NPR News

The Salt
12:13 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Not So Offal: Why Bone Soup, A 'Perfect Food,' Tastes So Meaty

Sup tulang, as this dish is called in Singapore, is Malay for "bone soup." The fattiness of the marrow rounds out the chili, tomato, fennel, cumin and ginger.
Konstantin Kakaes for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 12:43 pm

I ate the best meat I've ever eaten through a straw.

When the Singaporean food stall proprietor who'd just served me a plate of bones first offered the straw, I refused. I didn't want to take any shortcuts as I worked the tastiest bits of marrow out from the skeletal hollows.

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Music
11:55 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Every Composer Needs A Great Storyteller

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 9:39 am

The legendary German conductor Otto Klemperer was one of the most profound musicians of the 20th Century. In the 1960s, nearing the end of his career, he overcame many physical handicaps to create an astonishing body of recorded classical music. EMI has just reissued a broad spectrum of his recordings, including a box set of one of the composers he's most associated with: Gustav Mahler. Fresh Air classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz has a review of Mahler: Symphonies 2, 4, 7 & 9 / Das Lied von der Erde.

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It's All Politics
10:21 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Palin's Call For Impeachment Reopens Debate Over ... Sarah Palin

Former Alaska governor and vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin introduces U.S. Senate challenger Chris McDaniel at a May 29 rally in Ellisville, Miss.
George Clark AP

It's nice to see Sarah Palin back in the news. Nice, that is, if you're a Sarah fan — or if you're a Democrat, or a member of the media.

Palin's fans, and they are legion on the right, love her reliably tough-talking take on how conservatives should fight President Obama and his use of executive power to circumvent Congress.

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The Two-Way
9:52 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Casino Boat Runs Aground Off Georgia Coast In Maiden Voyage

The Escapade grounded on a rocky bottom off the Georgia coast early Wednesday
U.S. Coast Guard

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 8:36 pm

This post was updated at 10:35 p.m. ET.

The Coast Guard has evacuated passengers from the Escapade, a casino boat that ran around off the Georgia coast after midnight on Wednesday. The boat remains lodged on a sandbar.

Passengers were shuttled to a Coast Guard cutter via small rubber zodiacs, according to the Savannah Morning News.

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Krulwich Wonders...
9:51 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Neil Whosis? What You Don't Know About The 1969 Moon Landing

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Sat July 19, 2014 11:29 pm

Forty-five years ago, this week, 123 million of us watched Neil and Buzz step onto the moon. In 1969, we numbered about 200 million, so more than half of America was in the audience that day. Neil Armstrong instantly became a household name, an icon, a hero. And then — and this, I bet, you didn't know — just as quickly, he faded away.

"Whatever Happened to Neil Whosis?" asked the Chicago Tribune in 1974.

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The Two-Way
9:40 am
Wed July 16, 2014

A Huge New Crater Is Found In Siberia, And The Theories Fly

Aerial footage posted online shows a large crater in northern Siberia, in an area called "the end of the world."
YouTube

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 10:46 am

The area of Russia is said to be called, ominously enough, the end of the world. And that's where researchers are headed this week, to investigate a large crater whose appearance reportedly caught scientists by surprise. The crater is estimated at 262 feet wide and is in the northern Siberian area of Yamal.

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The Two-Way
8:43 am
Wed July 16, 2014

A Dozen People Killed As Typhoon Batters The Philippines

Residents wade through floods as they go back to their home while Typhoon Rammasun batters suburban Quezon city, north of Manila, on Wednesday
Aaron Favila AP

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 9:26 am

At least a dozen people were killed as the Philippines was battered by its first typhoon of the season on Wednesday. Since the storm passed through major population centers, officials were relieved that the death toll wasn't higher.

The storm, known as Rammasun but called Glenda locally, sideswiped Manila but knocked out power there and across Luzon, the most populous island of the archipelago.

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Goats and Soda
8:26 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Nepalis Treat This Peace Corps Volunteer Like Justin Bieber

Hannah Marqusee taught these Nepali 8th- and 9th-graders to play Ultimate Frisbee. "Despite being terrible at throwing, they had a really good time," she reports. Their verdict: slightly more fun than soccer but not quite as fun as cricket. Bottom row, fourth from the right, is her host brother, Sachin.
Courtesy of Hannah Marqusee

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 12:26 pm

Being a foreigner in Nepal sometimes gives you the illusion that you are a celebrity. Children follow you down the street, women you just met tell you they love you, and everyone wants to be your friend.

I've been living in Nepal for 10 months now as a Peace Corps volunteer. In Peace Corps years, this means I'm a baby. Even after all this time I'm still in the very early planning stages of projects that I hope will improve health, food security, gender equality and income in my community.

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Goats and Soda
8:05 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Death, Sex And A Glimmer Of Hope: Reporting On Ebola From Sierra Leone

Musa James died of Ebola on Monday. Staff from Doctors Without Borders prepare the body of the 70-year-old for burial.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 3:20 pm

NPR's Jason Beaubien is in Kailahun, Sierra Leone, covering the Ebola outbreak that began in March in Guinea and has spread to neighboring countries. This morning, he talked with us about a controversial burial, the impact of the "no touching" recommendation — and a sign of hope.

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The Two-Way
7:40 am
Wed July 16, 2014

New Hampshire Says It Will Now Allow D.C. Residents To Buy Booze

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 9:28 am

Clearing up a technicality that had left visitors from Washington, D.C., unable to purchase alcohol in New Hampshire, the state's liquor board says it's now OK to accept D.C. licenses. Earlier this month, some Washington residents were told they couldn't buy alcohol because their IDs weren't from a state.

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The Two-Way
6:11 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Court Finds Netherlands Liable For 300 Deaths In Srebrenica Massacre

Women from the Bosnian town of Srebrenica embrace their lawyers following a ruling Wednesday at a civil court in The Hague, Netherlands.
Phil Nijhuis AP

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 8:24 am

A court in the Netherlands ruled today that the country's government was partly liable for the deaths of 300 Bosnian Muslims whom Dutch peacekeepers failed to protect in Srebrenica in 1995.

But The Associated Press notes that the court decision clears the government of liability in the deaths of the thousands of others who were killed in Srebrenica.

"Relatives of the dead welcomed the limited finding of liability, but lamented that it did not go much further," The AP added.

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The Two-Way
5:34 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Syria's Assad Sworn In For Third 7-Year Presidential Term

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 1:35 pm

Syrian President Bashar Assad was sworn in Wednesday for a third seven-year term amid a brutal civil war that has split his country.

National television broadcast what it called the live swearing-in ceremony from the presidential palace in the capital, Damascus.

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The Two-Way
5:30 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Israeli Official: Chance Of A Ground Invasion Of Gaza 'Very High'

A picture taken from the Israeli border with the Gaza Strip shows smoke billowing from the coastal Palestinian enclave following an Israeli airstrike Wednesday.
Jack Guez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 3:48 pm

This post was updated at 3 p.m. ET.

Israel has agreed to a United Nations request for a temporary cease-fire in its shelling campaign of the Gaza Strip, the Israeli newspaper Haaretz reports.

The five-hour bombing halt on Thursday will allow humanitarian aid to be delivered in Gaza.

But any semblance of peace will be fleeting.

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Around the Nation
4:59 am
Wed July 16, 2014

3 Vintage VW Buses Stolen From Hotel Parking Lot

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 8:32 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with the story of a really cheesy theft of three vintage Volkswagon buses. Now they were valuable - worth $100,000 each. The vintage buses were also bright orange, custom designed to look like loaves of cheese. The Tillamook cheese vans were on a publicity tour when they were stolen from a hotel parking lot in Sacramento. Two men were arrested for stealing the vans after, of course, they were spotted in a storage locker. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
4:53 am
Wed July 16, 2014

YMCA Campers Mistaken For Migrant Kids Headed For Detention

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 8:32 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Africa
4:44 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Young Pakistani Activist Urges Nigeria To Do More For Kidnapped Girls

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 8:32 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

When more than 250 schoolgirls were kidnapped by Islamist extremists in Nigeria, the president of Nigeria was accused of a slow response. That was three months ago. Now trust between the families of the girls and their government is all but gone. NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports.

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NPR Story
3:02 am
Wed July 16, 2014

House Approves $11 Billion To Keep Highway Fund Solvent

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 8:32 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We have another update now on a basic piece of federal business that's not getting done. Congress has been fighting over the Highway Trust Fund. It pays the federal share of road and bridge construction projects. That trust fund is running on fumes. In the absence of a long-term agreement, the House has passed a temporary extension. It would provide $11 billion to keep the fund paying out until spring. President Obama had been pressing for a long-term fix but says he will settle for this. Here's NPR's Brian Naylor.

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NPR Story
3:02 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Israelis, Palestinians Defy Recent Violence To Break Fast Together

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 8:32 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Another day's worth of rockets has flown from Gaza to Israel. Another day's worth of Israeli strikes have hit Gaza. After a cease-fire fell apart, it's not clear how this conflict ends.

MONTAGNE: But this morning, we have a story of people waging peace. However briefly, they tried to bridge their differences. The story begins with a coincidence of the calendar. NPR's Ari Shapiro explains from Jerusalem.

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Parallels
1:28 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Violence And Other Threats Raise Press Freedom Fears In Hong Kong

Police remove a protester during a pro-democracy rally early on July 2 in Hong Kong. Frustration is growing over the influence of Beijing on the city and its press.
Philippe Lopez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 9:08 am

On the evening of July 1, just hours after Hong Kong's biggest pro-democracy protests in years, the printing presses of the Ming Pao newspaper — long respected for its editorial independence — suddenly ground to a halt.

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Shots - Health News
1:28 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Want More Stress In Your Life? Try Parenting A Teenager

Amy Myers talks with her son Kamron, 18, in the backyard of their home in Boise, Idaho. She has found raising a teenager to be extremely stressful.
Kyle Green for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 8:32 am

If anyone can handle the stress of parenting in the teen years, you'd think it would be a high school teacher.

That's how Amy Myers felt. She teaches high school English in a suburb of Boise, Idaho, where she says she has "pseudo parented" about 3,000 teenagers "who I have talked to, given advice to, guided, directed, even lectured about teenage issues," she says.

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The Two-Way
9:18 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

California Approves $500 Fines For Residential Water-Wasters

Sprinklers water a Sacramento, Calif. lawn Tuesday morning.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 9:15 am

Californians who waste water will have to pay up to $500 a day for their extravagance under new restrictions approved Tuesday by the State Water Resources Control Board.

The move comes after the board concluded that voluntary conservation measures have failed to achieve the 20 percent reduction in water use that Gov. Jerry Brown was hoping for, reports The Associated Press.

In fact, a survey by the board showed a 1 percent increase in water use in May compared to the same month a year ago.

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It's All Politics
5:48 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Highway Bill As Establishment Vs. Tea Party, Chapter 943

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 2:47 am

The Tea Party-aligned groups that pushed the strategy that led to last fall's government shutdown are back, this time urging a "no" vote on the short-term extension to the federal highway funding program.

FreedomWorks, Heritage Action and the Club for Growth have all announced they intend to use the vote when grading lawmakers.

Call it the latest round in the Republican's Party's battle between its establishment and Tea Party wings. And as has often been the case in recent months, on Tuesday afternoon, the establishment prevailed.

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All Tech Considered
5:40 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

FCC Extending Net Neutrality Commenting Time After Site Buckles

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Thomas Wheeler.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 8:32 am

A flood of comments about net neutrality crashed the Federal Communications Commission's commenting site on Tuesday, the original deadline for public comments on the controversial Internet proposal. But the tech problems are buying those who want to weigh in some extra time — the deadline for public commenting is now Friday at midnight.

Of the 780,000 comments submitted to the FCC, 100,000 came on Tuesday alone, which the FCC's outdated electronic comment filing system was not capable of handling.

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The Two-Way
5:12 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Apple Teams Up With Former Rival IBM On Business Apps

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 6:08 pm

Apple announced on Tuesday a deal with the company it once painted as Big Brother in its infamous 1984 ad: IBM.

The former rivals agreed on an exclusive partnership to work together on new business applications for Apple's iPads and iPhones. As part of the deal, IBM will also sell iPhones and iPads with the software to businesses all over the world.

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Shots - Health News
4:57 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Stroke Rate May Be Declining In Older Adults

Film CT scans show these people have suffered strokes.
stockdevil/iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 7:31 am

Stroke is the fourth highest cause of death among adults in the U.S. But among people older than 65, stroke rates may be going down, a study published Tuesday suggests. And compared with 10 or 20 years ago, more of those hit with a stroke are surviving.

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It's All Politics
4:54 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Temporary Fix For Highway Money Is Well-Traveled Road

The I-75 highway modernization project in Dayton, Ohio, in April 2014.
Skip Peterson AP

If kicking the can down the road were a competitive sport, the championship trophy would never leave Washington.

When the need to make a difficult choice collides with an unyielding deadline, the tendency in a city where partisan gridlock is the norm is to put the tough decisions off for another day.

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NPR Ed
4:54 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Federal Loans Tough To Come By For Community College Students

Tuition and fees at most community colleges these days are pretty reasonable but according to a new report, students in a fifth of these schools do not have access to federal student loans.
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 7:50 am

Tuition and fees at most community colleges are pretty reasonable these days, about $3,500 a year. Which is why the vast majority of community college students don't take out loans to cover their costs. But, according to the Institute for College Access and Success, a non-profit advocacy group based in California, nearly a million community college students who do need help paying for school don't have access to federal student loans.

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Parallels
4:40 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

The Violence In Gaza, Through The Lens Of One Family's Losses

Iman el-Kaas' 33-year-old husband, Anas, was killed last week by an Israeli attack that hit their apartment in the Gaza Strip. She says her husband, a pharmacist, had no ties to Hamas. He is among the nearly 200 killed so far in the current conflict.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 6:16 pm

Cloaked in black from head to toe, Iman el-Kaas cries in her mother's home in the Gaza Strip. Iman is in mourning.

Her husband, Anas el-Kaas, was killed by an Israeli attack that hit their apartment in Gaza early Friday morning. He was 33 years old, a pharmacist with two young children. They had just moved in a few months ago.

"I thought that apartment was gift, but it was the place he would be killed," Iman says. "Why? Why did they kill him?"

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The Two-Way
4:18 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

University Of Texas Can Continue Affirmative Action, Court Rules

Last year, Bradley Poole posed for a photo at the University of Texas after becoming president of the school's Black Student Alliance.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 7:30 am

A federal appellate court in Texas has ruled that the state's flagship university can continue to use race as a factor in admissions.

"To deny UT Austin its limited use of race in its search for holistic diversity would hobble the richness of the educational experience," Judge Patrick Higginbotham wrote for a split panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

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The Salt
3:44 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Captain Ahab's Revenge: Brewing Beer From An Ancient Whale Bone

Jasper Akerboom of the Lost Rhino Brewing Co. in Ashburn, Va., tested a dozen yeasts before finding one that was perfect for making bone beer.
Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 3:54 pm

What happens when an amateur paleontologist with a love for beer teams up with a microbiologist? Bone beer, or beer made from yeast scraped from a 35-million-year-old whale fossil, to be precise.

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