NPR News

The Two-Way
10:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Increasingly, Reporters Must First Answer Some Questions

May we see some ID?
Alan Greenblatt

As he's been reporting for NPR.org in recent months, Alan Greenblatt has noticed something unusual: he's increasingly being asked to prove who he is and that he is, in fact, a journalist. Here's what he found when he started to ask why that's happening:

How many people would bother to impersonate a reporter? Enough, apparently, to cause some government officials to do preliminary background checks on people to whom they grant interviews.

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It's All Politics
9:53 am
Tue April 10, 2012

'A Moon-Colony Guy?' The Republican Campaign Returns

The Salt
9:32 am
Tue April 10, 2012

More, Better, Faster Sushi? Call In A 'Sushi Bot'

Suzbo sushi roller.
Youtube.com

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 6:39 pm

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The Two-Way
8:35 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Marlins Manager Ozzie Guillen Suspended Following 'I Love Fidel' Comment

Marlins manager Ozzie Guillen during his news conference this morning in Miami.
Lynne Sladky AP
  • Tom Goldman on 'Morning Edition'

Miami Marlins manager Ozzie Guillen has been suspended without pay for five games, effective immediately, as the firestorm continues over his comment to Time magazine last week that "I love Fidel Castro."

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Shots - Health Blog
8:22 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Analysis Finds Lung Cancer Screening Worthwhile For Longtime Smokers

Dr. Steven Birnbaum positions a patient inside a CT scanner at Southern New Hampshire Medical Center in Nashua, N.H., in June 2010.
Jim Cole AP

Now there's fresh evidence that CT scans to detect early lung cancer belong on the short list of effective cancer screening technologies — at least for people at high risk.

Researchers conclude that spiral CT, which makes 3-D pictures of lungs, could reduce lung cancer deaths by 35 percent at a cost of $19,000 to $26,000 per year of life saved.

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The Two-Way
6:55 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Carriers, FCC Join In Bid To Curb Cellphone Thefts

On the phone in Manhattan.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Wireless providers have agreed to create a national database of stolen cellphones that it is hoped will make the devices somewhat less tempting to thieves.

Julius Genachowski, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, and a group of lawmakers and law enforcement officials are set to announce outlines of the plan at 10 a.m. ET.

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The Two-Way
6:20 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Tips Led To Tulsa Shooting Suspects' Arrests; Police Say They've Confessed

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 6:31 am

The key moment in the manhunt for suspects in a murder spree that terrorized African-Americans in Tulsa, Okla., came Saturday morning when a tip was called in to the city's Crime Stoppers hotline, the Tulsa World says.

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The Two-Way
5:45 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Syria Says It Is Pulling Troops Back, Activists Say Army Continues To Attack

At a refugee camp in Reyhanli, Turkey, on Monday, Syrians sought help and safety.
Germano Assad AP

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 5:58 am

On this day when a U.N.-brokered cease-fire was supposed to go into effect in Syria, "activists reported military attacks on two towns ... even as the government claimed its military forces have begun pulling out" of some areas, The Associated Press reports.

The BBC says:

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Europe
5:44 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Sarkozy Bans Cheese Course At Presidential Palace

The chef at the presidential palace recently revealed that Nicolas Sarkozy has said no to the cheese course after meals. He doesn't drink, so no wine for him either.

Around the Nation
5:26 am
Tue April 10, 2012

18 Year Old Runs For Honolulu City Council Seat

If E.J. Delacruz, 18, were elected, he would be the youngest person ever to hold political office in Hawaii. Not that it will be easy. A state representative is running for the same job, which also has an incumbent seeking re-election.

The Two-Way
5:15 am
Tue April 10, 2012

George Zimmerman Launches Website And Seeks Support, Lawyer Says

TheRealGeorgeZimmerman.com

A new website — TheRealGeorgeZimmerman.com — was indeed launched over the weekend by the Florida man who shot and killed a black teenager in an incident that has ignited a national discussion about race relations and racial profiling, one of his attorneys tells local news outlets in Orlando, Fla.

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Sports
2:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Miami Outraged Over Guillen's Castro Comments

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 4:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And one of baseball's better-known characters, with a knack for testing the boundaries of free speech, has created a controversy in the very first week of the season. Ozzie Guillen, new manager of the Miami Marlins, is holding a press conference today in Miami to apologize. It's all about some comments he made about Cuba's Fidel Castro. Joining us now is NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman. Good morning.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Renee.

MONTAGNE: OK. What did he say?

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Education
2:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Vets Help Others Move From Combat To College

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 3:29 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Thanks to the new GI Bill, which went into effect in 2009, hundreds of thousands of U.S. veterans have the opportunity to go back to school. For many veterans, heading to college or university often involves a difficult transition. Sean Bueter of member station WBOI in Fort Wayne, Indiana explains how one university is helping veterans succeed.

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Around the Nation
2:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

1921 Riot Reveals Tulsa's History Of Race Relations

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 4:31 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Police are still investigating whether the Tulsa shootings were racially motivated. We do know some of Tulsa's history. It has a difficult history of race relations, including a riot in 1921 that left scores, if not hundreds, of people dead.

Scott Ellsworth has studied that event closely. He's a Tulsa native who now teaches African-American history at the University of Michigan. He's on the line from Michigan Radio.

Welcome to the program.

SCOTT ELLSWORTH: Thank you very much.

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Around the Nation
2:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Police: Suspects Confess To Tulsa Shooting Spree

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 4:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

We're going to spend this part of the program in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where a deadly shooting spree in a black neighborhood has revived memories of a long-ago race riot.

INSKEEP: First, we have an update on the news here. Police in Tulsa confirm that the two men accused of shooting five black people, and killing three, confessed shortly after they were arrested on Sunday.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:40 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Bird Flu Studies Mired In Export Control Law Limbo

An electron microscope view of the bird flu virus.
PR Newswire

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 5:50 am

Scientists who created mutant forms of bird flu want to see their research published, and an influential advisory committee recently gave them the green light after a debate that lasted for months.

But one of the manuscripts is now being blocked from publication because of Dutch legal controls on the export of technology that could potentially be used for weapons.

It's just the latest example of how complicated international export control laws have affected the debate over what to do about two studies on bird flu.

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The Two-Way
6:00 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Paintball Journalism? Ex-Army Ranger, Journalists Trade Shots With Hezbollah

Meeting Hezbollah on the paintball playing field.
vice.com

"Paintballing With Hezbollah Is The Path Straight To Their Hearts," says the headline at the Vice.com newssite.

In a quest to get to better know members of the Hezbollah militia in Lebanon, four Western journalists and a former U.S. Army Ranger last year arranged to play paintball in Beirut with some men who said they were among the group's fighters.

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All Tech Considered
5:17 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Jack Tramiel, Man Behind Commodore 64, Has Died

Jack Tramiel, the man behind the Commodore 64 computer, died Sunday, according to reports. Tramiel, who was 83, came to America after World War II. He was a survivor of the Auschwitz concentration camp in his native Poland.

Update: This post has been updated to reflect Tramiel's liberation from the Ahlem work camp, after his time in Auschwitz.

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The Two-Way
5:16 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Jack Tramiel, Father Of Commodore 64 And An Auschwitz Survivor, Dies At 83

Jack Tramiel, seen in 1984, founded Commodore International as well as Atari Corp.
Sal Veder AP

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 4:35 am

Jack Tramiel, the founder of Commodore International, whose iconic Commodore 64 was one of the best-selling computers of all time, has died. He was 83.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:11 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Jack Tramiel, Father Of Commodore 64, Dies

Jack Tramiel, seen in 1984, founded Commodore International as well as Atari Corp.
Sal Veder AP

Jack Tramiel, the founder of Commodore International, whose iconic Commodore 64 was one of the best-selling computers of all time, has died. He was 83.

Forbes reports that Tramiel was born in Poland in 1928 to a Jewish family, and sent to Auschwitz during World War II. He and father were then sent to the Ahlem labor camp near Hanover from where he was rescued in 1945. He came to the U.S. in 1947 where he started Commodore as a typewriter business.

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The Two-Way
4:30 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Maryland Says Mega Millions Winner Has Come Forward

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 4:31 pm

The second of three winning tickets in last month's $656 million record-breaking Mega Millions lottery has been turned in, officials at the Maryland Lottery just announced.

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The Two-Way
3:35 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Obama's Off His Game — Basketball, That Is

Presidential pique at a missed shot.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Four years ago, then-candidate Barack Obama famously sank a 3-point shot when he visited U.S. troops in Kuwait who had gathered in a gym to hear from the Democratic senator. The video was a cable TV favorite for a day or two.

Today, the first hoopster's shot wasn't dropping, as Politico reports.

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The Salt
3:11 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Now On The Menu For Hungry Kids: Supper At School

Students at Garfield Elementary School eat dinner as part of an after-school program in Kansas City, Mo. In the past few years, a federally subsidized school dinner program has spread from six to all 50 states.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 11:34 am

Not long after the start of the school year, Monique Sanders, a teacher at Nathan Hale Elementary School in Manchester, Conn., realized many of her students were going to bed hungry.

"It was very bad. I had parents calling me several times a week, asking did I know of any other way that they could get food because they had already gone to a food pantry," Sanders says. "The food pantry only allows you to go twice per month, so if you are running low on your food stamps or you didn't get what you needed and you're not able to feed your family, that's very stressful."

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Shots - Health Blog
2:54 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Colon Cancer Screening More Likely When People Are Given A Choice

Kristen Miller talks over the risks and benefits of colonoscopy with Stephen Hanauer, chief of gastroenterology at the University of Chicago Medical Center.
Brian Kersey AP

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 4:14 pm

One-third of people over age 50 aren't getting screened for colon cancer, despite a big push from the medical establishment. But what if all those people needed was to be given a choice?

People whose doctors let them choose between a colonoscopy or a fecal occult blood test were much more likely to get screened than were people whose doctors told them to go get a colonoscopy.

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The Record
2:30 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

How To Succeed In The Music Business (By Trying Really, Really Hard)

Raka Dun (left) and Raka Rich of the Oakland, Calif., duo Los Rakas.
Laura Sydell via Instagram NPR

Originally published on Wed April 11, 2012 12:43 pm

It's never been easy to make a living as a musician. But there was always a dream: to become a star on the strength of your talent and your music. The Internet is a rude sandman, however, and today that dream is a lot more convoluted.

No longer can a would-be rock star follow the once-accepted checklist: (1) sign with a big label, (2) get a hit, (3) buy mansions and cars. The number of ways a musician can make money is now varied. The question, for many musicians still trying to make a go of it in the industry, is whether those many sources can add up to something sustainable.

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Africa
2:29 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Is The Old Regime Seeking A Comeback In Egypt?

Omar Suleiman (right), who was intelligence chief and vice president under former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, leaves the presidential elections committee headquarters in Cairo on April 7, after submitting his candidacy papers.
Khaled Elfiqi EPA /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 3:14 pm

In Egypt, next month's presidential election has undergone a wrenching several days.

First, leading Islamist candidates faced possible disqualification on legal grounds, and then, hours before the deadline to register, a leading face from the regime of Hosni Mubarak jumped into the race.

The appearance of 75-year-old Omar Suleiman, Mubarak's former intelligence chief, has sparked fears that the military council running the country is maneuvering to bring back the old regime.

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The Two-Way
2:25 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Here's How And Why Bubba Watson Hit The Shot That Won The Masters

Bubba Watson hitting the hook that effectively won the Masters Tournament.
Streeter Lecka Getty Images
  • Jaime Diaz on Watson's swing
  • Jaime Diaz on how Watson learned to do that
  • Jaime Diaz on Watson's ADD

Hours and hours of hitting little plastic golf balls and learning to make them twist and turn and bend and bounce in almost any direction.

That's one reason why golfer Bubba Watson was able to hit a shot Sunday that most duffers could never make — and do it to win this year's Masters Tournament.

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Africa
2:10 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

For The First Time, Mr. Gay World Crowned In Africa

Andreas Derleth of New Zealand was named Mr. Gay World 2012 on Sunday in Johannesburg. It marked the first time the competition was held in Africa, where being gay is a crime in many countries on the continent.
Denis Farrell AP

At a golf resort in suburban Johannesburg, a group of men lounged by the pool. They cheered as five competitors sprinted around a grassy field — in Speedo swimsuits — to the sounds of "Yellow Polka Dot Bikini."

This was sports day at Mr. Gay World 2012.

Gay men from 22 countries took part, and this year's competition was noteworthy because it was the first time it was held on African soil. It addition, it also marked the first time that black African men participated, though there were just two.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:01 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

With Cancer Care, The U.S. Spends More, But Gets More

Newer cancer treatment drugs have raised the cost of treatment even more.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 2:03 pm

By now it's hardly news that the U.S. spends more than every other industrialized country on health care. But a new study suggests that at least when it comes to cancer care, Americans may actually be getting decent value.

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Europe
1:28 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Lack Of Graduates Hampers Portugal's Recovery

A group of young Portuguese protest at Lisbon's Rossio square last month to vent their frustration at grim career prospects amid an acute economic crisis that shows no signs of abating.
Armando Franca AP

As Portugal tries to dig out of its financial mess, it's confronted with a sobering fact: Fewer than 30 percent of adult Portuguese have graduated from high school. Not college. High school.

And in a country that's been hit so hard by the economic crisis, even those with an education are struggling.

Ana Dias and Ruth Cardozo, both 27, are lifelong friends who now work together at a shoe store in Lisbon, the Portuguese capital. Cardozo dropped out of high school 10 years ago to take this job.

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