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Father Columba Stewart (@ColumbaStewart) has spent more than a decade traveling to some of the world’s most dangerous regions — Iraq, Syria, the Balkans — to find and preserve manuscripts, many of them centuries old. And now, with the rise of ISIS, his work has become more urgent than ever.

Who Benefits From Health Savings Accounts?

Mar 13, 2017

As GOP lawmakers in Washington work out the details of repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, one proposed element of their new plan is an expansion of health savings accounts. The accounts allow people to put aside money for medical costs, tax-free.

When Juveniles Are Held In Adult Jails

Mar 13, 2017

Every day in the United States there are approximately 20,000 juveniles held in detention facilities. The average length of stay is about 20 days. That may not seem like much, but research shows even a short time behind bars can have a major impact on a young person’s life.

Baby injuries associated with nursery products like carriers, strollers and cribs are on the rise, a study shows.

The study, published Monday, found a 23.7 percent increase in injuries to young children related to nursery products between 2003 and 2011. In all, the authors analyzed 21 years of emergency department data.

Updated 6:30 p.m. ET

The Justice Department has asked for more time to respond to a congressional committee about any evidence that President Barack Obama ordered surveillance of then-candidate Donald Trump last year, as Trump has claimed.

The remotely operated underwater research vessel known as Boaty McBoatface is preparing for its first research mission — an expedition into "some of the deepest and coldest abyssal ocean waters on earth."

Boaty McBoatface, of course, was the moniker that emerged triumphant in an online poll meant to name the newest research ship in the U.K.'s Natural Environment Research Council fleet. But the council opted to overrule the will of the people, and named the ship the Royal Research Ship Sir David Attenborough instead.

Olly the Jack Russell terrier forgot the first rule of skills competitions: It's generally best to avoid falling flat on your face.

Iowa Republican Rep. Steve King, who has a history of controversial statements on immigration and race, is drawing condemnation for a Sunday tweet in support of a right-wing Dutch politician, in which King wrote, "We can't restore our civilization with somebody else's babies."

Should the Irish Giant be allowed to rest in peace?

That's the question swirling around the bones of Charles Byrne, a literal giant from Ireland who was an 18th century celebrity.

In a bombshell announcement Monday, Scottish leader Nicola Sturgeon told reporters in Edinburgh that she will seek the authority to hold a second independence referendum for Scotland.

Citing a "brick wall of intransigence" from British Prime Minister Theresa May, Sturgeon asserted that the only way to preserve Scottish interests in the midst of the U.K. exit from the European Union is to put matters directly in the hands of Scottish voters.

Notorious terrorist Carlos the Jackal — real name: Ilich Ramirez Sanchez — is in a French court Monday, facing charges related to a deadly attack on a shopping center more than 40 years ago. He is already serving a long prison term for the murders of two French secret agents and a Lebanese informant and other crimes.

"Today's trial concerns the launching of a hand grenade in a Paris shopping mall in 1974 that killed two people and injured dozens," NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports. "Ramirez Sanchez denies involvement but if convicted could receive a third life term."

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Violence in Syria took a horrible toll on the country's children last year, the United Nations' children's agency says, with the civil war blamed for killing at least 652 children — 255 of whom were either in or near a school.

In another unsettling trend, 851 children were recruited and used in the conflict in 2016 — double the figure who were recruited in 2015, UNICEF says. The agency says that children's deaths rose 20 percent and injuries rose by 25 percent.

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Good morning. I'm David Greene. The news team at WSB-TV in Atlanta used their traffic report to pay tribute to a certain East Coast rapper.

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(SOUNDBITE OF JOHN WILLIAMS' "THEME FROM 'JAWS'")

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The two-lane Truman Bowling Alley isn't glamorous or grand, but as bowling alleys go, the location is mighty exclusive. It's in the basement of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, inside the White House complex.

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Many people are worried about how potential changes to the federal health law might affect them. But few are as concerned as those with pre-existing health conditions.

Six times in recent days, Marco Antonio Cabachuela, his wife, Irma, and their 3-year-old, Valerie, walked up to federal immigration officers at the Hidalgo, Texas, port of entry and asked for asylum.

And every night, they returned to an immigrant shelter in Reynosa, Mexico, where men and women sit listlessly in a shady courtyard.

"They rejected it," he says. "They said there was no room for us."

Chemotherapy remains one of the mainstays of cancer treatment, but these harsh drugs are slowly being edged aside in medical research, as new treatments, like immunotherapy, grab the spotlight.

Still, this is not the end of the road for chemotherapy. For one thing, doctors are coming to realize that some of these drugs are useful for more than just killing cancer cells.

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And President Trump's Twitter habits are pretty well known. But NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith has noticed that Trump has a tendency to make news in another way that's abbreviated.

Updated at 11 a.m. ET

Investigators in Ethiopia are trying to determine why a mountain of trash gave way Saturday night, reportedly killing more than 60 people and leaving several dozen missing, at a massive garbage dump on the outskirts of the capital, Addis Ababa.

The death toll stood at 62 on Monday, according to The Associated Press, which cited the state-affiliated Fana Broadcasting Corporate.

The collapse at the Koshe Garbage Landfill buried several makeshift homes and concrete buildings.

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LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

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LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

I'm Lakshmi Singh.

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UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Chanting in foreign language).

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Joni Sledge of the group Sister Sledge, best known for the iconic disco 1979 anthem We Are Family, has died at 60.

The group's publicist, Biff Warren, said Sledge was found at home in Arizona and they have yet to determine a cause of death. She had not been ill, he said.

A bus plowed into a crowd of people in northern Haiti around 3 a.m. Sunday morning, killing at least 34 people and injuring 17.

The bus was driving from Cap Haitien to Port-au-Prince when it crashed into a "rara" parade in the city of Gonaives, reports the AP.

Rara is a type of Haitian music played on traditional instruments, with onlookers often joining in the procession.

Reuters reports that the driver and passengers are being held by police. Following the accident, people began throwing rocks at the bus and other vehicles.

As in its past two seasons, ABC's anthology series American Crime opens with a timely and provocative image. In a nondescript desert near the U.S./Mexican border, a group of men and women are being smuggled into the United States. They manage to cut through a gap in the wall that already divides the two countries. Quickly though, viewers learn that the red-capped man the show is asking us to follow isn't interested in merely nabbing a farm job in nearby Texas or California. He has his eyes set on North Carolina.

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