NPR News

Please note:  Sometimes, NPR publishes headlines before the story and/or audio is ready; check back for content later if this occurs.  We also publish national/world news on our home page from AP, BBC, and others.

It's not often — if ever — that presidential nominees use footnotes in their acceptance speeches.

But last night, Donald Trump used 282 of them in the written version of his acceptance speech — to bolster what he promised would be a presentation of the "facts plainly and honestly." I was footnote number 145.

Trump told the Republican audience that if they wanted to hear "the corporate spin, the carefully-crafted lies and the media myths" they should go to the Democratic convention.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A manhunt was underway Friday for a shooter or shooters who opened fire at a shopping mall in Munich, killing and wounding several people, a Munich police spokeswoman said.

Munich police spokeswoman Claudia Kuenzel told The Associated Press there had been “several dead and wounded” in the shooting at Olympia Einkaufszentrum mall. She could not provide exact numbers.

“The shooter or shooters are still on the run” either in or around the mall, she said.

The Bavarian Interior Ministry confirmed at least one dead and multiple people hurt.

The toilets, sewage systems and waste that a civilization leaves behind can tell researchers a lot about how that civilization lived.

Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow, who teaches at Brandies University, has studied the toilets and sewage systems of ancient Rome. She speaks with Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti about her research.

Interview Highlights: Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow

On the changing understanding of Roman toilets

A shooting at a shopping mall in Munich has left at least 10 people dead, including the alleged attacker, and at least 27 people injured, the Munich police say.

Munich police chief Hubertus Andrae said at a press conference Saturday that the suspect was an 18-year-old German-Iranian man born and raised in Munich, armed with a handgun.

A search of the suspect's home turned up "no evidence" of links to the Islamic State group.

The suspect had no criminal record and his motive is unknown, Andrae said in an earlier press conference.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt from the latest episode of the Invisibilia podcast and program, which is broadcast on participating public radio stations.

Walking among the California redwoods, drifting blank-brained on a break from college, I got to thinking about shoes. I can't say why, exactly. Perhaps it was because they were touching my feet.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

It's really hot in most of the mainland United States right now. The National Weather Service predicts temperatures in the triple digits through the weekend in much of the South, Midwest and along the East Coast.

The culprit: a "heat dome."

It's a real meteorological event — the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration even took the time to define it in the agency's warning this week:

During our time covering the Republican National Convention in Cleveland this week, we asked pretty much everyone we met why they were supporting Donald Trump.

Here are some of their answers:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

The Justice Department calls it the largest criminal health care fraud case ever brought against individual suspects: Three people are accused of orchestrating a massive fraud involving a number of Miami-based health care providers.

The three facing charges are all from Florida's Miami-Dade County; they include Philip Esformes, 47, owner of more than 30 Miami-area nursing and assisted living facilities; hospital administrator Odette Barcha, 49; and physician assistant Arnaldo Carmouze, 56, the Justice Department says.

Days after Charles Kinsey was shot by North Miami police as the behavioral health care worker tried to help a patient, we now know more about the officer who fired the shot — and according to the head of the local police union, the officer was trying to shoot Kinsey's patient, a man with autism, not Kinsey.

"Fearing for Mr. Kinsey's life, the officer discharged his firearm, trying to save Mr. Kinsey's life," says John Rivera, president of the Dade County Police Benevolent Association. "And he missed, and accidentally struck Mr. Kinsey."

Who hasn't dreamed of visiting France? The two most popular tourist destinations in the country are Paris and Nice, on the French Riviera. But now they've both been hit by deadly attacks — three large-scale attacks in a year and a half.

Last Thursday's truck rampage in Nice killed 84 people on a seaside promenade watching fireworks. It's taken a serious toll on the French spirit – and has made some tourists reconsider a visit.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

You probably know Neil deGrasse Tyson as an astrophysicist with a seemingly endless stream of science fun facts at his command. You might not be aware that he is also a great oenophile and lover of food.

Some 16 years ago, before I was a journalist and illustrator, I worked with Neil at the American Museum of Natural History. He would sometimes carry around a small canvas tote bag. As I recall, the bag would contain one of two things: either a weighty, mango-sized meteorite to show to guests of the museum, or a bottle of wine to gift to a colleague.

Welcome to our sand box.

For months now, the NPR Ed Team has been playing with what we like to call "long listen" ideas — worthy stories that we can't tell in three or four minutes.

Three countries leading the effort to find Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared in March 2014 with 239 people aboard, say they plan to suspend their search for the missing airliner. While the search has turned up tantalizing clues, officials say hope of finding the jet is fading.

It has been said that "to cleave" is the only verb in English that connotes one specific action and its direct opposite. To cleave sometimes means to hold together, and it can also mean to split apart.

That's why Cleveland was the perfect city to host the 2016 Republican National Convention. Because this week, in this town, the GOP demonstrated both its persistent divisions and its instinct for overcoming them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Editor's note: This story is part of the latest episode of NPR's show and podcast Invisibilia, exploring the power of clothes.

Donald Trump accepted the Republican nomination for president Thursday night, delivering a speech that lays out America's struggles with crime, terrorism and immigration and how he plans to address them.

NPR's politics team has annotated Trump's speech below. Portions we commented on are highlighted, followed by analysis, context and fact check in italics.


Thank you, thank you. Thank you very much.

Friends, delegates and fellow Americans: I humbly and gratefully accept your nomination for the presidency of the United States.

In an apparent first, a Republican convention speaker on Thursday took the stage during the final, most high-profile night, just minutes before the nominee himself, and uttered these words: "I am proud to be gay."

The tap water in a small Colorado town has been contaminated with THC, the mind-altering ingredient of marijuana, local authorities have told residents.

Hugo, Colo. — about 100 miles from Denver, in Lincoln County — warned residents not to drink, cook with or bathe in the local water supply.

The Hugo Public Works detected "evidence of THC," the Lincoln County Sheriff's Office told the public. A few hours later the county sheriff said there were "no symptoms" in the town, and tests so far had found "no level of concentration."

Painting a grim picture of America, Donald Trump promised to protect the country and restore "law and order" by putting "America First" in his address Thursday evening formally accepting the GOP nomination for president.

With two outsize white bows in her hair, 6-year-old Heavenly Joy brought the house down at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland Thursday night. She sang two songs to open the night — "Let There Be Peace On Earth" and "America the Beautiful."

Watch it here via C-SPAN.

Pages