NPR News

Europe
3:04 am
Fri June 26, 2015

Migrants In French Camp Near English Channel Attempt To Get Into Britain

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 5:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
3:04 am
Fri June 26, 2015

Kosovo: The Pros And Cons Of Being Europe's Newest Country

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 5:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
3:00 am
Fri June 26, 2015

A Showdown Looms At South Korea's Gay Pride Parade

A religious activist is carried away by police after he tried to stop a gay pride parade in Seoul last year. Christian activists are planning to disrupt the parade again this year.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 7:40 am

In Seoul, a gay pride parade 15 years in the running is at the center of heated controversy between LGBT groups and Christian activists, who threaten to do what it takes to stop the marchers.

The growing visibility of South Korea's gays and lesbians has led to louder opposition from church groups in recent years, and this weekend's event has organizers preparing for confrontation.

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Race
2:57 am
Fri June 26, 2015

A Baltimore Civil Rights Icon Is Still Pushing To Help City's Young

Helena Hicks has remained active in Baltimore through eras of desegregation and the drug trade. Now she gives back to her childhood neighborhood, the same one where Freddie Gray lived.
Jennifer Ludden NPR

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 7:19 am

When I set out to interview Helena Hicks, I thought we'd talk history. The soft-spoken, 80-year-old who stands just 4 feet 10 inches tall with a sleek, silver bob, is known for her role in helping to desegregate Read's Drug Store chain. But it turns out she's as active as ever, a force to reckon with at any sense of injustice.

"My father taught me that 'you are somebody,' " she says. "If it's wrong, you do something about it."

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The Two-Way
8:14 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Not So Happy Hour For Beck's

Beck's beer has been brewed in Missouri since 2012.
Joerg Sarbach AP

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 10:44 am

Beck's, which used to call itself "America's favorite German beer," is going to have to be a little more clear about its provenance.

Since 2012, the beer, now a part of the same company that brings you Budweiser and Bud Light, has been brewed in Missouri.

But its packages still say things like "German Quality" and "Originated in Bremen, Germany."

A class-action lawsuit accuses the giant brewer Anheuser-Busch InBev of tricking American beer drinkers into believing that Beck's is still brewed abroad.

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The Two-Way
6:32 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Kentucky's Karl-Anthony Towns Is No. 1 NBA Draft Pick

Power forward Karl-Anthony Towns shakes hands with NBA Commissioner Adam Silver shortly after being taken first in the NBA Draft by the Minnesota Timberwolves.
Kathy Willens AP

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 1:26 am

The 2015 NBA Draft took place Thursday night in Brooklyn's Barclay Center. Karl-Anthony Towns from the University of Kentucky was the first pick, drafted by the Minnesota Timberwolves, a team that ended last season with a 16-66 record. Nineteen-year-old, 6-foot-11 Towns only played one year at Kentucky, but during that season was named a 2015 Second-Team All-American. He also helped lead Kentucky to the Final Four.

In an interview shortly after his pick, Towns told ESPN, "This is what you live for." He continued, "I'm coming with a winning attitude. I just want to win."

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It's All Politics
6:22 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Univision Cuts Ties With Trump After Comments About Immigrants

Donald Trump is just a week into his presidential bid, and he is in hot water over comments he made about a key voting bloc, Latinos.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 7:23 am

Following comments Donald Trump made about Mexican immigrants during his presidential announcement last week, Univision, the nation's largest Spanish-language TV network, has announced it is cutting ties with Trump and dropping plans to broadcast the Miss Universe Pageant.

Trump, the businessman and now-presidential candidate, co-owns the pageant.

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It's All Politics
5:17 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Supreme Court Thwarts Efforts To Put Obamacare On Life Support

At the heart of the case ruled on by the Supreme Court Thursday are the exchanges where people go online to shop for individual insurance.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 3:09 am

The U.S. Supreme Court handed the Obama administration a sweeping victory on Thursday, upholding the nationwide subsidies that are crucial to the president's health care law. By a 6-3 vote, the high court ruled that Congress meant all three major provisions of the law to apply to all states and to work in tandem.

The ruling was the court's second decision upholding the Affordable Care Act — three years ago, it upheld the law as constitutional.

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The Two-Way
4:02 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Lawmakers Put Brakes On Resolution To Ban Mississippi Flag From Capitol

The state flag of Mississippi is unfurled against the front of the Governor's Mansion in Jackson, Miss., on Tuesday. The flag has been the center of renewed controversy since last week's racially motivated shooting of nine parishioners at a black church in South Carolina.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 9:14 am

A proposed resolution to remove state flags containing any portion of the Confederate battle flag from the U.S. Capitol has been put on hold by House Republicans.

The measure, sponsored by Rep. Bennie Thompson, the only black member of Mississippi's congressional delegation, would authorize the Speaker of the House to remove any state flag that contained the Confederate symbol on the House side of the Capitol complex. Mississippi is the only state flag that would be affected.

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The Two-Way
3:58 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Oxford English Dictionary Adds New Words, Offers Clarity On Old Ones

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia unleashed colorful vocabulary against the court's support of Obamacare Thursday. The Oxford English Dictionary explains what he meant.
Brennan Linsley AP

Justice Antonin Scalia called on using old-time language on Thursday to express his contempt for the Supreme Court's ruling in favor of Obamacare. He called the majority opinion "jiggery pokery" and "pure applesauce."

Also Thursday, the editors of the Oxford English Dictionary added 500 entries, mostly of the new-fangled variety.

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The Salt
3:58 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Farewell, Low-Fat: Why Scientists Applaud Lifting A Ban On Fat

On the left, olive oil, which is low in saturated fat and high in monounsaturated fat, which may lower bad cholesterol levels. On the right, coconut oil, which is 90 percent saturated fat and may raise bad cholesterol levels.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 2:23 pm

There were plenty of tasty tidbits packed into the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee report that came out back in February.

As we reported, the panel of nutrition experts that wrote the report said it was OK to eat an egg a day. The scientific evidence now shows it won't raise the amount of LDL cholesterol – the bad kind of cholesterol — in your blood or raise the risk of heart disease.

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Parallels
3:50 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

U.S. Army Begins Training Ukrainian Soldiers

Ukrainian national guardsmen practice protecting and recovering wounded comrades as American military trainers watch.
Corey Flintoff NPR

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 1:11 pm

Fighting surged again this week in eastern Ukraine, where government troops are battling separatist militias and their Russian allies.

NATO is responding by sending troops and equipment to eastern Europe, and it's also giving defensive training to Ukraine's beleaguered army.

First, you need to know how bad things were for the Ukrainian army when separatist militias and their Russian allies began the fight in eastern Ukraine in April 2014.

Miroslav Gai volunteered for the army last winter.

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Goats and Soda
3:18 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

The Cycling World May Soon Bow Down Before Nairo Quintana

Colombian cyclist Nairo Quintana poses for a snapshot during a training session this month in Colombia.
LUIS ACOSTA AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 5:17 pm

He began biking to get to high school. The return trip was a 10-mile uphill slog. That didn't deter Nairo Quintana. Sometimes he'd even attach a cable to his sister's bike and haul her up the mountain with him.

And now some pundits think that the 25-year-old Colombian athlete could win the grueling, three-week Tour de France, which kicks off on July 4.

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Law
3:18 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

After Sandusky, A Debate Over Whether Sex-Abuse Law Goes Too Far

The Penn State University campus in State College, Pa. A new state law requires university professors to get a background check every three years and have their fingerprints taken.
Gene J. Puskar AP

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 6:13 pm

University professors in Pennsylvania are upset over a new law that requires them to get a child abuse background check every three years and have their fingerprints taken.

The law was passed after the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal. In 2012 Sandusky, a former Penn State assistant football coach, was convicted of sexually abusing 10 boys over a 15-year period. He'll likely spend the rest of his life in prison.

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Health Care
3:18 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Obamacare Ruling Moves Debate To Presidential Race, Rep. Tom Price Says

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 5:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Commentary
3:18 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Some Find It Difficult To Heed Calls For Racial Healing After Charleston, S.C.

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 5:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
3:18 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

For Poland's Gay Community, A Shift In Public Attitudes, If Not Laws

Marchers carried a multicolor flag during Warsaw's annual gay pride parade earlier this month. Poland prohibits gay marriage but activists say attitudes toward gays have improved in recent years.
Alik Keplicz AP

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 5:17 pm

Around the world, gay marriage is allowed in more than 20 countries. Many European Union nations are enhancing rights for their gay, bisexual and transgender citizens. But Catholic Poland isn't one of them.

This former Soviet satellite constitutionally restricts marriage to a man and a woman. Recent efforts to pass laws to protect the LGBT community in Poland from discrimination and violence have gone nowhere.

But there is one notable change these days — in Polish attitudes.

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The Two-Way
2:49 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

After Ben Affleck Scandal, PBS Postpones 'Finding Your Roots'

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 7:54 am

PBS has released details about an internal investigation that found that actor Ben Affleck exerted improper influence by requesting that the show Finding Your Roots hide details of a slave-owning ancestor in his family tree.

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Shots - Health News
1:58 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

California Law To Curtail Vaccine Exemptions Clears Hurdle

A box of vaccine vials sits on a table during a Solano County health fair in 2010 in Vallejo, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 2:41 pm

The controversial bill that would require almost all children entering day care or school in California to be vaccinated crossed another key hurdle Thursday, as the state Assembly approved it by a vote of 46-30.

The bill, SB 277, now returns to the state Senate, where lawmakers will be asked to concur with amendments made in the Assembly.

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Study Reveals What Happens During A 'Glacial Earthquake'

One of the 20 GPS sensors deployed on Greenland's Helheim Glacier to track its movement.
Alistair Everett/Swansea University

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 5:35 am

When giant icebergs break off of huge, fast-moving glaciers, they essentially push back on those rivers of ice and temporarily reverse the flow.

That's according to a new study of "glacial earthquakes," an unusual kind of temblor discovered just over a decade ago.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Wild Animal Selfies Lead To Injuries, Charges

When people take selfies with wild animals, they may be putting themselves or the animals at risk. (jentwen/Instagram)

More and more people are putting themselves and wild animals in danger, all in the name of a cool selfie. The trend of taking exciting selfies and videos has resulted in injured animals and animal harassment charges for the humans involved.

Vicki Croke, host of WBUR’s The Wild Life blog joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about the abuse of animals in pursuit of a good selfie.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Social Media Buzz: From #Charleston To #SCOTUS

Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Julia Turner, editor-in-chief of Slate, about what’s trending on social media.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

California Lawmakers Pass Bill Requiring Vaccines For School Entry

Christy Pritchard carries her son, Zachary, 3, as she waits to appear before the Assembly Health Committee to voice her opposition to a measure mandating that schoolchildren be vaccinated at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, June 9, 2015. (Rich Pedroncelli/AP)

The California State Assembly has passed a bill that would require all children – except for those with medical wavers – to receive vaccinations before attending school. Current law allows for personal belief exemptions.

Many California parents choose not to vaccinate their children out of fear that it will cause autism or other medical problems, but medical professionals assert that there is no risk of such side effects.

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The Two-Way
1:27 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

California Lawmakers Vote To Remove Vaccine Exemptions For Schoolchildren

Leukemia survivor Rhett Krawitt, 7, carries a box of petitions representing more than 30,000 people supporting a measure requiring nearly all California schoolchildren to be vaccinated. He took them to the governor's office at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., on Wednesday. The state Assembly voted Thursday to remove so-called "personal belief exemptions" for immunizations.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 3:37 pm

The California Assembly has joined the state Senate in voting to approve a controversial bill requiring all children attending school to be vaccinated against measles and other common, preventable illnesses — effectively eliminating so-called "personal belief exemptions" that allowed parents to opt out.

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Environment
1:24 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

How A Historical Blunder Helped Create The Water Crisis In The West

A bathtub ring marks the high-water line on Nevada's Lake Mead, which is on the Colorado River, in 2013.
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 2:57 pm

In 1922, seven Western states — Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming and California — drew up an agreement on how to divide the waters of the Colorado River. But there was one big problem with the plan: They overestimated how much water the river could provide.

As a result, each state was promised more water than actually exists. This miscalculation — and the subsequent mismanagement of water resources in those states — has created a water crisis that now affects nearly 40 million Americans.

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Music Reviews
1:24 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Leon Bridges Offers Retro R&B With A Twist In 'Coming Home'

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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The Two-Way
1:15 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Tama, The Cat That Saved A Japanese Train Station, Dies

Tama had held sway as stationmaster of the Kishi train station since 2007.
Toru Yamanaka AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 1:35 pm

A calico cat in southeastern Japan has left some big paw prints to fill. Tama, who served as "stationmaster" of the Kishi train station near Wakayama City, died Monday from acute heart failure, according to CNN. She was 16 (about 80 in cat years), the network reports.

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The Two-Way
12:19 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Haven't Found The Gown? The GSA Can Help With That

Pallas Athena Wedding Gown, Size: 6, Pearl/Sequin Beading. Color:Ivory (Lot 25)
U.S. General Services Administration

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 6:15 pm

The government wants you to say yes to the dress.

It's auctioning off the contents of a bridal shop in Juneau, Alaska, that were seized by the U.S. Marshals service after the owner was sentenced for her role in a drug trafficking conspiracy.

Prospective brides can find gowns, women's and men's formalwear, and even a 3-carat diamond and platinum engagement ring.

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It's All Politics
12:10 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Christie To Announce Tuesday That He's Running For President

Gov. Chris Christie, R-N.J., will announce Tuesday that he is running for president.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 6:00 pm

This post was updated at 7:34 pm ET to reflect comment from Christie.

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The Two-Way
12:01 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Pope: Sometimes Marital Separation 'Morally Necessary'

Nuns greet Pope Francis as he arrives to lead the weekly audience in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican on Thursday. The pope, speaking at his weekly general audience, said sometimes separation is "morally necessary."
Tony Gentile Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 3:26 pm

Pope Francis, speaking on family issues, says that sometimes marriages are so damaged that it is "morally necessary" for a husband and wife to separate.

"There are cases in which separation is inevitable," the pontiff said at his weekly general audience. "Sometimes it can become even morally necessary, precisely when it comes to subtracting the weaker spouse, or small children, from more serious injuries caused by arrogance and violence, by humiliation and exploitation ... and by indifference."

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