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Around the Nation
6:00 am
Fri March 27, 2015

Social Media Posts Help Police Nab Suspect

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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The Two-Way
5:38 am
Fri March 27, 2015

WATCH: Obama, A 'Wire' Superfan, Talks To Show's Creator David Simon

President Obama talks to David Simon, creator of The Wire.
YouTube

President Obama is a fan of The Wire. He has even said Omar Little was his favorite character on the HBO show.

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Around the Nation
5:25 am
Fri March 27, 2015

Buffalo Fans Cheer Sabres 4-Game Losing Streak

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 6:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
5:04 am
Fri March 27, 2015

German Prosecutor: Germanwings Co-Pilot Concealed Medical Condition

Police officers carry boxes outside a house in Montabaur, Germany, on Thursday in connection with the investigation into the Germanwings A320 crash.
Fredrik von Erichsen EPA /Landov

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 4:14 pm

Updated at 8:53 a.m. ET

Prosecutors in Duesseldorf, Germany, say Andreas Lubitz, the co-pilot of Germanwings Flight FU 9525, who appears to have deliberately crashed the plane carrying 150 people into the French Alps, concealed a medical condition from his employers.

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NPR Ed
5:03 am
Fri March 27, 2015

Stretching One Great Teacher Across Many Classrooms

At Nashville's Bailey Middle Prep, Whitney Bradley teaches her 8th-graders how to organize an essay in preparation for the writing section of Tennessee's standardized test. Most in her class trail their peers in literacy.
Blake Farmer Nashville Public Radio

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 9:55 pm

A stack of research suggests that all the classroom technology in the world can't compare to the power of a great teacher. And, since we haven't yet figured out how to clone our best teachers, a few schools around the country are trying something like it: Stretching them across multiple classrooms.

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The Two-Way
3:02 am
Fri March 27, 2015

NASA To Study A Twin In Space And His Brother On Earth

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly is seen inside a Soyuz simulator at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center on March 4 in Star City, Russia. Kelly, along with Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency, are scheduled for launch Friday aboard a Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
NASA/Bill Ingalls

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 1:58 pm

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

A Russian rocket has carried a Russian cosmonaut and an American astronaut to the International Space Station, where they will live for a full year, twice as long as people usually stay.

No American has remained in space longer than 215 days. Only a few people have ever gone on space trips lasting a year or more — the longest was 437 days — and they're all Russian cosmonauts. The last year-plus stay in space occurred nearly two decades ago.

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NPR Story
3:02 am
Fri March 27, 2015

Is There Evidence That Yemeni Rebels are Backed By Iran?

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 12:28 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:02 am
Fri March 27, 2015

Air War In Yemen May Come At The Expense of Coalition Against ISIS

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 6:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:02 am
Fri March 27, 2015

As Nigeria Votes, The Specter Of Boko Haram Hangs Over The Election

A man hammers a wall with elections posters at an open market in Kano, Nigeria, on Friday. The country is preparing for presidential elections on Saturday. President Goodluck Jonathan faces former military ruler Muhammadu Buhari and 13 other candidates in what is seen as the closest presidential race since the end of military rule in 1999.
Goran Tomasevic Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 2:36 pm

Nigerian voters go to the polls Saturday to elect their next president and lawmakers in a vote delayed since February, partly due to the insecurity brought on by the Islamist extremist group Boko Haram.

In the past six weeks, Boko Haram has been pushed out of a huge zone in the northeast by Nigerian forces backed by troops from the neighboring countries of Chad, Niger and Cameroon. While the group has lost ground, it is still a dangerous force.

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Goats and Soda
2:41 am
Fri March 27, 2015

Her Instagram Feed Finds The Fun In Long-Suffering Somalia

Ugaaso Boocow is back — and instagramming — in her homeland of Somalia.
Courtesy of Ugaaso A. Boocow

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 8:23 am

Ugaaso Abukar Boocow has become an Instagram sensation by sending out stunning visual messages from an unlikely place: poor, suffering Somalia.

She was just a toddler when her grandmother fled with her to Canada to escape Somalia's civil war, leaving her mother behind.

Then last year, she decided to go back, moving to the capital, Mogadishu, and reuniting with her mother, whom she hadn't seen in over two decades.

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It's All Politics
4:58 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Amazingly, Congress Actually Got Something Done

House Speaker John Boehner takes the gavel from Democratic Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi Jan. 6 at the start of the 114th Congress.
Mark Wilson Getty

They said it couldn't be done. And for more than a decade they were right.

But on Thursday, staring at a deadline that could have disrupted health care to millions of seniors, the House got something done.

It voted to fix the flawed formula for compensating doctors who provide services to patients under Medicare. But this time it wasn't just a patch for a few months or years — like the ones Congress has done 17 times since 2003.

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Science
4:09 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Big Shelves Of Antarctic Ice Melting Faster Than Scientists Thought

A 2008 view of the leading edge of the Larsen B ice shelf, extending into the northwest part of the Weddell Sea. Huge, floating ice shelves that line the Antarctic coast help hold back sheets of ice that cover land.
Mariano Caravaca Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 6:01 pm

The Antarctic is far away, freezing and buried under a patchwork of ice sheets and glaciers. But a warming climate is altering that mosaic in unpredictable ways — research published Thursday shows that the pace of change in parts of the Antarctic is accelerating.

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National Security
4:09 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

National Guardsman, Cousin Arrested For Trying To Join Islamic State

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 6:01 pm

An Illinois National Guardsman and his cousin were arrested for allegedly conspiring to provide support to the self-proclaimed Islamic State. One of the men wanted to go to Syria to martyr himself, and the other planned to carry out an attack on a nearby military base in northern Illinois.

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Law
4:09 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Ellen Pao Trial Highlights Long Road To Ending Workplace Bias

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 6:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Religion
4:01 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Church Of Scientology Calls New HBO Documentary 'Bigoted'

The HBO documentary Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief airs Sunday — over the vigorous objection of Scientology officials.
Courtesy of HBO

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 6:01 pm

The Church of Scientology is famous for its efforts to silence its critics, but it has not blocked an upcoming HBO film that turns a harsh light on the powerful organization and its leadership.

Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief, directed by Academy Award-winning documentarian Alex Gibney, will debut Sunday over the vigorous objection of Scientology officials.

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The Salt
3:42 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Think Nobody Wants To Buy Ugly Fruits And Veggies? Think Again

Not so ugly, eh? Supposedly imperfect produce rescued and reclaimed for consumption by Bon Appetit and Better Harvests.
Far left and far right: Courtesy of Ron Clark/Better Harvests. Center three images: Courtesy of Bon Appétit Management Company

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 8:47 am

Remember that old movie trope, in which the mousy girl who never gets noticed takes off her eyeglasses and — voila! — suddenly, everyone can see she was beautiful all along?

Well, a similar sort of scenario is starting to play out in the world of produce in the U.S. (minus the sexist subtext).

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Shots - Health News
3:04 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

How Much Does Cancer Cost Us?

WNYC

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 7:33 am

Before we started our Living Cancer series, we went on NPR's Facebook page to ask people about their experiences in paying for cancer treatment. Over a hundred people from across the country responded.

We talked with some people by phone to learn about their stories.

Maureen Carrigg, who lives in Wayne, Neb., was diagnosed with multiple myeloma six years ago. Even though she says she was meticulous about staying within her insurer's network for care, she still ended up owing $80,000 in out-of-pocket costs.

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National Security
3:03 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Testing The Standards: Do Gender Differences Matter For Combat?

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 6:01 pm

The man who designed the training experiment to determine if female Marines should be allowed into combat positions is not a Marine himself, but a civilian scientist. His data could also help the Marines justify their own standards for what makes a person fit for combat.

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National Security
2:57 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Marines Hope To Determine Gender Neutral Standards For Ground Combat

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 6:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

To learn more about the research behind this experimental unit, we turn to Katelyn Allison. She's a professor at the University of Pittsburgh. She's part of the team studying this group. Welcome to the program.

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Parallels
2:40 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

A Fraying Promise: Exploring Race And Inequality In Havana

A view of one of the oldest parts of Havana. The buildings in the city tell a story of inequality.
Eyder Peralta NPR

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 3:39 pm

Miguel Coyula points at an open door in the middle of Old Havana. The mahogany door looks worn, but still handsome. The concrete facade has lost most of its paint, and time has ripped parts of it open.

"That's marble," Coyula says, pointing to the treads of the staircase. "They are the remnants of something that was very glorious."

Coyula is an architect and an economist, and as he walks through the streets of Havana, he doesn't just see breathtaking decay. He sees how economic policies and social circumstances have shaped this city.

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Shots - Health News
1:38 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Critic Faults Alcoholics Anonymous For Lack Of Evidence

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 7:34 am

Founded by two men in Akron, Ohio, in 1935, Alcoholics Anonymous has since spread around the world as a leading community-based method of overcoming alcohol dependence and abuse. Many people swear by the 12-step method, which has become the basis of programs to treat the abuse of drugs, gambling, eating disorders and other compulsive behaviors.

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Shots - Health News
1:36 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

A Single Gene May Determine Why Some People Get So Sick With The Flu

The H1N1 swine flu virus kills some people, while others don't get very sick at all. A genetic variation offers one clue.
Centre For Infections/Health Pro Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 3:07 pm

It's hard to predict who will get the flu in any given year. While some people may simply spend a few days in bed with aches and a stuffy nose, others may become so ill that they end up in the hospital.

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The Salt
1:32 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Is Colorado Primed To Become The Silicon Valley Of Agriculture?

A drone built by Agribotix, a Boulder startup, flies over a farm in Weld County, Colo. The drone has a camera that snaps a high-resolution photo every two seconds. From there, Agribotix stitches the images together, helping the farmer see what's happening in a field.
Luke Runyon Harvest Public Media/KUNC

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 6:31 am

Colorado is famous for its beer and its beef. But what about its farm drones?

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Parallels
1:31 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

How Yemen's Chaos Stretches Beyond Its Borders

People examine the rubble following an air strike near the airport in Yemen's capital Sanaa on Thursday. Saudi Arabia said it carried out bombing raids in neighboring Yemen as Houthi rebels, allied with Iran, continued their offensive in the country. Yemen's president fled the country Wednesday and was reported to be in Saudi Arabia on Thursday.
Khaled Abdullah Reuters/Landov

Yemen's downward spiral toward civil war is a disaster for the poorest country in the Arab world and adds one more member to the growing list of Middle East states that have imploded in the past several years.

But how important is Yemen to the wider world?

One argument holds that Yemen is, and always has been, an isolated backwater. The chaos is tragic for Yemenis, but remains largely an internal feud between rival groups and will have limited spillover beyond its borders.

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Music
1:31 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Courtney Barnett Makes Ennui Vivid On Debut Album

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 9:01 am

Courtney Barnett is an Australian singer-songwriter in her late 20s who's just released her first full album. It's called Sometimes I Sit and Think, And Sometimes I Just Sit. Barnett fills her songs with details about things she observes around her, everyday details that Fresh Air rock critic Ken Tucker says she somehow manages to infuse with a freshness rare in any songwriter, let alone one this young.

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Goats and Soda
1:26 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Ebola Is Not Mutating As Fast As Scientists Feared

In November, the Ebola virus found in Mali was surprisingly similar to strains circulating in Sierra Leone six months earlier.
Courtesy of NIAID

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 3:31 pm

Back in August, scientists published a worrisome report about Ebola in West Africa: The virus was rapidly changing its genetic code as it spread through people. Ebola was mutating about twice as fast as it did in previous outbreaks, a team from Harvard University found.

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It's All Politics
1:09 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

After Spending Scandals, Rep. Aaron Schock Says Goodbye

"Abraham Lincoln held this seat in Congress for one term but few faced as many defeats in his personal, business and public life as he did," Rep. Schock said on the House floor Thursday.
Kris Connor Getty Images

Once a fast-rising star in the Republican Party, Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock gave his final speech on the House floor Thursday.

Schock, who was elected to Congress in 2008, will resign his House seat at the end of the month. His resignation comes after weeks of questions about his judgment, lavish lifestyle and spending.

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NPR Story
12:51 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

WWII Veterans Return 'Good Luck Flags' To Japanese

Obon 2015 co-founder Rex Ziak at Monday's Returning Ceremony in Astoria, Oregon. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)

The 70th anniversary of the end of WWII will be marked later this year. In the meantime, some veterans of that war are embarking on one more mission.

In some cases, wives or children are taking on the mission if the veteran has passed away. The object is to return Japanese flags taken as war souvenirs from Pacific battlefields.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Tom Banse reports from Astoria, Oregon on an emotional gesture of peace and reconciliation.

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NPR Story
12:51 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Noah Baumbach On Middle Age And 'While We're Young'

Naomi Watts and Ben Stiller star in "While We're Young."

In writer-director Noah Baumbach‘s new film “While We’re Young,” Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts play a documentary filmmaker and his wife who live a reasonably content life in New York City. They befriend a younger couple whose free-spirited ways first energize them and then cause them to question themselves and their marriage.

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NPR Story
12:51 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Trying To De-Radicalize French Prisons

French prisons have come under the spotlight in the past two months, as a key recruiting ground for Islamist extremists. January’s attacks in Paris by brothers Cherif and Said Kouachi and Ahmedy Coulibaly, in which 17 people were killed, led to fresh questions about the links they made in prison.

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