hong Kong's Government Complex.
Chris McGrath Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 10:24 am

After two-months' worth of pro-democracy demonstrations that at times paralyzed Hong Kong, authorities are warning that they will clear protesters from a campsite blocking a main road near government headquarters on Thursday.

The Admiralty protest site is the last bastion of a protest movement that has come to be known as the Umbrella Revolution.

Reuters reports:

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Europe
4:23 am
Wed December 10, 2014

Britain's House Of Lords Still Seems As Elitist As The Name Suggests

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

National Security
2:54 am
Wed December 10, 2014

Ex-CIA Lawyer Says No One Was Misled On Torture, Abuses Were Reported

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 4:23 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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