NPR News

Africa
9:55 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Religious Violence Shakes Up Northern Nigeria

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up, who doesn't love a wedding? Marvel Comics just decided to hold a big one for superhero Northstar. We'll find out why even some of his alien mutant friends decided not to show. That's in just a few minutes.

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The Two-Way
7:51 am
Mon June 25, 2012

As Turkey Looks To NATO, Syria Defends Shooting War Plane

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, arrives for a cabinet meeting in his office in Ankara, Turkey on Monday.
AP

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 6:28 am

Update at 3:16 p.m. ET. An Attack On All Of NATO:

The tension between Turkey and Syria has heightened this afternoon. First Turkey said that Syria had fired at another one of its planes; this one was involved in a search rescue operation of the war plane shot down by Syria last week.

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The Two-Way
6:42 am
Mon June 25, 2012

As Celebrations Continue, Morsi Begins Forming Government

Egyptian supporters of their new president-elect, Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohamed Morsi, perform noon prayers in Cairo's Tahrir Square, one day after Morsi was elected as the country's "first civilian president" on Sunday.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 6:52 am

Mohammed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood candidate who became Egypt's president-elect yesterday, began consultations and moved into the office once held by the deposed Hosni Mubarak.

This was a historic weekend for Egypt: Many feared that the ruling military council would give the elections to Ahmed Shafiq, Mubarak's last prime minister. But that didn't happen and when Morsi was handed the victory, hundreds of thousands of Egyptians poured into the streets.

From Cairo, NPR's Grant Clark filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
6:02 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Supreme Court Strikes Down Key Provisions Of Arizona Immigration Law

Waiting for word: The U.S. Supreme Court building.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 12:13 pm

Update at 10:21 a.m. ET. Strikes Down Key Provisions Of Immigration Law:

The United States Supreme Court invalidated three of four challenged provisions of Arizona's controversial immigration law. Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote the majority opinion.

The high court upheld the part of the law that asked police to check the immigration status of those stopped for another violation.

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The Two-Way
5:43 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Moving Slowly In Gulf, Tropical Storm Debby Soaks Florida

High winds, high tide strike at the main street of Cedar Key, Fla., as Tropical Storm Debby makes its way across the Gulf of Mexico on Sunday.
Phil Sandlin AP

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 11:43 am

Spinning off the coast, Tropical Storm Debby's effects have already been felt from Georgia south to central Florida, where it dumped rain and spawned some isolated tornadoes.

The path — as has been the case with this storm all along — is still unclear, but the National Hurricane Center expects it to move very slowly and make landfall in Florida in he next few days. At one point, the hurricane center had posted warnings over Louisiana. Those have now been discontinued.

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Around the Nation
4:58 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Ugly Mugly Is World's Ugliest Dog

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 11:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
4:54 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Ohio Octogenarians Skydive For Charity

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 11:37 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. George H. W. Bush, the first president Bush, made news since leaving office by jumping out of airplanes. Marjorie Bryan says she'd like to join him sometime. She's 83, and on Saturday she parachuted from a plan over Lima, Ohio, as did 82-year-old Marianna Sherman. They raised money for the Blue Star Mothers, whose kids served in the military. They jumped with a retired sergeant who has accompanied the ex-president in midair. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
3:55 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Famed Tortoise Dies In Galapagos Islands

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 11:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And we have a bit of sad news from the Galapagos Islands. The giant tortoise known as Lonesome George, believed to be the last living member of its subspecies - has died. We reported on the tortoise in 2008 when Lonesome George mated with a female from a similar species. The hope was his subspecies would be carried on. But the eggs turned out to be infertile. By tortoise standards, Lonesome George died relatively young. He was believed to be about 100 years old. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

NPR Story
3:13 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Despite New President, Egypt's Military Wields Real Power

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 6:40 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

The next leader of Egypt promises he will be president of all Egyptians. That's a vital promise for Mohamed Morsi to make and it addresses an issue on which he will be closely watched.

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NPR Story
3:13 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Putin Visits Israel During Uncertainty In The Middle East

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 1:56 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Russian President Vladimir Putin is in the Middle East today. He's on a tour of the region that begins in Israel, where he's accompanied by a four-plane convoy carrying an entourage of 300 businessmen and policymakers.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports on the agenda in a country where Putin's policies have caused a lot of consternation.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:02 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Obesity Stokes Rheumatoid Arthritis With More Than Just Extra Weight

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that can cause painful inflammation in the fingers and other joints.
Richard Rudisill iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 9:36 am

Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes painful joint inflammation and can be debilitating for many people who suffer from it. New research shows that the female hormone estrogen, along with proteins produced by the body's fat cells, may play an important role in the development of the disease.

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All Tech Considered
1:01 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Prevent Your Password From Becoming Easy Pickings (Or PyPfbEp)

Your crafty password may not be powerful enough to overcome a cyberattacker. Earlier this month, LinkedIn urged its users to change their passwords after a database was hacked, exposing millions of passwords.
Mihai Simonia iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 9:35 am

When 6.5 million LinkedIn passwords were stolen earlier this month, the revelation made Internet users think again about their ubiquitous words and phrases, and what they can do to make their online accounts a bit safer.

Shoppers in a suburban Seattle mall were asked recently about their password habits. Aaron Brown and Erin Gilmer have very different approaches.

"I try to keep as few as possible," Brown said.

And Gilmer said she has too many.

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Environment
1:00 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Alaska Glacier Studied For Clues On Water Supply

Researchers measure the Eklutna glacier in Alaska to see how long the water it provides will last. The glacier supplies Anchorage with both drinking water and hydro power.
Annie Feidt for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 11:37 am

Anchorage is one of the few North American cities that depend on a glacier for most of their drinking water. The Eklutna glacier also provides some of the city's electricity, through hydro power. So a team of researchers is working to answer a very important question: How long will the glacier's water supply last?

To get that answer, those researchers have to shovel a lot of snow. "It gets to be the consistency of really strong Styrofoam once you get down, maybe six or eight feet," glaciologist Louis Sass says as he flings pristine snow out of a growing hole in the glacier.

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Mitt Romney
1:00 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Romney's Next Challenge: Woo Skeptical Republicans

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney greets attendees at the conference of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials in Orlando, Fla., on June 21. The presumptive GOP nominee took knocks from congressional Republicans during the party's presidential primaries.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 9:30 am

The battering Mitt Romney took from Republican rivals during the primary made big news. What seemed less noteworthy at the time — the knocks he took from Republicans in Congress — is now much more significant if there is to be a President Romney.

"He's the least of the candidates running right now that would be considered a Tea Party candidate," Rep. Tim Scott, R-S.C., told CNN.

After Romney won Florida, GOP Rep. Allen West told CBS that Romney has to do a far better job in "making the appeal as far as being a strong constitutional conservative."

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The Salt
12:59 am
Mon June 25, 2012

We Evolved To Eat Meat, But How Much Is Too Much?

Paleo diet promoter John Durant digs into some ribs.
Allison Aubrey NPR

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 9:31 am

You won't catch John Durant in a tie. Shoes are optional, too. He has traded cubicle life for something a little wild: Promoting the diet and lifestyle of our ancestors from the paleolithic era. He's blogging and writing a book about his approach.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:57 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Many Migraines Can Be Prevented With Treatments, But Few Use Them

A promising crop of new migraine treatments could alleviate the suffering of millions of Americans.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 9:36 am

Millions of Americans suffer from migraine headaches so severe they miss work, social gatherings and important family events.

But that doesn't have to be the case, according to Charles Flippen, a University of California, Los Angeles, neurologist and researcher. "Everyone says, 'Oh, well, everyone has headaches,' so they just push through and suffer in silence," says Flippen.

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Dead Stop
12:55 am
Mon June 25, 2012

In Alaskan Cemetery, Native And Orthodox Rites Mix

A spirit house in the Eklutna Cemetery in Alaska.
Diana Derby

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 9:33 am

The first thing you see at Alaska's Eklutna Cemetery is a tidy white church, with copper-colored onion domes that are topped by the three-barred Russian Orthodox cross.

The church is a reminder of the days when Alaska was claimed by imperial Russia. But it hardly prepares you for the unique combination of Native American and Russian Orthodox influences in the graveyard beyond.

Our guide is Aaron Leggett, who waits patiently under a light but steady rain to explain his community's burial traditions.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Sun June 24, 2012

Egypt Celebrates, But Tough Road Ahead For New President, Muslim Brotherhood

Fireworks illuminate Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, on Sunday to celebrate the victory of Mohammed Morsi in the country's presidential election.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 6:35 am

The winner of Egypt's first competitive presidential election is the Muslim Brotherhood's Mohammed Morsi. The official announcement was made Sunday to the cheers and jubilation of a massive crowd in Cairo's Tahrir Square.

Challenges remain, however, as the ruling military council has effectively stripped the incoming president of most of his powers. The popularly elected Parliament, dominated by the Muslim Brotherhood, was also dissolved.

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Music
1:43 pm
Sun June 24, 2012

The Co-Opting Of Tchaikovsky's '1812 Overture'

A Civil War cannon with American flags in Kennesaw, Ga.
iStock

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 1:08 pm

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky wrote his piece The Year 1812, Festival Overture in E flat major in commemoration of the Russian Army's successful defense of Moscow against Napoleon's advancing troops at the Battle of Borodino. Most Americans, however, know the piece as the bombastic tune that accompanies Fourth of July fireworks shows all over the country.

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Music Interviews
1:38 pm
Sun June 24, 2012

Smashing Pumpkins: Making Peace With The Immediate Past

The Smashing Pumpkins in 2012 (from left): Nicole Fiorentino, Billy Corgan, Mike Byrne and Jeff Schroeder.
Paul Elledge Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 6:45 pm

Next year will mark the 20th anniversary of Siamese Dream, the second album by The Smashing Pumpkins and the one, along with 1995's Melon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, that broke the band into the mainstream and spawned its most lasting hits.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
11:24 am
Sun June 24, 2012

The Movie Anthony Mackie's 'Seen A Million Times'

Kelly McGillis, left, and Tom Cruise star in the 1986 film, "Top Gun." (AP Photo/Paramount Pictures)
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 5:11 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen a Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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The Two-Way
8:43 am
Sun June 24, 2012

Muslim Brotherhood's Mohammed Morsi To Be Egypt's New President

Egyptian campaign officials of the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate, Mohammed Morsi, celebrate over a giant poster of him at his campaign headquarters in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 4:45 am

Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohammed Morsi is Egypt's new president, the country's electoral commission announced on Sunday. A massive crowd in Cairo's Tahrir Square erupted in cheers at the announcement.

Morsi's election is a victory for Islamist groups as well as those who saw his candidacy as a way to clear out last remnants of ousted leader Hosni Mubarak's regime.

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Music
5:31 am
Sun June 24, 2012

In Survival Of The Funkiest, Bad Music Dies First

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 1:34 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Human evolution is all about survival of the fittest. Over thousands of generations, the weak have been weeded out, and the strong have survived. But how would that kind of natural selection work in other settings - like, say, music? Well, one biologist decided to find out. He designed a website where listeners can rate collections of notes according to their musicality. The nice sounds survive, and other users listen to them. But the ugly sounds die off.

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Sports
5:31 am
Sun June 24, 2012

In Sports, Fans Love To Hate

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALL GAME")

SISTER WINONA CARR: (Singing) Life is a ball game being played each day. Life is a ball game being played...

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

If life is a ball game, well, Mike Pesca is our man courtside. We talk sports with him every Sunday. This week, we saw a lot of boiling hot temperatures around the country.

But, Mike, we should probably talk about a different kind of heat, I guess.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Yes, the kind of heat that brings joy - to at least some people in South Florida.

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Fitness & Nutrition
5:31 am
Sun June 24, 2012

The Ultimate Superfood Meal

Food researchers in England have analyzed health claims on some 4,000 foods and came up with this super meal of superfoods: salmon terrine, chicken casserole and yogurt blancmange.

Middle East
5:31 am
Sun June 24, 2012

Egypt To Announce Presidential Election Results

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene. This morning, Egyptians have their first-ever democratically elected president. Mohamed Morsi, the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood candidate has been declared the winner of hotly disputed election.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD CHEERING)

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Politics
5:31 am
Sun June 24, 2012

'Who I Am': N.Y.C. Council Speaker On Politics, Faith

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene. Americans are growing more and more frustrated with the gridlock in Washington, D.C. In a Gallup poll out this month, only 17 percent of Americans said they approve of the job Congress is doing. Well, Christine Quinn says it does not have to be that way. She is the speaker of the New York City Council, and she's taken heat for seeming too close to the executive branch - that would be New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

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Middle East
5:31 am
Sun June 24, 2012

Turkey Denounces Syrian Action Against Its Plane

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Education
4:29 am
Sun June 24, 2012

A Year Without Mexican-American Studies In Tucson

Protesters are seen in June 2011 in support of the Tucson Unified School District's Mexican-American studies program. A new state law effectively ended the program saying it was divisive.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 5:51 pm

An Arizona law that went into effect last year essentially ruled that the Mexican-American studies program offered in the Tucson public school system was divisive and should be scrapped. At the end of the first semester without the classes, hard feelings still linger.

For eight years, until this past January, Lorenzo Lopez taught Mexican-American studies at Cholla High in Tucson, Ariz., the very school from which he graduated in 1992.

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Afghanistan
4:16 am
Sun June 24, 2012

Afghan Tunnel: Decrepit, Dangerous Yet Indispensible

A truck drives down a highway on Salang Pass in Afghanistan's Parwan province in December. The Salang Tunnel, which crosses under the pass, provides a vital link between Central Asia and northern Afghanistan to Kabul.
Qais Usyan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 5:49 pm

The U.S. military says it's spending an extra $100 million a month on the war in Afghanistan since Pakistan closed its border to NATO supply convoys. Now, NATO is using a route thousands of miles longer through Russia and Central Asia.

That route passes through Afghanistan's perilous Salang Tunnel, 11,000 feet up in the Hindu Kush mountains. The Soviet-built tunnel was heralded as a marvel of engineering when completed in 1964.

But years of war, neglect and geology have turned it into a dangerous bottleneck.

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