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Hurricane Irma was the longest-lasting powerful hurricane or typhoon ever recorded, worldwide.

Irma sustained its 185-mph winds for 37 hours – "the longest any cyclone around the globe has maintained that intensity on record," according to Phil Klotzbach, a research scientist at Colorado State University. The previous record was held by Typhoon Haiyan, also called Super Typhoon Yolanda, which hit the Philippines in 2013.

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Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin with news that would shake Napoleon Dynamite to his core. For the first time, four male liligers were born in one litter. A liliger is a hybrid from a male lion and a female liger. And a liger? Well, ask Napoleon.

When it comes to drinking alcohol during pregnancy, some women wonder: Is it OK to have one drink?

"I do get that question often," says David Garry, a maternal-fetal medicine specialist at Stony Brook University Hospital. And, he says his answer is clear.

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Comic Book Legend Len Wein Dies At 69

Sep 12, 2017

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The man who co-created Wolverine, Swamp Thing and a whole lot of other comic book characters died Sunday at the age of 69. NPR's Glen Weldon says Len Wein was a writer, an artist and an editor whose love of superheroes was clear on every panel.

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Understanding your health plan benefits and what isn't covered is crucial for consumers. But that isn't always easy. Readers' questions this month center around what insurance companies need to tell customers about their benefits and when. For example, does my insurer have to give advance notice if it changes my benefits? And does my plan have to issue a written excuse if it denies coverage for services? What if the coverage doesn't meet federal health law standards? Here are some answers.

What was already expected to be a contentious second meeting for President Trump's Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, on Tuesday in Manchester, N.H., is likely to get a whole lot more contentious thanks to a column written by the panel's co-chair.

Although the chairman, Vice President Pence, said in that first meeting that the commission has "no preconceived notions or pre-ordained results," the panel's co-chair, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, seemed to contradict him in Breitbart News last week.

The United Nations Security Council voted unanimously on Monday to impose a new set of sanctions against North Korea after the United States compromised with Russia and China who opposed an even harder line sought by the Trump administration.

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Brexit Leaves French Fishermen On The Hook

Sep 11, 2017

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A supporter of an Albuquerque mayoral candidate has filed a complaint against another candidate over donations.

Bernalillo County resident Terry Brunner filed on Monday an ethics complaint against Albuquerque mayoral hopeful and Bernalillo County Commissioner Wayne Johnson. The complaint alleges that Johnson's mayoral campaign has accepted around $40,000 in donations from donors who have ongoing county business.

Brunner is a supporter of Albuquerque mayoral candidate Tim Keller.

She was working with children who had cerebral palsy in Afghanistan. At around 10:15 Monday morning, she stepped outside of the ward to approach two patients in the orthopedic center. One of them, a man in a wheelchair, took out a gun and fatally wounded Lorena Enebral Perez. He had been a patient at the orthopedic center in Mazar-i-Sharif for 19 years, having first visited the center at age 2 to be treated for polio. She was a Spanish physiotherapist on her first mission with the International Committee of the Red Cross.

Pollinators such as bees play a key part of producing the beans that go into your morning cup of coffee.

In fact, they are responsible for about 20 to 25 percent of coffee production by increasing the plants' yield, Taylor Ricketts, the director of the University of Vermont's Gund Institute for Environment, tells The Two-Way. Bees actually increase the quality of the beans by making their size more uniform.

The U.S. Supreme Court will temporarily allow the Trump administration to block many refugees from six mostly Muslim countries without direct familial ties in the United States from entering this country.

In a brief order issued Monday, Justice Anthony Kennedy delayed implementation of a ruling issued by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals last week that would have allowed entry to refugees with formal ties to resettlement agencies here.

France's busiest port, Boulougne-sur-Mer, sits just across the English Channel from Britain, in the Calais region.

Seagulls glide above scores of brightly painted boats docking to unload the catch of the day — mainly sole but also cod, roussette, crab and scallops.

It's all sold at a bustling seaside market where Marie-Laure Fontaine sells seafood from a fishing boat called Providence.

Last Friday, a federal judge in Manhattan ordered that the first and most famous verse of the Civil Rights era anthem "We Shall Overcome" belongs in the public domain.

Plaintiffs in the case had asked the judge to negate a half-century-old copyright by four songwriters, including the late Pete Seeger.

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Comic book writer and editor Len Wein has died. He helped create a lot of famous characters during his nearly 50-year career.

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Like Storm, the white-haired X-Man who controls the weather.

Stephen Ward arrived at the Germain Arena in Estero, Fla., at 4 in the morning on Saturday as Hurricane Irma was making its approach.

On Monday morning, after the storm had passed, the elderly Fort Myers resident was unhappily looking out over the parking lot at the arena where some 5,000 people had sought shelter.

"I have to get home and see if I still have a house," he said. But the lot was covered in water, spilling from a nearby pond and rising over the hubcaps of the smaller cars. And both roads out of the parking lot were underwater, too.

"You couldn't be more dead wrong. America was built on her citizens. ... Look at the 19th century. What built America's called the American system, from Hamilton to Polk to Henry Clay to Lincoln to the Roosevelts. [It was] a system of protection of our manufacturing, financial system that lends to manufacturers, OK, and the control of our borders. Economic nationalism is what this country was built on. The American system." – Steve Bannon

Experiencing Irma In Naples, Fort Myers

Sep 11, 2017

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets two updates from Florida assessing the situation as Irma — now a tropical storm — moves through the state. She speaks with Randy Henderson, the mayor of Fort Myers, Florida, about how the storm has affected the city, and Ed Laudise, assistant principal of a school in Naples, where people were sheltered as Irma passed overhead.

At the White House and the Pentagon Monday morning, the president and first lady observed the 16th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

NPR’s Ron Elving (@NPRrelving) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss President Trump’s remarks, and also to look ahead to the week in politics.

Following the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, first responders rushed to ground zero in Manhattan, where they braved dangerous conditions to rescue people buried in the rubble, retrieve the remains of the dead and clear the debris. Among them was demolition supervisor John Feal.

Feal arrived at ground zero on Sept. 12; just five days later, he was seriously injured when an 8,000-pound piece of steel fell and crushed his foot.

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What to do if you live in Florida's Manatee County waiting on a hurricane? Rescue a few manatees, naturally.

On Sunday, Hurricane Irma was still 100 miles away from Tampa but had already sucked the water out of shallow Sarasota Bay, a prime habitat for manatees — the protected marine mammals also known as sea cows.

Intrigued, Marcelo Clavijo and several friends went out for a drive to take in the strange sight of an empty bay.

Back in 2007, the hype around Apple's new phone was all about the keyboard — or lack thereof.

"In fact, some experts think the days of the telephone keypad are numbered," NPR's Laura Sydell wrote in advance of the release of the very first iPhone by Steve Jobs. It's fair to say, the forecast triumph of the on-screen keyboard has proved true (RIP BlackBerry Classic).

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