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Sports

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And it's time for sports.

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SIMON: It's less than a month until the Super Bowl. And the NFL playoffs begin today. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us now for the first time in 2017. Good morning, Tom.

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So if you happen to visit Bavaria in January, you might not think of packing a bathing suit. Then again, you might be Nuala Moore from Dingle, Ireland.

NUALA MOORE: One should always have their bathing suit in the winter.

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET on Jan. 6

A French court has convicted four British men of racist violence for pushing a black man off the Paris metro as fans chanted, "We're racist, we're racist, and that's the way we like it."

The incident, which was caught on video by a bystander, happened in February 2015. In the video, a group of Chelsea football club supporters can be seen repeatedly shoving a black man off a crowded metro train as he tries to board.

Frenchman Robert Marchand set a new world record Wednesday when he cycled 22.547 kilometers (about 14 miles) in an hour — at the age of 105.

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Big time athletes really put their professional careers on the line if they decide to stand up for a social cause, and commentator Frank Deford says this is something that's been going on in sports for decades.

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Good morning, I'm David Greene. I'm going to spare the Cleveland Browns today because this happened.

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JENNIE FAGEN: (Singing) Bills are 16 going on 17 years out of the playoffs.

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Sunday Sports

Jan 1, 2017

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Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF JOHN CAMERON SONG, "THE COMPETITIORS")

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I think I've waited all year to say it's time for sports.

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Muhammad Ali was outspoken about everything - his boxing skills...

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MUHAMMAD ALI: I am the greatest.

(CHEERING)

SIEGEL: ...His Muslim faith and why he changed his name...

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We're heading into the last weekend of the NFL's regular season, and there's just one wildcard playoff spot still up for grabs. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers are still mathematically eligible.

Rashaan Salaam, the former college football standout whose body was found in a Boulder, Colo., park earlier this month, died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head, according to the Boulder County Coroner's office.

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It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

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For years, college football longed to build a football playoff system for one simple reason: money.

Unlike basketball's March Madness, which generated a record $1 billion in advertising revenue alone in 2013, the NCAA didn't make a dime off the bowl system that year. Who did? TV networks, the bowl organizers and the coaches.

Well, enough of that. When it was announced that the new four-team football playoff would start in 2014, the TV rights alone would be worth almost half a billion dollars for just three games.

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Owen Delaney is an avid runner. A couple weeks ago, he looked at a map of his local park in London and he saw all the normal things - trails, a fountain but also an opportunity.

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It's time for sports.

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The plan began with an idle thought.

Glancing at a map earlier this month, Owen Delaney realized something funny: Seen from above, the Diana Fountain in London's Bushy Park bears a striking resemblance to the bulbous nose of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer — at least, it would if that famous nose of his were blue. At any rate, that fountain-nose would look better if seen in the context of a full face.

So, Delaney decided to do it himself.

It's become a tradition in the NFL for players to go out for an exorbitantly expensive meal to welcome rookies — and then stick them with the bill.

Houston Texans safety K.J. Dillon fell victim to such a stunt Monday night at a Pappas restaurant. The tab was a whopping $16,255.20.

2016: A Good Year For Sports

Dec 21, 2016

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You just think about 2016 and the storylines in the news - horrific terrorist attacks, relentless wars. A divisive presidential campaign. Commentator Christine Brennan is reflecting on something else.

Two of college football's star running backs, Stanford's Christian McCaffrey and LSU's Leonard Fournette, have said they won't play in their respective bowl games, decisions that have prompted some debate in the football world.

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Tennis star Petra Kvitova was badly injured Tuesday morning when a man armed with a knife attacked her at her home in Prostejov, Czech Republic.

The two-time Wimbledon champion said she sustained "severe" injuries to her left hand, which is her playing hand, and that she was "fortunate to be alive."

In a series of tweets, Kvitova wrote:

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It's time for sports.

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