NPR News

Middle East
3:02 am
Thu March 19, 2015

Benjamin Netanyahu And Washington

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 5:14 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
3:02 am
Thu March 19, 2015

Filmmakers Find A Different Way To Show The Syrian Conflict

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A film said to be made in Syria shows a man on a chair. You can't really see where he is - maybe some cafe. But it's quiet. The camera never moves. The man looks at his hands. He stays silent for 40 seconds. At last, he speaks.

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It's All Politics
1:47 am
Thu March 19, 2015

Obama Says Critics Making 'The Same Argument' Despite Better Economy

President Obama takes questions from the audience Wednesday after speaking about the economy and the middle class to the City Club of Cleveland.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 4:05 pm

Barack Obama let down his graying presidential hair a little bit on Wednesday. He also joked about coloring it.

Speaking to the City Club of Cleveland, Obama seemed to be in a reflective mood. During the question-and-answer period, he was asked by a seventh-grader what advice he would give to himself now, if he could go back to his first day in office.

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Science
1:35 am
Thu March 19, 2015

Scientists Catch Up On The Sex Life Of Coral To Help Reefs Survive

Staghorn coral planted by scientists in the Florida Keys. Researchers hope to give the same sort of boost to the world's shrinking population of pillar coral, now that they can raise the creatures in a laboratory.
Joe Berg/Way Down Video/Mote

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 5:54 am

For the first time, biologists have caught a rare type of coral in the act of reproducing, and they were able to collect its sperm and eggs and breed the coral in the laboratory.

The success is part of an effort to stem the decline in many types of coral around the world.

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U.S.
1:29 am
Thu March 19, 2015

One Year After Mudslide, First Responders Tackle Emotional Damage

A sign memorializes the devastating mudslide that killed 43 people in Oso, Wash., one year ago.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 5:21 pm

One year ago, a mudslide wreaked havoc on Oso, a small community in Washington state. It took just a few minutes to topple dozens of homes, leaving 43 people dead. Volunteers and first responders rushed to the scene to save trapped residents. Yet, remarkably, none of them were hurt, at least not physically.

In the weeks and months following the landslide, thousands of people from the outlying areas formed teams. Loggers brought in heavy equipment; Red Cross and other groups organized volunteers and protected families from the throngs of media.

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National Security
1:24 am
Thu March 19, 2015

As Women Try Out For Armor Units, 'If You Can Hack It, You Can Hack It'

Lance Cpl. Brittany Dunklee talks with her fellow Marines.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 3:03 pm

It's a recent morning out in California's Mojave Desert, and Marine Lance Cpls. Paula Pineda and Julia Carroll are struggling to pick up and maneuver Carl. He's a 220-pound dummy, and a stand-in for a wounded Marine.

Carroll's knees buckle for a moment, but as a dusty wind picks up, the two women pull Carl off their light armored vehicle. They carry him to safety, careful not to let his head drag on the rocky ground.

Both women are out of breath.

Pineda is 5 foot 2. On the back of her helmet is a piece of masking tape with the words "Mad Max."

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Shots - Health News
1:06 am
Thu March 19, 2015

Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.S.?

Acids, alcohol and pancreatic tissue were separated, bathed and mixed in this laboratory of a 1946 insulin factory in Bielefeld, Germany.
Chris Ware Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 1:16 pm

Dr. Jeremy Greene sees a lot of patients with diabetes that's out of control.

In fact, he says, sometimes their blood sugar is "so high that you can't even record the number on their glucometer."

Greene, a professor of medicine and history of medicine at Johns Hopkins University, started asking patients at his clinic in Baltimore why they had so much trouble keeping their blood sugar stable. He was shocked by their answer: the high cost of insulin.

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The Two-Way
7:39 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Microsoft Is Phasing Out Internet Explorer

The logo of Microsoft's Internet Explorer, the Web browser due to be phased out in the next version of Windows.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 7:41 am

Clippy will soon get a roommate in Microsoft heaven or hell, depending on your perspective. This week, Microsoft announced that it will phase out Internet Explorer, its much-maligned Web browser, beginning with Windows 10.

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Shots - Health News
6:27 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Blue Shield Of California Loses Exemption From State Taxes

Steve Rhodes/Flickr

California tax authorities have stripped Blue Shield of California, the state's third largest insurer, of its tax-exempt status in California and ordered the firm to file returns dating to 2013, potentially costing the company tens of millions of dollars.

At issue in the unusual case is whether the company is doing anything different from its for-profit competitors to warrant its tax break. As a nonprofit company, Blue Shield is expected to work for the public good in exchange for the exemption from state taxes.

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

WATCH: Police Detonate 20,000 Pounds Of Fireworks

Dahboo777 via YouTube

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 5:23 pm

How long does it take to detonate 20,000 pounds of fireworks? The answer, courtesy of the Midland, Texas, Police Department, is 3 1/2 days.

A court ordered the destruction of the illegal fireworks. The department's bomb squad, along with those from Odessa, Lubbock and Amarillo, assisted the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives in the controlled detonation.

And what does that controlled detonation look like? Here's the answer — in the form of a 48-second video from the department's Facebook page:

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It's All Politics
4:50 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Bad Blood Gets Worse Between Barack, Bibi And Israel

President Obama with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House in 2013. The two have never had a warm and fuzzy relationship.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 5:22 pm

The U.S.-Israeli relationship was one of the issues in the Israeli elections — in particular Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's poisonous personal relationship with President Obama.

Now, with Netanyahu's return to power, that relationship doesn't look like it will be improving anytime soon.

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It's All Politics
4:49 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Chicago Mayor's Race Reveals Deep Divide In Democratic Party

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel failed to capture a majority of the vote last month, forcing him into a runoff. It's highlighting a divide among Democrats playing out nationally.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 5:39 pm

One of the nation's savviest politicians is in an unexpected fight.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, President Obama's former White House chief of staff, is in an unprecedented runoff election next month.

The challenger, Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia, contends that Emanuel favors the rich and powerful over working-class Chicagoans. But Emanuel is firing back, attacking Garcia for having no plan to deal with the city's deep financial problems.

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U.S.
4:27 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Record Number Of Inmate Deaths Has Florida Prisons On The Defensive

Latandra Ellington, 36, was serving time for tax fraud at Lowell Correctional Institution when she died.
Florida Department of Corrections

A record number of inmates – 346 people — died behind bars in Florida last year.

Most were from natural causes, but a series of suspicious deaths have raised questions about safety in the prisons. Federal and state law enforcement agencies are now investigating why so many inmates have been dying.

Latandra Ellington, 36, was serving time for tax fraud at Lowell Correctional Institution in central Florida when she died. Algarene Jennings, Ellington's aunt, believes she was murdered.

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Goats and Soda
4:27 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

How Malaria In The Brain Kills: Doctors Solve A Medical Mystery

The effects of malaria in the brain are clear: A healthy brain, right, has many grooves and crevices. But when the brain swells up, left, these crevices smooth out.
Courtesy of Michigan State University

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 10:16 am

Malaria is one of the oldest scourges of mankind. Yet it's been a mystery how the deadliest form of the disease kills children.

One doctor in Michigan has dedicated her life to figuring that out. Now she and her team report their findings in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The key to solving the mystery was looking inside the brain.

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The Two-Way
4:17 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Controversial French Comedian Convicted Of Condoning Terrorism

French comedian Dieudonne M'Bala M'Bala gestures to the media as he leaves a Paris court house Feb. 4. He was convicted today of condoning terrorism after the attacks in January in Paris, and given a suspended sentence.
Michel Euler AP

Controversial French comedian Dieudonne has been found guilty of condoning terrorism and given a two-month suspended sentence.

The comedian faced up to seven years in prison and a fine for his Facebook post after the deadly attack on the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo.

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World
3:24 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Palestinian Authority Reacts To Prime Minister Netanyahu's Reelection

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 4:27 pm

NPR's Melissa Block interviews Maen Areikat, chief of the PLO Delegation in Washington D.C., about Netanyahu's victory. Just before the election, Netanyahu stated that there will be no Palestinian state while he is prime minister.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

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Music Reviews
3:24 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

'To Pimp A Butterfly' Aspires To Be Music's Great American Novel

To Pimp a Butterfly follows two and a half years of anticipation stoked by Kendrick Lamar's breakthrough LP, good kid, m.A.A.d. city.
Christian San Jose Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 4:27 pm

When Kendrick Lamar released his major label debut in 2012, he vaulted onto pop's leaderboard as one of the best rappers of his generation. He wasn't just a skilled lyricist, but a vivid storyteller able to create scenes with vivid detail and intrigue.

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All Tech Considered
3:24 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Premera Blue Cross Cyberattack Exposed Millions Of Customer Records

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 6:28 pm

Another big health insurance company has revealed it has been the target of a massive cyberattack.

Premera Blue Cross says hackers may have taken up to 11 million customer records. Those records include credit card numbers, Social Security numbers, even information about medical problems. This news is just coming out but Premera issued a statement saying it discovered the breach on Jan. 29. That's about the same date that Anthem, another Blue Cross company, told the FBI that it was breached.

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Code Switch
3:12 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Starbucks Campaign Already Inspiring Awkward Conversations About Race

"It's also interesting because I'm actually black, but you assumed otherwise," Jay Smooth told Nancy Giles.
MSNBC's All In With Chris Hayes

Starbucks' campaign to get people talking about race has already birthed a very public, very cringeworthy conversation about race. Jay Smooth, a radio DJ and video blogger, was on MSNBC's All In With Chris Hayes Tuesday night, discussing the coffee company's "Race Together" campaign with fellow guest Nancy Giles, a contributor to CBS Sunday Morning.

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The Two-Way
2:47 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Protesters, Police Clash At Opening Of European Central Bank Headquarters

A protester holds a stone as police use water cannons on crowds near the new headquarters of the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany.
Michael Probst AP

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 4:15 pm

Anti-capitalist demonstrators and police battled Wednesday outside the European Central Bank's new headquarters in Frankfurt, Germany. Police cars were set on fire and nearby streets were blockaded with burning tires while a ceremony got underway inside to inaugurate the $1 billion-plus building.

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Shots - Health News
2:45 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

How Much Can Women Trust That Breast Cancer Biopsy?

Pathologists use slides like this one to look for signs of cancer in breast tissue.
Boilershot Photo Science Source

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 3:06 pm

When a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer, the person who does the diagnosing is a doctor she never sees — the pathologist.

But though pathologists do a great job of identifying invasive cancer, they aren't as good at spotting two less clear-cut diagnoses that bring women a lot of uncertainty and worry, a study finds.

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The Two-Way
2:24 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Britain Unveils A New 1-Pound Coin

The new 1-pound coin is expected to be released by 2017.
The Royal Mint

The Royal Mint in the U.K. has unveiled a new 1-pound coin that it says will be the world's most counterfeit-proof coin.

The 12-sided coin, which is set to be released by 2017, will still feature a likeness of Queen Elizabeth II on one side. But the "tails side" will have a new design representing the four symbols of the U.K.: an English rose, a leek for Wales, a Scottish thistle and shamrock for Northern Ireland. They emerge from a single stem within a crown.

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Shots - Health News
1:46 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Teens Say They Change Clothes And Do Homework While Driving

Hey, I'm not texting. Surely this is safe.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 3:08 pm

While most teenagers recognize that texting while driving is a bad idea, they may be less clear about the risk of other activities – like changing clothes.

Twenty-seven percent of teens say they sometimes change clothes and shoes while driving, a study finds. They also reported that they often change contact lenses, put on makeup and do homework behind the wheel.

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NPR Story
1:40 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Report: New Yorkers Have Longest Commute Time In Country

A report from the New York City Comptroller finds New Yorkers have the longest workweek, because they have the longest commutes in the country. (xymox/Flickr)

A new report from New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer finds that New York residents with full-time jobs spend more time commuting than residents of other large U.S. cities, with average commutes of 6 hours and 18 minutes a week.

That translates into 49 hours a week that New York workers spend working and commuting, compared with 42 hours for Los Angeles.

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NPR Story
1:13 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Midwest States Push To Legalize Raw Milk

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control warns that one sip of unpasteurized milk can cause serious illness because it’s a fertile breeding ground for harmful germs like salmonella and e. coli. (Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media)

Federal health officials say drinking unpasteurized raw milk is unsafe and poses a threat to public health.

But, raw milk is gaining popularity in some circles, so several Midwest states are actually looking to legalize the sale of raw milk in order to regulate it.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Harvest Public Media’s Abby Wendle has more about the push to legalize raw milk.

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NPR Story
1:13 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Changing The Conversation With #IAmAStatistic

(L-R) Neil Osborne, Max Tilus,Tyler Holness, and Jack McGoldrick are behind "Statistic" -- to change the conversation about African-American men. (Robin Lubbock/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 10:19 pm

Over the past few months, a light has been shined on the African-American man’s experience, especially in relation to law enforcement.

Throughout the conversation, much attention has been given to statistics: how many African-American men go to jail, graduate high school and go to college.

Many of these statistics reflect African-American men’s experiences in a negative light, but what if the statistics focused on their positive accomplishments?

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The Two-Way
12:41 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

No Charges For Operator Of Drone That Crashed At White House

The Secret Service released this photo of a "quad copter" that crashed on the White House grounds Jan. 26.
Secret Service

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 3:53 am

Prosecutors say they will not press criminal charges against an intelligence agency employee who lost control of a drone that crashed on the White House grounds on Jan. 26.

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Music Reviews
12:16 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Saxophonist Tony Malaby's New Quartet Brings Out His Rowdy Side

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:55 am
Wed March 18, 2015

Video Break: Soaring Through An Immense Vietnamese Cave

Yes, those are people: A still image from a drone video filmed inside the world's largest cave shows cavers standing beneath one of two large skylights in Vietnam's Hang Son Doong.
Ryan Deboodt Vimeo

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 2:27 pm

Updated at 4:25 p.m. ET.

An enormous limestone cave in Vietnam is the subject of a jaw-dropping new video that uses aerial drones to show its immense scale and beauty. Hang Son Doong is the world's largest cave, featuring a river and huge "skylights" that have allowed trees and wildlife to flourish within it.

American photographer Ryan Deboodt says he filmed Hang Son Doong on his third visit to the cave. He edited his film down from some three hours' worth of footage.

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It's All Politics
11:45 am
Wed March 18, 2015

Attorney General Holder Jokes That Republicans Have 'A New Fondness For Me'

Attorney General Eric Holder has endured a rocky relationship with lawmakers during his tenure. But he's all they have until his successor is confirmed.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 4:00 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder joked Wednesday that given nearly six months of Senate delays in confirming his successor at the Justice Department, "it's almost as if the Republicans in Congress have discovered a new fondness for me."

"I'm feeling love there that I haven't felt for some time. And where was all this affection the last six years?" the attorney general asked, to laughter, in brief remarks at the Center for American Progress in Washington.

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