NPR News

Parallels
2:43 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Iraq's Artists Defy Extremists With Bows, Brushes And A Low Profile

The Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra performs in Baghdad. The concert was promoted by word of mouth to avoid being targeted by bombs.
Graham Smith NPR

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 5:00 pm

It's a hot night in Baghdad, and the national theater is packed with people who are here to see the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra.

They're fanning themselves with programs that show conductor Karim Wasfi, a striking man with thick eyebrows and a pointed beard, playing the cello. Tonight, he'll be conducting for the first time in more than a year.

Iraq has been in the headlines lately, with extremists taking over parts of the country, American airstrikes, the militias and the politics.

But the country was once a sophisticated center for learning and the arts.

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Parallels
2:34 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Scotland's Really Big Vote: Can Women Join St. Andrews Golf Club?

The clubhouse of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews sits just off the first tee. The course itself is open to the public — women as well as men. But women have never been allowed to join the club since its founding in 1754, and are not allowed to enter the clubhouse, even as guests.
Doug Tribou NPR

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 3:11 pm

Not long after the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews was founded in 1754, the members trimmed the local course from 22 holes to 18, setting the modern standard.

During the 20th century, the club was one of two groups that set the game's rules. Golf has changed a lot in the past 260 years, but one thing is the same: All of the Royal and Ancient's members are men.

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All Tech Considered
2:34 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Smartphones Are Used To Stalk, Control Domestic Abuse Victims

Cyberstalking victims often don't know they're being tracked through their own phone because spyware apps like mSpy use misleading labels (labeled "android.sys.process" here) and don't take up much data.
Aarti Shahani NPR

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 8:40 am

We've looked a lot at privacy from the Big Brother standpoint: how the National Security Agency or corporate giants like Google track us online, say for political reasons or to make money from ads.

But there's another kind of privacy concern that is a lot more intimate. You could call it Little Brother, though it's really more like husbands and wives, lovers and exes who secretly watch their partners — from a distance. They are cyberstalking — using digital tools that are a lot cheaper than hiring a private detective.

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Global Health
2:34 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Could Ebola Become As Contagious As The Flu?

Medical workers at the John F. Kennedy Medical Center in Monrovia, Liberia, put on their protective suits before going to the high-risk area of the hospital, where Ebola patients are being treated, Sept. 3.
Dominique Faget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 3:10 pm

Back in August, scientists reported that the Ebola virus is mutating during this epidemic.

When a virus spreads between people and reproduces, it copies its genetic code in a sloppy way. So there can be unpredictable changes.

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Code Switch
2:34 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Alain Locke, Whose Ashes Were Found In University Archives, Is Buried

Alain Locke is buried at the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. He lies near many of the nation's early congressmen and next to the first director of the Smithsonian's Museum of African Art.
Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 8:02 am

Inside the cemetery, beneath the stained glass, the chapel is full. Mourners line the walls and spill out the door into the rainy day.

About 150 people are gathered for the funeral of a man who died 60 years ago.

Author and philosopher Alain Locke is widely known as the father of the Harlem Renaissance. He inspired Martin Luther King Jr., who praised him as an intellectual leader on par with Plato and Aristotle.

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Shots - Health News
2:28 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Key Brain Connection Slow To Develop In Kids With ADHD

Maps of connections in the brain are helping researchers better understand attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Courtesy of Chandra Sripada/University of Michigan

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 6:57 am

Scientists analyzing data from a map of connections inside the human brain have gained new insights into the development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

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The Two-Way
1:46 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Minnesota Vikings Reinstate Peterson, Who Says He's Not A Child Abuser

Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, seen here at a practice in late May, has been reinstated after he was benched over alleged child abuse.
Andy Clayton-King AP

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 1:27 am

Days after he was arrested and benched over charges that he abused his 4-year-old son by punishing him with a wooden switch, NFL star running back Adrian Peterson has been reinstated. The Minnesota Vikings announced the move Monday, as Peterson released a statement defending himself.

Peterson did not go into detail about his actions. Instead, he said, "I want everyone to understand how sorry I feel about the hurt I have brought to my child."

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The Two-Way
1:30 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Cameron And The Queen Speak Out On Scotland's Independence Vote

People gather in London's Trafalgar Square on Monday for a rally urging Scotland to stay with the U.K. Polls are showing that the "yes" and "no" camps are neck and neck.
Andrew Cowie EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 1:36 pm

With voter opinion polls showing single-digit margins over the call for Scotland to break away from the U.K., two of England's most visible leaders — Prime Minister David Cameron and Queen Elizabeth II — are speaking about the issue. Today, Cameron told Scots not to vote out of frustration, saying, "If you don't like me, I won't be here forever."

Cameron spoke one day after a rally for Scottish independence, and a day after the queen briefly addressed an issue on which she has been publicly silent. Voters in Scotland will decide the issue on Thursday, Sept. 18.

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NPR Story
1:29 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

HBO's New Documentary Captures Terror On Film

It seemed like just a normal, busy shopping day on September 21, 2013 at the West Gate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya.

Everything suddenly changed when four men from the terrorist group Al Shabab attacked the mall with high-powered weapons. The attack went on for hours and more than 60 people were killed. Nearly all of the carnage was captured on security cameras.

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NPR Story
1:29 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Frustration Over Fracking Could Play Role In November Elections

Anti-fracking activist Kaye Fissinger gestures out to a reservoir near her community of Longmont where oil and gas companies are looking to drill.(Brian Gill/Inside Energy)

Communities in Colorado have been engaged in a political fight with the state to get more local control over oil and gas drilling.

It's a battle many thought was heading to the ballot box this November, until a last minute compromise stopped the initiative in its tracks.

Colorado’s governor John Hickenlooper declared the compromise a victory, but that left some members of the state’s environmental community furious and vowing payback on election day.

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NPR Story
1:29 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Baja Coast Gets Pummeled By Hurricane Odile

Winds blow palm trees on the beach in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. (Victor R. Caivano/AP)

Residents and tourists hunkered down in shelters and hotel conference rooms overnight as a powerful and sprawling Hurricane Odile made landfall on the southern Baja California peninsula.

The area is home to gleaming megaresorts, tiny fishing communities and low-lying neighborhoods of flimsy homes. Forecasters predicted a dangerous storm surge with large waves as well as drenching rains capable of causing landslides and flash floods.

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The Two-Way
11:33 am
Mon September 15, 2014

500 Migrants Feared Dead After Boat Sinks In Mediterranean

An Armed Forces of Malta ship carrying rescued migrants arrives at an AFM base in Valletta last October. The number of migrants trying to make their way from the North African coast to European waters has ballooned in recent years.
Darrin Zammit Lupi Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 1:09 pm

Some 500 migrants trying to make their way from Egypt to Malta by boat are believed to have drowned last week after people smugglers reportedly rammed and sank their vessel, according to the International Organization for Migration.

The IOM report is based on reports from the few survivors of the tragedy who say the group of Syrians, Palestinians, Egyptians and Sudanese had hoped to eventually reach Europe.

In a separate incident, some 70 Libyans were feared drowned in a similar tragedy involving the sinking of a migrant boat.

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Remembrances
11:16 am
Mon September 15, 2014

'Fresh Air' Remembers Pulitzer-Prize Winning Editorial Cartoonist Tony Auth

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 12:19 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Music
11:16 am
Mon September 15, 2014

For Duo Tennis, Pop Is A Natural Language

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 12:19 pm

Can you re-invent lively pop from the distant past? Fresh Air music critic Milo Miles says the songwriting team Tennis does just that with their new third album, Ritual in Repeat.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:03 am
Mon September 15, 2014

'Nude' Or Not, Women's Cycling Team Uniform Makes Waves

This photo of a women's pro cycling team from Colombia raised both eyebrows and the question of who designed the uniforms. One of the team's riders reportedly created the design.
UltimoKilometro

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 12:46 pm

If one goal of the uniforms for a women's cycling team from Colombia is to attract attention, they're a smashing success.

Some observers are calling the outfits — which in photos seem to feature a swatch of flesh-tone-colored fabric in their lower region — "rude," "wrong" and a "disaster." But others are defending the uniform and the cyclists who wear it, saying the criticism is entirely sensationalized.

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The Two-Way
10:04 am
Mon September 15, 2014

European Scientists Choose Site For Rosetta's Comet Touchdown

Closeup of Philae's primary landing Site J, which is located on the "head" of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. The image was taken by Rosetta's OSIRIS narrow-angle camera on Aug. 20.
ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

After the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft spent a decade just catching up with Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, mission controllers have announced the spot where the probe's Philae lander will touch down. It turns out that there are no really good spots to land on a comet.

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The Salt
9:33 am
Mon September 15, 2014

The Perfect Summer Peach Wasn't Always So Rosy

A species of peach related to the 7,500-year-old pits found in China recently (left), and today's more modern versions (right).
Courtesy of Jose Chaparro/University of Florida

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 12:04 pm

The modern peach is a work of art: rosy, fuzzy, fragrant, fragile — and, of course, impossibly sweet and juicy. But that enchanting fruit is the product of centuries of painstaking breeding that have transformed it from its humble origins. The peach of the past was much smaller, acidic and a greenish-cream color.

Where the original, wild peach came from has been a mystery, but a new clue brings us closer than ever to its origin.

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Shots - Health News
9:32 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Antibiotics Prescribed For Children Twice As Often As Needed

Drat those viruses. They're the culprit in the majority of children's colds and sore throats.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 6:58 am

When your child has an earache or a bad cold, it's hard to think that there's not much you can offer beyond Tylenol and sympathy. But most of those infections are mostly caused by viruses that don't respond to antibiotics, a study finds.

Just 27 percent of acute respiratory tract infections are caused by bacteria, researchers at Seattle Children's Hospital found. That means that more than two-thirds are viral and antibiotics don't help.

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Parallels
7:55 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Chinese Teacher Is Busted After Demanding Gifts From Students

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 9:42 am

Chinese authorities have suspended a teacher after she was recorded berating her students for not providing teachers with gifts.

Many parents in China's hypercompetitive schooling system use gifts to try to buy influence.

The teacher, Feng Qunchao in Northeast China's Heilongjiang province, harangued the high school students throughout the class.

"You don't take this seriously, huh?" she says, according to an audio tape. "Can't afford two or four dollars? You guys are a bunch of trash! A bunch of dog lungs," she adds, using a Chinese insult.

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Code Switch
7:38 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Who Determines Whether Someone Has A 'Latino Heart'?

New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez (right) talks about the state's green chile during a visit to a restaurant in Bernalillo.
Susan Montoya Bryan AP

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 1:03 pm

When New Mexico Democratic gubernatorial candidate Gary King told the crowd at the Democratic Party of Valencia County annual fundraiser on Sept. 6 that Republican Gov. Susana Martinez "does not have a Latino heart," he was reportedly paraphrasing previous remarks made by famous labor icon and native New Mexican Dolores Huerta. King probably meant to say that Gov.

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The Two-Way
7:10 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Mexican Resort Town Pummeled By Powerful Hurricane Odile

Waves hit the coast of Los Cabos, Mexico, on Sunday as Hurricane Odile nears landfall in the largely tourist area of the Baja California peninsula.
Victor R. Caivano AP

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 11:02 am

Odile, the strongest hurricane on record to make landfall on Mexico's Baja California, slammed into the tourist resort of Cabo San Lucas with winds up to 115 mph and is now moving up the massive peninsula.

"We haven't seen one get so close and with the possibility of impact, and of such a nature," Wenceslao Petit, head of emergency services in Los Cabos, was quoted by Reuters as saying of the Category 3 hurricane. "There aren't words for this."

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The Two-Way
6:50 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Pistorius Could Still Compete For South Africa In Olympics

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 12:55 pm

Despite a conviction for culpable homicide and the looming possibility of a prison sentence, Oscar Pistorius would be free to compete in the Olympics, according to the head of South Africa's Olympic committee.

From The Associated Press:

"South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee chief executive Tubby Reddy tells The Associated Press that the sports body has no regulations that prevent someone with a criminal record from representing the country."

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The Two-Way
6:45 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Renewed Fighting Threatens Truce In Eastern Ukraine

A Ukrainian army helicopter flies over troop positions Friday in Debaltsevo, in the Donetsk region of Ukraine.
Efrem Lukatsky AP

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 9:17 am

A cease-fire in eastern Ukraine is looking increasingly fragile amid renewed shelling in some areas, and as Ukraine's defense minister says arms shipments from NATO members have begun to arrive in Kiev to aid its fight against pro-Russia separatists.

At least six people were killed and 15 wounded in artillery fire in the rebel-held city of Donetsk, according to the city council there.

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It's All Politics
6:08 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Hillary Clinton Keeps Iowa Crowd Guessing About Her Presidential Plans

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former President Bill Clinton and U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin work the grill during Harkin's annual fundraising steak fry in Indianola, Iowa, on Sunday.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 9:36 am

Hillary Clinton, who has a huge lead in many early presidential polls, returned to Iowa on Sunday. The woman who says she has not yet decided on a 2016 presidential run appeared along with former President Bill Clinton in a state she has not visited since she lost the 2008 Iowa caucuses to Barack Obama.

Her speech at the annual steak fry hosted by U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, a must-attend event for state Democratic activists, revealed little about her intentions — but also did nothing to dampen the widespread belief that she will indeed run.

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The Two-Way
4:57 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Leaders Meet In Paris To Forge Fight Against Islamic State Militants

French President Francois Hollande (right) and Iraqi President Fuad Masum attend the Conference for Peace and Security in Iraq at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Paris on Monday. The two leaders were among those urging quick action against Islamic State militants.
David Silpa UPI/Landov

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 10:44 am

World leaders and diplomats from more than 20 countries have gathered in Paris to discuss strategies for defeating the Islamic State insurgency, with France's president urging that there's "no time to lose" and Iraq's new president insisting that extremists must be pursued to their sanctuaries in neighboring Syria.

"The Iraqis' fight against terrorists is also ours," French President Francois Hollande said. "There is no time to lose."

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Technology
4:38 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Grandparents Accidentally Tag Themselves As Grandmaster Flash

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 6:08 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Around the Nation
4:29 am
Mon September 15, 2014

SWAT Team Startles Gamer

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 6:08 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
4:21 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Covering Up With The Hijab May Aid Women's Body Image

A contentious piece of clothing: Members of the Iranian women's soccer team celebrate their win over Syria back in 2007. That year, the international soccer league FIFA banned the wearing of hijabs during games. The ban was lifted in July.
Mohammad Abu Ghosh AP

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 8:31 am

Like any piece of clothing, the hijab isn't one size fits all.

Women around the world choose to wear — or not to wear — a headscarf or veil for many reasons.

Some see the hijab as a way to identify with the Muslim community or to assert themselves as a human being instead of a sexual object. Others feel the garment strips them of their individuality or turns them into a reluctant spokeswoman for the faith.

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Around the Nation
2:52 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Creating Your Baby's Last Name? Tennessee Says No

Carl Abramson, Kim Sarubbi and their three children.
Courtesy of the Sabr family

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 7:03 am

When naming a child, some parents opt for one of the parents' last names, some hyphenate the two. Still others invent a hybrid surname for their kids — though one Tennessee family discovered that state law bars them from doing that.

Kim Sarubbi runs a digital consulting firm. Her husband, Carl Abramson, is a chiropractor. The couple moved to Nashville from Santa Monica, Calif. Their first two kids were born outside Tennessee, and their last names are a blend of their parents' surnames, Sarubbi and Abramson.

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Shots - Health News
2:52 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Patients Vulnerable When Cash-Strapped Scientists Cut Corners

Tom Murphy, 56, in his home in Gainesville, Va., was diagnosed with ALS four years ago. An experimental drug seems to have slowed the progression of his disease, he says, though most ALS patients aren't as lucky.
T.J. Kirkpatrick for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 7:09 am

There's a funding crunch for biomedical research in the United States — and it's not just causing pain for scientists and universities. It's also creating incentives for researchers to cut corners — and that's affecting people who are seriously ill.

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