NPR News

The Two-Way
6:07 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Cervantes' Remains Have Been Found In Madrid, Scientists Say

A team of archaeologists and anthropologists work on identifying remains at the Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarians in Madrid. They believe they've found the 400-year-old grave of the author of Don Quixote.
Daniel Ochoa de Olza AP

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 6:31 pm

Spanish investigators announced Tuesday that they believe they've found the remains of author Miguel de Cervantes.

Considered a pillar of Spanish literature, and one of the world's most important writers, Cervantes published Don Quixote in two parts, in 1605 and 1615. The novel narrates the adventures of a delusional man who has read so many stories about chivalry, he decides to become a knight himself. Don Quixote's idealistic and impractical ventures gave birth to the adjective "quixotic."

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The Two-Way
6:02 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

More San Francisco Police Officers Accused Of Sending Racist Texts

In a rapidly unfolding scandal, San Francisco law enforcement officials are pledging to review the case work of four city police officers who are accused of sending a series of racist and homophobic text messages.

A published report says the San Francisco Police Department is also investigating at least 10 other officers in connection with the sharing of offensive text messages.

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Politics
4:53 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Secret Service Director Grilled About Agency Scandals In House Hearing

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 6:18 pm

Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy told the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security Tuesday that it took five days before he was informed that a car carrying two agents struck a security barrier outside the White House.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
4:36 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Breast-Feeding Boosts Chances Of Success, Study In Brazil Finds

Brazilian mothers participate in a demonstration in 2011 for the right to breastfeed in public, in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Eduardo Anizelli/STF LatinContent/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 10:23 am

Babies who are breast-fed may be more likely to be successful in life, a provocative study published Tuesday suggests.

The study followed more than 3,000 babies into adulthood in Brazil. The researchers found those who were breast-fed scored slightly higher in intelligence tests in their 30s, stayed in school longer and earned more money than those who were given formula.

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The Two-Way
4:25 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

U.S. Loses Control Of Drone Over Syria

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 4:43 pm

The U.S. lost control of a drone over Syria, a Pentagon official said Tuesday, hours after the Syrian government said it had shot down a U.S. drone near the city of Latakia.

The Pentagon official said it was not clear whether the drone had been shot down, but the Syrian claim was being investigated.

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Around the Nation
4:17 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Lost Camera Survives Two Years Submerged In Wyoming's Salt River

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 6:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now a story of lost and found. It was 2012. A man from Idaho went fishing on Wyoming's Salt River with his father.

DON GONYEA, HOST:

John Cassinelli says he and his dad were having a nice time.

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The Salt
3:59 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Tea Tuesdays: Gift Of The Moon, Bane Of The Spanish — The Story Of Yerba Mate

A gourd of yerba mate. Legend has it that the moon gifted this infusion to the Guaraní people of South America.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 2:02 pm

In 1616, Hernando Arias de Saavedra, the governor of the Spanish province that included Buenos Aires, banned the population from drinking a green herbal drink called yerba mate.

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The Two-Way
3:22 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

European Allies Defy U.S. In Joining China-Led Development Bank

Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, and Asian leaders approved an agreement on the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank in Beijing in Oct., 2014. European countries are beginning to sign up too.
Takaki Yajima AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 3:33 pm

Four key European allies have broken ranks with the U.S. to join a major new development bank created by China. Germany, France, and Italy today agreed to join the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. Last week, the U.K., one of America's staunchest allies, became the first Western nation to join the new bank.

The Obama administration opposes the AIIB, due to open later this year, and has pressured allies such as South Korea, Japan and Australia not to join the new bank. The administration says there's no need for another international lending institution.

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Code Switch
3:21 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Can New York Police Build Trust Among Public Housing Residents?

Reginald Britt first moved into the Taft Houses, a public housing complex in East Harlem, in 1976
Alexandra Starr

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 1:42 pm

In New York City, the police department has been re-examining the way it patrols public housing since the shooting of Akai Gurley late last year. Gurley, who was African-American, was unarmed when he was fatally shot by a rookie officer in a Brooklyn housing complex. His death highlighted tensions between police and the people who live in public housing.

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Books
3:20 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

The Long Road To 'Single, Carefree, Mellow'

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 6:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

We're going to spend some time now with writer Katherine Heiny. That profession is not something her family expected and, she says, in some ways, neither did she.

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Politics
3:19 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Netanyahu Hopes To Win 4th Term In Israeli Election

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 6:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DON GONYEA, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
3:15 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Your Drinking Habits May Be Influenced By How Much You Make

Cultura/Liam Norris Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 6:30 am

To keep people from getting into trouble with alcohol, it would help to know why they're at risk.

Genes make some people more susceptible to dependence or addiction, while the surroundings exert a stronger pull on others. But it's been devilishly hard for researchers to sort those out. Context — who's drinking where and when with whom — matters a lot.

Add in money and it gets even trickier. And we're not talking about whether you can afford microbrews.

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Shots - Health News
1:51 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Workplace Suicide Rates Rise Sharply

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 6:30 am

Suicide rates in the U.S. have gone up considerably in recent years, claiming an average of 36,000 lives annually.

Most people take their lives in or near home. But suicide on the job is also increasing and, according to federal researchers, suicide risk changes depending on the type of work people do.

Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health analyzed census data and compared suicide rates among different occupations.

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The Two-Way
1:46 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

U.S. Air Force Veteran Charged With Trying To Aid ISIS

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 4:21 pm

A federal grand jury in New York has indicted a U.S. Air Force veteran on charges of attempting to join the self-described Islamic State.

Tairod Nathan Webster Pugh was indicted on two counts, including obstruction of justice, the U.S. Justice Department said in a statement, adding he will be arraigned Wednesday.

NPR's Carrie Johnson tells our Newscast unit that prosecutors say Pugh was born and raised in the U.S., but "turned his back on the country in an attempt to join ISIS," as the Islamic State is also known.

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Goats and Soda
1:29 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

If These Two Teenagers Ran The World, We'd All Jump For Joy

Memory from Malawi, left, and Achie from Ethiopia became best friends in a New York minute.
Misha Friedman for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 3:11 pm

At first glance, it's a typical scene: Two teenage girls lean their heads together engrossed in conversation as they munch on tuna salad on a bagel and fries.

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The Two-Way
1:23 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock Resigns Amid Spending Questions

Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., talks to reporters on Feb. 6. The congressman, whose spending habits have come under heavy scrutiny, resigned Tuesday effective March 31.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 1:33 pm

Updated at 3:32 p.m. ET

Rep. Aaron Schock, the Illinois Republican whose lavish spending has come under heavy scrutiny, has resigned.

NPR's Juana Summers tells our Newscast unit that Schock will resign his House seat at the end of the month.

Here's Schock's statement on his resignation, which was first reported by Politico:

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Code Switch
1:10 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Here's What People Are Saying About Starbucks' 'Race Together' Campaign

Me: "My name is Rigoberto." Starbucks barista: "Giorgio?"
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 6:49 am

If your name isn't traditionally white-sounding, there's a good chance it's been misspelled by a coffeehouse barista. It's awkward when that happens, but is it the perfect time to engage in a dialogue about race and ethnicity? Starbucks seems to think so.

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NPR Story
12:38 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Scientists Discover More About 'Feel-Good' Gene

A genetic mutation found in about 20 percent Americans makes them less anxious and more resilient. (Moyan Brenn/Flickr)

Can one particular genetic mutation explain why some people are more anxious and less resilient than others?

Scientists at the Weill Cornell Medical College studied a gene mutation discovered about 10 years ago that only about 20 percent of Americans have. It bathes the brain in a sort of ‘natural cannabis.’

The New York Times is calling it the “feel-good gene,” because of the correlation between the mutation and a lack of anxiety, and an ability to bounce back.

The Cornell researchers wanted to know if there was more than a correlation.

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NPR Story
12:38 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Is It The End For Benjamin Netanyahu?

An Israeli ultra-orthodox Jewish man casts his ballot at a polling station in Jerusalem on March 17, 2015. (Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images)

As voters in Israel head to the polls today, Benjamin Netanyahu is fighting for his political life. His once implausible challenger Isaac Herzog has risen in the public opinion polls and could end up the winner in today’s election.

Jerusalem Post’s deputy managing editor Tovah Lazaroff joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to take a look at what’s motivating voters, and what a change in leadership in Israel would mean.

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NPR Story
12:22 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Kathy Gunst Does Breakfast

(vastateparkstaff/Flickr)

Do you skip breakfast? Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst used to. But then she worked on a book about breakfast and became a convert.

Gunst brings us recipes for granola bars, smoothies, and an open face smoked salmon sandwich for Jeremy Hobson to sample.

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Music News
12:11 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Remastering 78s: A Company Brings Clarity To Pianist Artur Schnabel's Works

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Television
12:11 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Forget Binge Watching: Great Television Happens When Networks Pace Shows

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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NPR Ed
11:33 am
Tue March 17, 2015

Talking About Great Teachers At SXSWedu

"Great teaching is: Finding the pathway in each student to help them to express their own deep-seated intelligence and then push it beyond their expectations. Rosanne Somerson, Rhode Island School of Design president."
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 4:59 pm

The NPR Ed Team is all about great teaching — so how could we attend the annual SXSW education conference and not ask folks to tell us about their favorite teachers?

It's All Politics
11:26 am
Tue March 17, 2015

House GOP Budget Sets Stage For Showdown With The President

Republican Rep. Tom Price, House Budget Committee chairman, said Tuesday that his budget "saves $5.5 trillion, gets to balance within 10 years, without raising taxes."
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 6:18 pm

House Republicans unveiled a draft budget Tuesday designed to bring government spending in line with revenues over the next decade, while making significant cuts to safety net programs such as Medicaid and food stamps.

The plan is non-binding, but sets the stage for a political showdown between the new, all-Republican Congress and President Obama.

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The Two-Way
11:19 am
Tue March 17, 2015

Ikea To 32,000 People: No Hide-And-Seek At Our Stores

It's not hard to find nooks and crevices to cram one's self into at Ikea.
Pavel Golovkin AP

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 12:34 pm

Anyone who has meandered through an Ikea store can see the potential for hide-and-seek: the gargantuan hollow tubs, the high-hung rugs concealing whole walls, ottomans.

Well, don't get any big ideas.

Ikea announced Monday that it will no longer allow games of hide-and-seek at its stores in the Netherlands, after more than 32,000 people signed up via Facebook to play at a store in Eindhoven, Bloomberg reports.

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The Two-Way
10:56 am
Tue March 17, 2015

Secret Service Director Tells Panel: 'This Is My First Test'

Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy testifies before a Homeland Security Subcommittee hearing on the Secret Service budget Tuesday, when he responded to sharp questions about misconduct by his agents.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 4:40 pm

Answering pointed questions about new claims of misconduct by his agents, Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy says he had a "good stern talk" with his staff about why he wasn't told sooner about an incident in which two senior agents who were apparently drunk drove a government vehicle through an area at the White House complex where their colleagues were investigating a suspicious package.

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NPR History Dept.
10:01 am
Tue March 17, 2015

7 Creative Wedding Ideas From History

Grant and Amanda Engler celebrate in jet packs at their wedding ceremony in 2012 in Newport Beach, Calif.
Lenny Ignelzi Associated Press

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 10:43 am

Wedding websites today are aswirl with inventive suggestions, including 10 Unique Wedding Venues from Burnett's Boards; 23 Unconventional But Awesome Wedding Ideas from Buzzfeed and 21 Most Unique Ceremony Ideas from Emmaline Bride.

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It's All Politics
9:52 am
Tue March 17, 2015

Tweets: Under Pressure — Service Director Testifies

U.S. Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy pauses as he testifies during a House Appropriations subcommittee hearing on Capitol Hill on Tuesday.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 2:14 pm

Updated at 11:50 A.M.

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Shots - Health News
7:55 am
Tue March 17, 2015

Most N.Y. Marketplace Plans Lack Out-Of-Network Coverage

If you're a New Yorker shopping for health insurance on the state's exchange, you won't be able to find a health plan with out-of-network coverage unless you live around Albany or in the far western part of the state.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 7:20 am

More than a dozen insurers offer plans on the New York health insurance marketplace. Depending on where shoppers live, they may have more than a hundred options to choose from.

But despite being spoiled in many ways, there's one popular feature that most New Yorkers can't find in any of the health plans offered on their state exchange: out-of-network coverage.

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The Two-Way
7:25 am
Tue March 17, 2015

U.S. Returns Dozens Of Looted Artifacts To Iraq

Some of the artifacts that were handed over to Iraq during a ceremony Monday in Washington, D.C.
Jackie Northam NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 1:31 pm

The U.S. returned dozens of artifacts to the Iraqi government Monday. The cultural treasures, some dating back more than 4,000 years, were looted from Iraq and smuggled into the United States.

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