NPR News

World Cafe
1:45 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Best Coast On World Cafe

Best Coast.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 3:29 pm

Best Coast is known for simple, beachy pop songs, but the L.A. duo's new album The Only Place steps up the production quality significantly. Singer Bethany Cosentino and multi-instrumentalist Bobb Bruno are driven by shared appreciation: Crazy For You and the new record both showcase the pair's infectious love of California.

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The Salt
1:33 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Some At-Risk Shark Species Are Ending Up In U.S. Soups

Click the image to see a full-size version. At least eight shark species, many endangered or threatened, were found in bowls of shark fin soup across the country.
Pew Environment Group

Sharks are some of the most feared and fascinating animals on the planet. They've had their own week of awareness-raising and celebration on the Discovery Channel for the last 25 years. But some say they are also delicious — as in the Chinese delicacy — shark fin soup.

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The Torch
1:24 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

U.S. Breaks Through In Wrestling, As Burroughs Delivers Gold

Jordan Burroughs celebrates with the U.S. flag after defeating Iran's Sadegh Saeed Goudarzi in the men's 74kg freestyle gold medal match.
Yuri Cortez AFP/Getty Images

American wrestler Jordan Burroughs has won the first and only U.S. gold medal in his sport at the London Games, beating Sadegh Saeed Goudarzi of Iran. Burroughs, the reigning world champion at the 74kg weight, won a point in the first two periods to put a quick end to the men's freestyle match.

Goudarzi took silver with the loss, and the two bronze medals went to Russian Denis Tsargush, whom Burroughs defeated in the semifinals, and Sosan Tigiev of Uzbekistan.

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Middle East
1:21 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Egypt's Christians Form Their Own Brotherhood

Egyptian riot police sit in the shade by damaged buildings as people walk through debris from the aftermath of clashes on Aug. 1 between Christians and Muslims in Dahshour, on the outskirts of Cairo. The violence was sparked by a dispute between a Muslim and Christian over laundered clothing.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 7:11 pm

A former leader of the Muslim Brotherhood occupies Egypt's presidential palace, leaving many of the country's Coptic Christians deeply anxious about their future.

Now, a new group calling itself the Christian Brotherhood has emerged, vowing to stand up for the rights of Copts.

On a Cairo rooftop recently, members of the new Christian Brotherhood are debating how to respond to the first major outbreak of Muslim-Christian violence since President Mohammed Morsi came into office in June.

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The Two-Way
1:07 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

7,500 Square Miles Of Pumice Floating In Pacific Is 'Weirdest Thing I've Seen'

This photo photo from the New Zealand Defense Force shows a handful of the rocks found floating in the South Pacific.
EPA /Landov

Nearly 300 miles long and about 35 miles wide, a floating raft of pumice in the South Pacific Ocean is "the wierdest thing I've seen in 18 years at sea," says Royal Australian Navy Lt. Tim Oscar.

He was aboard the Royal New Zealand Navy's HMNZS Canterbury on Thursday when the "amphibious support ship" investigated the phenomenon.

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The Two-Way
1:05 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Top New York ICE Officer Sues Napolitano For Discrimination Against Men

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

The officer in charge of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in New York has filed a lawsuit against Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano.

James Hayes Jr. alleges that the department, under Napolitano, has been turned into a female-run "frat house" and that Napolitano promoted women because of friendship instead of merit.

The lawsuit alleges that Napolitano hired two friends who have tormented the men of the agency.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Fri August 10, 2012

California's Baking And The Power Grid's Being Tested

Will there be too much demand? Power lines near Redondo Beach, Calif.
Gerard Burkhart AFP/Getty Images

Southern California will be broiling through the weekend, as a heat wave that has brought record-breaking temperatures continues, the Los Angeles Times says.

That's why the managers of California's power grid have issued a "flex alert" to customers.

They're asking that residents:

-- "Turn off all unnecessary lights."

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The Two-Way
11:15 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Wave Of Violence Leaves Dozens Dead Across Mexico

Police officers and soldiers stand around a white van containing the dead bodies of several man while it is being hauled onto a tow truck in San Luis Potosi on Thursday.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 12:39 pm

While the exact number of dead seems to be in flux, there is no question that the last few days have been incredibly bloody across Mexico.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:39 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Yoga On Commission: More Employers Pay For Good Health Habits

Health risk questionnaires and other wellness programs are becoming a popular way for employers to encourage employee health and, ultimately, reduce health care costs.
grandaded/iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 4:31 pm

If you feel like your employer is more interested in your health lately, you're probably right.

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Participation Nation
10:33 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Running For Others In Richmond, Ky.

Afsi and Lindsey use Skype to make plans for Eastern Further.
Colin Reusch Courtesy of Eastern Further

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 10:59 am

There is something special about Eastern Kentucky University: We call it "the Power of Maroon."

Eastern Further, a group of Eastern alumnae who recognize the positive impact that EKU has had on our lives, has organized a running team to compete in the Disney Princesses Half Marathon in February 2013.

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The Two-Way
10:23 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Bears With Taste For Beer Have Quite A Night In Norway

Don't get between a beer and a bear.
London Express Getty Images

"Drunk Bear Family Downs Over 100 Beers During Bear Rager."

Given our fondness for stories about pick-a-nicking bears, we couldn't resist that Gawker headline.

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'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
10:11 am
Fri August 10, 2012

It's All Politics, Aug. 9, 2012

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 6:01 pm

In what could be the last podcast before GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney's V.P. announcement, NPR's Ron Elving and Ken Rudin once again review the finalists. Plus: A look at the latest Obama and Romney ads, more battleground state polls, primary results in Missouri and elsewhere, and a look ahead to the next Tea Party target: U.S. Senate candidate Tommy Thompson in Wisconsin on Aug. 14.

Election 2012
10:00 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Voter ID Laws: Necessity Or Burden?

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 3:11 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up, if you thought the Tea Party a passing political fad with a catchy name, our next guest would urge you to reconsider. He's written a new book about the Tea Party and what he believes is the source of its influence in today's politics. We'll talk about that in just a few minutes.

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Shots - Health Blog
9:28 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Why Is The World's Largest Foundation Buying Fake Poop?

Graduate student Clement Cid sits atop the solar-powered toilet he helped to build at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif. Underneath the platform, the toilet converts waste into fertilizer. The Caltech team will use fake feces to demonstrate the toilet's features next week at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation offices.
Courtesy of Michael Hoffmann/Caltech

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 10:31 am

Last week, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation announced that it's purchasing 50 pounds of fake poop.

A practical joke? No, not in the least.

Nor is this synthetic poop a plastic replica of the real thing; it's an organic version made from soybeans. The Gates Foundation will use it to test high-tech commodes at their Reinvent the Toilet Fair next week.

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The Torch
9:07 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Boxing Maths and Aftermaths: Why Similar Scores Are A Mean System

Shiming Zou of China is declared the winner over Paddy Barnes of Ireland during their men's light flyweight boxing semifinal in London. The match was scored a 15-15 tie; Zou won on the number of punches landed.
Scott Heavey Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:16 am

Four years ago, Irish boxer Paddy Barnes lost to China's Zou Shiming by a score of 15-0 in Beijing. Today in London, Barnes fought his way back into their match to tie Zou at 15-15 — but he still lost. Barnes accepted the decision, but the result might confuse anyone who isn't familiar with boxing's scoring system.

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The Torch
8:03 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Let's Catch Up: Taekwondo Setback, And A Spice Girls Sighting

Great Britain's Stuart Bithell leaps off the boat while teammate Luke Patience sails on as they win silver in the men's sailing 470 two-person dinghy medal race in Weymouth, England.
William West AFP/Getty Images

Good morning. The final weekend of the Summer Olympics is about to begin. In the medal count, the U.S. has jumped out to a 90-80 lead over China, with 39 golds to China's 37. And Russia has overtaken Great Britain, with 57 to the host nation's 54 medals.

Here's today's news that caught our interest:

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The Two-Way
7:53 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Drought Deepens In Hardest Hit Parts Of U.S.

Drought-stricken corn struggles to survive on a farm near Poseyville, Ind.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:36 am

The areas of the lower 48 states where this summer's drought is judged to be "severe, extreme or exceptional" (in ascending order of seriousness) increased slightly again this week, according to the experts at the federal government's National Drought Mitigation Center.

It reports that:

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Shots - Health Blog
7:28 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Yes, There's Probably A Medical App For That

With thousands of medical apps available for download, patients and physicians can instantly keep visual records of wounds and look up symptoms.
Benjamin Morris NPR

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 7:46 am

How many calories have I consumed this week? How well did I sleep last night?

What about this thing on my leg — is it infected? What does an ECG for ventricular tachycardia look like again?

Yes, you guessed it. There is an app for that.

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The Two-Way
6:47 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Fighting Has Forced More Than 1.5 Million Syrians To Move, U.N. Says

In northwestern Syria earlier this year, this man and boys fled fighting.
Bulent Kilic AFP/Getty Images

The scope of the ongoing crisis in Syria is made clear yet again by two new reports from the United Nations:

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The Two-Way
6:00 am
Fri August 10, 2012

In Wisconsin, Thousands To Pay Homage To Sikh Temple Shooting Victims

A makeshift memorial outside the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in honor of the six people who were killed there.
Mira Oberman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 10:03 am

Several thousand people from across the U.S. and the world are expected in Oak Creek, Wis., today as Sikhs gather to mourn for the six people killed during Sunday's shooting rampage at a temple.

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Participation Nation
5:33 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Doing The Write Thing In Portland, Maine

Practicing the craft of storytelling in the Telling Room.
Courtesy of the Telling Room

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 10:59 am

The Telling Room is a non-profit center in Portland that inspires young people to explore the pleasures of the written word.

In an increasingly diverse state, the Telling Room engages with communities that are under-served by the public school system: young people from Maine's growing immigrant and refugee populations, those with emotional challenges and at-risk middle and high school students.

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The Two-Way
5:18 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Three U.S. Troops Killed In Latest 'Green On Blue' Attack

As boys washed their feet in the background, a U.S. Marine stood nearby earlier this summer in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.
Adek Berry AFP/Getty Images

"Three U.S. Forces-Afghanistan service members died following an attack by an individual wearing an Afghan uniform in southwest Afghanistan today," according to a statement from the International Security Assistance Force - Afghanistan.

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Animals
4:55 am
Fri August 10, 2012

London's Zoo Gets Animals Into Olympic Spirit

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. In the spirit of the Olympics, the London Zoo is presenting its own games: Animal Athletes in Action. Bob the Owl's 100-centimeter sprint has been a big hit. Adoring crowds cheer on the penguins in diving, otters in swimming and zebras in long-distance running, all competing, not for medals, but tasty morsels. Personal favorite: the insects weightlifting 850 times their body weight. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
4:49 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Semi-Automatic Rifle Arrives In TV Box

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Seth Horvitz says all he wanted was a TV. The Washington, D.C. resident was expecting it to be shipped through Amazon. Instead, he received a military-grade, semi-automatic rifle. Mr. Horvitz complained to Amazon, UPS and the seller. Nobody took responsibility. But police were happy to take the gun, which is illegal in the nation's capital. The Second Amendment assures the right to bear arms, not to ship them to the wrong address. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

World
4:39 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Anti-Blasphemy Law Introduced In Tunisia

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A small incident in Tunisia hints at some of the larger strains in the revolutions we call the Arab Spring. Police arrested an activist and journalist named Sofiene Chourabi. He was a prominent figure in Tunisia's uprising against a longtime ruler. But he differed with the new government that came to power, which is dominated by an Islamist party. Chourabi found himself under arrest after he criticized a proposed blasphemy law that he saw as a restriction of free speech. We talked about this with Tunisian journalist Asma Ghribi.

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Middle East
4:37 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Egypt Accused Of Inflating Facts On Sinai Attacks

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 7:45 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Space
2:43 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Followers Embrace Curiosity's Mars Tweets

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 5:05 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, at the same time that Adam Steltzner's team was waiting for news from Curiosity, tens of thousands of people around the world were waiting for some news from the rover's own Twitter feed. One week after landing, nearly 900,000 followers are getting to know the unique personality of Mars Curiosity. That's the rover's name on Twitter.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Here are a couple of Curiosity's tweets so far: You asked for pics from my trip, here you go: my first look of many to come of my new home, Mars.

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U.S.
1:24 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Sikh Shooting Puts Focus On Hate Groups At Home

Rescue workers stand in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City after an explosion on April 19, 1995. The bombing killed 168 people.
David Longstreath AP

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 4:28 am

The slaying of six people at a Sikh temple by a gunman with ties to white supremacists has raised questions about the scope of domestic terrorism — and what law enforcement is doing to stop it.

Federal law enforcement agencies cracked down hard on homegrown extremists after the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, which killed 168 people, including 19 children at a day care center. Many leaders went to prison, died or went bankrupt.

But in recent years, the spread of the Internet, the worsening economy and changing demographic patterns have been giving new voice to hate groups.

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First And Main
1:20 am
Fri August 10, 2012

An Undecided Florida Voter Faces Emotional Decision

Wanda Kos is undecided this election year, but voted for Barack Obama in 2008. She is concerned for the future of her daughter Sofia, 6, and her two older children, including one son who just joined the military
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 10:25 am

As the presidential election nears, Morning Edition has begun a series of reports from an iconic American corner: First and Main. Several times in the next few months, we'll travel to a battleground state, then to a vital county in each state. In that county, we find a starting point for our visit: First and Main streets, the intersection of politics and real life.

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National Security
1:19 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Air Force Chief Leaves Legacy In The Sky: Drones

Gen. Norton Schwartz (shown here in October 2010) is stepping down as the top U.S. Air Force officer.
Tim Sloan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 4:28 am

The top officer in the U.S. Air Force, Gen. Norton Schwartz, is stepping down Friday after four years on the job.

Schwartz got the job after his predecessor was fired for — among other things — clashing with his Pentagon bosses over how many fighter jets the military needs.

Schwartz is most likely to be remembered for pushing another kind of aircraft: drones.

At this moment, dozens of these unmanned aircraft are flying high above Afghanistan.

Just don't call them drones when speaking with Schwartz.

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