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Climate Change Winners And Losers

Nov 27, 2015

It’s not just the polar bear that is suffering from climate change. Other animals are already seeing the effects of a warming planet, including habitat loss, food shortages and extreme weather conditions. While many species will suffer, some will do well and adapt to the changes.

Checking In On Greece's Debt Crisis

Nov 27, 2015

There has been good news for the Greek economy this week – $2 billion of good news. That was the latest infusion of bailout loans that Greece got this week.

Greece was cleared for that money after putting a number of reforms into place as part of a much larger bailout agreed to this summer, the third Greek bailout in recent years. Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti checks in on the Greek debt crisis with the BBC’s Andrew Walker.

Chicago Police say a 27-year-old man has been arrested and charged with first-degree murder in the fatal shooting this month of a 9-year-old boy on the city’s South Side.

Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy said at a news conference Friday that Corey Morgan of Chicago is in custody. He says the boy was killed as part of a dispute between warring gangs, and he pledged to obliterate the gangs.

The victim, Tyshawn Lee, was gunned down Nov. 2 in what police say was a targeted shooting.

In Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer‘s new book, he passionately argues that when issuing its rulings, the court must consider the world beyond our national frontiers.

There’s an obvious and immediate tension here. The court’s duty is to interpret the constitutionality of American law. Breyer’s critics would say any consideration of international issues, politics or law subverts the primacy of the U.S. Constitution.

Diya Abdo, a professor at Guilford College, has launched Every Campus a Refuge, a project that aims to get every college and university campus to host one Syrian refugee family. As Guilford College makes plans for a refugee family to move on campus, North Carolina's governor is now one of a couple dozen who have said they don't want Syrian refugees entering their states, citing security reasons. Abdo and the college are moving forward with the program, despite requests from state legislators to rescind their offer to refugees.

What To Expect At The Paris Climate Summit

Nov 27, 2015

World leaders from more than 190 nations will gather in Paris to try to forge a new global climate agreement. The United Nations conference begins on November 30 and end December 11.

Police say they are unsure about the location of a shooter in an attack near a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs that left three officers injured.

A witness says she heard as many as 20 shots in less than five minutes and saw an officer fall to the ground Friday during the shooting.

Denise Speller, manager of a nearby haircut salon, told The Gazette of Colorado Springs that she saw another officer kneel down to render aid to the officer who fell.

Books To Give As Gifts This Year

Nov 27, 2015

If you’re looking to give a book to a friend or family member this holiday, check out these recommendations from NPR Books editor Petra Mayer.

Updated 2:30 a.m. ET

A suspect is in custody in shootings at a Planned Parenthood in Colorado Springs, Colo., the city's mayor announced at a press conference Friday, and officers are actively checking the building for any additional suspects or devices.

"The situation has been resolved; there is no continuing peril to the citizens of Colorado Springs," Mayor John Suthers said.

Real estate mogul Donald Trump this week stood firm by his claim that he saw a crowd of Muslim-Americans cheering in New Jersey following the 9/11 terrorist attacks, even though several of Trump’s Republican rivals backed away from those comments this week.

Meantime, a new poll showed Texas Senator Ted Cruz surged to second just behind Trump in Iowa. And Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders courted the African-American vote in Georgia and South Carolina.

This year marks the centennial of the last log drives on the Connecticut River. From the late 1800s to the early 1900s, logs up to 30 feet long were floated 300 miles downriver to sawmills in Massachusetts and Connecticut to build the cities of 19th century New England.

Jon Kalish brought Here & Now this story about two Vermonters who are keeping the history alive by chronicling the history of the drives.

The rate of deforestation in Brazil has increased by 16 percent over the past year, the country's Environment Ministry announced.

Brazil has often declared progress in reducing the rate of deforestation in the Amazon, but the government's own figures, released Thursday, show the challenges still facing the country.

As France held a national ceremony Friday in homage to the victims of this month's terrorist attacks, President François Hollande called on his compatriots to display the French flag in their homes.

For many Americans, it's something they would instinctively do after such a national trauma. But the French have an entirely different relationship with their flag.

In France, the flag flies on public buildings and is often waved at sporting events, but it is not traditionally a symbol people personally embrace.

On Dec. 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Ala., bus to a white man. That act of protest and her arrest sparked one of the most famous civil rights actions in American history. Through the boycott, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. rose to national prominence, and the U.S. Supreme Court eventually outlawed segregation on public transportation.

Edit note: Since this story was first published, former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver was found guilty of taking nearly $4 million in bribes and kickbacks. We have updated the story to reflect this change.

Las Vegas has The Mob Museum. Washington, D.C., has the International Spy Museum. And if a concerned citizen has his way, there will be a Museum of Political Corruption in Albany, N.Y.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. On Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you three items.

From Edith Chapin, executive editor of NPR News:

A rocket piece, most likely from the unmanned SpaceX Falcon 9 that blew up after takeoff in June, was recovered off the Southwest coast of England near the Isles of Scilly.

France paid homage today to those who died in terrorist attacks in Paris two weeks ago. The names of the 130 people killed were read at a national memorial service at a historic military building in Paris called Les Invalides.

President Francois Hollande delivered a speech, saying France would continue to defend the values for which the victims were killed.

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Two years ago my mom fell at home and ended up being admitted to the ICU with four broken ribs and internal injuries. She was lucky. After two weeks in the hospital and a few more in a rehab unit she was back home, using her new blue walker to get around.

Robots Are Being Taught How To Say 'No'

Nov 27, 2015
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



And earlier this week, we heard from one of the world's most celebrated classical musicians. Itzhak Perlman was just 13 when he performed on the "Ed Sullivan Show" in 1958. And he says he's still getting better.

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It has become de rigueur to write about the woes of Thanksgiving-table political arguments. If you are unlucky enough to actually experience these, you may have noticed that the fights at the Thanksgiving table have grown more heated in recent years. That would make sense — after all, we keep hearing that Capitol Hill is growing more polarized (and, relatedly, paralyzed).

Copyright 2015 Prairie Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit

Sweet Name Of Kids' Clinic Gives Some People Heartburn

Nov 27, 2015

The name that UNC Health Care is giving its children's clinic in North Carolina has been raising a lot of eyebrows. The facility is slated to be renamed the Krispy Kreme Challenge Children's Specialty Clinic. But criticism from the medical community at the University of North Carolina and elsewhere is making the health care system rethink that choice.

First thing Friday morning, Bill Florence is getting his two kids, Chloe, 11, and Austen, 8, ready to head out the door.

"Did you guys brush your teeth?" he asks. "Yes," they moan.

Monday through Thursday, Chloe and Austen catch the bus to Peralta Trail Elementary School, but today, their dad scoots them into the family's silver Honda.

Conjuring images of a dystopia, the shroud of bad air blanketing New Delhi in recent weeks has intensified global pressure on India to curb its greenhouse gas emissions.

India will arrive at the climate change summit in Paris next week as the third biggest generator of fossil fuel pollution blamed for warming the planet, after China and the U.S.

Half of India's emissions come from burning coal. A visit to the coal-rich northeastern Indian state of Jharkhand reveals how this stands to get even worse.

Every year, the flu almost goes extinct in temperate places like the United States. The key word is "almost." It stays afloat by constantly moving.

"It looks like it's hopping between different cities and different populations," says Sarah Cobey, a computational biologist at the University of Chicago.

The virus does an annual migration across the world, hitting the Southern Hemisphere during its winter, the Northern Hemisphere right about now, and hanging out in the tropics in between — especially in parts of Asia.

Flu season is in swing and likely won't let up until April.

It seemed like high time to check in on how Americans feel about flu vaccination, so we asked more than 3,000 adults in the latest NPR-Truven Health Analytics Health Poll, conducted during the first half of October.

All told, 62 percent of people said they had been vaccinated or intended to get vaccinated against flu.