NPR News

Politics
5:38 am
Sat July 12, 2014

What Could $100 Million Buy You — Besides Campaign Ads In Kentucky?

Campaign spending in the Kentucky Senate race between GOP Sen. Mitch McConnell and Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes could reach $100 million.
LM Otero AP

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 10:14 pm

For the amount of money that's expected to be spent in the Kentucky race for U.S. Senate this year, you could buy a bottle of the state's own Maker's Mark whiskey for nearly every man, woman and child in the state.

Some observers say the election could end up as the most expensive Senate race in history, with spending topping $100 million. And why wouldn't it be? It's at the heart of the battle for control of the U.S. Senate.

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Around the Nation
5:38 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Governors Talk Infrastructure At Annual Meeting

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 10:12 am

The National Governors Association held its annual summer meeting in Nashville, Tenn. this week, and the collapsing highway trust fund was the centerpiece issue.

Music Interviews
5:38 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Jack Antonoff Takes A Break From fun. To Release 'Desire'

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 10:12 am

Transcript

TAMARA KEITH, HOST:

You may or may not recognize the name. But I'm pretty confident you already know our next guest - Jack Antonoff. Two summers ago, if you had a radio or a phone or just went outside anywhere where speakers exist, you heard Jack Antonoff. He was playing an extra distorted guitar for a band called Fun.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WE ARE YOUNG")

FUN: (Singing) Tonight we are young. So let's set the world on fire, we can burn brighter than the sun.

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Asia
5:38 am
Sat July 12, 2014

The Day That Changed Everything On Mt. Everest

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 10:12 am

On April 18, 16 Nepalese guides were killed in an avalanche on Mt. Everest. NPR's Tamara Keith talks to Outside Magazine's Grayson Schaffer about the deadliest day in Everest history.

Sports
5:36 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Rio's Statue Is Restored, But Brazil Team's Redemption Still Ahead

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 10:12 am

Restoration work on Rio's famed "Christ the Redeemer" statue is now complete. But can Brazil get redemption after not making it to the World Cup finals?

Goats and Soda
3:38 am
Sat July 12, 2014

What If The World Cup Were Awarded For Saving Trees And Drinking Soda?

Leif Parsons for NPR
Leif Parsons for NPR

The World Cup is down to four teams: Argentina, Germany, Brazil and the Netherlands. We've seen how these nations perform on the soccer field. But how do they perform in the fields of health and development?

Poverty

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Parallels
3:37 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Israel And Gaza Struck By Rockets, Bombs And A Sense Of Deja Vu

A convoy of Israeli tanks roll near Israel's border with the Gaza Strip on Friday. There's a sense of repetition to the violence in the region, as Hamas fires rockets at Israel and Israel responds with bombs and the threat of a ground invasion.
Menahem Kahana AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 10:12 am

The violence between Israel and Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip has taken on a grisly repetition: This is the third time in five years that Israel has bombed Gaza in response to Hamas rocket fire.

And as Israel considers what would surely be a bloody ground invasion, it's unclear what such an operation would hope to achieve — or how much things would change.

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The Salt
4:51 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Are Organic Vegetables More Nutritious After All?

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 4:10 pm

There may never be an end to arguments over whether organic food is more nutritious. But a new study is the most ambitious attempt so far to resolve the issue — and it concludes that organic fruit and vegetables offer a key benefit.

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It's All Politics
4:15 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Florida Ruling Is A Primer On Redistricting Chicanery

Florida Republican state Sen. Rene Garcia examines a map of proposed changes in congressional districts in January 2012.
Chris O'Meara AP

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 4:25 pm

If you have some time over the weekend or need a break from the endless LeBron James coverage, you could peruse the highly readable opinion by a Florida judge who invalidated some of the redistricting efforts by the state's Republican Legislature.

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Shots - Health News
4:06 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Feds Tighten Lab Security After Anthrax, Bird Flu Blunders

Particles of H5N1 virus — a particularly dangerous type of bird flu that can infect people — attack lung cells.
Chris Bjornberg Science Source

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 6:21 pm

In the course of trying to understand a laboratory accident involving anthrax, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stumbled upon another major blunder — involving a deadly flu virus.

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Health
3:59 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Veterans Kick The Prescription Pill Habit, Against Doctors' Orders

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Sun July 13, 2014 4:28 am

For many people with post-traumatic stress disorder, sleeping can return you to the worst place you've ever been, at the worst possible moment.

"I always see his face," says Will, who did tours in Iraq and Afghanistan with the Army. "And in my dreams it's the same thing. ... I always walk over to him, and instead of this Afghani kid that's laying there, it's my little brother."

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Remembrances
3:38 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Remembering Jazz Legend Charlie Haden, Who Crafted His Voice In Bass

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 7:39 pm

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Politics
3:35 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

House GOP Plows Forward With Plans To Sue Obama

House Speaker John Boehner at a Capitol Hill news conference last month. He said Wednesday that the Republican-controlled House will file a lawsuit accusing President Obama of failing to carry out laws passed by Congress.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 6:21 pm

House Republicans are pushing ahead with a plan to sue President Obama, accusing him of trying to sidestep Congress and make his own laws.

But the president is also using the suit, which is considered a long shot in legal terms, to score political points.

House Speaker John Boehner says the lawsuit will focus on the administration's decision to postpone the requirement in the Affordable Care Act that large employers provide health insurance for their workers.

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Law
3:18 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Fate Of The New N.C. Voter ID Law Now Rests In A Judge's Hands

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 6:21 pm

North Carolina's voter ID law has come under fire in the courts, challenged by lawyers from the U.S. Department of Justice, the NAACP and voting rights groups. A judge will decide whether parts of the law should be implemented or delayed. Jeff Tiberii of WUNC has been following the hearing, and he wraps up recent developments and possible outcomes.

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The Salt
3:03 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Spread Of Palm Oil Production Into Africa Threatens Great Apes

Gorillas in Virunga National Park in Democratic Republic of Congo, in 2013. Great apes like the gorilla have become increasingly threatened by the expansion of palm oil production in Africa.
Brent Stirton WWF/Canon/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 9:10 pm

In recent years, consumers have grown increasingly aware that the explosion of palm oil plantations to supply food companies making everything from Pop-Tarts to ramen noodles has taken a heavy toll on the environment.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Newspaper Editor, Activist John Seigenthaler Dies At 86

Nashville Tennessean Editor John Seigenthaler testifies at a Senate Commerce Subcommittee hearing in Washington in 1969. Seigenthaler died Friday at 86.
Bob Daugherty AP

John Seigenthaler, the legendary journalist who edited The Tennessean, was instrumental in shaping the editorial page of USA Today and worked as an assistant to Robert Kennedy, has died at 86.

A statement from his son, broadcast journalist John Seigenthaler Jr., said his father died "peacefully at home," where he was recovering after a recent medical treatment.

NPR's David Folkenflik says Seigenthaler was known as a crusader against corruption and for civil rights.

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This Week's Must Read
2:54 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

In Aftermath Of Brazil's World Cup Defeat, A Poem To Numb The Pain

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 6:21 pm

Any time you're facing big failure is a good time to revisit the 1888 poem "Casey at the Bat." It's the classic story of dashed optimism, of an entire city putting its hopes on the result of one single, heartbreaking at-bat. Here are the last stanzas. It's down to the wire. The Mudville team has two outs, two strikes, and they're hoping Casey will save them.

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Trade Lingo
2:54 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

The Musician's Secret Slang: A 'Crow,' An Oboe And A Cleveland Call-Out

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 6:21 pm

Every profession has a jargon all its own, and musicians are no different. Oboist Alli Gessner and blues musician Brian Brickley offer a few terms distinctive to the music world: "crowing" and "good night, Cleveland," among others.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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NPR Story
2:24 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Thoughts On Neighbors In Summertime

What Hurley's neighbors see (Sam Hurley/NHPR).

When the weather is warm and the days long, we often get a chance to see and talk to our neighbors more often than we do when winter’s cold keeps people indoors.

Of the range of people you can know in the world, the neighbor occupies a curious spot.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Sean Hurley of New Hampshire Public Radio has these thoughts on what he’s learned about the people who live near him.

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NPR Story
2:24 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

GMO Bananas Must Pass Their First Test

Ugandan researcher Stephen Buah and Professor James Dale hold bananas bred to be rich in vitamin A at Queensland University of Technology (Erika Fish/Courtesy of Queensland University of Technology)

Volunteers in Iowa are getting a great deal — $900 for eating a banana. It’s part of a human feeding experiment to test genetically-engineered bananas.

Researchers hope that blood drawn from the volunteers will show higher levels of vitamin A, so the bananas can head to Uganda, where bananas are a staple and vitamin A deficiency is widespread.

NPR’s Dan Charles joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about the experiment, and what this may mean for fortified produce.

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NPR Story
2:24 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

On Stage: The Colorado Black Arts Festival

Fresh Oil From Heaven performs at the 2013 Colorado Black Arts Festival, which was founded 28 years ago. (CBAF/Facebook)

“On Stage” is our look at what’s happening on the boards across the country, from comedy shows to celebrations of slices of American life.

Today, we turn to the Colorado Black Arts Festival, kicking off in Denver today. The festival features three full stages with jazz, blues, reggae and gospel music, as well as traditional African drumming and dance.

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All Tech Considered
2:22 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Friday Feline Fun: A Ranking Of The Most Famous Internet Cats

Celebrity Internet cat Lil' Bub, who ranks No. 4 on the cat influencer list.
Dave Kotinsky Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 8:41 am

For reasons I can't fully understand, the Internet loves its cats. Keyboard Cat and Grumpy Cat are household names, I Can Haz Cheezeburger is a digital empire, and my real-life cats are on a social networking site called Catster (this is not a joke).

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Goats and Soda
2:11 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

New Guidelines For Gay Men: A Daily Anti-HIV Pill

AIDS drugs line a pharmacy's shelves. A new recommendation from the World Health Organization suggests a daily anti-HIV pill for men who have sex with men.
Astrid Riecken MCT/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 3:14 pm

The World Health Organization has thrown its weight behind a controversial strategy for curbing the spread of HIV/AIDS: Today the organization strongly recommended that men who have sex with men consider taking a daily pill that prevents infection with the virus.

WHO guidelines are not binding, but can carry considerable sway with governments, which draw on the organization's expertise to determine their national health priorities.

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Music Interviews
2:11 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

The Music — And Mess — In Ben Watt's Long Goodbye To His Father

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 2:54 pm

Ben Watt is a singer and DJ, best known for being in the British pop duo Everything but the Girl. Now, he's back with a new album and a book that gives an inside look at his complicated relationship with his parents.

Medical Treatments
2:11 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Health Officials Push HIV Prevention Pills

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 6:21 pm

The World Health Organization has announced a sweeping new guideline, recommending that all men who have sex with mean take antiretroviral drugs to prevent HIV infection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a similar recommendation in May. For more on these announcements, Melissa Block speaks with reporter Richard Knox.

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Middle East
2:11 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Among Israelis, Pressure Swells To Commence Ground War In Gaza

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 6:21 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

As we mentioned, no Israelis have been killed by rocket fire, but one strike today did cause severe injuries and damage. Around 8:30 in the morning local time, a rocket struck a gas station in Ashdod. One man was sent to the hospital seriously wounded. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports this increases the internal pressure on Israel to stage a ground invasion.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: A taxi driver Avram Ayash, comes to this gas station every day. This morning he watched the place go up in flames.

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Middle East
2:11 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

By Laying Waste To Houses, Israeli Strikes May Lay Seeds For New Rage

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 6:21 pm

Israeli air strikes on houses in the Gaza Strip have killed families and flattened the homes of neighbors, even as they target Hamas militants. One Palestinian human rights advocate says that, with these attacks, Israel is destroying a safe future for itself.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

WATCH: Giant Undulating Anchovy School

A massive school of anchovies off La Jolla, filmed on Tuesday.
Scripps Institution of Oceanography — UC San Diego

It's the biggest aggregation of anchovies seen in near-shore waters in three decades, according to scientists at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego.

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Remembrances
12:28 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

'Fresh Air' Remembers Soul Singer And Songwriter Bobby Womack

Womack sang for a gospel group with his brothers called the Valentinos. It's All Over Now was their first international hit. Womack, who died June 27 at the age of 70, talked with Terry Gross in 1999.

The Two-Way
11:44 am
Fri July 11, 2014

U.S. Had Heads-Up Over Destruction Of 'Guardian' Hard Drives

The Associated Press reports that the U.S. knew the British government would oversee the destruction of hard drives held by the Guardian newspaper that contained sensitive information.
Raphael Satter AP

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 1:01 pm

The National Security Agency knew the British government would oversee the destruction of hard drives held by the Guardian newspaper that contained information leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, though at that time the agency distanced itself from the action. That's according to emails obtained by The Associated Press through a Freedom of Information request.

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