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A judge in New York City has sentenced former NYPD officer Peter Liang, who was convicted of manslaughter and official misconduct last month in the 2014 fatal shooting of Akai Gurley, to five years' probation and 800 hours of community service.

Justice Danny Chun also reduced the manslaughter conviction to criminally negligent homicide, NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports, adding that prosecutors say they will appeal that decision.

Ahead of today’s New York’s primary, many polls showed Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton comfortably ahead of her rival, Bernie Sanders. But Sanders, who has drawn big crowds at his New York rallies, says polls can be wrong. What is the outlook for Sanders in New York and beyond? NPR’s lead political editor Domenico Montenaro addresses that question in his conversation with Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

As New York State votes in the primaries today, Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with veteran Democratic U.S. Rep. Louise Slaughter, one of the longest-serving women in Congress. They discuss the issues that matter most to her constituents and why she’s stumping for Hillary Clinton.

Across the country, school districts get their funding from property taxes. But the Texas Supreme Court will soon rule on a challenge to that system, which opponents say short-changes poor children and those whose parents don’t speak English.

If you're like most people in North America, you probably spend most of your time indoors. Leave home in the morning, drive to work, stay in your cube all day, head home again. Ninety percent of our lives are spent inside a built environment of some kind – ones that we share with millions of invisible microbes.

Scientists increasingly recognize that rooms and buildings have their own microbiomes, and that those microbial roommates may affect the health of human inhabitants. Those microbes vary depending on what city you're in, according to a study published Tuesday.

To show that the tainted water in Flint, Mich., is safe when filtered, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder says he will be drinking it for the next month when he's at home and at work.

During a visit to Flint on Monday, Snyder said he visited a family's home and drank filtered tap water, according to the Detroit Free Press.

The 75th annual Peabody Awards were announced Tuesday and honored NPR, This American Life and PBS NewsHour, among others.

The awards recognize excellence in electronic media, and are granted to both journalism and entertainment programs.

In 1973, in a 5-4 ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court decided that there was no federal right to equal school funding in the Constitution.

That was more than 40 years ago, and today Patty Rodriguez, a teacher in the same school district in San Antonio where that fight started, says nothing has changed.

Her father, Demetrio Rodriguez, filed the suit. It became a landmark case, a turning point when the focus around school funding shifted from the federal government to the states.

Tennessee's Legislature is no longer considering a bill requiring transgender students to use school bathrooms based on their gender as assigned at birth, instead of their identified gender.

The measure had been hotly debated, The Associated Press reports, with religious organizations urging its advancement, saying it would protect children's privacy, and opponents saying suggesting it was discriminatory.

The bill's sponsor, Republican state Rep. Susan Lynn, says she wants to revise the legislation and reintroduce it next year.

Denise Johnson works two jobs, but neither of them offers health insurance to part-timers like her. She signed up for a marketplace plan this year, but for routine medical care Johnson still goes to the free clinic near her home in Charlottesville, Va.

The problem is her plan's deductible of at least $1,000. She can't recall the precise figure, but it doesn't really matter. "It's absolutely high," said Johnson, 58. "Who can afford that?" She struggles to pay her $28 monthly premium.

In Germany, obscene mockery of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan could potentially land you in court — as comedian Jan Boehmermann discovered last week.

In the U.K., obscene mockery of Erdogan could land you £1000.

British journalist Douglas Murray was horrified by the recent news that German Chancellor Angela Merkel will be allowing a criminal investigation of comedian Jan Boehmermann, who read an obscene, satirical poem mocking Erdogan on German TV.

Hundreds of search and rescue experts from 13 countries are joining Ecuadorian rescue teams, the nation's foreign minister says, to try to save the lives of anyone who survived a magnitude 7.8 earthquake on Saturday and remains trapped beneath the rubble.

But hour by hour, the odds dwindle that anyone has survived this long.

Appearing to drown all hope that the U.K.'s new $300 million research vessel will be named "Boaty McBoatface," Science Minister Jo Johnson says the ship needs a more "suitable" name.

Twenty-one years ago, the nation was rocked by the largest domestic terrorism attack it had ever experienced. A bomb at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City killed 168 people, including 19 children in a day care center on the ground floor.

Submerged subdivisions, impassable roads, overflowing creeks: For the second day in a row, Houston has been struggling to cope with disastrous flooding.

Nearly 18 inches of rain has fallen on parts of Houston and surrounding areas in the past two days, according to the Harris County Flood Warning System. The resulting floodwaters have reportedly led to the deaths of five people.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Third-grader Victor Reza was watching CNN in the living room in Houston with his family when Donald Trump was announced as the winner of the Florida Republican primary. Victor teared up, his older sister, Maria, said in a telephone interview.

At least 28 people have been killed and more than 320 wounded in an attack in Kabul. The assault targeted a key government security agency and included a suicide car bombing and an offensive by armed militants. The Taliban has claimed responsibility.

The attack hit at about 9 a.m. local time, during morning rush hour — one reason there are so many casualties, NPR's Philip Reeves reports. It comes about a week after the Taliban announced the start of their spring offensive.

The results from Tuesday night's New York primary could be crucial in determining whether either (or both) of the presidential nominating contests is clinched anytime soon.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Tens of thousands of South Koreans compete each year for entry-level jobs at Samsung, the high-tech firm that's considered the country's premier company.

Workers with previous job experience can join the company without taking the test, but Samsung uses the 160-question quiz to help whittle down potential applicants looking to start their careers.

President Obama leaves this afternoon for Saudi Arabia, and what could be an uncomfortable visit.

King Salman and neighboring leaders are unhappy with the president's overtures to their regional enemy, Iran. And Obama only added to that tension with a magazine interview that was anything but diplomatic.

"It's going to be a tough visit," says Ilan Goldenberg of the Center for a New American Security.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Henry Threadgill, a saxophonist and flutist known as one of the most original composers influenced by jazz, has been awarded the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Music for his recording In for a Penny, In for a Pound.

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff said Monday that she will not step down from the presidency despite a vote by Brazil's lower house to impeach her. Comparing the Sunday vote to a coup, she said it's "an attempt at indirect election because those who want to rise to power would not have the votes to do so in a normal election."

Tributes continue to flood in for celebrated Malian portrait photographer Malick Sidibe, who died of complications from diabetes in Bamako on April 14, at 80.

Mali's culture minister, N'Diaye Ramatoulaye Diallo, says Sidibe was a national treasure and an important part of their cultural heritage, whose loss the entire country is mourning.

The city of Boston and the friends and family members of the marathon bombing victims will never forget the day when two explosions ripped through the crowd at the race, killing three people and injuring more than 200. Neither will the family of Sunil Tripathi, but for very different reasons. Their story is told in the documentary film Help Us Find Sunil Tripathi.

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