NPR News

All Tech Considered
2:01 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

Long Before The Internet, The Linotype Sped Up The News

Thomas Edison called the linotype the "eighth wonder of the world."
Copyright Linotype: The Film

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 8:17 am

As part of a new tech segment, we're occasionally going to be looking at a concept, invention or tool that's altered the way the world works. To start things off, we asked Doug Wilson, director of Linotype: The Film, to tell us about — what else? — the linotype.

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NPR Story
1:56 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

Afghans Who Helped U.S. Forces Still Hope For Visas

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 7:01 pm

Afghans hired to help U.S. forces in Afghanistan say Congress should keep its promise to grant them visas to America. Despite death threats from the Taliban, thousands of Afghans have worked with Americans since the war in Afghanistan began. Most say they wanted to serve their country, but they also hoped to win visas to America. But since 2009, the number of U.S. visas awarded has slowed to a trickle.

Afghanistan
1:43 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

Afghan Female Boxers Strike A Blow For Girl Power

An Afghan girl takes part in a boxing training session around in a training room at the Kabul stadium, in Kabul in January 2011.
Shah Marai Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 6:52 pm

When Saber Sharifi goes out recruiting girls and young women for his female boxing team in Afghanistan, he encounters a lot of skeptical parents.

"I reassure them that their daughters will not have broken noses on their wedding day," he says with a smile.

Sharifi launched his recruiting campaign in girls' high schools back in 2007. After three months of relentless speeches and presentations, he could only get two girls to sign up.

But he didn't give up. After two more years, he had eight more members on the team.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:22 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

With PSA Testing, The Power Of Anecdote Often Trumps Statistics

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 7:46 am

Millions of men and their doctors are trying to understand a federal task force's recommendation against routine use of a prostate cancer test called the PSA.

The guidance, which came out last week, raises basic questions about how to interpret medical evidence. And what role expert panels should play in how doctors practice.

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All Tech Considered
11:46 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Vintage Spy Plane Gives High-Tech Drone A Run For Its Money

The Air Force's U-2 spy plane first took flight in August 1955 and has been in commission ever since.
USAF Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 2:01 pm

In the early days of the Cold War, the U-2 spy plane helped the U.S. collect intelligence on Soviet military operations. It was a relatively unknown aircraft until May 1, 1960, when U-2 pilot Francis Gary Powers crashed one in the Soviet Union. (Powers spent nearly two years in Soviet prisons before he was released.)

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U.S.
11:27 am
Mon May 28, 2012

In Sweat Lodge, Vets Find Healing 'Down To The Core'

Veterans make preparations for a sweat lodge ceremony at Salt Lake City's Veterans Affairs center.
Taki Telonidis for NPR

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 5:38 am

Substance abuse. Violence. Even thoughts of suicide. These are some of the problems that many veterans returning home from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are struggling with.

Today it's called post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, but it has affected veterans going back much farther. While doctors and researchers put enormous efforts into developing new treatments, one group of veterans in Salt Lake City is finding relief in a very old tradition: a Native American sweat lodge.

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Africa
11:09 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Islamist Tops Egypt's Vote Count, But Run-off Needed

Mohammed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood's presidential candidate, was the leading vote getter in Egypt's presidential election last week. But he did not get an outright majority and will face a run-off on June 16-17 against a former prime minister. He's shown here during a campaign rally.
Fredrik Persson AP

The runoff vote for Egypt's next president will pit the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate against the last prime minister to serve under Hosni Mubarak, according to full official results released Monday by the election commission.

Commission chief Farouq Sultan told a news conference that the Brotherhood's Mohammed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq, a former air force commander and a longtime friend of the ousted leader, were the top two finishers in the first round of voting held on May 23-24.

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Middle East
9:07 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Ex-Mubarak PM, Islamist In Egyptian Runoff

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 10:43 am

In Egypt, Ahmed Shafiq and the Muslim Brotherhood candidate, Mohammed Morsi, will face each other in a runoff election next month. David Greene talks with NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson about what these results might mean for Egypt's future.

Music Interviews
6:03 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Catherine Russell: An In-Studio Fresh Air Concert

Catherine Russell.
Stefan Falke

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 5:49 am

This interview was originally broadcast on February 21, 2011.

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Around the Nation
4:24 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Secret To A Happy Marriage: Matching Outfits?

Mel and Joey Schwanke have been married 64 years. The Fremont, Neb., couple appears to be the perfect match — perhaps their secret is matching outfits. The Schwankes told Omaha's KETV they've dressed alike for decades. They've got a closet full of 146 combinations. Mel's tie always matches the patterns on Joey's dresses.

Health Care
4:10 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Sick In America: Americans' Views On Health Care

Morning Edition's Renee Montagne talks with Dr. Elliott Fisher, director of Dartmouth's Center for Population Health, about the issues raised in our series "Sick in America." NPR, along with Harvard and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, recently surveyed 1,500 Americans on their views about the cost and quality of health care.

Around the Nation
3:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Free Rent, Courtesy Of Unsuspecting AOL

Many young people expect to spend some time couch-surfing when they're just starting out. For Eric Simmons, the couch came courtesy of an unsuspecting AOL. Simmons had been enrolled in an incubator program at the tech firm's Palo Alto campus. And when the program ended, the card that gave him access to the building kept working. That key card unlocked the solution to his housing problem.

Around the Nation
3:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

50 Years Later, Honoring Vietnam Veterans

Vietnam veterans never got the homecoming many feel they deserved. On Monday, a group of veterans, the Department of Defense and others will begin the first of many ceremonies to honor those who served and commemorate the 50th anniversary of the start of the Vietnam War. Events will be planned over the next 13 years, concluding with the fall of Saigon. Many will gather Monday at the Vietnam Memorial Wall for a wreath ceremony, including President Obama.

Election 2012
3:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

For A Billionaire, $2M Gets You Superdonor Status

Bill Koch (center) celebrates his team's 1992 America's Cup win. Koch, the brother of billionaire GOP donors Charles and David, has given $2 million to the superPAC backing Mitt Romney.
Vince Bucci AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 8:25 am

In the world of high-dollar politics, the billionaire industrialists David and Charles Koch are famous for their lavish funding of conservative politicians and causes. But there's another Koch brother — William — who is passionate about many things, but only recently about politics.

Bill Koch is an avid yachtsman, and he set out to win the 1992 America's Cup. It would take four boats, more than 260 team members and single-minded determination.

David Rosow was the team's business manager and is a longtime friend of Koch's.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Patients Find Each Other Online To Jump-Start Medical Research

Katherine Leon says she spends up to 12 hours a day online interacting with others who share her rare heart condition.
Emily Bogle NPR

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 9:17 am

People with extremely rare diseases are often scattered across the world, and any one hospital has a hard time locating enough individuals to conduct meaningful research.

But one woman with an extremely rare heart condition managed to do what many hospitals couldn't. Katherine Leon connected with enough people online to interest the Mayo Clinic in a research trial.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Patients Crusade For Access To Their Medical Device Data

Hugo Campos' implantable cardioverter-defibrillator was a mystery to him. So he decided to ask his doctor for access to the data. He made this image with one of his own X-rays.
Hugo Campos

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 6:19 am

Each year, tens of thousands of Americans are implanted with tiny battery-controlled devices that regulate the beating of their hearts. Those devices transmit streams of medical data directly to doctors.

But some patients, like Hugo Campos of San Francisco, fear they're being kept out of the loop.

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Dead Stop
3:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

The Graveyard Of Shelved Ice Cream Flavors

Headstones in Ben and Jerry's "Flavor Graveyard" are dedicated to bygone favorites such as Oh Pear (1997), Makin' Whoopie Pie (2002-2003), and Urban Jumble (2000-2001). Click the enlargement for a detailed view.
Ben and Jerry's

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 8:19 am

The first installment in Dead Stop, Morning Edition's summer road trip series about interesting gravesites in America.

When the Ben and Jerry's ice cream company kills a flavor, it's treated with respect — including a burial in the company's "Flavor Graveyard."

"I think we've got the best, and the not-best, up here," Sean Greenwood, Ben and Jerry's Grand Poobah of Publicity, says from the cemetery in Waterbury, Vt.

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Science
3:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Summer Science: An Introduction

David Greene speaks with NPR's Joe Palca about Morning Edition's upcoming series, "Summer Science."

Around the Nation
3:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

A Conversation With Chief Of Hurricane Center

David Greene talks to Rick Knabb, the newly named head of the National Hurricane Center. Knabb is currently the Weather Channel's resident hurricane expert. When he previously worked at the National Hurricane Center as a meteorologist, he was one of the lead forecasters for Hurricane Katrina.

Afghanistan
3:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Memorial Honors Americans Killed In Afghanistan

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Today is Memorial Day, the day we remember the men and women who've died while serving in the Armed Forces. In Kabul, Afghanistan, the top U.S. commander, General John Allen, laid a wreath at a garden across from his headquarters. And he read a letter written by Marine Sergeant William Stacey to his parents in Seattle.

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Europe
3:49 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Spanish Lender Gets $24 Billion Lifeline

Spain's third largest lender, Bankia, is getting a $24 billion lifeline from the Spanish government. The move is a part of Madrid's effort to return some stability to the country's struggling financial sector.

NPR Story
3:43 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Syrian Government Denies Role In Houla Massacre

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 5:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The United Nations special envoy to Syria, Kofi Annan, is in Damascus today to urge the Syrian government to abide by a ceasefire that most agree has been a failure - this after a horrific massacre over the weekend that left more than 100 people dead, nearly half of them children. Witnesses say Syrian army troops shelled a residential area, and then pro-government militias moved in and went on a killing spree. NPR's Kelly McEvers joins us from Beirut. And, Kelly, what happened in this village?

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NPR Story
3:43 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Butler's Arrest Latest Embarrassment For Vatican

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 3:49 am

Vatican authorities have charged Pope Benedict XVI's butler with illegally possessing secret documents. His arrest is the latest embarrassment for the Vatican. David Greene talks to NPR's Sylvia Poggioli for the latest on the investigation.

NPR Story
3:43 am
Mon May 28, 2012

At Vietnam Memorial, An Unlikely Bond Began

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 4:21 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

The soldier's motto is leave no man behind. And one very visible symbol of that promise is the bracelet worn by many Americans to honor a prisoner of war or a service member missing in action. One bracelet created a rare bond between two people. Both had lost a close family member in service overseas. On this Memorial Day, here's Curt Nickisch of member station WBUR.

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Interviews
4:56 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Blacks, Gays And The Church

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Let's turn to another story we've been following in recent weeks: African-Americans and same-sex marriage. When President Obama came out in support of gay marriage, some African-American religious leaders protested. But according to new polling data, African-Americans are no less supportive or, for that matter, opposed to gay marriage than any other group in the country.

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Interviews
4:56 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Why Music Matters

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 8:47 am

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Every few weeks on the program, we've been running an occasional series called Why Music Matters, where we bring you the stories of music fans in their own words, about how certain songs or even bands have changed their lives. Today's story comes from a young artist in Seattle. Her name is Vivi Perez, and she almost gave up on high school, that is until a community activist group called El Centro de la Raza introduced her to the music business.

VIVI PEREZ: I felt kind of, like, I didn't know where I was going a lot in high school.

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The Two-Way
4:46 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Security Council Condemns Syrian Government For Killings

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 4:45 am

The U.N. Security Council is condemning the Syrian government for the massacre of scores of people, including children, in the town of Houla, a day after images of the mass killings shocked the world.

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It's All Politics
3:46 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Polls Show Obama's Support For Gay Marriage Influencing Blacks

President Obama is seen on a monitor in the White House briefing room May 9. In an interview with ABC, he said he supports gay marriage.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 9:27 am

In this space earlier this month, I wrote about whether President Obama would face a backlash from African-Americans for his endorsement of same-sex marriage. (He hasn't.) I made mention of a random field experiment in which 285 black people in Cook County, Ill., were polled about gay marriage.

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Interviews
3:04 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Ahead Of Memorial Day, Veterans Remember

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 4:56 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

In a few minutes, the latest on the reports of a massacre in Syria that may have left at least 30 children dead. But first to our cover story today.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: OK, veterans. Veterans, look here for just a few minutes.

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Middle East
3:04 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Syrian Government Suspected Of Massacre

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 5:49 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

The United Nations Security Council has condemned Syria for an attack in the central part of the country yesterday that left at least 90 people dead, dozens of them children. The council once again called on Syria's government to halt further violence against its civilians. Here's NPR's Kelly McEvers with more from Beirut.

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