NPR News

Music
12:46 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

If Jim Lauderdale Is A Song, More People Should Hear It

Jim Lauderdale's new album is called I'm A Song, a title that suggests his deep
immersion in songwriting. His compositions have been covered by singers ranging from George Strait to Solomon Burke, from the Dixie Chicks to Elvis Costello. Since his debut album in 1991, he's recorded more than 25 albums for a variety of record companies, and I'm A Song contains a generous 20 songs. Rock critic Ken Tucker says Lauderdale's career is at once admirable and somewhat puzzling.

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The Salt
12:46 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Biologist Says Promoting Diversity Is Key To 'Keeping The Bees'

The decline of honeybees has been attributed to a variety of causes, from nasty parasites to the stress of being transported from state to state to feed on various crops in need of pollination.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 1:32 pm

Every year, more than half of the honeybee hives in the United States are taken to California to pollinate the state's almond crop.

Biologist Laurence Packer says this illustrates both our dependence on honeybees to pollinate many plants people rely on for food and the devastating decline in the domestic honeybee population in recent years.

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The Two-Way
12:17 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

What Happens When Israeli Mourners Visit A Palestinian Family

On Monday, Hussein Abu Khdeir, father of 16-year-old Palestinian Mohammed Abu Khdeir, held a photo of his son as he met with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank. On Tuesday, the Abu Khdeir family received Israeli guests who wanted to apologize for their loss.
Mohamad Torokman AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 1:30 pm

The family of slain Palestinian teenager Mohammed Abu Khdeir received condolences from an unlikely source Tuesday: Israelis who had asked to come and mourn with them.

The scene was predictably awkward, even painfully so. But as NPR's Ari Shapiro reported for today's Morning Edition, the visit also brought a moment of grace for many of those involved.

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The Two-Way
12:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Senate Confirms Julian Castro As Housing Secretary

Julian Castro was confirmed Wednesday to be the next secretary of Housing and Urban Development.
Kevin Dietsch UPI /Landov

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 2:06 pm

The Senate voted 71-26 on Wednesday to confirm San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro to head the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

All 26 no votes came from Republicans.

"Julian has lived the American dream in his own life, and I'm confident he will help Americans across our country seize their own piece of that dream for themselves and their children," President Obama said in a statement after the vote.

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Rivals Claim Victory In Indonesian Presidential Election

Indonesian presidential candidate Joko Widodo claimed victory on Wednesday.
Bagus Indahono EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 2:52 pm

Jakarta Gov. Joko Widodo, who entered national politics just two years ago, has claimed victory citing early results in the presidential election in Indonesia, the world's most-populous Muslim nation. But his main rival, former Gen. Prabowo Subianto, is refusing to concede.

"This is the victory of the whole Indonesian population!" Widodo said.

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Sports
10:29 am
Wed July 9, 2014

NFL Players Association Still Not Satisfied By Concussion Settlement

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
10:27 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Germany Widens Spy Investigation Reportedly Involving U.S.

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 1:00 pm

Germany is reportedly investigating a second spy case involving the U.S., just days after the arrest of a man who news reports say passed intelligence to the United States.

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Shots - Health News
10:08 am
Wed July 9, 2014

What Gets You Stressed? Tell Our Expert Panel

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 8:42 am

Editor's note: The webcast is over, but you can watch the archived video of the event.

For many Americans, stress is a constant and frequently overwhelming fact of daily life.

What are the biggest sources of stress? How does stress affect us? And what do we do in response?

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The Two-Way
10:04 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Flop Life: What If We All Acted Like We Were In The World Cup?

In a new video, people casually bump into one another in cafes and groceries, sparking histrionics like those seen in the World Cup.
YouTube

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 6:13 am

The flailing about, the protests, the sheer agony — what if everyone behaved like international soccer stars who can evidently be slammed to the ground by a fingertip?

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The Two-Way
9:43 am
Wed July 9, 2014

As Deadline Nears, Snowden Seeks To Extend His Stay In Russia

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 2:29 pm

Edward Snowden remains a fugitive from U.S. authorities over leaking secret documents about its surveillance programs. Now he's asking Russia to extend the one-year term of asylum the country granted the former NSA contract worker last summer.

Snowden's asylum, which was granted last August, is set to expire at the end of this month. His lawyer, Anatoly Kucherena, says they've filed papers for an extension.

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It's All Politics
9:42 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Why You Should Care Where The GOP Meets

Cleveland won the unanimous backing of a Republican National Committee panel on Tuesday, all but guaranteeing the GOP's 2016 presidential pick will accept the party's nomination in perennially hard-fought Ohio.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:58 am

The next Republican nominated for president will take the stage and wave to the crowd in ... wait for it ... Cleveland, Ohio.

That may shock you for any number of reasons, not least being that hardly anyone remembers the last time Cleveland hosted a national convention.

In fact, it was 1936, when the GOP went there to nominate a guy named Alf Landon, who carried exactly two states in November. It was the worst showing by a Republican nominee in U.S. history, which may have something to do with Cleveland's long wait for another try.

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The Two-Way
9:37 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Ex-New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin Gets 10 Years In Corruption Case

Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin leaves federal court after his conviction in New Orleans on Feb. 12. He was sentenced Wednesday to 10 years in prison.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 12:23 pm

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin was sentenced Wednesday to 10 years in prison for bribery, money laundering and other crimes.

He was convicted Feb. 12 of accepting hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes and kickbacks. The indictment included 21 counts.

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Politics
8:54 am
Wed July 9, 2014

What's Causing The Latest Immigration Crisis? A Brief Explainer

Demonstrators from opposing sides confront each other while being separated by police officers on July 4, outside a U.S. Border Patrol station in Murrieta, Calif.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 5:28 pm

It's turning into the largest influx of asylum seekers on U.S. soil since the 1980 Mariel boatlift out of Cuba.

Since October, more than 52,000 children — most from Central America and many of them unaccompanied by adults — have been taken into custody. That's nearly double last year's total and 10 times the number from 2009.

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The Two-Way
8:53 am
Wed July 9, 2014

5,000 Years Old: Ancient Yew Tree Identified In Wales

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 11:18 am

It might be the oldest tree in Britain. A yew tree that sprawls over a churchyard in Wales is more than 5,000 years old, according to experts. While it's not exceptionally tall, the tree has a wide canopy. And it dates back to the era of Egypt's pharaohs.

From NPR's London bureau, Rich Preston reports:

"The 60-foot-wide yew tree sits in the grounds of St Cynog's churchyard near Swansea in Wales. Recent DNA and ring-count testing shows the tree to be more than 5,000 years old — making it older than the Great Pyramid of Giza.

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The Two-Way
8:14 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Defending Tour De France Champ Froome Quits Race

Britain's Chris Froome gestures to a teammate (right) after getting up from his third crash in two days. Froome, who hurt his wrist in Tuesday's fall, has abandoned the race that he won in 2013.
Laurent Cipriani AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 12:32 pm

Chris Froome, who raced to the top of the podium in Paris last July, is out of this year's Tour de France after falling in treacherous conditions on today's stage of the bicycle race.

Today's stage had been predicted to be harrowing, owing to the course's inclusion of cobblestones. But Froome went down twice before the race even reached that point, leaving his riding kit torn on both thighs and one shoulder, where a bloody wound could be seen.

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Goats and Soda
7:56 am
Wed July 9, 2014

This Kenyan Runner Can't See But He Has A Far-Reaching Vision

Joseph Kibunja guides blind runner Henry Wanyoike (in sunglasses).
Ryan Kellman NPR

When Henry Wanyoike and Joseph Kibunja first started running, it was out of necessity. The childhood friends had no other way to travel the three miles from their Kenyan village to school. So they made the barefoot trek every day, in both directions, regardless of weather.

Thirty years later, Wanyoike and Kibunja are still running together, only now, they're headed to the finish lines of races around the world — and often getting there first.

Although Kenya is known for producing champion runners, the duo stands out: Wanyoike is blind and Kibunja serves as his guide.

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Goats and Soda
7:43 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Volunteer Recap: A Bumpy (And Itchy) Ride Through Tanzania

Nick Stadlberger in Africa.
Courtesy of Nick Stadlberger

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 1:44 pm

Nick Stadlberger, a fourth-year medical student at Dartmouth College spent four weeks this spring in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, working in the infectious disease ward at Muhimbili Hospital as part of his school's global health program.

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The Two-Way
7:19 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Brazil Reels From Thrashing That Bounced It From World Cup

A fan screams as she watches Brazil lose to Germany, in a live telecast Tuesday in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The host nation is reeling from its loss in the World Cup semifinal.
Bruno Magalhaes AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:45 am

"The worst game I saw in my life" is how one Brazilian fan describes it. Another says it's simply a tragedy. Some angry fans burned Brazil's flag in the street.

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Immigrants Sending Money Back Home Face Fewer Options

A customer stands at the counter at Unitransfer, a money transfer company at the Little Haiti neighborhood in Miami, Fla.
Wilfredo Lee AP

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 10:04 am

The giant remittances economy — which consists of folks, mainly immigrants, sending money across borders — has been expanding for years. In 2014, the World Bank expects that people will send $436 billion in remittances to developing countries (despite more deportations of migrant workers). And by 2016, the World Bank projects that global remittances will rise to $681 billion, with remittances to developing countries landing at $516 billion.

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The Two-Way
5:23 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Israel Continues Gaza Offensive, Hints At Ground Operation

Smoke and debris rise after an Israeli strike on the Gaza Strip Wednesday. Since the Gaza offensive began Tuesday, Israel has attacked more than 400 sites in Gaza.
Ariel Schalit AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 1:21 pm

Update at 2:42 p.m. ET

Israeli leaders are signaling that a ground invasion might be imminent as the offensive on Gaza intensifies, killing at least 53 people and wounding 465 others.

The toll comes from the Palestinian Authority's Health Ministry.

Reporter Daniel Estrin tells NPR's Newscast unit that Israel's military struck at least 200 Hamas targets on the second day of its offensive on the Gaza Strip. The operation is in response to rocket attacks from Gaza toward Israeli cities.

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Krulwich Wonders...
5:03 am
Wed July 9, 2014

A Tough Little Droplet Fights To Stick Around

Zach Heller Flickr

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 1:58 pm

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Book News & Features
4:58 am
Wed July 9, 2014

J.K. Rowling Posts New Harry Potter Short Story

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 7:45 am

Harry Potter is attending the Quidditch World Cup with his family, as well as Ron and Hermione. He is in his 30s, with "a couple of threads of silver" in his hair and a mysterious cut on his cheek.

Around the Nation
4:50 am
Wed July 9, 2014

iPhone From Oklahoma Ends Up In Grain Shipment To Japan

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 7:39 am

A Japanese worker found the phone and tracked down the American owner. Farmer Kevin Whitney recovered the phone, which had pictures of his daughter's wedding on it.

Afghanistan
3:06 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Afghan Civilians Suffer During Violent Year

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 6:01 am

There is renewed fighting in Kandahar as the outcome of the Afghan presidential election remains uncertain. And a new U.N. report says civilian casualties are up significantly from a year ago.

Sports
3:06 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Brazil Wakes Up To Find Tuesday's Nightmare Was Not A Dream

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 7:46 am

Host country Brazil was eliminated from the World Cup in epic fashion: Germany defeated Brazil 7-1 during the semifinal match. Brazilians are wondering how their beloved team could be so pulverized.

NPR Story
3:06 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Cleveland, A Democratic Stronghold, Wins GOP Convention

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 6:01 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. We do not know which Republican will accept the nomination for president in 2016. We do know where.

MONTAGNE: Cleveland is celebrating that honor. Republicans chose it over Dallas.

INSKEEP: Maybe Cleveland just won because it's in the swing state of Ohio, but however it happened, the city takes it as a sign of a comeback. Nick Castele reports from member station WCPN.

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All Tech Considered
2:22 am
Wed July 9, 2014

In Google Newsroom, Brazil Defeat Is Not A Headline

After the Brazil-Germany semifinal, Google's experimental newsroom focused on search trends that don't rub salt in Brazil's wounds.
Google

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 11:04 am

If you do a Google search on the World Cup game in which Germany slaughtered Brazil 7-1, the top results will say things like "destroy," "defeat," and "humiliate."

But Google itself is choosing to steer clear of negative terms. The company has created an experimental newsroom in San Francisco to monitor the World Cup, and turn popular search results into viral content. And they've got a clear editorial bias.

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Law
1:33 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Gay Teacher Files Sex Discrimination Claim Against Georgia School

Flint Dollar practices organ at First Presbyterian Church in Milledgeville, Ga. He's working there part time while he pursues a legal complaint against a private Catholic school that declined to renew his position after administrators learned he plans to marry his male partner.
Adam Ragusea Georgia Public Broadcasting

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 11:40 am

For the past four years, Flint Dollar has been teaching music at Mount de Sales Academy, a Catholic school in Macon, Ga. He is, by all accounts, beloved by his students.

But Dollar won't be leading the band or teaching the chorus in the fall. His contract was not renewed after administrators found out he plans to marry a man.

Under federal anti-discrimination laws, employers are not prohibited from hiring or firing people on the basis of sexual orientation. Dollar is working to change that.

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Law
1:32 am
Wed July 9, 2014

States Push For Prison Sentence Overhaul; Prosecutors Push Back

The Lafayette Parish Correctional Center in downtown Lafayette, La. By most counts, Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the country, but sentencing reformers have loosened some of the state's mandatory minimum sentences and made parole slightly easier to get.
Denny Culbert for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 6:01 am

Some red states like Louisiana and Texas have emerged as leaders in a new movement: to divert offenders from prisons and into drug treatment, work release and other incarceration alternatives.

By most counts, Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the country. In recent years, sentencing reformers in the capital, Baton Rouge, have loosened some mandatory minimum sentences and have made parole slightly easier for offenders to get.

But as reformers in Louisiana push for change, they're also running into stiffening resistance — especially from local prosecutors.

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Shots - Health News
1:32 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Like All Animals, We Need Stress. Just Not Too Much

Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 10:09 am

Ask somebody about stress, and you're likely to hear an outpouring about all the bad things that cause it — and the bad things that result. But if you ask a biologist, you'll hear that stress can be good.

In fact, it's essential.

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