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Around the Nation
3:16 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Fifth Graders' Onion Crop Is Missing, Apparently Stolen

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 6:24 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:55 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Congress Will Eventually Vote On Force Against Islamist Militants

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 6:24 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
1:24 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Fast-Moving Ebola Slows Down Liberia's Economy

Not every business has been hurt by the Ebola epidemic: Stephen Kollie says his newspaper stand is thriving because people are hungry for the latest Ebola information. But many of his usual expatriate customers have left the country, he says.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 8:30 am

Postwar Liberia had struggled back onto its feet in the past decade, after the civil war, and was just catching its collective breath when Ebola landed. One of the lasting effects of Ebola on the country is likely to be its impact on the economy.

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U.S.
1:23 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Child Migrants Settle Uneasily In The Big Easy

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 7:05 am

Last June, 13-year-old Yashua Cantillano and his 11-year-old brother, Alinhoel, left their uncle's home in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, with a change of clothes in plastic bags, some snacks, water and their mother's phone number scribbled on a piece of paper.

Their guide and protector? Seventeen-year-old Sulmi Cantillano, their step-sister.

With the help of a smuggler, or coyote, Sulmi says, they got to the Mexican border city of Reynosa about 11 miles south of McAllen, Texas. They crossed the Rio Grande and turned themselves in to the U.S. Border Patrol.

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Politics
9:43 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

As Visible Villain, Islamic State Alters U.S. Political Calculus

President Obama addresses the nation from Cross Hall in the White House on Wednesday. Opening a new military front in the Middle East, Obama authorized U.S. airstrikes inside Syria for the first time, along with expanded strikes in Iraq as part of a broad mission to root out violent Islamic State militants.
Saul Loeb AP

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 6:46 am

After a decade in national politics as a dove, Barack Obama has become a reluctant hawk.

Obama's long transformation reached its endpoint on the eve of the 13th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. But it came, in the end, because Americans suddenly felt a renewed sense of peril from a terrorist enemy — and a renewed willingness to fight. Both the fear and the resolve were manifest in a flurry of fresh polls showing overwhelming support for new military commitments in Iraq and neighboring Syria.

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The Two-Way
5:23 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

Obama Says U.S. Will 'Take Out' Islamic State 'Wherever They Exist'

In this image made through a window of the Oval Office, President Obama speaks on the phone to Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah on Wednesday.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 8:51 pm

In a prime-time speech on Wednesday, President Obama said the United States plans to "take out" the Islamic State "wherever they exist."

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The Two-Way
5:16 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

NFL: Ex-FBI Chief Will Investigate How League Handled Rice Evidence

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 9:33 pm

Update, 11 p.m.:

The NFL is bringing in former FBI Director Robert Mueller to investigate how the league handled evidence in the Ray Rice case, a reporter for the league's website said Wednesday night.

The original story continues below:

The National Football League is denying a report that it received a video from police that shows former Baltimore Ravens star Ray Rice punching his then-fiancee, Janay Palmer.

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Around the Nation
4:25 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

Preserving Black History, Americans Care For National Treasures At Home

Neonta Williams (left) shares family letters dating back to 1901 with preservationist Kimberly Peach during the Smithsonian's Save our African American Treasures program at the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute. Peach advises her to use archive-quality polyester sleeves to protect the fragile papers, rather than store them in a zip-lock bag.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 10:28 pm

In a hall inside the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute in Alabama on Saturday, long tables are draped with black linen. Experts are bent over tables, examining aging quilts, letters filled with tight, hand-penned script, and yellowing black-and-white photos tacked into crackling albums — all family keepsakes brought in by local residents.

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Music News
4:19 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

Nonesuch At 50: A Record Label Without Borders

Björk's interdisciplinary project Biophilia was released on the Nonesuch label in 2011.
Nonesuch

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 10:08 am

Sometimes good things come in small packages. Nonesuch Records, which started as a tiny independent budget classical label in 1964, is celebrating its 50th anniversary with three weeks of concerts at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. The label became a force in the recording industry by pioneering electronic music and world music, launching the ragtime revival and becoming a place where contemporary classical composers had a home. Now an industry powerhouse, Nonesuch still operates like an independent record company.

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Goats and Soda
3:55 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

Nepal Struggles To Help Villages Washed Away In Floods

Families carry their belongings while moving to higher ground in the Bardia region of Nepal during the flooding on Aug. 15.
Bhabuk Yogi AP

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 6:26 am

In August, monsoon rains brought flooding and landslides to Nepal on a massive scale.

Three days of constant rains inundated valleys and huge swaths of land came tumbling down mountainsides in the western part of the country.

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Krulwich Wonders...
3:44 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

Souls Tumbling In The Light

BirdCast YouTube

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 10:58 am

Every year on Sept. 11, this happens ...

When it gets dark, New York City turns on 88 7,000-watt xenon light bulbs to produce two powerful beams that shoot up, side by side, to remind us that once upon a time, two towers stood here, and then didn't, and this is how we remember the day they came down — by looking up.

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The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

Underneath Stonehenge, 'A Map Of What Was There In The Past'

Researchers in the U.K. have uncovered a hidden complex of archaeological monuments under Stonehenge using high-tech methods of scanning below the Earth's surface.
Geert Verhoeven/University of Birmingham AP

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 5:31 pm

There's much more to Stonehenge, it turns out, than meets the eye (or, for that matter, Spinal Tap).

Researchers from Birmingham University used high-tech equipment to map 17 ritual monuments in the area. That's in addition to the iconic circle of stones that has stood there for thousands of years.

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NPR Ed
3:21 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

This Is Your Brain. This Is Your Brain On Music

Amir Pinkney-Jengkens, 8, is learning trombone through Harmony Project, a nonprofit that provides musical instruments and instruction to children in low-income communities. Recent research suggests that such musical education may help improve kids' ability to process speech.
Annie Tritt for NPR

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 9:55 am

Musical training doesn't just improve your ear for music — it also helps your ear for speech. That's the takeaway from an unusual new study published in The Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers found that kids who took music lessons for two years didn't just get better at playing the trombone or violin; they found that playing music also helped kids' brains process language.

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Politics
2:57 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

A New Brand Of Paul Gains Support In Iowa

Sen. Rand Paul meets with local Republicans in Hiawatha, Iowa. He's made three trips to the state this year.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 11:43 am

It's still more than 15 months until the Iowa caucuses, and no one in the crowded field of Republicans with presidential ambitions has announced. But things are already happening in Iowa, especially for Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky.

Paul has reached out to Iowans who never considered voting for his father, Ron Paul, who made a respectable third-place showing there in 2012.

He's still popular with his father's old supporters. Many of them are in the so-called liberty faction of the Iowa GOP.

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Shots - Health News
2:50 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

Suicides Rise In Middle-Aged Men, And Older Men Remain At Risk

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 3:37 pm

Men have historically been more likely to commit suicide than women, but a new, vulnerable group is emerging from their ranks: middle-aged men. That age group includes comedian Robin Williams, who committed suicide last month at age 63. The rate for middle-aged men now eclipses older men, who historically have had the highest rate of suicide.

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Environment
2:33 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

Illegal Loggers Suspected In Death Of Peruvian Activist

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 4:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Politics
2:33 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

President Obama To Outline Strategy For Confronting ISIS

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 4:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
2:19 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

In Strange Twist, Kenyans March For Police Officer Accused Of Murder

Kenyan police confront university students protesting higher fees on May 20. The police have a reputation for corruption and violence and are not well-liked. But when a popular officer was arrested and charged with a vigilante-style killing, residents took to the streets to support him.
Tom Maruko Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 6:38 pm

Kenyans rate their police force among the most corrupt institutions in the country. Even worse, police are often accused of inflicting violence on citizens. So when a Nairobi officer was arrested for murder this week, you would think most people would applaud.

But in a strange twist, residents in the officer's district rose defiantly in defense of his vigilante approach to justice.

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Shots - Health News
1:59 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

Women Who Eat Fish Twice Weekly Cut Their Risk Of Hearing Loss

Researchers speculate that the Omega-3 fatty acids in fish may help maintain good blood flow to the inner ear.
iStockphoto

Are you finding it tougher to follow conversations in a noisy restaurant? Or does it seem like people are mumbling when you speak with them?

These are two questions commonly used to screen for hearing loss, which affects more than one-third of people over age 65, according to the National Institutes of Health.

So, what to do to cut the risk?

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

'We Expect You Back': A Friend's Poem For James Foley

Daniel Johnson (R) and his friend James Foley at a friend's wedding in Sept. 2001. Foley was captured and killed by Islamic militants in Syria. (Courtesy Daniel Johnson)

Poet Daniel Johnson has long tackled difficult subjects.

But his recently published poem “In the Absence of Sparrows” took on a much more personal note.

It’s a poem he penned for and about his friend James Foley, who was killed in Syria by Islamic militants, where he was working as a freelance reporter.

“I turned to poetry as a way to speak to him directly,” Johnson told Here & Now’s Robin Young.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

NFL Commissioner Tells CBS NFL Had Not Seen Rice Footage

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell told CBS that to the best of his knowledge, no one at the NFL had seen the full video of Ray Rice assaulting his fiancee in an elevator until this week when TMZ posted it online.

Goodell said that the League had only seen one video — that of Rice dragging his unconscious fiancee from an elevator.

“We were told that was not something we would have access to,” Goodell said. “On multiple occasions, we asked for it. And on multiple occasions we were told no.”

 

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NPR Story
1:35 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

NFL Youth Safety Program Takes A Hit

LaToya Cook and her son Braylon Powell, who has complained of headaches since a hit before a game two years ago. (John Daley/CPR)

Concussions continue to plague the NFL. There were eight reported concussions in the first week of the NFL season.

The injuries are not just a problem for professional football, but youth football, as well.

As a result, the NFL is trying to teach moms of young players about the risks and how to prevent concussions.

But, critics are calling these efforts white-washing.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Colorado Public Radio’s John Daley reports.

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The Salt
12:13 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

The Comeback Of The Endangered Colorado Orange, An Apple

The Maiden Blush, Chenango Strawberry and Duchess of Oldenburg are heirloom apples found in old orchards across Colorado, which was once a major apple-producing state.
Adalyn Schuenemeyer Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 2:03 pm

The Colorado Orange is not an orange, in color or essence.

"It is an apple, with a unique texture and taste. It has a little bit of a citrus bite," says Paul Telck, one of the few people today to have tasted the apple – a yellow fruit with an occasional red blush, once thought to be extinct.

A few years ago, Telck, who owns an orchard in Fremont County, southwest of Colorado Springs, knew little about the Colorado Orange. Now, he's involved in an effort to bring it and other endangered Colorado apples back from the brink of extinction.

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The Two-Way
11:41 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Putin: Russia To Upgrade Nuclear Forces In Response To West

Russian President Vladimir Putin leaves the Life-giving Trinity church in Moscow, on Wednesday. Putin accused NATO of using the Ukraine crisis to "resuscitate itself."
RIA NOVOSTI Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 11:52 am

Vladmir Putin, whose annexation of Crimea and involvement in the conflict in eastern Ukraine have drawn plenty of comparisons in the West to his Cold War predecessors, is not going to calm any nerves with his latest pronouncement: Russia has begun development of new nuclear weapons.

Speaking at a Kremlin meeting on weapons modernization plans, Russia's president said the West had been "warned many times that we would have to take corresponding countermeasures to ensure our security" in light of U.S. missile defense plans.

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Iraq
11:38 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Islamic State Was Fueled By 'Epic American Failure In Iraq,' Reporter Says

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
10:54 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Covering Ebola: Fear And Love In Liberia

Sami Yenigun flies into Lofa province in a U.N. helicopter.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 4:29 pm

Sami Yenigun, an education producer at NPR, has dreamed of reporting overseas.

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Parallels
10:14 am
Wed September 10, 2014

A Sad End For A Beloved Kitten

Peat the kitten kept Scotland's Glenturret Distillery free of mice that are attracted to the grain used in production. The 6-month-old kitten was also an ambassador who was featured in public relations photos. But Peat died Monday, apparently after being hit by a car.
Fraser Band Volpa

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 7:24 am

Peat the kitten quickly made a name for himself at the Glenturret Distillery in Scotland.

Officially, his job was to kill the mice attracted to the grain used in the making of whisky. And he had big paws to fill. One of his predecessors at the distillery, Towser the Mouser, is in the Guinness Book of World Records, credited with killing 28,899 mice.

There aren't many mice around the distillery anymore, but the photogenic Peat has been warming hearts with his appearances in public relations photos for Scotland's oldest distillery.

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Shots - Health News
10:00 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Heavier Teen Pot Smoking Linked To Problems In Young Adults

Does smoking pot make it less likely that you'll go to college?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 1:59 pm

There's a lot of argument over how teenage marijuana use might affect people through life, but distressingly little data to help figure it out. That leaves parents, policymakers and young people pretty much in the dark when it comes to making decisions about use and legalization.

Three long-running studies of teenagers and young adults in Australia and New Zealand might help. An analysis of the studies found a dose-response relationship: The more someone smoked pot as a teenager, the more likely that person would struggle as a young adult.

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The Two-Way
9:39 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Britain's Cameron Pleads With Scots To Stay In U.K.

British Prime Minister David Cameron speaks during a visit to Scottish Widows offices in Edinburgh, where he made an impassioned plea to keep Scotland part of the union.
Andrew Milligan PA Photos/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 1:49 pm

British Prime Minister David Cameron says he'd be "heartbroken" if Scotland voted to separate from the United Kingdom in an upcoming referendum, calling on independence-minded Scots to look at the future consequences of separation.

"I would be heartbroken ... if this family of nations is torn apart," Cameron told an invited audience at the Edinburgh headquarters of the Scottish Widows insurance firm.

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Parallels
7:48 am
Wed September 10, 2014

How Far Will President Obama Go?

President Obama has been wary of open-ended military commitments in the Middle East. But the president, shown speaking in Estonia on Sept. 3, now appears likely to expand the current bombing campaign against the Islamic State.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 11:43 am

President Obama previewed his plan for dealing with the Islamic State by comparing it to counterterrorism operations in recent years and said it would not be an invasion akin to the ground war in Iraq.

As he prepares to lay out the details in a speech to the nation Wednesday night, several key factors are likely to determine the success or failure of any military mission.

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