NPR News

The Two-Way
12:42 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

U.S. Privacy Board Says NSA Internet Spying Is Constitutional

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 3:34 pm

A bipartisan privacy board that was appointed by President Obama following the disclosures made by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden has released a report (PDF) that says the security agency's Internet spying is legal and constitutional.

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NPR Story
12:26 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Grill Time: New Twists On July 4th Favorites

Kathy Gunst's grilled vegetables for her "Grilled Corn Relish." See recipe below. (Kathy Gunst/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 7:44 am

The Fourth of July is almost upon us, and for many people that means two things: fireworks and grilling. Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst may not have pointers on the pyrotechnics, but she sure knows her way around a grill. Kathy’s special ingredient for burgers? Bacon. Lots and lots of bacon. She also shares recipes for a goat cheese crostada, vegetable kebabs, potato salad (with bacon or without) and corn relish:

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NPR Story
12:26 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Red Spruce Makes A Comeback

Josh Halman surveys red spruce for signs of "winter injury" or dead needles and buds caused by cold temperatures hitting needles weakened by acid rain. (Sam Evans-Brown/NHPR)

There’s a dramatic recovery underway in the forests of New England. Red spruce, a tree that researchers once thought was doomed because of acid rain, is now growing faster than ever.

And it’s not the only tree growing like gangbusters. The story of the red spruce hints that with a changing climate, there will be species that are winners as well as losers.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Sam Evans-Brown of New Hampshire Public Radio reports.

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NPR Story
12:26 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Not Your Father's Hog

Harley Davidson's "Livewire," the company's foray into the electric motorcycle market. (Latoya Dennis)

Harley Davidson is known for the size of its motorcycles and their distinctive growl. But the bike maker may soon be offering a model that’s a lot quieter.

There’s no shifting and no clutch on the LiveWire, and the motorcycle weighs only about 450 pounds, compared to the 700 to 800 pounds for a more typical Harley.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Latoya Dennis of WUWM reports from Milwaukee on the LiveWire, Harley’s possible foray into the electric motorcycle market.

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Protesters Turn Back Buses Of Immigrant Detainees Near San Diego

Protesters block the arrival of immigrant detainees who were scheduled to be processed at the Murrieta Border Patrol station in California on Tuesday.
Sam Hodgson Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 1:10 pm

A plan to move immigrant detainees to a Border Patrol facility north of San Diego has set off protests and counterprotests this week, as residents and activists argue over how to treat people caught entering the U.S. illegally.

Three buses that were carrying nearly 140 migrants to a processing center were forced to turn around Tuesday, after their path was blocked by protesters urged on by the mayor of Murrieta, Calif. The migrants, mostly women and children, had reportedly crossed the border in Texas and were then flown to San Diego.

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Shots - Health News
11:43 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Costlier Digital Mammograms May Not Be Better For Older Women

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 12:07 pm

Medicare spending on breast cancer screening for women age 65 and older has jumped nearly 50 percent in recent years. But the rise in price was not associated with an improvement in the early detection of breast cancer.

Researchers at the Yale School of Medicine found that Medicare spending on breast cancer screening rose from $666 million in the years 2001-2002 to $962 million in the years 2008-2009.

So why the big increases in costs?

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Shots - Health News
11:04 am
Wed July 2, 2014

With Help From Extinct Humans, Tibetans Adapted To High Altitude

A mother and daughter herd their yaks along a highway on the Tibetan plateau.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 3:15 pm

At an altitude of nearly 3 miles, the Tibetan plateau is an extreme place to live. It's cold, it's hard to grow food, and there's about 40 percent less oxygen in the air than there is at sea level.

Somehow, though, native Tibetans are adapted to it. Their bodies — and their blood in particular — work differently than those of people used to lower altitudes. The Tibetans' advantage might be thanks to an ancient inheritance.

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History
10:51 am
Wed July 2, 2014

At 50, The Civil Rights Act Creates 'Opportunities For All Americans'

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Michel Martin speaks with historians Charles Cobb and Taylor Branch about the legacy of the Act and what it accomplished.

Shots - Health News
9:37 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Easy Method For Making Stem Cells Was Too Good To Be True

The heart beats in a mouse embryo grown with stem cells made from blood. Now the research that claimed a simple acid solution could be used to create those cells has been retracted.
Courtesy of Haruko Obokata

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 9:14 am

A prestigious scientific journal Wednesday took the unusual step of retracting some high-profile research that had generated international excitement about stem cell research.

The British scientific journal Nature retracted two papers published in January by scientists at the Riken research institute in Japan and at Harvard Medical School that claimed that they could create stem cells simply by dipping skin and blood cells into acid.

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The Two-Way
9:19 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Oh, Pooh: Bear Cub Gets Head Stuck In Cookie Jar

A bear cub that had to be rescued from a tree after getting its head stuck in a cookie jar is shown in a handout photo from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 10:25 am

Blame it on the animal crackers. A plastic jar of the treats was too enticing for a young bear in New Jersey, which got its head irretrievably wedged in the container. When people approached it to help, the 28-pound bear cub got scared — and climbed 40 feet up a tree, where it became stuck.

The incident happened in Ringwood, a small New Jersey town that's situated among forests and parkland. Workers from the state Environmental Protection Department and other local agencies got the cub safely back down and cut the jar off its head — but not before taking a photo of its plight.

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The Two-Way
8:14 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Navy Promotes Its First Female 4-Star Admiral

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert applaud Adm. Michelle Howard on her promotion Tuesday.
MCC Peter D. Lawlor U.S. Navy

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 10:46 am

After 238 years, the U.S. Navy has its first female four-star admiral. Michelle Howard attained that rank Tuesday, in a ceremony presided over by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus at the Women in Military Service for America Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery.

It's the latest "first" for Howard, 54, who in 1999 became the first African-American woman to command a ship in the U.S. Navy after taking over the USS Rushmore. In her new capacity, she takes up the post of vice chief of Naval operations.

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Politics
8:04 am
Wed July 2, 2014

It's The End Of The World As We Know It, So Give Us Money

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 11:12 am

Judging from email inboxes Monday night, the political apocalypse loomed.

Democrats were about to be overrun by GOP hordes. An army of liberal special interests and Hollywood cronies were on the verge of overtaking Republicans.

How to explain the dire, all-is-lost pronouncements? FEC deadline day.

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Wed July 2, 2014

The Return Of The One-Room Schoolhouse

The West Street Schoolhouse in Southington, Ct., was built around 1760. It was heated with a potbellied wood stove.
National Register of Historic Places

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 11:52 am

Even if your grandpa didn't walk uphill to school both ways, or have to break the ice on the bucket before fetching a drink with the dipper, you probably have iconic images in your mind of the one-room schoolhouse. It's a storied piece of America's past dating back to the Colonial era.

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The Two-Way
7:09 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Tim Howard Emerges As Hero In U.S. World Cup Loss

No Score: Belgium's Divock Origi throws himself into the net behind goalkeeper Tim Howard of the U.S. during Tuesday's World Cup Round of 16 game.
Ruben Sprich Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 10:34 am

After a wrenching loss to Belgium ended the U.S. team's World Cup run, fans are still touting the play of goalkeeper Tim Howard, Photoshopping his head onto U.S. currency and even (briefly) dubbing him Secretary of Defense on Wikipedia.

In Tuesday's game, Howard set a new World Cup record by making 16 saves. The mark dates back to at least 1966, when organizers started keeping records of that statistic. He was elected man of the match in the 2-1 loss.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
6:07 am
Wed July 2, 2014

A Woman Wrestles With A Disturbing Family Memento

Carol Zachary's grandfather, Herbert Fleming, a county auditor, was required to attend Montana's first legal triple-hanging in a barn in Meagher County, Mont., in 1917. Fleming was one of approximately 60 witnesses that day.
Courtesy of Carol Zachary

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 12:15 pm

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris dips into those stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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The Two-Way
5:36 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Palestinians Clash With Israeli Forces After Teen Is Abducted

Palestinian protesters throw stones toward Israeli police during clashes in the Shuafat neighborhood in Israeli-annexed Arab East Jerusalem on Wednesday, after a Palestinian teenager was apparently abducted in what's thought to be an act of revenge for the murder by militants of three Israeli youths.
Ahmad Gharabli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 10:40 am

Reacting to the discovery of a body believed to be that of an abducted Palestinian teenager, Palestinians clashed with Israeli troops in Jerusalem Tuesday. The body was found in a forest, stoking tensions in a city still coping with the deaths of three abducted Israeli teens.

The slain Israeli teens were found Monday in the Israeli-occupied West Bank after an intense and highly publicized search.

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Krulwich Wonders...
5:03 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Watch It Swallow An Entire Tree In Seconds

Animals
4:58 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Ukraine Wants Its Dolphins Back

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Ukraine wants its dolphins back. It seems when Russia invaded the Ukrainian nation of Crimea, it also seized Ukraine's military dolphins. Those dolphins were trained to detect mines and enemy divers. Now they're under Russian control. A Russian news site reports Ukraine is demanding Russia return the dolphins as it has other military equipment. But Russia is saying nyet, the dolphins are in the navy now - the Russian Navy. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Sports
4:15 am
Wed July 2, 2014

U.S. Goalkeeper Becomes Social Media Star

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:53 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR Story
3:05 am
Wed July 2, 2014

World Cup Sparks More Interest In U.S. Soccer

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:53 am

All through the World Cup, Kansas City has been a terrific place to watch a match. Interest in soccer has exploded there, stoked by the rise of the city's professional soccer team.

Sports
3:05 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Belgium Ends U.S. Team's World Cup Hopes

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 12:09 pm

The U.S. men's soccer team is out of the World Cup. For 90 minutes, the score was tied at 0-0, but the team lost in extra time to Belgium on Tuesday, 2-1.

Research News
3:05 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Living 63 Feet Underwater Helps Cousteau Team Conduct Experiments

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 12:03 pm

Fabien Cousteau and a crew of scientists and explorers have spent the past 31 days underwater in the Aquarius Reef Base off the coast of Florida. David Greene talks to Cousteau about the experience.

Parallels
1:39 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Afghanistan's Slow-Motion Election Strains A Fragile Country

Supporters of Afghan presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah rally Friday against alleged fraud in the presidential runoff election. Preliminary results were to be released Tuesday but have been delayed following Abdullah's accusations of widespread fraud.
Jawad Jalali EPA /Landov

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:53 am

The 2000 U.S. presidential election between George Bush and Al Gore went down to the wire, involved close scrutiny of the ballots and took weeks to sort out. And it left the country deeply divided.

Now, imagine a bitterly close election in a divided country with weak institutions, powerful strongmen, rampant corruption and thousands of armed militants running around.

That's what is playing out in Afghanistan right now as the country tries to determine who won the June 14 presidential runoff election.

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The Two-Way
6:19 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Still Off Florida's Coast, Tropical Storm Arthur Moves Northward

Tropical Storm Arthur spins off the coast of Florida.
NOAA

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 1:36 am

Updated 3:30 a.m. ET Wednesday:

Forecasters at the U.S. National Hurricane Center In Miami say Tropical Storm Arthur is gaining strength as it moves slowly northward. Early Wednesday morning, the storm was about 95 miles off the coast of Cape Canaveral. Its maximum sustained winds had increased to about 60 mph.

Original Post:

The first tropical storm of the Atlantic season has formed off the coast of Florida and is threatening the Carolinas.

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It's All Politics
5:02 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Another Day, Another Reason For Voters To Loathe Congress

The House Ethics Committee dismayed government watchdogs by reducing disclosure requirements for privately paid trips taken by members of Congress.
Matthias Schrader AP

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 5:25 pm

Congressional approval ratings are at rock bottom. Why would members pull a stunt likely to make them even more unpopular than they already are?

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Code Switch
5:02 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Honolulu Police Chief's Ban On Visible Tattoos Sparks Criticism

Keone Nunes, a Native Hawaiian tattoo artist, says prayers to "awaken" the tattoo tools and bless the ink. Two "stretchers" pull the skin tight on the chest of Kaiola Farin to enable Nunes to tap straight lines.
Wayne Yoshioka Hawaii Public Radio

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 5:37 pm

The Honolulu Police Department motto is "integrity, respect and fairness." But many of the Hawaiian natives on the force say the new rule banning visible tattoos isn't fair and doesn't respect their religious customs.

Keone Nunes is a practitioner who taps out tattoo designs just as they were done a thousand years ago. He uses a hand-held tool — a kind of miniature rake with needle-sharp tines made of animal tusks dipped in black ink. Uhi, or the artwork, is secondary to the prayers, protocols and techniques used in the ancient Native Hawaiian practice, he says.

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Code Switch
5:01 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Language Barriers Pose Challenges For Mayan Migrant Children

Hugo Pascual Tomas Manuel, 15, attends English classes at the Guatemalan-Maya Center in Lake Worth, Fla. He grew up speaking Q'anjob'al, or Kanjobal, an indigenous Mayan language.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 5:43 pm

Among the tens of thousands of unaccompanied minors who have come from Central America this year are children who speak little or no Spanish. Many are from Guatemala's indigenous communities, who speak more than 20 different Mayan languages.

Rafael Domingo, 16, grew up in Guatemala speaking Q'anjob'al, sometimes referred to as Kanjobal. The youngest son of a single mother, he rode a bus, walked for miles and crossed a river before he was stopped at the Texas border.

"It was so difficult to come to this country," Domingo says through an interpreter.

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Code Switch
4:22 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Influx Of Children Creates New Strain On Beleaguered Immigration Courts

Boys in a holding area at a Border Protection center in Nogales, Ariz. Generally, minors are put into deportation proceedings and given a "Notice To Appear" in immigration court, but they have permission to stay in the country while the U.S. decides their fate.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 8:55 pm

President Obama said over the weekend that he is seeking to fast-track deportations of unaccompanied immigrant children from Central America who cross into the United States.

More than 52,000 have been caught in South Texas since October, and hundreds more arrive daily, overwhelming Border Patrol stations and overflowing temporary shelters.

But once they get here, what happens? Do they just get to stay, as the president's critics charge?

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The Salt
3:40 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Breeding Battle Threatens Key Source Of California Strawberries

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 9:48 pm

In California, a legal skirmish has erupted over strawberries — or rather, over strawberry breeding.

To be absolutely precise, the battle is about strawberry breeding at the University of California, Davis. This is more important than it might sound. More than half of all strawberries in the supermarket trace their ancestry to breeding plots at UC Davis.

The strawberry breeders at UC Davis, who've led that program for decades, are leaving the university to carry on their work at a new private company.

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Shots - Health News
2:38 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

A Misspent Youth Doesn't Doom You To Heart Disease

Had a bit too much fun in your 20s?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 8:34 am

We all know that a healthy lifestyle can keep heart disease at bay. But if like many of us you spent your 20s scarfing down pizza, throwing back a few too many beers and aggressively avoiding the gym, don't despair.

People who drop bad habits in their late 30s and 40s can reduce their risk of developing coronary artery disease, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal Circulation.

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