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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

"Full employment" is a phrase economists use to explain how the job market recovers from a recession. We'll be hearing this phrase a lot as the Labor Department releases the latest jobs data on Friday. It's expected to show that employers added even more workers in January.

But the phrase doesn't tell the full story for millions of Americans either still out of work or who are looking for something better than part-time work.

What is full employment and what does it mean?

On a little patch of grass outside a police station in the small town of Rubayda in northern Iraq, a half-dozen women with small children sit on a rug, with a haggard-looking group of men nearby, eager to talk about how they walked here.

"Day and night, for 48 hours, without food or water or sleep," says Khalaf Hussein Karam, a former soldier with a deeply lined face. He escaped from his town in the Islamic State-held area around the city of Hawija. With numerous relatives including women and children, he crossed the Hamrin mountain range.

An attack by Boko Haram on a village in northeastern Nigeria killed at least 65 people on Saturday night, according to Reuters.

A Nigerian military spokesman told the wire service that Boko Haram militants attacked the village of Dalori, near the city of Maiduguri in Nigeria's northeast.

The initial death toll was provided by a Reuters reporter who counted bodies, burnt beyond recognition, at a hospital morgue. The Associated Press, citing a local official, reports the death toll much higher, at 86 people.

One month down, two to go.

For unemployed adults in 22 states, that's how long they can count on help with the grocery bills: Starting this January, they have three months to find a job or lose their food assistance.

SNAP benefits — formerly known as food stamps — have been tied to employment for two decades. Unless they are caring for children or unable to work, adults need to have a job to receive more than three months of benefits.

Ted Cruz has one of the most overtly religious stump speeches on the Iowa campaign trail.

In Emmetsburg, Iowa, Friday the Texas senator quoted the Bible and exhorted his supporters to pray "each and every day" until Election Day.

"He's real," said Bobbie Clark, a Cruz supporter from Algona. "There's something there. There's substance behind it. It's not just talk."

Three explosions near a shrine revered by Shiite Muslims in Damascus have killed at least 45 people, according to reports from Syrian media and human rights monitors.

NPR's Alison Meuse, reporting from Beirut for our Newscast unit, says the Islamic State has claimed responsibility through its media outlets. She continues:

Donald Trump has not only caused deep divisions in the GOP establishment, but he's also exposed a stark divide within the evangelical community.

Monday's Iowa caucuses are being billed, as they are every election season, as "a fight for the soul of the Party," both Democratic and Republican.

Yes, it's a worn-out cliché, but especially on the Republican side this year, it's a real battle.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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And we are back with Morning Edition host David Greene, who's leading our coverage in Iowa. So the two big Democratic candidates, Clinton and Sanders, David, is that how Iowa Democrats are separating themselves, as diehards for either Hillary or Bernie?

The Latest On GOP Candidate Race Iowa

Jan 31, 2016
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Trump's Confidence Grows Amid Iowa Race Poll Results

Jan 31, 2016
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Iowa and New Hampshire get a lot of attention, but their records in picking presidents, let alone nominees, is spotty (as you can see from the chart above). But that doesn't mean the states don't matter. They have been effective at weeding the field of candidates, and they're about momentum for those later states.

Plus, in the last 40 years, just one person has gone on to win the presidency after losing both Iowa and New Hampshire — Bill Clinton.

Here's how the predictability of the states breaks down by party:

Are refugees still welcome in Denmark? Many Danes say yes, despite a new, controversial law requiring police to seize cash and other valuables from asylum seekers arriving in the Nordic country. There's widespread criticism in Denmark of the new law, even as many Danes are nervous about the rising number of asylum seekers.

The pretty Baltic port town of Sonderborg is one of many Danish communities sending mixed signals to asylum seekers these days. It hosts scores of migrants at an asylum center on the city's outskirts.

The armed standoff between anti-government militants and law enforcement in Oregon has lasted more than four weeks.

Donald Trump said a final word to evangelical voters on Saturday by showing them the Word of God.

In a Facebook video, the real estate mogul opens his Bible to thank "the evangelicals" for the support they've shown him in polls.

"My mother gave me this Bible, this very Bible, many years ago," Trump says. "In fact, it's her writing, right here. She wrote the name, and my address, and it's just very special to me."

He closes this way: "I want to thank the evangelicals," he says. "I will never let you down."

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders' campaigns have agreed in principle to six more Democratic presidential debates following the Iowa caucuses on Feb. 1, though the deal has not been finalized, according to campaign and party officials.

Currently, the Democratic National Committee has only two more sanctioned debates: Feb. 11 in Milwaukee, Wis., sponsored by PBS NewsHour and March 9 in Miami, Fla., sponsored by Univision.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump lead narrowly just two days before the Iowa caucuses in the final Des Moines Register/Bloomberg poll, considered the "gold standard" of Iowa polling.

But Clinton's 3-point lead over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is within the margin of error.

Trump leads Texas Sen. Ted Cruz by 5 points, but pollster J. Ann Selzer noted that if evangelicals turn out in similar percentages to years past, Trump's lead shrinks to 1, though he still leads.

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The World Health Organization has described the advance of the Zika virus as "explosive." It was first detected in Brazil in 2015 and has spread to at least 22 countries since. The mosquito-borne virus has been associated with severe birth defects in babies born to infected mothers.

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Living on the streets is tough enough in a city. But when you're homeless in rural America, it's even harder to pull yourself out of poverty.

In the small town of Flagstaff, Ariz., one woman tried to make a difference, and flipped an old motel into transitional housing.

When former financial planner Lori Barlow moved to Flagstaff, she volunteered at the emergency shelter. She was overwhelmed by the number of people stuck in poverty.

Building A New Community For The Rural Homeless

Jan 30, 2016

Most of the time when we talk about homelessness, big cities come to mind. But about seven percent of homeless people live in rural areas, where access to help is much harder to come by. Flagstaff, Ariz. is one of those places. While city officials work to find solutions, one woman has taken an old motel and turned it into transitional housing.

There's football season, hunting season, and the holiday season. Overlapping all of these is something decidedly less fun and sexy: open enrollment season for health insurance.

"We've been busy this past month," says Iris Galvez, a health insurance navigator with the Houston social services agency Change Happens!

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

From Washington Desk correspondent Brian Naylor

I have a soft spot in my heart for the New Hampshire primary. (I'm writing this from my Manchester hotel room.)

Facebook is changing its policies to ban users from arranging the private sale of guns on both Facebook and Instagram.

The new rules, first reported Friday, are stricter than Facebook's previous stance on gun sales, which allowed users to arrange such sales under some restrictions as long as they did not use Facebook ads.

The ban on person-to-person firearm sales comes after pressure from the Obama administration, state attorneys general and gun safety advocates, NPR's Laura Sydell reported for our Newscast unit.

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