NPR News

Commentary
6:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

A Moment That Forever Changed A Soldier's Outlook

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

Throughout our show this Memorial Day weekend, we're hearing from members of the 182nd Infantry Regiment of the Army National Guard. In this installment, Spc. Michael Cella remembers a close call while on patrol.

Sports
6:18 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Musings On The NBA Draft Lottery

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:55 am

Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR sports correspondent Mike Pesca, who has an off-speed pitch on the week's sports news.

Home Front: Soldiers Learn To Live After War
4:35 am
Sun May 27, 2012

After A Year In Afghanistan, Memories That Stick

Michael Currie was stationed in Afghanistan for the past year, leaving behind his wife and daughters. His most vivid memory of his service was the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 2:40 pm

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National Teachers Initiative
4:34 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Hard Lessons Follow Rocky Start For Chicago Teacher

Tyrese Graham teaches science at John Marshall Metropolitan High School in Chicago.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 7:39 am

Tyrese Graham is a second-year science teacher at John Marshall Metropolitan High School on the West Side of Chicago. When he started teaching there, Marshall was among the worst public schools in the city.

When Graham walked into his first class, he could hardly speak over the noise of the students. He tried to make a point by not talking.

"I'll let you finish, but realize, every moment that I'm not talking and providing you instruction, you guys will be giving that back to me," he told them.

Graham's remarks were met with a sharp rebuke from one of his students.

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Religion
4:32 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Philadelphia Priest Abuse Trial Takes Combative Turn

Monsignor William Lynn leaves the Criminal Justice Center in Philadelphia in March. When he finally took to the stand after two months of testimony, the prosecutor called him a liar over and over.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 5:25 pm

A clergy sex-abuse trial is intensifying in a Philadelphia courtroom. One defendant is James Brennan, a priest accused of trying to rape a minor.

What's drawing attention is the second defendant, Monsignor William Lynn. Lynn is the first high-level Catholic official to be criminally prosecuted — not for abusing minors himself, but for failing to protect children from predator priests.

Failure To Protect?

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History
4:31 am
Sun May 27, 2012

75 Years Later: Building The Golden Gate Bridge

San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge opened in 1937, connecting San Francisco to Marin County in the north.
George Rose Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 9:29 am

Seventy-five years ago today, San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge opened to the public. People walked across the bridge for the first time, marveling at what was then the largest suspension bridge in the world.

Before the project began, many people thought building the bridge was impossible. And when the construction started, most thought that dozens would die in the process. The rule of thumb at the time was that for every million dollars spent on a project, one person would die — and the Golden Gate Bridge was going to cost $37 million.

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Election 2012
3:56 pm
Sat May 26, 2012

Outside Money Making The Race A Rich Man's Game

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 7:59 am

Hotshot political consultant Matt Mackowiak is a rising star in the very lucrative world of political consulting. His firm, the Potomac Strategy Group, helps Republicans win elections, but he's not working with Gov. Mitt Romney's campaign this election year.

People who are part of Mackowiak's tribe — the strategists, the opposition researchers, the pollsters — are discovering that they can have a much bigger impact working for outside groups that can raise unlimited amounts of money, unencumbered by the rules that restrict what a presidential campaign can do.

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NPR Story
3:02 pm
Sat May 26, 2012

D.C. Mayor's Administration Mired In Cloud Of Scandal

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 4:44 pm

Washington, D.C., Mayor Vincent Gray was elected to office on a platform of anti-corruption. But just two years into his term, a federal investigation has left two former aides pleading guilty to misdeeds during the 2010 election. Gray has denied any wrongdoing. Host Guy Raz talks about D.C. politics with Washington Post reporter Nikita Stewart.

Digital Life
2:45 pm
Sat May 26, 2012

In A World Where One Teen's Voice Is An Internet Hit

Jake Foushee's "movie trailer" voice went viral when he was 14. Now he may be headed for the big screen.
YouTube

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 7:17 pm

Jake Foushee had a cold.

He was 13 at the time, at his home outside Chapel Hill, N.C.

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Music Interviews
1:28 pm
Sat May 26, 2012

The Lumineers: Chasing Big Dreams Out West

The Denver folk ensemble The Lumineers has released its self-titled debut album. From left: Wes Schultz, Neyla Pekarek and Jeremiah Fraites.
Hayley Young Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 4:44 pm

The Denver folk group The Lumineers was founded in 2002 by Wesley Schultz and Jeremiah Fraites, who grew up together in the New Jersey suburb of Ramsey. In its early days, the band had its sights on nearby New York as the gateway to success.

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The Salt
5:49 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Soft-Shell Lobsters So Soon? It's A Mystery In Maine

Lobster boats in Maine have been pulling up soft-shell lobsters strangely early in the season.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 8:52 am

April and May are fairly quiet times for Maine lobstermen and women, with the height of the summer season still a couple of months away. This year, strange things are happening on the ocean floor. Many of the lobsters have prematurely shed their hard shells, and lobstermen are hauling large numbers of soft-shelled lobsters much earlier than usual.

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Business
5:49 am
Sat May 26, 2012

A Holiday Treat: Lower Prices At The Pump

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And if you're one of millions of motorists on the roads this holiday weekend, you may have noticed something unexpected and welcome. Gas prices are falling. This at the start of the summer driving season when gas prices usually spike. We turn now to Daniel Yergin. He's author of "The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World," and chairman of IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates. He joins us from his office in Washington, D.C.

Mr. Yergin, thanks so much for being with us.

DANIEL YERGIN: Thank you.

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Middle East
5:49 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Egypt's Elections Stamp The Arab Spring Timeline

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. This week in Egypt, a nation that has been ruled for thousands of years by pharaohs, colonial rulers, military regimes and dictators held its first free election for a national leader. Egyptians went to the polls on Wednesday and Thursday, and though the official results are not yet in, the election is certainly a milestone in the democratic awakening known as the Arab Spring. Here's a selection of voices from Cairo in the week that Egypt voted.

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Media
5:49 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Residents Expect New Orleans Paper Cut To Hurt

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

New Orleans had endured so much - the Civil War, yellow fever, the Depression and a string of spectacular political shenanigans, but its award-winning daily newspaper, the Times-Picayune, has not been able to survive as a daily. Eileen Fleming of member station WWNO reports now on the diminution of a paper that's continued reporting during the darkest days of Hurricane Katrina.

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Politics
5:49 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Reading Between The Polls: What Voters Should Watch

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

As we just heard from Ari, early polling can do much to shape political campaigns, but voters who are just trying to follow the debate, polls and surveys can seem contradictory and confusing. To help us see through some of the fog of polling, we're joined now by Michael Dimock. He's the associate director for research at the Pew Research Center in Washington D.C. Thanks for being with us.

MICHAEL DIMOCK: Thank you.

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Politics
5:49 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Harvard Diversity Stats Put Warren In Hot Seat Again

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Massachusetts Democratic Senate candidate and Harvard law professor Elizabeth Warren continues to be dogged by the question of if she has claimed American Indian heritage. Yesterday, in the wake of new allegations, Republican Senator Scott Brown accused Professor Warren of misleading Harvard about her Native American ethnicity. From member station WBUR in Boston, Fred Thys reports.

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Europe
5:49 am
Sat May 26, 2012

At Eurovision 2012, Politics Take The Stage

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The annual kitsch contest known as the Eurovision Song Contest takes place later today. It's always held in the home country of the previous year's winner. This time, it's authoritarian Azerbaijan in central Asia. So it's been hard to avoid politics at what's supposed to be a nonpolitical event. Vicki Barker reports on both the contest and the context.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WATERLINE")

JEDWARD: (Singing) Oh, I am close to the waterline.

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Sports
5:49 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Sports: Ice, Hoops And Rackets

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. And I wait all week to say: time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: The Stanley Cup finals are set - left versus right, a frequent flier bonanza. The NBA playoffs feature a thrilling matchup between Texas and Oklahoma, the Old Hands versus the Young Guns. And tennis, red, dusty and with a side of frites - the French Open opens. Here to talk about all of it, NPR Tom Goldman,

Morning, Tom.

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The Salt
5:18 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Clean Your Grill, And Other Hot Holiday Tips From Food Network's Alton Brown

Food science guy Alton Brown says the last thing you want to see is flames touching food on the grill.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 1:40 pm

If there's one grilling tip to remember this Memorial Day weekend, it should be this: Flame is bad.

"Flame does nasty things to food," food historian and science guy Alton Brown tells NPR's Scott Simon in the kick-off segment of Weekend Edition's "Taste of Summer" series.

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Election 2012
4:18 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Can May Polls Predict A November Winner?

Mitt Romney greets guests after addressing the Latino Coalition's 2012 Small Business Summit at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 8:52 am

A Quinnipiac University poll out this week found Mitt Romney with a 6-point lead over President Obama in Florida. That would seem to be very good news for the presumptive Republican nominee in what may be the biggest swing state this fall.

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Latin America
4:17 am
Sat May 26, 2012

From Canada Down To Argentina, The Oil Flows

Like countries throughout the Americas, Argentina is feverishly drilling for oil and gas. Workers are shown here at a derrick in the desert in southern Argentina.
Juan Forero for NPR

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 7:12 pm

As the wind whips across the scrub grass in southern Argentina, a crane unloads huge bags of artificial sand for oil workers preparing for the hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, of a well.

Water mixed with chemicals and tiny ceramic beads are then blasted underground at high pressure. This mixture helps create fissures, allowing oil and natural gas to flow.

Energy analysts believe there are billions of barrels of oil and gas buried in a desert-like patch in Patagonia.

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Music Interviews
4:17 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Cadence Weapon: A Poet Hones A Musical Personality

Hope in Dirt City is the third album by Cadence Weapon, the performing name of Canadian poet Rollie Pemberton.
Evan Prosofsky Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 8:52 am

Rollie Pemberton is a poet — in fact, he was poet laureate of his hometown, Edmonton, Alberta, for a couple of years. That meant he was expected to write three poems a year about events in a town sometimes nicknamed "Dirt City." But outside of Edmonton, Pemberton is better known under a different name: Cadence Weapon, the hip-hop artist.

In poetry and song, Pemberton finds inspiration, tough and otherwise, in his Edmonton roots. The latest Cadence Weapon album, his third, is called Hope in Dirt City.

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Europe
4:16 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Even Soccer Teams Are Feeling The Pinch In Spain

Spain's soccer teams are feeling the crunch of debt, too. But rich, winning teams like Real Madrid and Barcelona — seen here playing in April — are the most likely to stay in the game.
Denis Doyle Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 1:32 pm

One of the ways Spaniards console themselves amid their failing economy is with their beloved sport of soccer. If you can't afford tickets to a game, it's always on TV in your local bar.

"For an escape from work, economic problems — just enjoy it and support your team," says soccer fan Ivan Rassuli, who's having a beer as he watches a match at a bar. "Everybody likes football. Maybe like the NBA or baseball in the United States."

But futbol, as Spaniards call soccer, has followed the same sorry trajectory as Spain's economy.

Failure To Pay Taxes

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Around the Nation
4:16 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Chicago Ward Gives Budgetary Power To The People

In Chicago's Rogers Park, Alderman Joe Moore handed the purse strings over to his constituents.
Melissa Beck Groundwork

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 1:53 pm

Chicago's 49th Ward is better known as Rogers Park. It's a neighborhood of middle-class houses and apartment buildings, home to Loyola University. It's known for diversity and an affordable, laid-back kind of cool.

But the 49th has a new claim to fame: In 2009, the ward's alderman, Joe Moore, became the first elected official in the country to hand over the purse strings to his constituents. Three years later, the experiment is still attracting new residents to planning meetings.

Forming Ideas

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Law
4:16 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Chicago Outsider Busted Crime With Apolitical Flare

U.S. Attorney Patrick J. Fitzgerald speaks to reporters during a news conference Thursday in Chicago. Fitzgerald announced he would step down.
Brian Kersey Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 12:16 pm

Patrick Fitzgerald, the federal prosecutor who went after the Gambino crime family, al-Qaida and even the White House in court — not to mention several Illinois politicians — is leaving his job as U.S. attorney in Chicago.

The career prosecutor, known as "Eliot Ness with a Harvard degree," will leave a legacy as a tenacious corruption buster, though some criticize his style as overzealous.

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U.S.
4:15 am
Sat May 26, 2012

Delayed At The Airport? They're Working On It

An air traffic controller works at the Atlanta TRACON, or terminal radar approach control, facility in Peachtree City, Ga. The FAA's NextGen program will modernize the air traffic control system, transforming it from radar to GPS-based technology.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 8:52 am

When the summer travel season begins, airline passengers typically brace for delays as vacationers fly in larger numbers and the inevitable weather-related disruptions occur.

The Federal Aviation Administration, which oversees the nationwide system of air traffic control, is hoping to make some of those delays a thing of the past. It's developing what it calls "Next Generation" technology. The NextGen program will modernize the air traffic control system, transforming it from radar to GPS-based technology.

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The Two-Way
5:14 pm
Fri May 25, 2012

Observing Memorial Day

People walk through a portion of the Boston Common covered with American flags on Wednesday.
Steven Senne AP

Like many Americans, we plan to take Memorial Day off. And while a three-day weekend is always fun, this holiday is a somber one.

We were reminded of that reading an Op-Ed from Tom Manion in today's Wall Street Journal. Manion served in the military for 30 years and his son, Travis Manion, was killed in Iraq when he was just 26-years-old.

Manion delivers an emotional piece that attempts to answer a complex question: Why do they serve?

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The Two-Way
4:53 pm
Fri May 25, 2012

What's In A Smile? Turns Out Computers Best Humans At Parsing What's Genuine

A study participant smiles for different reasons.
MIT

Did you know most people smile when they are frustrated?

Look at this picture:

The one on the right came from frustration; the one on the left is genuine.

But when researchers asked participants to act frustrated, 90 percent didn't smile; however, when researchers made participants frustrated, 90 percent smiled.

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The Two-Way
3:40 pm
Fri May 25, 2012

CBS, NBC, Fox Battle Dish Network In Court Over Ad-Skipping DVR

This image provided by Dish Network shows a screen message of the AutoHop feature, which allows customers to skip over commercials.
AP

Does Dish Network have the right to offer a commercial-free experience for its customers? Or does that infringe on broadcasters' copyrights?

As you might expect, CBS, NBC and Fox are not very happy at the prospect and filed suit yesterday against the TV provider to stop it from rolling out its "AutoHop" service.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:41 pm
Fri May 25, 2012

Keep Kids Away From Laundry Detergent Packs

A label on a package of Tide laundry detergent packets warns parents to keep them away from children. Nearly 250 cases of illness from such packets have been reported to poison control centers this year.
Pat Sullivan AP

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 9:19 am

Something that looks good enough to eat can sometimes turns out to be a really big mistake.

Take those small, brightly colored single-use packs of laundry detergent that are becoming popular. To a curious toddler or small child, they look like candy.

But once inside childrens' mouths, the tempting packs can burst, releasing a concentrated blast of irriitating detergent. Already this year there have been at least 250 cases of illness from the packs reported to poison control centers across the country.

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