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It was a hug that put sportsmanship on full display.

A lot hung on the game: The winning team would play for the Minnesota state championship for baseball. Mounds View, a public high school in a Minneapolis suburb, was leading Totino-Grace, a nearby Catholic high school.

Totino-Grace's Jack Kocon stepped up to bat, meeting eyes with pitcher Ty Koehn, his longtime friend. Koehn, reportedly the star player of his team, the Mustangs, struck out Kocon to win the game and move ahead to the championship.

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Updated at 9:45 p.m. ET

Justify won the 150th Belmont Stakes, making him the 13th Triple Crown winner.

The big, chestnut colt stood above the other horses with a commanding lead all the way through the homestretch Saturday in Elmont, N.Y. It was only his sixth race, and some bettors had worried that he packed too many races into the 110 days leading up to the race, but it was no contest.

Justify, jockeyed by Mike Smith, became a sensation because of his impressive size, his calm and dominating presence, and his ability to overcome inexperience.

A Horse Named Justify

Jun 9, 2018

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Time for sports.

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First baseman Keith Hernandez won 11 consecutive Gold Glove Awards for his extraordinary fielding in the 1970s and '80s. After his Major League career was over, he went on to have a celebrated guest appearance on Seinfeld and enjoy fame as a color commentator for his old team the New York Mets. He has now written a new memoir called I'm Keith Hernandez.

The Cleveland Cavaliers didn't enter Friday with much hope, trailing the Golden State Warriors 3-0 in the NBA Finals. The Warriors demolished anything left in yet another of their signature third-quarter runs, extending their lead to 21 points before winning 108-85 in Cleveland.

Stephen Curry led the Warriors in clinching the title — the team's sixth overall and third in four years — with 37 points, four rebounds, six assists, three steals and three blocks. Kevin Durant had a triple-double with 20 points, 12 rebounds and 10 assists, and was named the MVP of the Finals.

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If you listen carefully to this next tape, you just may hear a 44-year-old albatross dying.

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T.J. Oshie shares his father's name.

The Washington Capitals winger, born Timothy Leif Oshie, won his first NHL title Thursday night in Las Vegas — more than five years after his father, Tim, was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

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Washington, D.C., has had, by some measures, among the most miserable sports fans in the United States. The city ended a quarter century of futility Thursday night as the Washington Capitals beat the Las Vegas Golden Knights 4-3 to win the NHL's Stanley Cup.

The first time he touched a football, Gelek Wangchuk was 9 years old.

It was in a settlement of Tibetan refugees in Himachal Pradesh, in northern India, where he and other Tibetan boys attended the Tibetan Children's Village, a school founded by the Dalai Lama, the Tibetan spiritual leader.

"I didn't know how to play, I didn't have any [football] kit. But I had a lot of interest," said Wangchuk, now 26. "I started playing football only for enjoyment without any shoes."

The first time a group of humans managed to scale El Capitan, a granite monolith rising 3,000 feet sheer from California's Yosemite Valley, it took at least 45 days of climbing over the course of about 18 months. In the six decades since, those who followed in their footholds lessened the time it takes to reach the top — but, with some rare exceptions, even the most seasoned climbers generally take several days to complete the trek.

On Wednesday, two men did it in under two hours.

If you tune into Game 5 of the Stanley Cup Finals on Thursday, it's unlikely you'll hear NBC hockey announcer Mike "Doc" Emrick use the word "pass" very often to describe action on the ice.

You may hear that a player "squirts" the puck — or possibly, he "ladles" it.

With a few minutes left in game two of the NBA Finals between the Cleveland Cavaliers and the Golden State Warriors, this past Sunday, something unremarkable happened: Quinn Cook scored.

It was a layup, and it happened when the game already was decided and the bench players, like Warriors reserve guard Cook, were on the court. Unremarkable. Still, there was Cook in a Warriors uniform, playing and scoring in the Finals. Kind of amazing for those who followed his story.

The soccer match scheduled for Saturday between Israel and Argentina was to have little consequence, at least as far as the teams' standings were concerned. It was just an exhibition in Jerusalem, a way for Argentine players to get their legs warm before the World Cup and for Israeli fans to get a glimpse of such superstars as Lionel Messi.

Now Argentina has called off the game — and disputes over why, exactly, have shifted the confrontation from the soccer field to the international political arena.

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Which City Deserves The Stanley Cup?

Jun 6, 2018

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The former president and CEO of USA Gymnastics, Steve Penny, was dismissed from a hearing before a U.S. Senate subcommittee investigating the sexual abuse of athletes by ex-team doctor Larry Nassar on Tuesday after Penny refused to answer questions by lawmakers.

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The White House held an impromptu celebration of America today.

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Updated at 5:21 p.m. ET

There was God Bless America, but no Swoop the Eagle. The U.S. Marine Band was there, but neither quarterback Nick Foles, nor head coach Doug Pederson, nor any member of the 2018 Super Bowl winning team was at the White House Tuesday for what was to be a celebration of the Philadelphia Eagles victory.

After President Trump cast aspersions on the Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles and disinvited them from a White House celebration, the fallout has been wide-ranging and swift — from Philadelphia's mayor questioning Trump's patriotism to Fox News apologizing for implying Eagles players had taken a knee during the national anthem.

The acrimony continued Tuesday, when the White House said "the vast majority of the Eagles team decided to abandon their fans."

FIFA is escalating its fight against the secondary ticket market, filing a criminal complaint against ticket reseller Viagogo to block it from selling tickets for the 2018 World Cup. FIFA says its own website is "the only official and legitimate" way to get the tickets — and it's threatening to cancel tickets bought elsewhere.

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Hockey's Stanley Cup Final will crown a new champion this week.

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Updated at 11:05 p.m. ET

President Trump has disinvited this year's Super Bowl winners, the Philadelphia Eagles, from a victory celebration at the White House Tuesday. The reason: the team won't promise that all players will stand with hand on heart for the national anthem.

In a statement issued Monday, Trump provided the following explanation: "They disagree with their President because he insists that they proudly stand for the National Anthem, hand on heart, in honor of the great men and women of our military and the people of our country."

Updated at 2:20 a.m. ET Tuesday

For nearly a quarter century, Washington Capitals fans knew a simple, unchanging truth: If you were listening to a Caps game, you were listening to Ron Weber.

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