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With a driving layup late in the second quarter against the Los Angeles Sparks Sunday evening, the Phoenix Mercury's Diana Taurasi became the WNBA's all-time leading scorer.

Otto Warmbier, a U.S. citizen who was freed last week after more than a year in North Korean detention, has died. Doctors who examined him after his return to said he had "extensive loss of tissue" in all parts of his brain.

Warmbier, 22, had been in a coma since coming home to the United States last week.

There's a good chance something you've bought online has been in the hands of a "picker" first. These are the workers in warehouses who pick, pack and ship all those things we're ordering.

The Supreme Court has agreed to hear a partisan gerrymandering case out of Wisconsin. It’s the first case of its kind to make it to the high court.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Emily Bazelon (@emilybazelon), staff writer at the New York Times Magazine and a fellow at Yale Law School, about the case’s significance.

On Friday, six members of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS resigned. In an op-ed published in Newsweek, council member Scott Schoettes wrote he and other members could no longer be effective serving a “president who simply does not care.”

Penn State is considering reforms to the school’s fraternities, after video tapes and an investigation showed that Beta Theta Pi pledge Timothy Piazza died after being forced to drink excessively.

For the second time in eight months, the fate of former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing is in the hands of a jury over the fatal shooting of black motorist Sam DuBose. A previous trial ended in a deadlocked panel, and a mistrial.

As in the earlier trial, Tensing, 27, faces murder and manslaughter charges over his killing of DuBose in July of 2015. The police officer had pulled DuBose over because the car he was driving was missing its front license plate.

As we reported last fall:

A man carrying guns and explosives died when he rammed a car into a police van Monday on Paris' famed Champs-Élysées in what officials characterize as a deliberate attack.

But upon collision, the car — and not the van — burst into flames, NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports from Paris. The man died even though police were able to extricate him from the burning car.

No officers or bystanders were hurt.

Police have arrested and charged a man in the murder of a Muslim teenaged girl who went missing early Sunday morning in northern Virginia. Authorities haven't released details of how Nabra Hassanen of Reston, Va., died but tweeted that they are not investigating the killing as a hate crime.

Russia says its missile systems in Syria will track everything in the air west of the Euphrates River as a potential target — including aircraft from the U.S.-led coalition — after the U.S. shot down a Syrian jet Sunday. U.S. officials say the aircraft had struck America's rebel allies.

Russia also says it will suspend its participation in a "deconfliction" line that was established to prevent inadvertent clashes when Russia began military operations in Syria's airspace 20 months ago.

In 2010, Sonia Vallabh watched her mom, Kamni Vallabh, die in a really horrible way.

First, her mom's memory started to go, then she lost the ability to reason. Sonia says it was like watching someone get unplugged from the world. By the end, it was as if she was stuck between being awake and asleep. She was confused and uncomfortable all the time.

"Even when awake, was she fully or was she really? And when asleep, was she really asleep?" says Sonia.

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to take up an appeal over electoral districts in Wisconsin after a lower court ruled that the state's Republican-drawn map constitutes an "unconstitutional partisan gerrymander."

It's the first time in more than a decade that the nation's highest court will take up the issue of partisan gerrymandering, or drawing voting districts with the aim of strengthening one political party.

Updated 4:01 PM ET Tuesday

Do you know where your workplace's automated external defibrillator is located? About half of all U.S. employees don't, according to the results of an American Heart Association survey.

"I'm afraid to say there are now 79 people that we believe are either dead" or presumed dead in London's Grenfell Tower fire, Metropolitan Police Cmdr. Stuart Cundy said Monday morning, in an update on the huge fire that overtook a 24-story building last week.

"Sadly, for many families, they have lost more than one family member," Cundy said. "This is an incredibly distressing time for all of them."

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You can tell a lot about a culture by its food, particularly if food is all that remains.

District Six was a mixed-race section of Cape Town, South Africa, that was home to Europeans, Asians, Africans, Christians, Muslims and Jews.

A half-century ago, District Six, which was just outside of downtown, was declared a whites-only area. By the early 1980s, 60,000 people had been forcibly removed from their homes.

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Photographer and journalist Katie Hayes Luke reported throughout the year on an innovative school for homeless children in Oklahoma City, Okla. We're not using the first names of students and family members to protect their privacy.

On the last day of school, the fifth grade students at Positive Tomorrows perform last-minute rehearsals for the inaugural "Classy Awards."

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Sonia Vallabh saw her mother die at age 52 from a rare disease that causes irreversible brain damage. Then Sonia learned she has inherited the genetic mutation that killed her mother. She and her husband quit their jobs and trained to become scientists. They're now racing against time to come up with a treatment that could save Sonia's life.

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President Trump did it again on Twitter late last week.

"I am being investigated for firing the FBI Director by the man who told me to fire the FBI Director! Witch Hunt," he tweeted Friday morning.

Once again, a Trump tweet set off a media frenzy, this time making everyone wonder whether he was indeed confirming that he was under investigation for obstruction of justice. (The White House later said the tweet was not confirmation that Trump has been informed that he is under investigation.)

How Could The Navy Destroyer Collision Happen?

Jun 19, 2017

The headline shocked the close-knit world of the surface Navy: Seven sailors aboard the destroyer USS Fitzgerald were killed, and other crew members injured, when the warship collided with a cargo vessel off Japan.

As the Navy family grieves, both it and the wider world are asking the same question: How did this happen?

Updated 4:10 a.m. ET

A van drove into pedestrians early Monday morning in north London, police say, in what they are investigating as a terrorist attack.

"One man was pronounced dead at the scene," the Metropolitan Police Service said in a statement. "Eight people injured were taken to three separate hospitals; two people were treated at the scene for minor injuries."

The U.S. military says it shot down a Syrian air force jet that dropped bombs near U.S.-backed forces in the fight against Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria.

According to a statement from the Pentagon, pro-Syrian regime forces attacked a Syrian Democratic Forces-controlled town West of Raqqa, the de facto ISIS capital the rebel fighters were trying to take back. The bombings wounded "a number of SDF fighters and driving the SDF from the town."

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