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The Two-Way
5:04 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Ukraine Says It Can't Withdraw Weapons, Citing Attacks During Truce

Ukrainian troops ride on self-propelled artillery near Artemivsk, eastern Ukraine, Monday. A Ukrainian military spokesman says that separatist attacks are delaying Ukrainian forces' pullback of heavy weapons from the front line.
Evgeniy Maloletka AP

Noting deadly attacks by Russian-backed separatists who have renewed a push near the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine says it can't withdraw heavy weapons from the front lines, as required by a week-old cease-fire.

"Ukraine's military says two government soldiers were killed and about 10 wounded in the past 24 hours," NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from Moscow. "A government spokesman say its positions were hit by shelling 27 times in the past day. Meanwhile, of course, the separatists are claiming that the government initiates the attacks."

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NPR Story
3:54 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Wil Smith, Single Dad And Beloved StoryCorps Participant, Dies At 46

Wil Smith visited StoryCorps with his daughter, Olivia, in Sheffield, Mass.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 4:50 pm

Wil Smith, a single dad whom listeners first met through StoryCorps in 2012, died Sunday at the age of 46. A few years ago he was diagnosed with colon cancer.

Smith attended Bowdoin College in Maine in the 1990s. When he enrolled, he was not just older than the other students, but was also raising his infant daughter, Olivia, on his own.

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NPR Story
3:02 am
Mon February 23, 2015

'Birdman,' Julianne Moore, Eddie Redmayne Win Big Oscar Prizes

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 9:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:02 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Homeland Security Warns Of Terrorist Threats Against U.S. Malls

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 9:25 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Ed
3:02 am
Mon February 23, 2015

How We Talk About Our Teachers

For his study Professor Benjamin Schmidt culled roughly 14 million reviews from the website Rate My Professor. Blue dots represent male professors, red dots female. The farther right the dot, the more often that the word on the left was used to describe the professor.
Alyson Hurt

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 12:57 pm

Male professors are far more likely to be considered "smart" or "brilliant" by their students, according to an analysis of reviews from the website Rate My Professor.

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Shots - Health News
3:02 am
Mon February 23, 2015

When Kids Think Parents Play Favorites, It Can Spell Trouble

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 9:21 am

If you have siblings, you probably think that your parents liked one kid best — and you're probably right. Scientists say the family pecking order does affect children, but not always in the way you might think.

The vast majority of parents do have favorite child, according to research — about 80 percent. But that number sounds pretty darned high. So I decided to ask some kids in my neighborhood in Bethesda, Md., what they think happens in their families.

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Shots - Health News
2:24 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Lots Of Seniors Are Overweight, But Few Use Free Counseling For It

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 2:16 pm

Anne Roberson walks a quarter-mile down the road each day to her mailbox in the farming town of Exeter, deep in California's Central Valley. Her daily walk and housekeeping chores are her only exercise, and her weight has remained stubbornly over 200 pounds for some time now. Roberson is 68 years old, and she says it gets harder to lose weight as you get older: "You get to a certain point in your life and you say, 'What's the use?' "

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Parallels
2:23 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Brutal ISIS Tactics Create New Levels Of Trauma Among Iraqis

An Iraqi child who fled fighting between the so-called Islamic State and Kurdish peshmerga is among the some 3,000 people living at the Baharka camp, near Irbil, the capital of the Kurdish autonomous region in northern Iraq, on Jan. 16.
Safin Hamed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 1:47 pm

At a camp for displaced people in northern Iraq, you pass rows of tents to reach the clinic run by the International Medical Corps. They have medicines to treat all kinds of problems: diabetes shots, vaccines, heart pills.

But it's harder to cure what's afflicting one woman in particular.

"The pain inside of me is so deep," she says. "I just cry every day."

Militants from the group that calls itself the Islamic State kidnapped the woman's adult son in June, and she doesn't know his fate.

Her husband expresses the loss in more destructive ways.

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It's All Politics
2:22 am
Mon February 23, 2015

For TSA Officers, Congress' Inaction On Funding Could Hit Home

If Congress doesn't act to fund the Department of Homeland Security by Friday, then over 200,000 TSA employees won't be receiving paychecks — but many of them will still have to show up to work.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 2:23 pm

Congress has until the end of Friday to figure out a way to fund the Department of Homeland Security. Otherwise, the department shuts down. But a "shutdown" doesn't mean workers go home. Instead, the vast majority of transportation security officers will have to keep showing up for work — but they won't be seeing paychecks until lawmakers find a way out.

For transportation security officers, it's a bad memory replaying way too soon.

A Case Of Deja Vu

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U.S.
2:21 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Immigration Courts 'Operating In Crisis Mode,' Judges Say

People in Miami protest the Texas district judge who on Tuesday temporarily blocked the implementation of President Obama's executive actions on immigration.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 11:54 am

As Congress debates the fate of President Obama's immigration policies, the nation's immigration court system is bogged down in delays exacerbated by the flood of unaccompanied minors who crossed the southern border last summer.

The administration made it a priority for those cases to be heard immediately. As a result, hundreds of thousands of other cases have been delayed until as late as 2019.

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Shots - Health News
10:41 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

Kids, Allergies And A Possible Downside To Squeaky Clean Dishes

Vidhya Nagarajan for NPR

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 9:21 am

Could using a dishwashing machine increase the chances your child will develop allergies? That's what some provocative new research suggests — but don't tear out your machine just yet.

The study involved 1,029 Swedish children (ages 7 or 8) and found that those whose parents said they mostly wash the family's dishes by hand were significantly less likely to develop eczema, and somewhat less likely to develop allergic asthma and hay fever.

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The Two-Way
10:08 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

2015 Oscar For Best Picture Goes To 'Birdman'

Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárittu (center) and the cast and crew of Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) accept the award for the best picture at the Academy Awards Sunday night in Los Angeles.
John Shearer AP

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 12:14 pm

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) took home the best picture award at the 87th annual Academy Awards; the film also earned director Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárittu the Oscar for directing.

Julianne Moore won best actress for her work in Still Alice, and Eddie Redmayne won best actor for his role as Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything.

Other notable wins:

Big Hero 6 won for best animated feature film.

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Religion
6:17 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

House Churches Swap Steeples For Sofas, And Say They've Never Been Closer

A dozen families gather in Dover, Del., for a house church meeting. Everyone brings something, either a dish for the potluck dinner or a conversation topic for the informal worship service.
Eleanor Klibanoff

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 11:24 am

At most churches, it's embarrassing to show up late. But if you arrive early at Greg Stultz's church, you might interrupt the hosts' last-minute preparations as they put away homework or toss shoes up the stairs.

Stultz and his family are part of a house church. They typically meet on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, though the week that I visited they were meeting in Dover, Del. Each week, their small group crowds into a private living room for dinner and fellowship — and their church is no rarity.

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Afghanistan
3:18 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

New Defense Secretary Makes Unannounced Trip To Afghanistan

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 5:21 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

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U.S.
3:18 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

For Some Mothers In Prison, A Sentence Doesn't Mean Separation

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 4:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
2:27 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

When Pot Goes From Illegal To Recreational, Schools Face A Dilemma

Schools in Colorado are trying to find effective ways to teach the health effects of marijuana use. "When it's legal for your parents to smoke it or grow it," says one educator, "that changes the conversation."
David Zalubowski AP

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 9:21 am

Like many schools across Colorado, Arapahoe Ridge High School in Boulder has seen an increase in overall drug incidents since recreational marijuana became legal.

While public schools aren't required to report marijuana incidents separately from other drugs such as cocaine, evidence compiled by Rocky Mountain PBS I-News suggests more students are using marijuana.

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The Salt
2:27 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

Lamb Dumplings, Lentils And A Bittersweet Taste Of Home

Traditional desserts, like these served in 2010 at the original Naranj restaurant in Damascus, offer sweet, familiar flavors at the restaurant's various locations in the Middle East. A platter like this shows up at the end of every meal at Naranj, and all the pastries are made in-house.
Jan Smith Flickr

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 5:22 pm

For people living in a new country, a taste of home can be a powerful emotional experience.

All the more so when you've left your country because of war.

Iraq has taken in about a quarter-million people fleeing Syria's civil war. In the northern Iraqi city of Irbil, one of Syria's most famous restaurants is re-creating the tastes of Damascus.

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Around the Nation
2:26 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

California's Drought Exposes Long-Hidden Detritus

California's long-term drought has significantly dropped the water level at Lake Perris in Southern California. According to local fishermen, all of this sand used to be covered in water.
Tom Dreisbach NPR

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 8:15 am

The message from park rangers, amateur metal detectors and regular fisherman at California's Lake Perris is unanimous: The water is lower than they've ever seen it.

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The Two-Way
2:02 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

Bomb Blast Kills 2 At Pro-Kiev Rally In Eastern Ukraine

A man holds a Ukrainian flag as he cover the body of a victim of an explosion in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Sunday.
Andriy Marienko AP

A bomb blast at a rally in eastern Ukraine has killed two people on the first anniversary of the ouster of President Viktor Yanukovych, an event that helped trigger Russia's annexation of Crimea and a separatist uprising.

Ukraine's Interior Ministry described the blast at a pro-Kiev rally in Kharkiv as an act of terrorism and said it had been caused by a bomb. It said a police officer was among the dead and that about a dozen other people were wounded.

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Education
10:29 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Imagining The Future: 'Howard Project' Students Look Forward

"Howard Project" participants (left to right) Kevin Peterman, Taylor Davis, Ariel Alford and Leighton Watson in the Howard University library.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 10:36 am

In some ways, the questions young people grapple with are universal: Who are you? What's important to you? What kind of life do you want?

But at the same time, those questions are profoundly shaped by each person's experience.

As part of an ongoing conversation on Weekend Edition, four college seniors at a historically black university in Washington, D.C., are sharing insight into their experiences — both shared and individual.

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The Two-Way
10:29 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Homeland Security Chief: Threat To U.S. Malls 'A New Phase' For Terrorists

Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson says a video released by al-Shabab "reflects [a] new phase" for terrorism networks.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 12:24 pm

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson says he's taking seriously a call by Islamist extremists for attacks on shopping malls in the West, including Minnesota's giant Mall of America.

In an interview on CNN's State of the Union program, Johnson said a video released by the Somali-based group al-Shabab "reflects [a] new phase" in which terrorist networks publicly call "for independent actors in their homelands to carry out attacks.

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The Two-Way
10:28 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Kerry Warns More Russian Sanctions Possible Over Ukraine

Britain's Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond and Secretary of State John Kerry deliver a statement at a news conference in London, today. Kerry said the two were going to discuss the possibility of further sanctions against Russia amid cease-fire violations in eastern Ukraine.
Neil Hall AP

Originally published on Sat February 21, 2015 10:46 am

Secretary of State John Kerry is signaling the possibility of more sanctions on Russia over continued fighting in eastern Ukraine, saying the U.S. and its allies would not tolerate Moscow's "brazen" violations of the Minsk cease-fire agreement.

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A Blog Supreme
10:24 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Clark Terry, Ebullient Jazz Trumpeter, Has Died

Clark Terry wasn't just a trumpeter with flawless technique; he was also, according to one peer, a "natural-born educator" who devoted much of his later career to passing on his immense musical knowledge.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 5:22 pm

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The Two-Way
9:43 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Clark Terry, Acclaimed Jazz Trumpeter And Composer, Dies At 94

Trumpeter Clark Terry in 1991. Terry's wife announced Saturday that he had died at age 94.
AP

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 12:27 pm

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

Grammy-winning trumpeter and composer Clark Terry, who recorded with the likes of Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald and Quincy Jones, has died at age 94.

Gwen Terry wrote that her husband "has joined the big band in heaven where he'll be singing and playing with the angels.

"He left us peacefully, surrounded by his family, students and friends," she wrote on his Facebook page Saturday. She did not say when he died.

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Monkey See
9:01 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Watch The Oscars With Us

Preparations continue for the 87th Annual Academy Awards at the Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, CA.
Gabriel Olsen Getty Images

The nominees are in, the arguments have been had, and the ceremony is all that's left of Oscar season. (Well, and the griping over what should have won.)

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The Two-Way
8:06 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Bangladesh Ferry Accident Kills Dozens

Bangladeshi rescue workers carry the dead body of one of the victims after a river ferry carrying about 100 passengers capsized Sunday.
A.M. Ahad AP

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 10:19 pm

Updated at 11:50 p.m.: Death toll rises

The bodies of at least 68 passengers have been recovered from the site of a capsized river ferry in Bangladesh, The Associated Press reports.

Up to 140 people are believed to have been on the ferry; however, officials have not determined the number of missing passengers. The AP reports that ferries in the region normally don't maintain precise lists of their passengers.

Our previous post continues:

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The Two-Way
6:30 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Turkish Operation Rescues Soldiers Guarding Tomb In Syria

Turkish soldiers during the military operation in Syria on Sunday. Turkey launched the raid to evacuate some 40 soldiers guarding the Tomb of Suleyman Shah, grandfather of the founder of the Ottoman Empire.
Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 12:40 pm

The Turkish army launched an overnight operation to rescue some 40 of its soldiers guarding an Ottoman-era tomb in Syria. The soldiers had come under attack by self-declared Islamic State.

The remains of the Tomb of Suleyman Shah were taken back across the border.

NPR's Peter Kenyon, reporting from Geneva, says that throughout the conflict in Syria, Turkey has kept soldiers at the tomb near Aleppo. Suleyman Shah was the grandfather of Osman I, the founder of the Ottoman Empire, which ruled vast parts of Europe, Asia and Africa for six centuries. Shah is revered by Turks.

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Afghanistan
6:04 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Ash Carter Says U.S. Is Considering A Slower Exit From Afghanistan

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 10:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Middle East
6:01 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Turkey Launches Operation Across Syria's Border

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 10:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Parallels
6:01 am
Sun February 22, 2015

A Greek City Nervously Watches Its Fur Trade Falter

A worker at Soulis Furs in Kastoria sorts through treated mink pelts. "We buy the pelts — minks or foxes or other animals — from North America and Scandinavia and send them for treatment in factories or abroad," says Makis Gioras of Soulis Furs in Kastoria.
Joanna Kakissis NPR

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 10:36 am

Below the snow-capped Pindus Mountains, on Lake Orestiada in northwestern Greece, sits Kastoria — a city that largely survived the country's devastating economic depression by exporting its signature good: fur garments.

"When you're born in this city, you have something to do with fur. So in the end, you end up in this business," says Makis Gioras, marketing director for his family's business, Soulis Furs. "It's a long, long tradition."

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