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In parts of Berlin, racial segregation in schools is far from official policy, but it is often a reality. In the fast-gentrifying district of Neukölln, young, mainly white professionals usually move away as soon as their kids reach school-age.

But small, parent-led initiatives are working to change this trend and ensure their local schools better reflect the neighborhood.

Scientists working in Ethiopia say they've found the earliest known fossil on the ancestral line that led to humans. It's part of a lower jaw with several teeth, and it's about 2.8 million years old. Anthropologists say the fossil fills an important gap in the record of human evolution.

Boris Nemtsov was just 37 when Russian President Boris Yeltsin named him deputy prime minister in 1997. Trained as a physicist, Nemtsov symbolized a new generation of young leaders who rose to power in the chaotic aftermath of the Soviet breakup.

But after Vladimir Putin became president, Nemtsov joined the liberal opposition and became an outspoken critic. He was arrested on several occasions, but continued his attacks on the Russian leader.

Melissa and her husband started trying to have a baby right after they got married. But nothing was happening. So they went to a fertility clinic and tried round after round of everything the doctors had to offer. Nothing worked.

"They basically told me, 'You know, you have no chance of getting pregnant,' " says Melissa, who asked to be identified only by her first name to protect her privacy.

But Melissa, 30, who lives in Ontario, Canada, didn't give up. She switched clinics and kept trying. She got pregnant once, but that ended in a miscarriage.

Instead of fighting like cats and dogs, Congress appears to be coming together for a change, and maybe it's because of our feline and canine friends.

In a rare bipartisan vote, the House Wednesday approved an Amtrak funding bill that will keep the trains running for another four years, and allow some pets to ride along on the intercity passenger rail service.

With yet another do-or-die test of Obamacare before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, the justices were sharply divided.

By the end of the argument, it was clear that the outcome will be determined by Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Anthony Kennedy. The chief justice said almost nothing during the argument, and Kennedy sent mixed signals, seeming to give a slight edge to the administration's interpretation of the law.

Judging by the comments from the remaining justices, the challengers would need the votes of both Roberts and Kennedy to win.

Excited children shout out the answers during a Sunday afternoon Arabic class at the grand mosque in the Paris suburb of Argenteuil. The mosque has thousands of worshipers and is one of the largest in Western Europe.

Aboubakar Sabri is a part-time imam there. During the week he runs a successful elevator-construction firm in Paris. Sabri came to France from Morocco in 1980 for doctoral studies at the Sorbonne, then stayed and raised three daughters.

He says Muslims can live perfectly well in French secular society.

The United States ambassador to South Korea was attacked on the streets of Seoul, Thursday morning Korean time.

Appearing on CNN, State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said Mark Lippert is now in the hospital and officials have yet to determine a motive.

"We will do a full investigation," Harf said, adding that the "injuries are not life threatening."

The House Select Committee on Benghazi has issued a subpoena for all emails related to Libya or Benghazi that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton may have sent from a private email account.

This is the first concrete fallout from a revelation by The New York Times that Clinton conducted official business through a personal account that was not and is still not controlled by the federal government.

Sugar is sweet.

But too much of it can expand our waistlines, rot our teeth and increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

FIFA president Sepp Blatter says he's concerned about the findings of a recent study regarding racism in Russia, which will host the 2018 World Cup.

The Ebola epidemic has taken a heartbreaking toll on children.

More than 1,000 children have died from the disease. Even more have lost parents, grandparents and siblings.

America's oil boom is going through some growing pains. But despite the recent dip in oil prices, some segments of the industry are focused on long-term growth.

In southwestern Washington state, oil companies want to build the largest oil-by-rail terminal in the country at the Port of Vancouver, on the banks of the Columbia River.

NPR's Melissa Block talks to Jason R. Baron, former director of litigation at the National Archives, about federal laws governing email. Until four months ago, officials could use personal email as long as they forwarded it to agency records.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Fast food giant McDonald's announced Wednesday it will begin sourcing chickens raised without antibiotics.

Over the next two years, the chain says its U.S. restaurants — which number around 14,000 — will transition to the new antibiotics policy, which prohibits suppliers from using antibiotics critical to treating human illness.

When a grand jury decided not charge former Officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, Ferguson, Mo., ended up in flames.

Protesters decried the injustice and faced off violently with police officers and the National Guardsmen who were brought in to ensure peace.

Robert McCulloch, the prosecuting attorney in the case, also decided to release reams of documents with the evidence presented to the grand jury.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Moles get a bad rap. They dig tunnels destroying gardens and lawns.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

They're not particularly cute or cuddly - I mean, come on, there are games where the goal is to hit plastic moles on the head.

There are about 800 schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District, and hundreds of them have music programs. There are jazz bands, choirs, orchestras and marching bands. But for a couple of years, teachers and student musicians have faced a big problem: broken strings, worn-out horns and out-of-tune pianos — a backlog of aging instruments that the district is scrambling to repair and replace.

Instruments like the violin in senior Melissa Valenzuela's hands.

Congress mustered big majorities for the Keystone XL, which you might think would mean that pipeline would soon be under construction to carry Canadian crude oil from Alberta to the Gulf of Mexico.

But you would be forgetting the presidential veto, which President Obama signed on Feb. 24 with little or no fanfare.

Wednesday, the Senate put an end to years of legislative effort by upholding the Obama veto. The Senate voted 62 to 37 in favor of the override, but it wasn't enough.

India is banning a documentary about the deadly gang rape of a young woman in 2012 amid concerns over remarks made by one of her convicted rapists. The government also says it will investigate how the film crew gained access to him on death row.

Mobile games – the apps you download onto your phone or tablet – used to be a bit of an afterthought in the gaming industry, behind the bigger console and computer markets.

But mobile games are growing fast, and are reaching millions of users who don’t consider themselves gamers.

The mobile gaming industry held its annual awards dinner last night, and the game Monument Valley took the Grand Prix.

Two hundred million and counting: That's how many times a documentary about China's massive air pollution problem has been viewed online since the weekend. Environmentalists are hailing it as an eye-opener for Chinese citizens.

Adolf Hitler’s manifesto “Mein Kampf” is a rambling, hate-filled, disjointed and sometimes unintelligible blueprint for the Third Reich. When a new annotated edition of the book is published in Germany in January 2016, it will mark the first time in almost 70 years that the text will be found in German bookstores.

After the war, the occupying allies banned the book, and the rights passed to Hitler’s home state of Bavaria. But the copyright expires at the end of the year, and all 16 German states have agreed that the book can be re-released, as long as it contains annotations.

Smarter Robots In The Works

Mar 4, 2015

Having robot office helpers could be pretty handy. But today’s machines are nowhere close to the smart, free-roaming robots you see in movies. Right now, robots couldn’t get around a building without tripping on chairs or getting stuck behind doors.

From Here & Now’s tech partner IEEE Spectrum, Prachi Patel reports on a new bot that will work better in human environments.

A partial jawbone found in Ethiopia is the oldest human-related fossil, scientists say.

NPR's Christopher Joyce, who is reporting on the story, tells our Newscast unit that the discovery fills in an important gap in human evolution. He says:

"The fossil consists of a partial jawbone and several teeth. It dates to about 2.8 million years ago.

"The team says the fossil appears to belong to an individual from the beginning of the ancestral line that led to humans. That would make it the earliest known Homo — the human genus.

For the second time in three years, the Affordable Care Act went before the Supreme Court Wednesday. And before a packed courtroom, a divided group of justices mostly picked up right where they left off the last time.

Once again, people inside the courtroom and out were left to wonder where Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Anthony Kennedy, considered swing votes in the case, stand. A decision is expected by the end of June.

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