NPR News

The Two-Way
4:55 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Eduard Shevardnadze, Former Georgian President, Dies At 86

Then-Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze flashes a "V" sign in France in 1989, after attending the International Conference on Chemical Weapons. Shevardnadze died Monday at age 86.
Derrick Ceyrac AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 9:06 am

Former Soviet minister and Georgian President Eduard Shevardnadze, who is credited with helping end the Cold War, died Monday after a long illness, his spokeswoman tells the media.

To remind you of the former leader's career, NPR's Corey Flintoff has this report for our Newscast unit:

"White-haired and dapper, Eduard Shevardnadze was the face of Soviet foreign policy during the era when President Mikhail Gorbachev was attempting to liberalize the Communist bloc.

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Remembrances
4:49 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Ex-Georgia President Eduard Shavardnadze Dies. He was 86

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's take a moment to remember Edward Shevardnazde. He was the foreign minister for the Soviet Union in the 1980s. That means he was one of the faces of the Soviet Union during its final period of reform under Mikhail Gorbachev. When that union broke apart, Shervardnazde became the president of his home republic, Georgia. And he has died at the age of 86. We're going to talk about Shevardnazde with Pavel Palazhchenko. He was an interpreter for both Gorbachev and this Shervardnazde. He's on the line. Welcome to the program.

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NPR Story
3:21 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Video Of Extremist Sunni Group's Leader Needs To Be Confirmed

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:21 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Michelle Obama Lobbies Congress Over School Lunch Program

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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U.S.
1:18 am
Mon July 7, 2014

A Presidential Contest ... For Obama's Library

This undated file photo released by Obama for America shows Barack Obama teaching at the University of Chicago Law School in Chicago, where he was a faculty member for more than a decade. The university is contending for his presidential library.
AP

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:14 am

There are 13 presidential Libraries in the United States run by the National Archives, and when President Obama leaves office, the construction of the 14th library won't be far behind.

A nonprofit foundation created to fund and build the Obama presidential library is already beginning to mull proposals from contenders who'd like to be home to the facility.

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Shots - Health News
1:18 am
Mon July 7, 2014

For Many Americans, Stress Takes A Toll On Health And Family

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:14 am

Stress is part of the human condition, unavoidable and even necessary to a degree. But too much stress can be toxic — even disabling.

And there's a lot of toxic stress out there.

A national poll done by NPR with our partners at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health finds that more than 1 in every 4 Americans say they had a great deal of stress in the previous month.

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The Salt
1:17 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Raw Milk Producers Aim To Regulate Themselves

Charlotte Smith, of Champoeg Creamery in St. Paul, Ore., says raw milk may offer health benefits. But she also acknowledges its very real dangers.
Courtesy of Champoeg Creamery

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 7:45 am

A growing number of Americans are buying raw milk. That's milk that has not been pasteurized to kill bacteria.

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National Security
1:16 am
Mon July 7, 2014

The Marines Are Looking For A Few Good (Combat-Ready) Women

Sgt. Jarrod Simmons speaks to his squad of Marines before they head out on a training march with 55-pound packs on Feb. 22, 2013, at Camp Lejeune, N.C. The Marines and the other military branches must open combat jobs to women in 2016. More than 160 female Marines are taking part in a grueling training program that begins this summer.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 7:51 am

The challenge for the Marines, and for the Army, is how to open up ground combat jobs to women in January 2016, without lowering standards.

And here's where things stand in the Marines.

Eighty-five female Marines already made it through an infantry training course last fall at Camp Lejeune, N.C., which included drills such as attacking a mock enemy force, hidden in a pine forest. That course lasted eight weeks, and the men and women all completed the same training.

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Around the Nation
4:56 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Programs Target Poverty In Obama's 5 'Promise Zones'

People line up at the FamilySource Center in Los Angeles, an organization in one of President Obama's five designated "Promise Zones" that aims to help fight poverty in the area.
Priska Neely NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 9:02 am

Five areas across the country have been designated as "Promise Zones" by the federal government. These zones, announced by President Obama in January, are intended to tackle poverty by focusing on individual urban neighborhoods and rural areas.

In the five Promise Zones — located in Philadelphia, San Antonio, southeastern Kentucky, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and Los Angeles — the idea is to basically carpet-bomb the neighborhoods with programs like after-school classes, GED courses and job training to turn those areas around.

What Happens In The Zone?

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Middle East
4:51 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Six Israeli Youths Arrested In Death Of Palestinian Teen

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Israel arrested six Israeli Jewish suspects today in connection with the kidnapping and murder of a 16-year-old Palestinian teenager. It's the first major development in a case that's sparked riots in Jerusalem and Arab towns in Israel. The teenager was seized from his home in East Jerusalem last week, and his charred body was found in a nearby forest. Officials say the autopsy shows he was burned to death.

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Music Interviews
3:05 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Years After 'The Killing Moon,' Echo & The Bunnymen Still At It

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 4:55 pm

The band Echo & The Bunnymen has released its first new album in five years, called Meteorites. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with frontman Ian McCulloch about the release.

U.S.
3:05 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Increasing Use Of Oil Trains Inspires Backlash From States

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 10:18 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Law
1:12 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Rare Unanimity In Supreme Court Term, With Plenty Of Fireworks

The recent Supreme Court term resulted in an unusual number of unanimous decisions — but that doesn't mean there wasn't disagreement.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 1:10 pm

The nation greets the coming of July each year with fireworks on the National Mall and, days earlier, explosive decisions at the U.S. Supreme Court.

While the Mall fireworks dissipate within moments, the court's decisions will have repercussions for decades. Indeed, no sooner was the ink dry on this term's contraception decision than the court's three female justices accused their male colleagues of reneging.

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The Two-Way
12:55 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

California Highway Patrol Probing Videotaped Beating Of Woman

In this July 1 image from video provided by motorist David Diaz, a California Highway Patrol officer straddles a woman while punching her on the shoulder of a Los Angeles freeway.
David Diaz AP

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 4:14 pm

The California Highway Patrol says it is investigating a video that shows an officer repeatedly punching a woman after trying to stop her from walking into traffic.

As Reuters notes: "The video, which was taken by a passing motorist, posted online and broadcast by local television stations, has caused an outcry from community activists who say the officer used excessive force in the arrest on Tuesday."

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The Two-Way
11:16 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Novak Djokovic Beats Roger Federer For Wimbledon Title

Novak Djokovic of Serbia celebrates after defeating Roger Federer in their men's singles finals tennis match at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London.
Suzanne Plunkett Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 4:43 pm

Novak Djokovic won his first Wimbledon championship in three years in a hard-fought contest that went five sets, denying Roger Federer's bid for a record eighth title.

Djokovic took the trophy in a 6-7, 6-4, 7-6, 5-7, 6-4 victory.

USA Today says:

"Djokovic was serving for the match at 5-3 in the fourth set but Federer broke him twice and won the set forcing the match to go the distance.

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The Two-Way
8:21 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Separate Attacks In Uganda, Kenya Leave Dozens Dead

Armed police walk past a truck set on fire by attackers who raided Gamba police station at the Kenyan coast on Sunday.
Joseph Okanga Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 4:47 pm

This post was updated at 12:30 p.m. ET.

At least 17 people were killed in Uganda in an attack by armed gunmen on three police stations in an area of the country that had once been the focus of an Islamic insurgency.

Meanwhile, the al-Qaida-linked group al-Shabab has claimed responsibility for attacking on two coastal villages in Kenya that left at least 22 people dead. NPR's Gregory Warner, reporting from Nairobi, says the deaths in Kenya include one Russian tourist.

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Report: Most NSA-Intercepted Data From 'Ordinary Internet Users'

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 4:50 pm

A Washington Post analysis of data provided by Edward Snowden has revealed that nine out of 10 communications intercepted by the National Security Agency were from ordinary Internet users, not legally targeted foreigners. But the examination also showed that officials gleaned valuable intelligence from the wide net the agency cast.

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The Two-Way
6:17 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Israel Arrests 6 Jewish Youths In Teen's Death

Suha Abu Khdeir, mother of 15-year-old Tariq Abu Khdeir, a U.S. citizen who goes to school in Tampa, Fla., shows a picture of her son sent from Israel after he was allegedly beaten by Israeli police.
Mahmoud Illean AP

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 6:19 pm

This post was updated at 4:10 p.m. ET.

Israel has arrested six suspects in connection with last week's killing of Palestinian teen Mohammed Abu Khdeir. Meanwhile, an American cousin of the victim who was reportedly beaten by Israeli police has been sentenced to nine days home detention.

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Animals
5:55 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Study Shows Penguins Endangered By Waning Antarctic Ice

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 10:50 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

You're listening to WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. A study published in the journal "Nature Climate Change" says, the population of Emperor penguins in Antarctica is in danger. Hal Caswell is a scientist emeritus at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He co-authored the report. And he joins us from Amsterdam. Welcome.

HAL CASWELL: Thank you.

WERTHEIMER: You've been studying the Emperor penguin population in Antarctica. What's happening to them?

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Europe
5:55 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Filmmaker Searches For 'White Widow' Of London Bombing

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 10:50 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

On July 7, 2005 - nine years ago tomorrow - a series of explosions in central London killed 52 people and injured over 700 others. One of the bombers, Germaine Lindsay, was married to Samantha Lewthwaite, a white, working-class girl from southern England. They had both converted to Islam. Lewthwaite denounced her husband's actions after the attacks, but then her life took another mysterious turn. She left England in 2008 and moved to South Africa and from there, to Kenya.

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Governing
5:55 am
Sun July 6, 2014

New IRS Chief John Koskinen: 'I Enjoy A Crisis'

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 3:25 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Around the Nation
5:55 am
Sun July 6, 2014

First Responders Unprepared For Another Train Disaster

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 10:50 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Ever since that Canadian train derailment, first responders all across North America wonder, what if it happens here? And as NPR's David Schaper reports from this side of the border, many say they don't have the training, the equipment or the manpower necessary to respond to an oil train disaster in their cities and towns.

DAVID SCHAPER, BYLINE: The images of that fiery blast that incinerated much of Lac-Megantic's downtown last summer still haunt many first responders.

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Religion
5:55 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Pope Francis To Meet With Victims Of Clerical Sex Abuse

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 10:50 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Tomorrow, Pope Francis will meet, for the first time, with survivors of clerical sex abuse. The meeting will be at his Vatican residence. His decision to meet with six European survivors comes after criticism that this pope has been slow to speak out on an issue that has severely damaged the credibility of the Catholic Church. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli is with us now on the line from Rome. Sylvia, hello.

SYLVIA POGGIOLI, BYLINE: Hello, Linda.

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Iraq
5:55 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Iran's Surveillance Drones Over Iraq Make U.S. Military Wary

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 10:50 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Iran has pledged it's support to the Shiite-dominated Iraqi government in its battle to push back Sunni-led ISIS fighters. This puts the U.S. and Iran on the same side. But American officials say Iran's efforts include sending drones to conduct surveillance. The drones are unarmed, but the military is concerned about their development. Joining us is Anthony Cordesman, co-author of "Iran's Military Forces And Warfighting Capabilities." He is an analyst with the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Mr. Cordesman, welcome.

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Iraq
5:55 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Iraqi Lawmakers Fail To Reach Deal On A New Government

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 10:50 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Iraq is looking more and more like a country being divided into three parts. Hard-core Sunni militants have taken much of the west. Well-organized Kurdish soldiers have grabbed the north. And everywhere else, Shiites are mustering sectarian militia. Thousands of Iraqis have been killed in just the last month. NPR's Alice Fordham reports there are a lot of ideas for helping the Iraqis, but the country's newly elected politicians are not exactly rushing to address the situation.

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Middle East
5:55 am
Sun July 6, 2014

State Department 'Troubled' By Reports Of Teen's Beating In Israel

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 10:50 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Krulwich Wonders...
5:03 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Tell Me, Wave, Where Did You Come From? Who Made You?

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 10:27 am

"I'm sitting next to a swimming pool and somebody dives in," says the great physicist Richard Feynman in a conversation recorded in 1983. Other people jump in as well.

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Parallels
3:14 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Germany's Battle Over What May Be Its Last Lenin Statue

A statue of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin outside an apartment complex in Schwerin, Germany. Erected in 1985, four years before communism collapsed in East Germany, it's believed to be the last Lenin statue in Germany and the town is divided over whether it should stay. The inscription reads, "Decree on land," referring to a Lenin manifesto that said workers were the real owners of the land.
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 12:48 pm

It's easy to miss the controversial bronze statue. It stands in front of a Soviet-style, high-rise apartment in the East German city of Schwerin.

Far removed from the ornate city center, this 13-foot-tall depiction of Vladimir Lenin has him looking relaxed. His hands are tucked in his coat pockets and he's gazing off into the distance.

But an angry message is scrawled in red paint across the sidewalk at his feet. In German, it reads: "LENIN STAYS."

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Law
3:42 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

More Municipalities Deny Federal Requests, Won't Detain Immigrants

Philadelphia City Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez pushed for the city to change its practice of detaining immigrants on behalf of federal officials.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 8:42 am

Before immigrants get deported, they are sometimes held temporarily by local law enforcement at the request of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE. But cities across the country, including Philadelphia, are saying they will no longer fully cooperate with that plan.

Offenses including traffic stops and felonies can lead to deportation for immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally — or even those who are legal permanent residents. ICE requests that municipalities hold suspects until they can be transferred into federal custody.

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Shots - Health News
3:14 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

Faith Strengthens Aging Parents As They Care For Their Son

James Lee carries his son, Justin, to the shower. Justin's parents have a lift to help move him around the house, but their nearly 100-pound son, who has cerebral palsy, often needs to be picked up.
Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 12:37 pm

A good night's sleep is rare for Judy and James Lee. They are on parenting duty 24/7 for their son, Justin.

Justin, who has cerebral palsy and was born missing parts of his brain, also has a seizure disorder, which has gotten worse lately. He's often silent during his seizures, which means he has to sleep with his parents so they can tell when he needs help. Judy says caring for Justin is a lot like taking care of a newborn.

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