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It's become a tradition in the NFL for players to go out for an exorbitantly expensive meal to welcome rookies — and then stick them with the bill.

Houston Texans safety K.J. Dillon fell victim to such a stunt Monday night at a Pappas restaurant. The tab was a whopping $16,255.20.

2016: A Good Year For Sports

Dec 21, 2016

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You just think about 2016 and the storylines in the news - horrific terrorist attacks, relentless wars. A divisive presidential campaign. Commentator Christine Brennan is reflecting on something else.

Two of college football's star running backs, Stanford's Christian McCaffrey and LSU's Leonard Fournette, have said they won't play in their respective bowl games, decisions that have prompted some debate in the football world.

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Tennis star Petra Kvitova was badly injured Tuesday morning when a man armed with a knife attacked her at her home in Prostejov, Czech Republic.

The two-time Wimbledon champion said she sustained "severe" injuries to her left hand, which is her playing hand, and that she was "fortunate to be alive."

In a series of tweets, Kvitova wrote:

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It's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Ending a boycott that was sparked by the suspension of 10 players over an alleged sexual assault, the University of Minnesota's football team says they'll play in the Dec. 27 Holiday Bowl. The team relented after meeting with school administrators Friday.

In addition to promising to play in the game in San Diego later this month, the team sought to clarify its position.

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And it's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Days after 10 of its members were suspended as part of the University of Minnesota's response to a sexual assault allegation, the rest of the team has declared a boycott. The team is scheduled to play in the Holiday Bowl on Dec. 27.

Announcing the boycott at the Golden Gophers' practice facility Thursday night, the players said the suspended athletes, four of whom had already served team suspensions over the case, have now seen their reputations destroyed without the benefit of due process.

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Craig Sager, the longtime NBA courtside reporter for Turner Sports, has died. He was known for his sense of humor, his public battle with cancer and, it must be said, for his style.

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NBA sideline reporter Craig Sager, a broadcaster nearly as famous for his wardrobe as for his basketball knowledge, has died at the age of 65. Sager had been very public about his diagnosis of leukemia.

"There will never be another Craig Sager," David Levy, president of Turner Broadcasting, said in a tweeted statement. "His incredible talent, tireless work ethic and commitment to his craft took him all over the world covering sports."

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Over the course of two decades, at least 368 gymnasts have alleged they were sexually assaulted or exploited by adults working in the sport, according to a new investigative report by The Indianapolis Star.

Fans of curling, synchronized diving, discus and other Olympic sports may soon be able to watch year-round, as NBC and its partners get ready to launch a TV network dedicated to Olympic sports programming.

The Olympic Channel, which began as a digital outlet after the Summer Games in Rio, is a collaboration between NBC, the U.S. Olympic Committee and the International Olympic Committee. It's expected to launch in the second half of 2017.

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A little sports espionage story now from North Carolina - a scandal at Wake Forest University that is nicknamed...

SCOTT HAMILTON: Wakeyleaks.

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It all started with a plastic bag. Months after a boy in rural Afghanistan became a sensation for wearing a homemade Lionel Messi jersey, he has now met the soccer star and watched his FC Barcelona team play in Qatar.

"I'm very happy to have met my hero. It is a dream for me," Murtaza Ahmadi said of his time with Messi.

The U.S. Supreme Court says it will not consider a challenge to the terms of a concussion-related settlement between the National Football League and more than 20,000 retired players.

The deal settled a class-action filed by former players who accused the NFL of covering up what it knew about the link between playing professional football and the degenerative brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE.

President-elect Donald Trump took in one of college football's most storied rivalries on Saturday — the Army vs. Navy game.

The annual game between the military service academies was held this year in Baltimore. The soon-to-be commander-in-chief was cheered with chants of "USA! USA!" as he entered the stadium.

Trump talked with CBS Sports announcers Verne Lundquist and Gary Danielson during the third quarter of the game, joking that perhaps he should appoint Ludquist as ambassador to Sweden. Lundquist was calling his final football game for CBS on Saturday.

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Just when you're tired of the world, it's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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An anti-doping report has found that more than 1,000 Russian athletes were involved in state-sponsored doping, and that the "institutional conspiracy" extended far beyond previous evidence of cheating at the Sochi Olympics in 2014.

China's top court has handed basketball legend Michael Jordan a victory in a long-running trademark dispute over the use of his name by a Chinese company.

"Nothing is more important than protecting your own name, and today's decision shows the importance of that principle," Jordan said in a statement after the ruling. Here's more from Jordan:

In 2010, Chris Bertish paddled into 25-foot waves en route to a win at the Mavericks Surf Contest, an annual competition at one of the world's most famous (and nastiest) big-wave breaks. On Tuesday, Bertish paddled out to conquer something even more massive — roughly 4,600 miles larger, in fact.

The 42-year-old South African surfer and sailor set out to become the first person to cross the Atlantic Ocean unassisted on a stand-up paddleboard.

The slew of obituaries that have been published since Olympic diver Sammy Lee's death on Friday rightly highlight his conquest over racism and indignity on the way to winning gold medals in London and Helsinki nearly 70 years ago. As Greg Louganis, Lee's most famous protege, reflected in the Los Angeles Times, "At a time of intolerance, being Korean, he broke down racial barriers, setting an example of what it meant to be an Olympian."

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OK, let's stay in Texas now, where after two decades of futility, the Dallas Cowboys are back on top of the NFL. And commentator Frank Deford says, love them or hate them, this is a good thing.

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Like many gentlemen, Scott Sabol is always looking for a way to avoid shaving.

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Dr. Sammy Lee, the first Asian-American man to win an Olympic gold medal, died over the weekend after battling pneumonia. He was 96.

In the 1930s, Southern California had enough of the South in it that young Sammy Lee could only watch through the iron fence most days when other boys his age swam at the pool in Pasadena's Brookside Park. The pool, like the area's beaches and many other public facilities, was segregated. But not on Wednesdays.

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