NPR News

The Two-Way
6:02 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Stephanopoulos Apologizes For Not Disclosing Donations To Clinton Foundation

ABC news anchor George Stephanopoulos is apologizing for failing to disclose $75,000 in donations over a three-year period to the Clinton Foundation.

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The Salt
4:58 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

From Scornin' It To Lovin' It: McDonald's Tests Out Kale On Its Menu

Kale is not only loaded with nutrients, but it's become a emblem of a healthy lifestyle that's increasingly appealing to Americans ready to move away from processed, high-calorie food.
Peet Sneekes/Flickr

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 4:31 pm

Just a few months ago McDonald's was showing no love for kale.

In a TV ad promoting the beefiness of the Big Mac, the chain poked fun at the leafy green and other vegetarian fare: "You can't get juiciness like this from soy or quinoa," a low voice quips as the camera focuses on a juicy burger. "Nor will it ever be kale."

But the chain is now showing it some affection. McDonald's has announced that it's testing a new breakfast bowl that blends kale and spinach with turkey sausage and egg whites. McDonald's spokeswoman Lisa McComb says the bowls are "freshly prepared."

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It's All Politics
4:58 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

After Baltimore And Ferguson, Major Momentum For Criminal Justice System Reform

Demonstrators participated in a March2Justice for criminal justice reform legislation outside the Capitol in April. Lawmakers who are working to on fixes to the justice system say recent unrest is pushing them to act.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 16, 2015 5:46 pm

Lawmakers working on fixes to the justice system say that unrest in places like Ferguson, Mo., and Baltimore is pushing them to act.

"The whole idea of a young man dying in police custody, the confrontations with police, the looting and burning of innocent minority owned businesses," Texas Republican Sen. John Cornyn said on the Senate floor this month. "The question arises, what can we do?"

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The Two-Way
3:49 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Calif. Moves Closer To Banning Vaccine 'Personal Belief' Exemptions

A photo from April shows protesters in Sacramento, Calif., rallying against a bill that would require all school-age children to be vaccinated. The state Senate just passed the measure.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

California's state Senate has passed a bill to eliminate "personal belief exemptions" that currently allow parents to opt out of having their school-age children vaccinated.

SB 277, sponsored by Democratic Sens. Richard Pan of Sacramento and Ben Allen of Santa Monica, passed 25 to 10 and now advances to the Assembly.

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NPR Ed
3:42 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

After Suicides, MIT Works To Relieve Student Pressure

Professors are now particularly attuned to the issue of "impostor syndrome" — a feeling students can have that they must have gotten into MIT by mistake.
Robin Lubbock/WBUR

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 1:32 pm

On a sunny spring day at MIT in Cambridge, Mass., students line up at a table grabbing ice cream sundaes, milk and cookies, and, if they're interested, a hug from MIT parents including Sonal Patel.

"Yes!" Patel says, "giving away ice cream and now hugs."

"Oh, I want a hug," a student says, "that will be good."

The event — billed as "Stress Less Day" — is sponsored by the student mental health awareness group Active Minds. Volunteers are handing out fliers listing mental health facts and campus resources.

Sophomore Matt Ossa gets his ice cream and rushes on.

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Business
3:42 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Why Some Detroit Residents Claim To Live Someplace Else

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan (left) has proposed a $275,000 cap on auto-related medical coverage in order to make auto insurance more affordable.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 4:57 pm

How much does auto insurance cost in Detroit?

For an estimated 50 to 60 percent of Detroit drivers, it's actually a very good deal: "They're paying nothing, because they don't buy insurance," says Wayne Miller, an adjunct professor at Wayne State University Law School in Detroit.

He studies insurance and says Detroiters, who pay some of the highest insurance rates in the nation, have found other ways to game the system.

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Parallels
3:42 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Why Everyone's Talking About Israel's New Justice Minister

Ayelet Shaked of the right-wing Jewish Home party, shown here on May 6, is Israel's new justice minister. During her two years in parliament, she called for bringing more conservative judges to Israel's highest court.
Gali Tibbon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 1:33 pm

Among the faces in Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's new right-wing government, one is drawing particular attention: Ayelet Shaked, the new justice minister.

Shaked is secular, lives in liberal Tel Aviv, and has a background in the high-tech industry. Ari Soffer, the managing editor of Israel National News, calls her a patriot.

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Parallels
3:42 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

The Man Who Keeps Tabs On U.S. Money Spent In Afghanistan

John Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, testifies on Capitol Hill last June. Sopko says the Afghans are still having trouble managing the money the U.S. sends to the country. The U.S. has spent $110 billion on Afghanistan's reconstruction since 2002.
Charles Dharapak ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 12:46 pm

John Sopko, whose job is to watch over U.S. government spending in Afghanistan, says it's not his job to be a cheerleader — it's to speak truth to power.

"I am often the bringer of bad news to people. Or at least that's what some people think," he says.

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Goats and Soda
3:38 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Baltimore Artist Helps Turn Liberian School Into A Mural Masterpiece

David "Nanook" Cogdill, an American street artist, came to Liberia to create a welcoming mural for a school that had been damaged by riots during the Ebola outbreak.
M. Holden Warren for NPR

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 4:50 pm

Once the scene of tragedy, a school in the West Point slums of Liberia is now a work of art — and it's an international affair. Street artists from Baltimore collaborated with Liberian artists to create murals on the Nathaniel Varney Massaquoi Elementary and Junior High School.

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The Two-Way
3:24 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Obama Tries To Calm Arab Fears Over Iran Talks

President Obama sits with Kuwaiti Emir Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Sabah, left center, Secretary of State John Kerry, right center, and other Gulf Cooperation Council leaders and delegations at Camp David, Md., on Thursday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 5:00 pm

President Obama assured allies in the Persian Gulf the U.S. would stand by them in the event of an external attack, tried to assuage their fears over U.S. talks with Iran over its nuclear program and said he shared their concerns about the Islamic republic's "destabilizing actions in the region."

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It's All Politics
3:14 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Drone-Like Device Puts White House On Lockdown

This small unmanned aerial vehicle was spotted flying near the White House.
US Secret Service

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 4:54 pm

It's red and black and not much larger than a brick.

But the unmanned flying device, that looked more like a toy than a drone, was a big enough problem to put the White House, executive mansion and surrounding area on lock down for about an hour while it was checked out.

The small "unmanned aerial vehicle" was spotted flying 100 feet above Lafayette Park at lunchtime Thursday afternoon, according to the U.S. Secret Service. The park is right across the street from the White House.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Tom Brady Appeals 'Deflategate' Suspension

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady is appealing his four-game suspension in connection with the "deflategate" scandal.

The NFL Players Association filed the appeal today on Brady's saying:

"Given the NFL's history of inconsistency and arbitrary decisions in disciplinary matters, it is only fair that a neutral arbitrator hear this appeal.

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It's All Politics
2:54 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Now, Ben Carson Leads In A Republican Poll

Ben Carson, seen speaking in the early presidential nominating state of New Hampshire, is the latest Republican to vault to the top of a primary poll.
Mary Schwalm AP

Following a trio of Republican campaign announcements last week, Ben Carson leaps to the top spot of GOP presidential candidates in the latest Fox News poll tied with presumed GOP front-runner Jeb Bush.

Carson, former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee all entered the race for the Republican nomination early last week, but none has seen as dramatic a bump as the retired neurosurgeon.

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Shots - Health News
1:24 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Nurse Visits Help First-Time Moms, Cut Government Costs In Long Run

Symphonie Dawson and her son, Andrew. A visiting nurse program helped Dawson finish school while she was pregnant.
Courtesy of Symphonie Dawson

While studying to become a paralegal and working as a temp, Symphonie Dawson kept feeling sick. She found out it was because she was pregnant.

Living with her mom and two siblings near Dallas, Dawson, then 23, worried about what to expect during pregnancy and what giving birth would be like. She also didn't know how she would juggle having a baby with being in school.

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Race
1:16 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos

A helicopter flies over a section of Baltimore affected by riots. Richard Rothstein writes that recent unrest in Baltimore is the legacy of a century of federal, state and local policies designed to "quarantine Baltimore's black population in isolated slums."
Patrick Smith Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 11:25 am

Fifty years after the repeal of Jim Crow, many African-Americans still live in segregated ghettos in the country's metropolitan areas. Richard Rothstein, a research associate at the Economic Policy Institute, has spent years studying the history of residential segregation in America.

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The Two-Way
1:06 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

What NATO Diplomats Do On Their Downtime: Sing 'We Are The World'

Reuters via YouTube

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 8:35 am

NATO foreign ministers in Antalya, Turkey, were persuaded at the end of their meeting this week to come up on stage for a rendition of "We are the World."

Here's the video:

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NPR Story
12:48 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

'Good Kill' Takes A Searching Look At Drone Warfare

Ethan Hawke (Tom Egan) in Andrew Niccol’s "Good Kill." (Courtesy of Lorey Sebastian. Copyright © 2014 Clear Skies Nevada LLC. An IFC Films release.)

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 8:18 am

In the new film “Good Kill,” Ethan Hawke plays Tom Egan, a former Air Force pilot who’s now a drone operator in Las Vegas. Egan longs to go back into combat, but instead is relegated to firing at suspected terrorist targets from thousands of miles away.

Writer-director Andrew Niccol told Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti that he was drawn to make the film because he found drone operators to be an entirely new kind of solider.

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It's All Politics
12:42 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Jeb Bush Fully Walks Back: 'I Would Not Have Gone Into Iraq'

Jeb Bush walked back his position that he would have authorized the Iraq War, even knowing what we know now. He now says he would not have.
Pat Sullivan AP

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 1:09 pm

After nearly a week of confusion over his position on Iraq, the Middle East and the role of his brother as an adviser, Jeb Bush fully walked back his position that he would have gone to war in Iraq even knowing what we know now.

"So here's the deal," Bush told an audience in Arizona. "If we're all supposed to answer hypothetical questions, knowing what we know now, I would not have engaged. I would not have gone into Iraq. That's not to say that the world is safer because Saddam Hussein is gone. It is significantly safer."

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The Two-Way
12:41 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Greece Says It Won't Take U.K. To Court For Return Of Elgin Marbles

The headless, reclining sculpture of the river god Ilissos is on display at the State Hermitage Museum as part of its 250th anniversary celebration in St. Petersburg in December. The sculpture, taken from the Parthenon in Athens 200 years ago, was on loan to Russia from the British Museum.
Grigory Dukor Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 10:42 am

Greece has backed off a threat to sue the United Kingdom for the return of the Elgin Marbles, a set of sculptures dating to 400 B.C. that were removed from the Parthenon 200 years ago and have been in the British Museum ever since.

Greece's Culture Minister Nikos Xydakis said Athens would pursue the matter through "diplomatic and political" channels rather than take it to the International Court of Justice.

"One cannot go to court over whatever issue. Besides, in international courts the outcome is uncertain," Xydakis told the country's Mega TV.

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The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

VIDEO: Migrants Adrift In Andaman Sea After Thailand Turns Them Away

Migrants from Myanmar and Bangladesh are on an abandoned boat drifting in the Andaman Sea close to Malaysia and southern Thailand on Thursday.
EPA /Landov

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 1:40 pm

Boatloads of migrants fleeing Myanmar and Bangladesh who were turned away by authorities in three countries are adrift in the Andaman Sea near Thailand.

Here's the video, captured by The New York Times:

Thailand is the latest country to turn them away — after Malaysia and Indonesia did the same this week. An estimated 6,000 to 20,000 migrants are at sea in the region.

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NPR Story
12:30 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

No Resume, No Interview, No Problem At Yonkers Bakery

Bakers pose for a photo at Greyston Bakery in Yonkers, N.Y. (Courtesy of Greyston)

The open hiring policy at Greyston Bakery in Yonkers, N.Y., invites local residents to apply for jobs, regardless of their immigration status, whether they have criminal or drug records, or even prior work experience.

It’s all part of the company’s social justice business model, based on the Buddhist philosophy of Bernie Glassman, who founded the industrial food facility in 1982.

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NPR Story
12:30 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

'Black Love Matters' Movement Takes To The Streets In Milwaukee

Members of the Black Love Matters Movement convene during a march through a north side neighborhood. (LaToya Dennis)

“Black Lives Matter” has become a rallying cry across the U.S. among people upset about cases of police brutality against black men. In Milwaukee, another movement is afoot. It aims to let people know that black love also matters. LaToya Dennis from Here & Now contributor Milwaukee Public Radio reports.

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It's All Politics
12:27 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Lawmakers Spar Over Whether Amtrak Funding Cut Matters

"That's a stupid question," House Speaker John Boehner said after a reporter asked him about Democratic claims that the GOP had cut Amtrak funding to unacceptable levels.
Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 3:28 pm

Back-to-back news conferences by Democratic and Republican House leaders, given from the same podium on Thursday, showed a contrast in how both parties are responding to the politics of a deadly train crash that killed at least eight people and injured scores more.

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Music Reviews
12:06 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Country Hit Writer Chris Stapleton Breaks Out On His Own In 'Traveller'

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 1:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
10:50 am
Thu May 14, 2015

A Fungus Causes More Unexpected Illnesses In Montana

Cough? Check. Fever? Check. But bet you didn't think that this common fungus, Histoplasma capsulatum, could be making you sick.
Science Source

If you go to the doctor with a cough and fever, odds are you're not thinking you could have an unusual fungal infection — and neither is the doctor.

That's why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants to get the word out that they found more people sick with histoplasmosis in Montana and Idaho.

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The Two-Way
10:47 am
Thu May 14, 2015

Amtrak Train Accelerated Moments Before Entering Turn, NTSB Says

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 6:20 pm

Updated at 7:33 p.m. ET

The Amtrak train that derailed Tuesday accelerated to more than 100 mph just before it entered the turn and the engineer then slammed on the brakes to slow it down, the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday.

The derailment Tuesday night of Amtrak train No. 188 in Philadelphia killed eight people. More than 200 were injured.

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Goats and Soda
10:43 am
Thu May 14, 2015

Nepal's Peaceful Revolution: Citizens Rise Up To Aid Mountain Villages

A bed and breakfast called Yellow House has become the headquarters of a new citizen-run aid group. Above, tarps are stacked up in the courtyard and ready to move out.
Donatella Lorch for NPR

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 6:54 pm

Nepal's mountains are achingly beautiful. And extraordinarily dangerous.

Since April 25, when a 7.6 magnitude earthquake tore through central and eastern Nepal, the most affected were the hamlets, villages and towns in Nepal's Himalayan steep foothills. These have become more inaccessible than ever, places of death, dread and fear.

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It's All Politics
10:43 am
Thu May 14, 2015

Taking Aim At Money In Politics, Feingold Announces Comeback Bid

Former Democratic Sen. Russ Feingold of Wisconsin made his comeback bid official on Thursday, announcing he would seek a rematch with Republican Sen. Ron Johnson.
Joe Koshollek AP

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 4:46 pm

Russ Feingold might as well have flown into the Senate race in Wisconsin on a gyrocopter.

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The Two-Way
10:40 am
Thu May 14, 2015

Why Do Most Galaxies Die? It's A Case Of Strangulation, Scientists Say

The view of the universe known as the Hubble Deep Field, presented in 1996, shows classical spiral and elliptical shaped galaxies, as well as a variety of other galaxy shapes.
NASA AP

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 1:09 pm

Scientists think they may finally be resolving a decades-old cold case as to what is killing galaxies: They're being strangled.

Astronomers have long known that galaxies fall into two main categories — those that spawn new stars (like our own Milky Way) and those that don't.

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The Two-Way
10:18 am
Thu May 14, 2015

VIDEO: College Democrat Tells Gov. Jeb Bush, 'Your Brother Created ISIS'

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.
John Locher AP

Gov. Jeb Bush, who is still weighing whether to jump into the 2016 presidential contest, got a taste of the kind of raw confrontation that would inevitably be part of the campaign landscape.

During one of Bush's town halls, Ivy Ziedrich, a 19-year-old student at the University of Nevada, challenged Bush on his assertion that the so-called Islamic State was the result of the U.S. pulling out of Iraq.

Here's video of the moment from ABC News:

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