NPR News

The Salt
1:42 am
Wed April 15, 2015

The Space Station Gets A Coffee Bar

ESA/NASA

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 12:14 pm

In space, all they have is instant.

"For an instant coffee, it's an excellent instant coffee," says Vickie Kloeris, who manages the space station's food supply for NASA. Astronauts are allotted up to three freeze-dried cups (pouches, actually) a day, and Kloeris says it's "extremely popular."

But, she adds, "Can it compete with brewed espresso? No."

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Around the Nation
1:41 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Radio Connects North Dakota Residents Divided On Gay Rights

Joel Heitkamp smiles while broadcasting in 2009 at AM radio station KFGO in Fargo, N.D.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:09 am

This week, Morning Edition discusses gay rights in North Dakota, one of 13 states that still bans same-sex marriage. Wednesday's story features two men with contrasting ideologies: a liberal radio host and a conservative business owner.

North Dakota is a state where radio reigns supreme. Its communities are far apart, and shopping trips, or just visiting a neighbor, can mean a long drive. Many people have the radio on, and often it's tuned into KFGO-AM, The Mighty 790, out of Fargo.

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Shots - Health News
1:40 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Marathon Bombing Survivors Face A World That Still Feels Out Of Control

Martha and Alvaro Galvis used to travel from New Hampshire to Boston to watch the marathon every year. Both were hurt in the bombing two years ago.
Jesse Costa/WBUR

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 6:10 pm

It's just the crumb of a muffin, but Martha Galvis must pick it up. Lips clenched, eyes narrowed, she pushes it back and forth across a slick table, then in circles.

"I struggle and struggle until," Galvis pauses, concentrating all her attention on the thumb and middle finger of her left hand. She can't get them to close around the crumb.

"I try as much as I can, and if I do it, I'm so happy — so happy," she says, giggling.

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History
1:34 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Who Was John Wilkes Booth Before He Became Lincoln's Assassin?

John Wilkes Booth was the son of prominent, wealthy actors. He, too, became an actor and was so popular, he was one of the first to have his clothes ripped off by fans.
Hulton Archive Getty

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 10:33 am

John Wilkes Booth was the man who pulled the trigger, capping off a coordinated plot to murder President Abraham Lincoln.

But historian Terry Alford, an expert on all things Booth, says that there's much more to Booth's life. His new biography, Fortune's Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth, delves deep into his life — before Booth went down in history as the man who assassinated a president.

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Parallels
1:34 am
Wed April 15, 2015

The All-Work, No-Play Culture Of South Korean Education

Students take the annual College Scholastic Ability Test, or college entrance exam, at a high school in Seoul last November. Students face enormous pressure to do well on the test and get into a top university. Airplanes are grounded on the day of the test so they won't disturb the students.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 1:39 pm

In South Korea, grim stories of teen suicide come at a regular clip. Recently, two 16-year-old girls in the city of Daejeon jumped to their deaths, leaving a note saying, "We hate school."

It's just one tragedy in a country where suicide is the leading cause of death among teens, and 11- to 15-year-olds report the highest amount of stress out of 30 developed nations.

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The Two-Way
11:06 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

SpaceX Launches Successfully, But Rocket Doesn't Survive

After a one-day delay due to weather, SpaceX successfully launched a resupply mission to the International Space Station. In a tweet, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk wrote, "Ascent successful. Dragon enroute to Space Station."

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The Two-Way
10:41 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Congress Approves Longer-Term Fix For Medicare Reimbursements

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 5:49 pm

The Senate gave final passage Tuesday night to a lasting fix for a long-running problem with Medicare reimbursements for doctors, NPR's Giles Snyder reports. Doctors faced a 21 percent reduction in the fees.

Eight senators, all Republicans, voted against the bill because funding has not been fully allocated for its $214 billion cost. According to the Congressional Budget Office, the bill will add $141 billion to the federal budget deficit in the next decade.

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The Two-Way
4:28 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Iraqi Leader Visits Washington Looking For Help In Fight Against Islamic State

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi and President Obama meet at the White House on Tuesday. The prime minister is visiting to discuss the fight against the self-proclaimed Islamic State.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi is in Washington this week, trying to drum up financial and military support for his country. His first stop today was the White House, where he met with President Obama.

The administration promised $200 million in humanitarian assistance for Iraqis uprooted by violence. But the heart of the discussion was the joint fight against the self-proclaimed Islamic State.

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The Two-Way
4:04 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Drone Strike Reportedly Kills Al-Qaida Leader In Yemen

Ibrahim al-Rubaish, the top cleric of Yemen's al-Qaida branch, was killed in a drone strike on Sunday, according to a statement by al-Qaida. This poster is from U.S. State Department Rewards For Justice.
AP

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 4:13 pm

A former Guantanamo Bay prisoner, who had joined al-Qaida after his release, was killed by a U.S. drone strike in Yemen, the group said in a statement Tuesday.

Ibrahim al-Rubaish had fought in Afghanistan before being arrested and held in Guantanamo. He would go on to be one of the top leaders in al-Qaida in Yemen.

The drone attack is a sign that the United States has not abandoned its military campaign against al-Qaida despite the chaos in Yemen. U.S. and Yemeni officials did not immediately comment.

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Goats and Soda
3:58 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Thousands Of Young Women In U.S. Forced Into Marriage

A year ago, Lina says her parents took her to Yemen because her grandmother was gravely ill. But when the family arrived, Lina's father announced that she would be getting married to a local man.
Renee Deschamps Getty Images/Vetta

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 6:37 am

Lina describes herself as strong and independent. Born in Yemen and brought to the U.S. as a toddler, the 22-year-old now works retail at a mall to pay her way through college.

"I was raised very, very Americanized. I did sports, I did community service, I worked," Lina says. (NPR is not using her full name because she fears retribution from her family.)

When people hear her story, she says they tell her, "I never thought that this would ever happen to you."

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Europe
3:56 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

When Rates Turn Negative, Banks Pay Customers To Borrow

Earlier this year, the European Central Bank, headed by Mario Draghi, launched a bond-buying program to drive down interest rates and boost borrowing.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 12:13 pm

So what if the bank paid you to take out a loan? That's what's happening in some European countries, where interest rates have gone negative amid efforts by central bankers to boost economic activity.

NPR's Audie Cornish spoke with NPR's John Ydstie about this unusual turn of financial events.

Audie Cornish: What's going on?

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The Salt
3:46 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

How AeroPress Fans Are Hacking Their Way To A Better Cup Of Coffee

Twenty-four competitors put their brewing techniques to the test last week at the World AeroPress Competition in Seattle.
Jonathan Vanderweit Courteys of World Aeropress Championship

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 1:14 pm

Perhaps it takes a hacker to lure a hacker.

And Alan Adler, 76, is the ultimate hacker. A serial inventor based in Silicon Valley, Adler has 40 patents to his name. But among coffee aficionados, it's an incredibly simple device that's earned him accolades: the AeroPress.

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History
3:38 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Andrew Johnson's Presidency Highlighted Issues With Vice Presidential Selection

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 5:45 pm

NPR's Robert Siegel interviews University of Virginia historian Barbara Perry about the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Andrew Johnson presidency. Perry explains how he was chosen as vice president, and how he suddenly became president after President Abraham Lincoln's assassination.

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Book Reviews
3:38 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

These 'Voices In The Night' Whisper Of Wonders

Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sun April 19, 2015 4:40 pm

Beautifully made fantastic tales such as Steven Millhauser writes don't begin from nothing. As in the tradition of Nikolai Gogol, Italo Calvino and Gabriel Garcia Marquez (to name a few revered creators of fiction that carries us beyond the normal), most of them grow out of everyday incidents and lead us right up to the line between the ordinary and the magical. And sometimes they help us to cross over.

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The Record
2:26 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Percy Sledge Had A Voice The Whole World Heard

Percy Sledge performs in Montgomery, Ala., in 2010.
Rick Diamond Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 5:45 pm

Soul singer Percy Sledge epitomized Southern soul in ballads like "When A Man Loves A Woman," which became a massive international hit when it came out in 1966. Sledge died Tuesday morning of natural causes in East Baton Rouge, La. He was 74.

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Around the Nation
2:21 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

New York Mayor Announces Plan To Reduce Rikers Island Jail Population

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 5:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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U.S.
2:21 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Advocates Fight To Keep Sheltered Workshops For Workers With Disabilities

Most employees at Production Unlimited say they're happy at this sheltered workshop in Watertown, N.Y. But disability advocates say they'd get paid minimum wage, enjoy socializing with nondisabled people and no longer be segregated if they get jobs in community settings.
David Sommerstein North Country Public Radio

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 9:14 pm

It's a hectic day at Production Unlimited in Watertown, N.Y. Everyone has to drop his regular work — making plastic binders, safety equipment, office supplies — for a huge order.

Beth Carpenter punches hole after hole into colored plastic tags. She and her co-workers are paid based on how fast they work, usually well below minimum wage. Carpenter has done all different kinds of tasks here for more than 15 years.

"And I like working here every day," she says. "I work here five days a week. That's why I'd like to make sure we fight to keep this place open."

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Commentary
2:21 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Letters: Russian Memes, Abraham Lincoln Assassination Anniversary

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 5:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Police Weapon Use Under Fire, As More Videos Emerge

A video released by police shows North Charleston officer Michael Slager using a taser on the motorist after he had been pinned to the ground. (Screenshot)

Bob Bates, the 73-year-old reserve police officer in Tulsa, Oklahoma, who fatally shot a man after police say he confused his gun for his taser, now faces a second-degree manslaughter charge.

Meanwhile, in North Charleston, South Carolina, more video has surfaced showing another violent arrest by officer Michael Slager. Slager is being charged with murder after fatally shooting an unarmed motorist who tried to flee a traffic stop.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Saturday Night Live's Cecily Strong

Cecily Strong joined Saturday Night Live in 2012. (Courtesy of NBC)

Cecily Strong is joining the impressive list of female comedians who are taking their talent beyond the Saturday Night Live stage.

Strong has been asked to host the White House Correspondents Dinner later this month, and she is appearing in her first movie, “The Bronze,” which hits theaters this summer.

Strong is famous on SNL for her recurring character the “girl you wish you hadn’t started a conversation with at a party” on Weekend Update – a sketch she once hosted.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Russia-Iran Arms Deal Could Complicate Nuclear Talks

Russia's President Vladimir Putin (L) shakes with his Iran's counterpart Hassan Rouhani during their bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the fourth Conference on Interaction and Confidence Building Measures in Asia (CICA) summit in Shanghai on May 21, 2014. (Alexey Druzhini/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia is closing in on a deal that would send Russian missiles to Iran. Russian President Vladimir Putin approved the delivery of S-300 surface-to-air-missiles on Monday. A similar deal fell through back in 2010 under pressure from Western governments.

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The Two-Way
1:47 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

White House Says It Will Remove Cuba From List Of State Sponsors Of Terrorism

President Obama with Cuban President Raul Castro during their historic meeting at the Summit of the Americas in Panama City. The Obama administration announced Tuesday it will remove Cuba from its list of state sponsors of terrorism.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 3:22 pm

The Obama administration announced Tuesday it will remove Cuba from its list of state sponsors of terrorism, a major step in normalizing relations between the two countries. The announcement comes just days after a meeting between President Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro at a summit in Panama.

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Shots - Health News
1:45 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

No Rest For Your Sleeping Brain

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 12:12 pm

There's new evidence that the brain's activity during sleep isn't random. And the findings could help explain why the brain consumes so much energy even when it appears to be resting.

"There is something that's going on in a very structured manner during rest and during sleep," says Stanford neurologist Dr. Josef Parvizi, "and that will, of course, require energy consumption."

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The Salt
1:42 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Why The FDA Has Never Looked At Some Of The Additives In Our Food

Food on display at a Miami supermarket. Advocacy groups say they're concerned that Americans are consuming foods with added flavors, preservatives and other ingredients that have never been reviewed by regulators for immediate dangers or long-term health effects.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 1:38 pm

This piece comes from the Center for Public Integrity, a nonpartisan, nonprofit investigative news organization.

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Music
12:29 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

The Mountain Goats' John Darnielle Finds Refuge In The Ring

The Mountain Goats have a new album called Beat The Champ. It's unusual in that it is a concept album about professional wrestling, based on the interest in that sport band leader John Darnielle has had since he was a boy. Darnielle is also a prose writer whose novel Wolf in White Van was nominated for a 2014 National Book Award. Fresh Air rock critic Ken Tucker has this review.

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It's All Politics
11:42 am
Tue April 14, 2015

How Candidates Announce Can Say A Lot About Their Campaigns

Hillary Clinton announced her run for the president in a highly produced campaign video.
Hillary Clinton campaign announcement video

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 11:57 am

Now that Democrat Hillary Clinton has officially launched her presidential campaign, the 2016 race for the White House is underway.

The GOP got its third entrant in what is shaping up to be a crowded field when Florida Sen. Marco Rubio announced his bid Monday.

How and where a candidate chooses to roll out a campaign can say a lot about the type of race he or she intends to run, at least in the early going.

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The Two-Way
11:31 am
Tue April 14, 2015

Chicago Plans Reparations Fund For Victims Of Police Torture In '70s, '80s

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 4:14 pm

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is supporting a proposed $5.5 million reparations package for victims of police torture in the 1970s and '80s.

NPR's Cheryl Corley tells our Newscast unit that more than 100 people are eligible for reparations, including money and counseling, for their treatment at the hands of a former police commander, Jon Burge, and his officers. Burge was fired by the Chicago Police Department in 1993.

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The Two-Way
9:44 am
Tue April 14, 2015

Soul Singer Percy Sledge Dies

Singer Percy Sledge died Tuesday.
Taylor Hill Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 5:06 pm

Singer Percy Sledge, perhaps best known for his hit "When A Man Loves A Woman," has died, Artists International Management Inc., his talent agency, said.

Sledge died of natural causes a little after midnight at a hospice in East Baton Rouge, La., according to a coroner. The coroner said Sledge was 74, though the Encyclopedia of Music as well as his talent agency says Sledge was 73.

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The Two-Way
8:33 am
Tue April 14, 2015

Mountain Lion That Hid Out Under LA Home Appears To Have Left

The mountain lion known as P-22 is seen in Los Angeles' Griffith Park in November 2014. He hid out for a time in the crawl space of a Los Angeles home.
National Park Service AP

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 12:30 pm

Updated at 1:02 p.m. ET

The mountain lion who spent Monday night under a Los Angeles home despite authorities' best efforts to dislodge him appears to have left on his own, a wildlife official says.

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The Two-Way
6:58 am
Tue April 14, 2015

Scientists Release Largest Map Yet Of Dark Matter In The Cosmos

Mass map with images of two galaxy clusters and a cosmic void.
Dark Energy Survey

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 9:08 am

Scientists have released the first of several dark matter maps of the cosmos.

Researchers from the Dark Energy Survey used data captured by the Dark Energy Camera, a 570-megapixel imaging device they say is one of the world's most powerful digital cameras, to put together the largest contiguous map of dark matter created. They presented their findings Monday at a meeting of the American Physical Society in Baltimore.

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