NPR News

The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Study Reveals What Happens During A 'Glacial Earthquake'

One of the 20 GPS sensors deployed on Greenland's Helheim Glacier to track its movement.
Alistair Everett/Swansea University

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 5:35 am

When giant icebergs break off of huge, fast-moving glaciers, they essentially push back on those rivers of ice and temporarily reverse the flow.

That's according to a new study of "glacial earthquakes," an unusual kind of temblor discovered just over a decade ago.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Wild Animal Selfies Lead To Injuries, Charges

When people take selfies with wild animals, they may be putting themselves or the animals at risk. (jentwen/Instagram)

More and more people are putting themselves and wild animals in danger, all in the name of a cool selfie. The trend of taking exciting selfies and videos has resulted in injured animals and animal harassment charges for the humans involved.

Vicki Croke, host of WBUR’s The Wild Life blog joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about the abuse of animals in pursuit of a good selfie.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Social Media Buzz: From #Charleston To #SCOTUS

Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Julia Turner, editor-in-chief of Slate, about what’s trending on social media.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

California Lawmakers Pass Bill Requiring Vaccines For School Entry

Christy Pritchard carries her son, Zachary, 3, as she waits to appear before the Assembly Health Committee to voice her opposition to a measure mandating that schoolchildren be vaccinated at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, June 9, 2015. (Rich Pedroncelli/AP)

The California State Assembly has passed a bill that would require all children – except for those with medical wavers – to receive vaccinations before attending school. Current law allows for personal belief exemptions.

Many California parents choose not to vaccinate their children out of fear that it will cause autism or other medical problems, but medical professionals assert that there is no risk of such side effects.

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The Two-Way
1:27 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

California Lawmakers Vote To Remove Vaccine Exemptions For Schoolchildren

Leukemia survivor Rhett Krawitt, 7, carries a box of petitions representing more than 30,000 people supporting a measure requiring nearly all California schoolchildren to be vaccinated. He took them to the governor's office at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., on Wednesday. The state Assembly voted Thursday to remove so-called "personal belief exemptions" for immunizations.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 3:37 pm

The California Assembly has joined the state Senate in voting to approve a controversial bill requiring all children attending school to be vaccinated against measles and other common, preventable illnesses — effectively eliminating so-called "personal belief exemptions" that allowed parents to opt out.

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Environment
1:24 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

How A Historical Blunder Helped Create The Water Crisis In The West

A bathtub ring marks the high-water line on Nevada's Lake Mead, which is on the Colorado River, in 2013.
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 2:57 pm

In 1922, seven Western states — Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming and California — drew up an agreement on how to divide the waters of the Colorado River. But there was one big problem with the plan: They overestimated how much water the river could provide.

As a result, each state was promised more water than actually exists. This miscalculation — and the subsequent mismanagement of water resources in those states — has created a water crisis that now affects nearly 40 million Americans.

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Music Reviews
1:24 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Leon Bridges Offers Retro R&B With A Twist In 'Coming Home'

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The Two-Way
1:15 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Tama, The Cat That Saved A Japanese Train Station, Dies

Tama had held sway as stationmaster of the Kishi train station since 2007.
Toru Yamanaka AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 1:35 pm

A calico cat in southeastern Japan has left some big paw prints to fill. Tama, who served as "stationmaster" of the Kishi train station near Wakayama City, died Monday from acute heart failure, according to CNN. She was 16 (about 80 in cat years), the network reports.

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The Two-Way
12:19 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Haven't Found The Gown? The GSA Can Help With That

Pallas Athena Wedding Gown, Size: 6, Pearl/Sequin Beading. Color:Ivory (Lot 25)
U.S. General Services Administration

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 6:15 pm

The government wants you to say yes to the dress.

It's auctioning off the contents of a bridal shop in Juneau, Alaska, that were seized by the U.S. Marshals service after the owner was sentenced for her role in a drug trafficking conspiracy.

Prospective brides can find gowns, women's and men's formalwear, and even a 3-carat diamond and platinum engagement ring.

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It's All Politics
12:10 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Christie To Announce Tuesday That He's Running For President

Gov. Chris Christie, R-N.J., will announce Tuesday that he is running for president.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 6:00 pm

This post was updated at 7:34 pm ET to reflect comment from Christie.

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The Two-Way
12:01 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Pope: Sometimes Marital Separation 'Morally Necessary'

Nuns greet Pope Francis as he arrives to lead the weekly audience in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican on Thursday. The pope, speaking at his weekly general audience, said sometimes separation is "morally necessary."
Tony Gentile Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 3:26 pm

Pope Francis, speaking on family issues, says that sometimes marriages are so damaged that it is "morally necessary" for a husband and wife to separate.

"There are cases in which separation is inevitable," the pontiff said at his weekly general audience. "Sometimes it can become even morally necessary, precisely when it comes to subtracting the weaker spouse, or small children, from more serious injuries caused by arrogance and violence, by humiliation and exploitation ... and by indifference."

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Shots - Health News
11:32 am
Thu June 25, 2015

With More People Quitting Smoking, Do We Need E-Cigarettes?

E-cigarettes are marketed as a safer way to inhale nicotine, but the evidence remains unclear on benefits and harms.
Nam Y. Huh AP

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 2:41 pm

Once a smoker always a smoker, right? Not quite.

As the number of smokers drops, the remaining smokers actually smoke less and are more likely to quit, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Tobacco Control.

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It's All Politics
11:27 am
Thu June 25, 2015

Sanders: 'My Goal Right Now Is To Win This Election'

In an interview with Morning Edition host David Greene, Sen. Bernie Sanders discussed foreign policy, racial tension and his 2016 chances.
Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 2:06 pm

Since entering the race for president, Vermont independent Sen. Bernie Sanders has been on the rise against Hillary Clinton, staking out a position as a liberal alternative to the Democratic front-runner.

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The Two-Way
10:31 am
Thu June 25, 2015

Takeaways From The Supreme Court's Obamacare Opinion

We are reporting today on the Supreme Court's 6-3 decision to uphold the nationwide subsidies called for in the Affordable Care Act. The court's majority opinion was written by Chief Justice John Roberts, who was joined by the court's liberal justices, as well as Justice Anthony Kennedy.

The Majority's Rationale

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The Two-Way
10:26 am
Thu June 25, 2015

In Fair Housing Act Case, Supreme Court Backs 'Disparate Impact' Claims

The Supreme Court handed a victory to the Obama administration and civil rights groups on Thursday when, by a 5-4 decision, it upheld a key tool used for more than four decades to fight housing discrimination.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 10:06 am

Civil rights groups won a victory Thursday, as the Supreme Court ruled that claims of racial discrimination in housing cases shouldn't be limited by questions of intent.

The court affirmed a Court of Appeals decision in a case in which a nonprofit group, the Inclusive Communities Project, said that the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs had contributed to "segregated housing patterns by allocating too many tax credits to housing in predominantly black inner-city areas and too few in predominantly white suburban neighborhoods."

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News
10:16 am
Thu June 25, 2015

Obama Addresses Supreme Court Ruling Upholding Subsidies

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Law
10:16 am
Thu June 25, 2015

An Opponent's View On Supreme Court's Health Care Ruling

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It's All Politics
10:06 am
Thu June 25, 2015

'Judicial Tyranny' To 'A Great Day,' Candidates React To Health Care Ruling

"Today's decision only reinforces why we need a president who will bring about real reform," Sen. Ted Cruz said Thursday.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 12:49 pm

Following the Supreme Court health care ruling to uphold subsidies nationwide, President Obama said Thursday that the Affordable Care Act is "here to stay."

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The Two-Way
9:51 am
Thu June 25, 2015

Obama: Affordable Care Act Is 'Here To Stay'

President Obama delivers remarks in the Rose Garden after the U.S. Supreme Court's 6-3 ruling to uphold the nationwide availability of tax subsidies that are crucial to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.
Gary Cameron Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 11:28 am

Updated at 1:25 p.m. ET

President Obama, commenting on the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling today to uphold a key provision of his signature health care law, said after numerous challenges, the Affordable Care Act has been "woven into the fabric of America" and "is here to stay."

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The Two-Way
9:28 am
Thu June 25, 2015

'SCOTUSCare': Justice Scalia Issues Withering Dissent On Obamacare Subsidies

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia speaks to an audience last year at the University of Colorado in Boulder, Colo.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 11:57 am

We are reporting today on the Supreme Court's 6-3 decision to uphold the nationwide subsidies called for in the Affordable Care Act. One of the three justices who opposed the ruling was Justice Antonin Scalia, who issued a strong dissent.

Here are some highlights:

'SCOTUSCare'

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Shots - Health News
9:21 am
Thu June 25, 2015

Supreme Court Upholds Obamacare Subsidies

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act cheer outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., after a majority on the court ruled that Obamacare tax credits can continue to go to residents of any state.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 2:41 pm

The Affordable Care Act survived its second Supreme Court test in three years, raising odds for its survival but by no means ending the legal and political assaults on it five years after it became law.

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Law
9:21 am
Thu June 25, 2015

In Win For White House, Supreme Court Upholds Obamacare Subsidies Nationwide

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 10:01 am

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Law
9:19 am
Thu June 25, 2015

Breaking Down The Supreme Court Ruling On Obamacare Subsidies

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 10:17 am

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The Two-Way
8:33 am
Thu June 25, 2015

'Stealthy' Giant Rhea Eludes Police In U.K.

The female partner of the missing rhea bird that has been on the loose from a private collection in Carlton-in-Lindrick near Worksop, Nottinghamshire, U.K.
Joe Giddens PA Photos/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 11:45 am

The giant ostrich-like rhea, despite its largely useless vestigial wings, seems to be something of a flight risk.

Last year, we brought you the story of one of the birds — native to South America — that escaped from a farm in the U.K., startling cyclists and otherwise wreaking mayhem in the English countryside.

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Shots - Health News
8:03 am
Thu June 25, 2015

Most Dialysis Patients Aren't Receiving The Best Treatment

When kidneys fail to cleanse the blood, dialysis is often the solution. But the odds for success over the long haul depend in no small measure on the details of how the dialysis machinery is connected to the patient.
Mehau Kulyk Science Source

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 2:07 pm

For the past 20 years, doctors have recommended that dialysis patients have a simple operation to make it safer and easier to connect to a machine that cleans their blood.

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The Two-Way
7:04 am
Thu June 25, 2015

ISIS Launches Push To Retake Border Town Of Kobani

Civilians, reportedly wounded by fighting in Kobani, wait with their relatives to cross into Turkey at the Syrian-Turkish border crossing of Tel Abyad, Syria, on Thursday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 11:16 am

Islamic State fighters, who were ousted from the Kurdish border town of Kobani in January, have launched an offensive to recapture the Syrian city — setting off car bombs as a prelude to an attack, NPR's Deborah Amos reports.

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The Two-Way
6:51 am
Thu June 25, 2015

Funerals Begin For Those Slain At Emanuel AME Church

The casket holding Ethel Lance, who was killed during the shooting at Emanuel AME Church, is on view before her funeral at the Royal Missionary Baptist Church in North Charleston, S.C., on Thursday.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 9:44 am

Mourners will gather in South Carolina on Thursday for the funerals of the Rev. Sharonda Coleman-Singleton and Ethel Lance, two of the nine people who were killed during a Bible study meeting in Charleston last week.

Both Coleman-Singleton, 45, and Lance, 70, were integral members of Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, where police say a white gunman attacked last week with the stated intention of killing black people. The case is being investigated as a hate crime.

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Around the Nation
5:42 am
Thu June 25, 2015

2nd Prison Worker Arrested In Connection With Helping Escaped Killers

Clinton Correctional Facility officer Gene Palmer, 57, is seen in a picture released by the New York State Police. Palmer was arrested on Wednesday in connection with the escape of two convicted murderers who have eluded a massive manhunt for almost three weeks, police said.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 10:01 am

Clinton County prosecutor Andrew Wylie told reporters late Wednesday night that Gene Palmer carried into the prison frozen patties of hamburger meat that may have had saw blades and drill bits stuffed inside.

The guard also allegedly showed convicted killers Richard Matt and David Sweat a utility catwalk area behind their cells, which the inmates later used as part of their escape.

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Animals
5:23 am
Thu June 25, 2015

Flamingo Gets A New Leg; Goldfish Gone Wild

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 10:01 am

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Around the Nation
5:10 am
Thu June 25, 2015

Cleveland Indians Manager Is A Big Fan Of Popsicles

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 10:01 am

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