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In a West Bank settlement, Israelis are taking down a synagogue. The country's highest court ordered its removal because it was built without a permit on property owned by Palestinians.

It's a rare move, and the story of how this came to be reveals a heated debate around judicial activism, government money, and settlers' political power.

Two weeks ago, the Ayalet HaShahar synagogue in the Giv'at Ze'ev settlement was packed with young Israeli men.

Remember that health class you had in middle school? Where you found out all that stuff about your body? We wondered why there wasn't a class like that for middle age. Could someone tell us what happens to us as we move through the decades?

Morning Edition asked listeners to send their questions about women's bodies and aging as part of our ongoing series Changing Lives of Women. We heard from hundreds of you asking about everything from sleeplessness to STDs to sex in old age.

After a long stalemate, a bipartisan team of congressional negotiators has agreed to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The law, currently known as No Child Left Behind, sends roughly $14 billion a year to schools that serve mostly low-income students.

Here's what we know about the rough agreement. First, annual testing — a major feature of NCLB — would remain for grades three through eight and at least once in high school. Schools would still have to test 95 percent of their students and report the results by race, income and special need.

If egg freezing once sounded like science fiction, those days are over. Women now hear about it from their friends, their doctors and informational events like Wine and Freeze.

Shady Grove Fertility Center in the Washington, D.C., area hosts Wine and Freeze nights for prospective patients every few months. Fifteen or so women in their 30s gathered at one recently over wine, brownies and sticky buns. A doctor explained the procedure, the costs and the odds of frozen eggs resulting in a baby — which decline as a woman ages.

Tiny computers have allowed us to do things that were once considered science fiction. Take the 1960s film, Fantastic Voyage, where a crew is shrunk to microscopic size and sent into the body of an injured scientist.

While we aren't shrinking humans quite yet, scientists are working with nanotechnology to send computers inside patients for a more accurate and specific, diagnosis.

There are few costumes more recognizable than the blue-and-white checkered dress Judy Garland wore as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz. On Monday, an unidentified buyer snapped it up for $1.5 million over the phone during an auction at Bonhams in New York City.

An explosive belt was found on the southern outskirts of Paris, and is said to contain the same metal bolts and explosives as the belts worn by suicide bombers in the deadly Paris attacks on Nov. 13.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that analysts say the belt, which was found in a trash bin, could belong to the missing alleged eighth attacker, Salah Abdeslam. She adds:

If you are turkey-averse, turkeyphobic or just bored with the bird, fear not. We've got some other main dish ideas for you.

"What I think is cool is to put a center roast on the table that comes from the woods itself: something wild, something home-hunted, like venison," Amy Thielen, Minnesotan and author of The New Midwestern Table, tells All Things Considered's Ari Shapiro. Deer, says Thielen, is "one of those secret underground proteins in the American meat-eating story."

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UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Ladies and gentlemen, Mayor-elect Jackie Biskupski.



Doctors, patients and insurers have been struggling with how to determine who should be treated for hepatitis C now that effective but wildly expensive drugs can all but cure the disease. Treating prison inmates is a good investment that would save money in the long run, a study finds.

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America's death penalty is under scrutiny after a series of botched executions, drug mix-ups and difficulty acquiring lethal injection drugs. Just last month, President Obama called certain parts of capital punishment "deeply troubling."

Some say long waits and repeated last-minute delays are tantamount to torture.

A look at the brain's wiring can often reveal whether a person has trouble staying focused, and even whether he or she has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, known as ADHD.

A team led by researchers at Yale University reports that they were able to identify many children and adolescents with ADHD by studying data on the strength of certain connections in their brains.

Board meetings for the Mendocino Coast District Hospital are usually pretty dismal affairs. The facility in remote Fort Bragg, Calif., has been running at a deficit for a decade and barely survived a recent bankruptcy.

But finally, in September, the report from the finance committee wasn't terrible. "This is probably the first good news that I've experienced since I've been here," said Dr. Bill Rohr, an orthopedic surgeon at the hospital for 11 years. "This is the first black ink that I've seen."

Diesel trucks used to be known for belching black, polluting exhaust. Over the years, manufacturers have worked hard to shed that image, building cleaner engines. But there's a small group of diesel truck owners who are going in the opposite direction.

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It's time to stop dancing around the issue. Thanksgiving food is trash. Sitting down to a standard Thanksgiving meal means negotiating between dry and bland or lukewarm and sticky. But it doesn't have to be. If there's one thing we learned the first time around, it's that Thanksgiving is all about "borrowing" from others.

A week after protests over racism at their school became the biggest story in the country, 300 students, faculty and community members marched through the University of Missouri, Columbia campus behind a banner that read "Mizzou United, Columbia United." Their goal: to keep talking about what's been going on here, and why.

One Of The World's Last Northern White Rhinos Has Died

Nov 23, 2015

A northern white rhinoceros named Nola was put down at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park on Sunday. With Nola's death, there are now only three northern white rhinos left on Earth, all living in the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya.

The 41-year-old rhino had been suffering from a bacterial infection and age-related health issues, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

Walk into popular clothing stores and you’ll find trendy garments embellished with Native American-inspired patterns. That kind of cultural borrowing raises questions and concerns about commodification for the community of contemporary, indigenous American fashion designers. For them, tribal symbols, imagery and materials go much deeper than the mass marketplace.

Mark Bertolini has been CEO of Connecticut-based health insurance provider Aetna since 2010, the year the Affordable Care Act was passed.

He talks with Here & Now’s Indira Lakshmanan about why premiums are going up next year, and also how his near-fatal skiing accident caused him to view healthcare and his own work culture differently. He now provides free yoga and meditation classes to all of his employees, as well as base minimum wage of $16 an hour.

The drug companies Pfizer and Allergan said today that they will merge, in a nearly $160 billion deal that would create the world’s biggest drug maker, and bring Botox and Viagra under one roof.

Allergan is based in Dublin, Ireland, and the joint company could reincorporate there – making it an inversion, and the biggest inversion ever. Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with CBS News’ Jill Schlesinger to understand what’s happening.

At least 16 people were injured when shooting suddenly broke out in a New Orleans park Sunday evening, police said.

Hundreds of people were gathered at Bunny Friend Playground in the city's Upper Ninth Ward to record a music video when two groups began firing at each other, according to the New Orleans Police Department.

None of the injuries was described as life-threatening.

A government watchdog says the Department of Homeland Security can't say for sure whether its system to detect a biological terror attack actually works.

In a report released Monday, the Government Accountability Office says the BioWatch system has issued dozens of false alarms since its introduction. It recommends that Homeland Security, which oversees the system, hold off any upgrades until the department can be sure of BioWatch's current capabilities.

As authorities conducted antiterrorism raids across Belgium, they asked residents not to tweet any information about their movements.

As we've reported, this is a serious situation in Belgium: Brussels has been essentially shut down and police have detained 21 people. Still, the Internet being the Internet, residents of Brussels — and the world — responded to the plea with pictures of cats.

Here are five tweets we found amusing from the #BrusselsLockdown hashtag:

Brussels will remain in a heightened state of security until at least Monday, the country's prime minister Charles Michel said.

Schools and universities will reopen Wednesday and the subway system will begin reopening on Wednesday too. Still, said Michel, the country is still facing a "serious and imminent" threat.

Since Sunday, authorities have been carrying out raids in an attempt to stop what they suspect is planned Paris-style terrorist attack on Belgium's capital city.

Mauricio Macri, the former mayor of Buenos Aires, will be the next president of Argentina, after a close election that brings the 12-year rule of the Peronist Party to an end.

As NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports, Macri's win sways the country to the right. Lourdes filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"This is a politically polarized country and it was a hotly contested race. For the first time ever in Argentina's history there was a second round of voting in a presidential election.

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