NPR News

Shots - Health News
1:48 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Child Abuse And Neglect Laws Aren't Being Enforced, Report Finds

Will Crocker Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:27 am

Laws intended to protect children from abuse and neglect are not being properly enforced, and the federal government is to blame. That's according to a study by the Children's Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law, which says children are suffering as a result.

The numbers are grim. Almost 680,000 children in the United States were the victims of abuse and neglect in 2013. More than 1,500 of them died.

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Parallels
1:37 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Russian Threats Expose Europe's Military Cutbacks

A soldier from the Swedish army participates in a military exercise at Hagshult Airbase in Sweden in November.
Jonathan Nackstrand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:27 am

An international cat-and-mouse game played out in the waters of Stockholm a few months ago.

The "mouse" was a foreign submarine — Russia is the main suspect — that got away.

And as Russia's military becomes more aggressive, European leaders fear they do not have the military power to deal with this new threat.

Take Sweden, for instance. Its days of military might are long gone.

The numbers tell the story, says Karlis Neretnieks, who used to run Sweden's National Defense College and has had a long career in the military.

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NPR Story
9:17 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Obama And Modi Aim To Strengthen U.S.-India Ties

U.S. President Barack Obama (center), Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (right) and Indian President Pranab Mukherjee (left) attend a reception at Rashtrapati Bhawan, the Presidential Palace, in New Delhi on January 26, 2015. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:58 pm

On a three-day visit to India, President Obama became the first American president to serve as guest of honor for India’s Republic Day, a major holiday marking when the country’s postpartition democratic Constitution came into force in 1950.

Meeting with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, both claimed breakthroughs on nuclear, environmental and defense negotiations.

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NPR Story
9:17 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Fuel Is Cheap, So Why Are Airfares High?

A U.S. Airways Airbus A320 airplane takes off from a runway at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Virginia, September 23, 2013. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:58 pm

This week could be a nightmare for anyone hoping to travel in or out of the Northeast. But when weather cooperates, it’s a great time for road trips, with oil prices at the lowest levels in years. It seems the same should be true for air travel. Not so.

Airlines are happy to keep prices high, because their customers just keep coming. Seth Kaplan of Airline Weekly joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.

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NPR Story
9:16 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Bloom Of Arab Spring Fades In Egypt

Egyptian protesters shout slogans during a demonstration against President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi and marking the fourth anniversary of the 2011 uprising, on January 25, 2015 in the capital Cairo. (Mohamed El- Shahed/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:58 pm

At least 18 people were killed in clashes with police over the weekend on the fourth anniversary of the revolution that ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. Dozens were injured and hundreds more arrested.

It’s the latest blow for the democracy movement that filled Cairo’s Tahrir Square in the early days of 2011.

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NPR Story
9:16 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

One Greek's View On The Election

The world is waiting to see how Greece's new Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras takes on the country's economic problems, but some locals don't believe he can deliver. (Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:58 pm

Christina Androulidaki owns an art gallery in Athens. She did not vote for the Syriza party because she’s not sure that Alexis Tsipras can live up to his promises to renegotiate the bailout. She joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the election.

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Carnegie Hall Live
9:16 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Carnegie Hall Live: The Chicago Symphony Plays A Colorful Concert

Riccardo Muti leading the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.
Todd Rosenberg Courtesy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 12:59 pm

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra arrives at Carnegie Hall with a program that portrays choppy waters and changing tides, opening with Mendelssohn's Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage Overture followed by Debussy's La mer.

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NPR Story
9:14 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

What's The Future Of The Euro In Greece?

Newly elected Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras has vowed to end austerity policies and renegotiate the country's debt, triggering questions about whether Greece will continue to use the Euro. (Danial Roland/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:58 pm

Greece’s Syriza party gained the key backing needed to form a government today, creating a surprise alliance with a small right-wing party that signals possible confrontation over the country’s bailout.

The right-wing Independent Greeks party said it would back Syriza leader Alexis Tsipras to be the next prime minister, after he fell just short of the majority needed to govern alone following Sunday’s poll.

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The Two-Way
7:37 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

New England Expected To Bear The Brunt Of Nor'easter

Snow falls around the Empire State Building in midtown Manhattan.
Patrick Sison AP

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 4:51 am

Updated: 3:25 a.m. ET Tuesday:

Along the East Coast, people are waiting to see what Mother Nature unleashes. Forecasters had predicted the storm could bring 1 to 3 feet of snow and hurricane-force winds. But early Tuesday morning, the National Weather Service downgraded some of the numbers. It says New England will get slammed the hardest but not as badly as had been expected.

Original Post:

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It's All Politics
6:21 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

The CBO's Good News, Bad News Economic Report

Congressional Budget Office Director Douglas W. Elmendorf holds a briefing for reporters on the CBO's updated budget and economic outlook on Monday on Capitol Hill.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 5:58 pm

The federal deficit is on track to its lowest level as a percentage of the economy since 2007, and the economy is stronger than expected.

That's the good news from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office's new economic outlook released Monday. "Economic activity will expand at a solid pace in 2015 and over the next few years — reducing the amount of underused resources, or 'slack,' in the economy," the report said.

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The Two-Way
6:20 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Argentina's President Dissolves Intelligence Agency, Citing Prosecutor's Death

Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez unveiled her plan to replace her country's intelligence service with a new agency. She delivered a televised speech while seated in a wheelchair in Buenos Aires.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 8:33 pm

One week after an Argentine prosecutor was found dead on the eve of his testimony about an alleged government cover-up of a terrorist attack, President Cristina Fernandez has announced the dissolution of her government's intelligence agency.

Fernandez said she plans to shut down the SI, the Secretariat of Intelligence, in favor of a newly created agency, the Federal Intelligence Agency. She said it's time to reform the intelligence service because the existing one "has not served the national interests."

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Latin America
5:45 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Argentina's President Says She Will Disband Intelligence Agency

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 8:15 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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U.S.
5:14 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Obama's Arctic Refuge Drill Ban Won't Change Much, For Now

A herd of caribou begins the long trek across the Arctic plains in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.
Peter Mather SN/Landov

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 10:14 am

President Obama says he will ask Congress to give wilderness status to protect more than 12 million acres of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The president announced his intention Sunday in a video, describing the area as a pristine habitat with abundant wildlife.

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The Two-Way
5:11 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Backed By U.S.-Led Coalition, Kurds Take Kobani From ISIS

Kurds in Istanbul wave the flags of the outlawed PKK on Monday after Kurdish fighters backed by U.S.-led airstrikes pushed the Islamic State group out of Kobani, Syria.
AP

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 10:12 am

Kurdish militiamen have wrested control of the Syrian town of Kobani from Islamic State militants, according to activists. Syrian-Kurdish refugees in neighboring Turkey have been celebrating the apparent liberation of their town.

Kobani represents the first instance that the U.S.-led coalition against the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, has openly coordinated with a local fighting force on the ground in Syria. Syrian-Kurdish militiamen bolstered by rebel Free Syrian Army battalions and Iraqi Kurdish peshmerga received airdrops of American weaponry and major air support.

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The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Jeffrey Sterling, Former CIA Officer, Is Convicted Of Espionage

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 6:28 pm

A former CIA officer who was accused of giving a journalist classified information about U.S. plans to spoil Iran's nuclear program has been convicted of espionage in federal court.

Jeffrey Sterling, 47, was officially fired from the CIA in 2002; he was indicted for espionage in 2011 and now faces the possibility of dozens of years in prison. He'll be sentenced in April.

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Shots - Health News
3:14 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Medicare Looks To Speed Up Pay For Quality Instead Of Volume

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:51 am

The Obama administration said Monday that it wants to speed up changes to Medicare so that within four years half of its traditional spending will go to doctors, hospitals and other providers that coordinate patient care.

The shift is being made to stress quality and frugality over payment by the procedure, test and visit.

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The Two-Way
2:42 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

An Asteroid Is Passing Very Close To Earth Today. Here's How To See It

Asteroid 2004 BL86 will be visible in parts of the sky tonight. Visibility is expected to peak around 9 p.m. ET, as shown in this NASA graphic.
Sky & Telescope

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 3:46 pm

By the time you read this post, asteroid 2004 BL86 will already have come as close to us as it's going to get as it flies by Earth. At about 11:19 a.m. ET today, it was nearly 745,000 miles away from our planet. That's only about three times the distance from the Earth to the moon.

But don't worry, you may still be able to catch a glimpse of the huge hunk of rock tonight.

When and how can I see the asteroid?

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U.S.
2:41 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Accused Bomber's Lawyers Say Boston Jury Pool Is Too Biased

A memorial at the site of the first explosion in the Boston Marathon bombing. Defense attorneys say too many people in the potential jury pool have some kind of personal connection to the case.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:02 am

The search for jurors in the case of accused Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is taking longer than expected.

Defense attorneys say it's nearly impossible to find open-minded, unbiased jurors around Boston. They're asking yet again for the judge to move the trial somewhere else.

From the beginning, defense attorneys have argued the entire jury pool has been poisoned by what they call "a narrative of guilt" from a "tidal wave" of media coverage. Now, Tsarnaev's lawyers say jurors' own comments on a court questionnaire prove widespread bias.

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It's All Politics
2:07 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

At Koch Summit, A Freewheeling Debate Among GOP Hopefuls

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., center, meets with members of the Londonderry Fish and Game Club in Litchfield, N.H., on Jan. 14. Paul was one of three GOP presidential hopefuls who attended Sunday's semiannual gathering of David and Charles Koch's donor network in California.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 5:52 pm

Three Republican presidential hopefuls declined Sunday night to insult some of the party's biggest donors.

Sens. Rand Paul of Kentucky, Marco Rubio of Florida and Ted Cruz of Texas, asked by debate moderator Jonathan Karl of ABC News if billionaires now have too much influence in both major parties, agreed that it wasn't a problem — if not exactly for the same reasons.

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Parallels
2:01 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Syrian Rebels Want To Fight Assad, But Now They'll Face ISIS

Free Syrian Army fighters run behind sandbags in Daraa Al-Mahata, in southern Syria, on Jan. 21. Many moderate rebels joined the uprising to fight against President Bashar Assad, but the U.S. plans to train them to fight the self-proclaimed Islamic State.
Wsam Almokdad Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 5:45 pm

In the U.S. view, the most serious threat coming from Syria is the self-styled Islamic State, or ISIS. That's why the Pentagon is sending forces to train what it terms moderate Syrian rebel fighters.

But here's the catch. Moderate rebel commanders say it will be hard to explain this mission to their troops, who took up arms with the aim of toppling Syrian President Bashar Assad, not ISIS.

The U.S. plan calls for the Americans and their allies to train and equip about 5,000 Syrian moderates. U.S. troops are heading to Turkey, Qatar and Saudi Arabia for the training.

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Animals
2:01 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

On The Ant Highway, There's Never A Backup

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 5:45 pm

A team of Indian physicists has made a mathematical model that purports to explain why ants don't have traffic jams. NPR's Joe Palca explains as part of his series, Joe's Big Idea.

This story originally aired on Morning Edition on January 19, 2015.

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Europe
2:01 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Looking At How Greece's New Government Will Fare In Eurozone

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 5:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Europe
2:01 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Greece's Left-Wing Prime Minister Takes Charge

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 5:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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The Salt
2:00 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Sandwich Monday: Girl Scout Cookie Coffeemate

Made with real Girl Scouts!
NPR

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 2:15 pm

Used to be, you had to briefly stop eating Girl Scout Cookies while you finished your morning cup of coffee. But no more. Coffeemate is now making Girl Scout Cookie-flavored creamer, so you can now ingest them 24 hours a day, so long as you can find a friend to shove them in your mouth while you sleep. We decided to sample the caramel and coconut version, which is basically a liquid form of Samoas.

Miles: This is better than the Boy Scout Cookie coffee creamer, which tastes like pinewood derby cars.

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NPR Story
1:58 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Snowy Owls 'Irrupting' In Northern States

A snowy owl is tagged with a transmitter. (Alan Richard)

For a second year in a row, a mass migration of snowy owls from Canada is occurring, and that’s highly unusual. It’s called an irruption and it’s thought to be related to boom and bust cycles of arctic lemmings, the small rodents that snowy owls love to eat.

Author and naturalist Scott Weidensaul is co-founder of Project SNOWstorm, which since last year has been using cellphone technology to track these mysterious and majestic birds.

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NPR Story
1:58 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

'Potentially Historic' Blizzard To Hit Northeast

The snow covered MBTA Griggs St/Long Ave subway stop sits empty on February 9, 2013 in Boston, Massachusetts. Boston officials have already said the subway will be closed on Tuesday in anticipation of a "potentially historic" storm. ( Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

Across the Northeast, people are gearing up for what forecasters say is likely to be a severe and “potentially historic” blizzard, in which snowfall could be measured in feet.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks to Peter Judge of the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency, about what the state is doing to prepare. Boston officials have already said public transportation will be closed on Tuesday

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NPR Story
1:58 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Limitations Of Winter Freeze Inspire Maine Chef

Executive Chef David Levi prepares turnips for dinner at Vinland in downtown Portland, Maine. (Peter O'Dowd)

Each year half of the fresh fruit in the United States – and a quarter of the fresh vegetables – are imported from another country. One of the motivations for the local food movement in the U.S.

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The Salt
12:54 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Tossing Out Food In The Trash? In Seattle, You'll Be Fined For That

Seattle garbage collector Anousone Sadettanh empties a small residential garbage bin into his truck in 2014. It is now illegal to toss out food with the trash in the city. Residents will get warning tags for now; the city will start imposing fines in July.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 2:38 pm

In Seattle, wasting food will now earn you a scarlet letter — well, a scarlet tag, to be more accurate.

The bright red tag, posted on a garbage bin, tells everyone who sees it that you've violated a new city law that makes it illegal to put food into trash cans.

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It's All Politics
11:57 am
Mon January 26, 2015

Abortion Vote Shows How Much Democrats' World Has Changed

Rep. Bart Stupak, D-Mich., announces he will vote to pass the health care reform bill after President Obama agreed to sign an executive order reaffirming the ban on the use of federal funds to provide abortions, March 21, 2010.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 6:25 am

This week, Congress returns with House leaders vowing to revisit the anti-abortion bill they pulled off the floor last week. The ban on abortions after 20 weeks was withdrawn when it appeared there weren't enough Republican votes to pass it.

Why did it need quite so many Republican votes? Because the GOP can no longer count on a contingent of Democrats to help out on abortion-related votes.

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The Two-Way
11:39 am
Mon January 26, 2015

U.S. Drone Strikes Target Suspected Al-Qaida Militants In Yemen

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 12:38 pm

A U.S. drone strike on suspected al-Qaida militants in Yemen killed at least three people, just days after the U.S.-backed government resigned in the face of an uprising by Shiite Houthi rebels, effectively leaving the country with no government.

The Associated Press reports that the strike, which occurred in the central province of Marib, targeted a vehicle carrying three men near the border with neighboring Shabwa province, an al-Qaida stronghold. The news agency also quoted an al-Qaida member as saying two of the slain fighters were Yemenis, one Saudi. Here's more:

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