NPR News

The Two-Way
3:03 am
Fri October 24, 2014

European Scientists Conclude That Distant Comet Smells Terrible

The Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko smells of rotten eggs, drunk people and horses.
ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 10:35 am

A European spacecraft orbiting a distant comet has finally answered a question we've all been wondering: What does a comet smell like?

"It stinks," says Kathrin Altwegg, a researcher at the University of Bern in Switzerland who runs an instrument called ROSINA that picked up the odor.

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Around the Nation
2:53 am
Fri October 24, 2014

With Ferguson Protests, 20-Somethings Become First-Time Activists

Dontey Carter (from left), Mel Moffitt, Lenard Smith, Ned Alexander and Allen Frazier are all members of the Lost Voices group, formed after Michael Brown's death in August. They say they want to ensure justice for Michael Brown and other unarmed individuals killed by police officers.
Cheryl Corley NPR

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 9:18 am

In the weeks after 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., protesters gathered daily at the site of a burned-out convenience store.

About a block away, the empty lot of a boarded-up restaurant became the campsite for a group of young activists called the Lost Voices. During the protests, the group "invited all the people who can't come out every day and wanted to share the experience with us," says Lenard Smith.

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Politics
2:53 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Courting Republicans, Georgia Democrat Tries To Keep His Seat

Rep. John Barrow speaks at First African Baptist Church in Dublin, Ga. Barrow needs African-Americans to turn out on Election Day, but they're not enough to put him over the top.
Sarah McCammon NPR

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 12:25 pm

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Parallels
2:53 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Iraq's Abu Ghraib Is Back In The News, Now As A Front-Line Town

Iraqi policemen patrol Abu Ghraib, 25 miles west of Baghdad, in June. Islamic State militants have captured many cities and town in western Iraq this year. The government still controls Abu Ghraib, but the militants are nearby and local tribes are also restive.
Karim Kadim AP

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 8:23 am

To get to Abu Ghraib, I hitch a ride with an Iraqi military patrol. We start in Baghdad, where the convoy of battered Humvees weaves through heavy traffic. But as we head out west of the capital, the roads empty and we hardly see any civilian cars.

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Remembrances
2:53 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Journalist And Political Aide Frank Mankiewicz Dies At 90

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 5:03 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
12:23 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Frank Mankiewicz, Aide Who Announced Robert Kennedy's Death, Dies

Frank Mankiewicz, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy's press secretary, updates the media about Kennedy's condition after being shot in June 1968. Mankiewicz died Thursday at the age of 90.
AP

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 11:50 am

Updated at 11:15 a.m. ET

Frank Mankiewicz, a longtime Washington insider who as press secretary to Robert Kennedy in 1968 announced the senator's death by an assassin's bullet and who later served as the head of NPR, has died at age 90.

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The Two-Way
8:01 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Recently Returned From Africa, Doctor Tests Positive For Ebola At NYC Hospital

Police officers stand outside the home of Craig Spencer, a Doctors Without Borders physician who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa, on Thursday in New York. Spencer tested positive for the virus, according to preliminary test results, city officials said.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 8:29 am

A patient at a New York City hospital has tested positive for Ebola, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a news conference Thursday.

According to a statement from Doctors Without Borders, a doctor returned to the United States Oct. 12 after working with Ebola patients in Guinea.

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The Two-Way
7:41 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Criticized Over Missing Mexican Students, Governor Of Guerrero Will Step Down

After the kidnapping and disappearance of dozens of students in his state of Guerrero, Gov. Angel Aguirre announced he would step down on Thursday.
Jesus Guerrero AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 10:16 pm

The governor of the Mexican state of Guerrero, where 43 students were kidnapped and disappeared last month, says he will leave office.

Angel Aguirre had been under growing pressure to step down as the investigation of the student's disappearance dragged on.

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The Two-Way
5:50 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

EU Leaders Agree To Cut Emissions By At Least 40 Percent

European Union leaders announced on Thursday that they had agreed to cut emissions by at least 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030.

Herman Van Rompuy, the president of the European Council, made the announcement on Twitter, saying the agreement marked the "world's most ambitious, cost effective, fair climate energy policy."

The AP reports:

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All Tech Considered
4:24 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

The Fairfax County 911 Center in Virginia takes calls during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. It was relatively easy to locate callers when most people used landlines. But most 911 calls now come from cellphones, which can pinpoint a callers' location only within 100 to 300 meters.
Greg E. Mathieson Sr. Mai/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 4:57 pm

Today's mobile phones can do almost everything a computer can. But we still need them for their most basic purpose: making phone calls — especially in emergencies.

Yet existing technology can't always pinpoint a caller's location, particularly when a 911 caller is indoors.

The Federal Communications Commission has proposed new regulations for wireless carriers to help address the problem, but so far, wireless providers are resisting the changes.

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The Two-Way
4:23 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Second White House Fence Jumper Had Been Arrested Before

A Secret Service police officer walks outside the White House in Washington on Thursday.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:59 pm

The man who jumped the White House fence on Wednesday night has been charged with unlawful entry of the White House grounds and harming animals used in law enforcement.

According to officials, Dominic Adesanya kicked and punched two Secret Service dogs. NPR's Tamara Keith filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The dogs, Hurricane and Jordan, helped stop the fence jumper in his tracks on the White House lawn.

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The Salt
4:13 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

How 'Foodies' Were Duped Into Thinking McDonald's Was High-End Food

McDonald's Organic/youtube

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 11:36 am

We all know that how a food is packaged and marketed can influence our choices, no matter how hard we try to shake the effect. Haven't you ever found yourself contemplating a row of wines, trying to decide which bottle to buy, and then opting for the one with the higher price tag, the prettier label or the more tempting descriptors?

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Around the Nation
4:13 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Park Service Construction Damaged Native American Burial Sites

Jim Nepstad, superintendent of Effigy Mounds National Monument in northeast Iowa, stands at the top of a bluff looking over the Mississippi River.
Clay Masters NPR

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 12:10 pm

Imagine being able to drive an all-terrain vehicle right up next to a sacred earthen Native American burial mound.

At Effigy Mounds National Monument, you can. Three million dollars' worth of illegal construction projects went on for a decade at one of the nation's most sacred Native American burial grounds in northeast Iowa. And it happened under the watch of the National Park Service.

The park didn't do the proper archaeological studies before installing an intricate boardwalk system that now encircles ancient burial mounds that are shaped like bears and birds.

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Law
3:29 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

ACLU Challenges Miami Law On Behalf Of Homeless Sex Offenders

This encampment under the Julia Tuttle Causeway in Miami, shown in 2008, was cleared out by authorities in 2009. It was home to sex offenders who were unable to find places where they were permitted to live under Miami-Dade County's strict residency law. Although this makeshift community was broken up, homeless sex offenders continue to camp out in other areas of the county.
David Adame AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:17 pm

Miami-Dade County's sex offender residency restrictions — some of the tightest in the country — drew national attention a few years ago when an encampment of sex offenders sprang up on a causeway in Biscayne Bay. After a public outcry, local and state authorities evicted several dozen people, mostly men, from that makeshift settlement.

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Goats and Soda
2:57 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

What's My Risk Of Catching Ebola?

Data sources: David Ropeik/Harvard University, National Weather Service, World Health Organization, Northeastern University Laboratory for the Modeling of Biological and Socio-Technical Systems, National Geographic, United States Census
Adam Cole and Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 8:57 pm

Health officials are saying it. Scientists are saying it. Heck, even many journalists are saying it: "The risk of Ebola infection remains vanishingly small in this country," The New York Times wrote Wednesday.

But what does that mean? Are you more likely to be struck by lightning or catch Ebola?

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Politics
2:49 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Democrats Remain Optimistic About Senate, Gubernatorial Races

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 3:50 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Business
2:22 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Cigarette-Maker Reynolds American To Ban Smoking At Work

The headquarters of Reynolds American in downtown Winston-Salem, N.C.. Starting in January, workers there will no longer be allowed to smoke at their desks.
Chris Keane Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 4:35 pm

Reynolds American, the country's second-largest cigarette-maker, is changing its policy on smoking in the office. Until now, Reynolds employees have been able to light up at their desks, but come January, workers will have to either go outside or use specially equipped smoking rooms.

"We allowed smoking of cigarettes, cigars, pipes, traditional tobacco products throughout our facilities," says David Howard, a spokesman for Reynolds American. He says it's not as though his co-workers chain-smoke at work.

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Shots - Health News
2:22 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

FDA Cracks Down On Fake Ebola Cures Sold Online

The problem isn't just that fake cures are worthless, doctors say. Fraudulent claims also give some people the false sense that the product can protect them from getting sick.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 9:59 am

Snake venom, vitamin C, Nano Silver and herbs have all been pitched online as a treatment or cure for Ebola. None has the backing of the FDA.

"Unfortunately during public health threats such as Ebola, fraudulent products that claim to prevent, treat, cure disease often appear on the market almost overnight," says Gary Coody, the FDA's national health fraud coordinator. In particular, the FDA wants consumers to beware Ebola "cures" peddled online.

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Music News
2:22 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Who Sang It First? Mockingbirds And Musicians Cover Each Other In New Orleans

A short phrase New Orleans musicians use to communicate is identical to a common mockingbird call.
Sven Halling Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:47 pm

In certain New Orleans music scenes, there is a special sound — a signal — that lets players know it's time to pick up their instruments and strike up the band.

"It's a bugle call, or a band call, to assemble," trumpeter Leroy Jones says.

"It's like: C'mon, rally," musician Matt Bell adds. "Come to the bandstand and be ready to do it. Let's go."

The four-note phrase, however, doesn't belong to musicians alone. Another common New Orleans species, the mockingbird, also produces the call.

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Around the Nation
2:22 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

In Missouri, A Tale Of Two Fergusons

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 4:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
1:34 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

How Important Is Speaking Chinese For American Business?

Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg, left, speaks during a dialogue with students as a newly-appointed member to the advisory board for Tsinghua University School of Economics and Management in Beijing, China. (Tsinghua University via AP)

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg tried to appeal to a Chinese audience recently by speaking in Mandarin. Some audience members appreciated the gesture, others did not. Derek Thompson of The Atlantic spoke with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about how many business leaders are learning Chinese, and whether it can help a business.

Guest

  • Derek Thompson, business editor for The Atlantic. He tweets @DKThomp.
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Michel Martin, Going There
1:24 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

In North Carolina, Latino Voters Could Decide Tight Senate Race

Lacey Williams (from left), Mary Espinosa, Jaime Villegas, Armando Cruz Martinez and Elisa Benitez talk inside the offices of the Latin American Coalition in Charlotte, N.C. According to a 2011 Pew Hispanic report, the median age of Latinos in North Carolina is 24.
Andy McMillan for NPR

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 10:22 am

Ahead of the midterm elections, Michel Martin is visiting Charlotte, N.C., to learn more about Latino voters' growing influence in the state. Join Michel for a Facebook chat from 4:30-5 p.m. ET today as she answers questions and shares more on her reporting.

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The Two-Way
1:02 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

U.S.-Led Strikes In Syria Have Killed 553, Activists Say

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 4:23 pm

U.S.-led strikes in Syria have killed 553 people, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported on Thursday.

The Observatory, which relies on reports from activists on the ground, has been providing death-toll estimates since the protests in the country spiraled into civil war beginning in the spring of 2011.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Parliament The Day After: A Canadian Lawmaker Describes The Ordeal

Canadian MP David McGuinty, who represents the Ottawa area, was among those who were in Parliament on lockdown until late yesterday evening. (Twitter)

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 2:39 pm

Canada’s Parliament is back to business today, less than 24 hours after a lone shooter killed a soldier at the country’s War Memorial, and was later killed by Parliament’s Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, inside a crowded hallway.

Members of Parliament broke into spontaneous applause that lasted minutes as Vickers entered the floor of the House of Commons. He held back tears as hundreds of MPs honored what many are calling heroic actions that saved many lives.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Aretha Franklin's New Album Further Proves She’s Queen Of Cover Songs

Aretha Franklin performing at the Ottawa Jazzfestl (Mike Bouchard/Flickr Creative Commons)

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 12:21 pm

This week saw the release of “Aretha Franklin Sings the Diva Classics,” with Franklin singing songs made famous by Adele, Barbra Streisand and Etta James. Here & Now pop culture critic Renee Graham joins host Robin Young to take a listen to the album.

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Shots - Health News
11:58 am
Thu October 23, 2014

How To Sell Bogus Health Cures In 5 Easy Steps

Wouldn't it be great if this stuff really did cause quick painless weight loss?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 10:33 am

I'm bummed that the green coffee weight-loss cure touted by Dr. Oz doesn't work. It could have been the perfect painless antidote to my habit of lying on the sofa eating Russian chocolate.

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The Two-Way
10:42 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Ottawa Attack Seen As Canada's Security Wake-Up Call

Ottawa police officers, with Parliament Hill in the background, guard the area around the National War Memorial in downtown Ottawa on Thursday.
Blair Gable Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 12:28 pm

Until Wednesday, the front door of Canada's main Parliament building, Centre Block, was often left unlocked. Taken as a metaphor for the nation as a whole, many think the attack in Ottawa will change that approach to security.

In the assault, a soldier was killed as he guarded the National War Memorial and a shootout left the gunman dead inside Canada's parliamentary complex.

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The Salt
9:49 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Why California's Drought-Stressed Fruit May Be Better For You

These pomegranates are about an inch smaller than the typical size, but they're packed with antioxidants.
Courtesy of Tiziana Centofanti

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 11:36 am

California's severe drought is putting stress on everyone these days: the residents whose wells are running dry; the farmers forced to experiment with growing their produce with much less water; and of course, the thirsty fruits and vegetables themselves.

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The Protojournalist
9:15 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Girl Scouts Look For A Way Out Of The Woods

Girl Scouts model contemporary uniforms.
From Girl Scouts of the USA website

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 10:11 am

The Girl Scouts organization wants s'more — members and leaders, that is.

Membership in Girl Scouts of the USA is on the decline. In the past year, according to the group's official blog, there has been a significant drop nationwide — down 400,000 girls and adults — from 3.2 million to 2.8 million.

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The Two-Way
9:03 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Canada's Parliament Gives Sergeant-At-Arms Standing Ovation

Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers is applauded in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Thursday. Vickers was credited with shooting the suspect during an attack on the Parliament complex on Wednesday.
Chris Wattie Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 12:31 pm

Barely 24 hours after a gunman attacked Parliament Hill in Ottawa, killing a soldier, lawmakers gave a standing ovation to Kevin Vickers, the legislature's sergeant-at-arms, for reportedly firing the shots that took down the assailant.

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