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It's 6 a.m. and 14-year-old Kyubin Oh is wrapping up her first short track speedskating practice of the day. She unlaces her hot-pink skates. "The training's really hard," she says. "I do have my dream goal, which is obviously the Olympics." Then she giggles and cracks a huge smile.

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Updated at 6:10 p.m. ET

The board of USA Gymnastics says its remaining members will resign in response to a request by the U.S. Olympic Committee.

The U.S. Olympic Committee had earlier set a deadline of Jan. 31 for their resignation, or USA Gymnastics would face the loss of its certification as a national governing body. The deadline was one week from the day disgraced team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 gymnasts.

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Twelve members of the North Korean women's ice hockey team have crossed the heavily fortified border to begin training with their South Korean counterparts ahead of next month's Olympics in Pyeongchang.

Wearing red, white and blue team parkas emblazoned with the North Korean flag and "DPR Korea" on their backs, the women arrived on Thursday after the rival countries agreed to field a joint team at the games for the first time ever.

Baseball writers honored Atlanta Braves third baseman Chipper Jones and Cleveland Indians infielder Jim Thome in their first year of Hall of Fame eligibility Wednesday night, and also added San Diego Padres closer Trevor Hoffman and outfielder Vladimir Guerrero of the Montreal Expos and Los Angeles Angels.

Not approved, again: ace pitcher Roger Clemens and home run kings Barry Bonds and Sammy Sosa, who have been strongly tied to performance-enhancing drugs.

The new acting director of the National Park Service is a former parks official who was reprimanded 12 years ago for pressuring employees to allow the owner of Washington's NFL team to cut down trees for a better view of the Potomac River.

Interior Department Secretary Ryan Zinke announced the promotion of Paul Daniel Smith on Wednesday.

From 2004 to 2015, Smith was superintendent of Colonial National Historical Park.

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OK, unless you are a diehard professional wrestling fan, you might have missed a very special TV milestone this week.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "WWE MONDAY NIGHT RAW")

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Updated at 9 p.m. ET

Larry Nassar, the USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University doctor who has admitted to abusing girls and women who were receiving treatment from him, was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison on Wednesday.

"I just signed your death warrant," Judge Rosemarie Aquilina said, in her Lansing, Mich., courtroom as she read Nassar's sentence.

Heading into last night's game between the Cleveland Cavaliers and the San Antonio Spurs, LeBron James needed seven points to reach the 30,000 career point milestone.

He finished the game with 28 points. While that was more than enough to get James into the club, it was not however enough for the Cavaliers to win the game. The Spurs won 114-102 in San Antonio.

James became the seventh player with 30,000 career points when he hit a jumper with one second left in the first quarter.

How Hockey Took Hold In Las Vegas

Jan 24, 2018

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If your city gets a new sports franchise, it's exciting, sure, but you are doomed to years of failure. Expansion teams just don't do well, at least not immediately. Well, if there's one city that could beat the odds...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

3 USA Gymnastics Board Members Resign

Jan 24, 2018

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Having earned a spot Sunday on the U.S. Ski Team, Gus Kenworthy is the second openly gay man who will compete for the United States at the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

Kenworthy, 26, placed second at the final Olympic qualifier for freeski slopestyle, according to NBC.

Three key board members at USA Gymnastics have resigned, the organization said Monday. The moves indicate continued tumult at the sport's governing body as the sentencing hearing continues for former team doctor Larry Nassar, who has admitted to the sexual assault of minors under his care.

Efforts to make a show of North Korean and South Korean unity at the next Olympics are drawing a backlash in South Korea. In Seoul, protesters Monday set fire to the North Korean flag and a photo of Kim Jong Un. The South Korean president's approval rating has dropped in recent days as well.

"We oppose, we oppose, we oppose," shouted demonstrators at Seoul Station, the rail and subway station in the center of the capital. They showed up to confront a North Korean advance team that had arrived to scout out Olympic venues.

The defending NFL Champion New England Patriots will face the Philadelphia Eagles at the Super Bowl on Feb. 4 in Minnesota — setting the teams up for a rematch of their 2005 league championship contest and giving Philadelphia a chance to avenge the sting of that loss.

New England quarterback Tom Brady rallied his team in the final minutes for a comeback victory against the Jacksonville Jaguars in the American Football Conference championship. Brady threw a 4-yard touchdown pass to Danny Amendola with just 2:48 left on the clock, putting the Patriots at 24-20.

In just a few weeks, speedskater Kimani Griffin, 27, will join a cast of Olympic first-timers in Pyeongchang. But he's no stranger to the bright lights and big stage — or to public broadcasting.

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Rachael Denhollander was 15 the first time she went to see Larry Nassar, then the doctor for USA Gymnastics. Denhollander didn't tell anyone of authority about how he sexually assaulted her until years later, in 2004, when she was working as a gymnastics coach.

Nassar has admitted to sexually assaulting minors. He has been sentenced to 60 years in prison for charges related to child pornography but has not yet been sentenced in a state case for sexually assaulting the athletes.

Tell Us: Are You Still Watching The NFL?

Jan 19, 2018

Updated on Jan. 30, 2018

The past few NFL seasons have been mired in controversy, from findings about concussions and brain damage to injustice protests and domestic violence.

Have you changed your viewing habits as a result? If you have, Weekend Edition wants to hear from you.

Whether you're watching more football now, or less, let us know below, and tell us why. Your responses may be used in an upcoming story, on air or on NPR.org. A producer may reach out to you to follow up on your response, too.

Editor's note: This report includes disturbing descriptions of abuse.

On Thursday, USA Gymnastics announced they will stop using the Karolyi Ranch — the site of many of the atrocities committed against Olympians by Larry Nassar, the team's former doctor. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to New York Times reporter, Juliet Macur about what happens next as Nassar faces sentencing hearings this week.

We live in an age of heightened awareness about concussions. From battlefields around the world to football fields in the U.S., we've heard about the dangers caused when the brain rattles around inside the skull and the possible link between concussions and the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

More than 30 Russian athletes participating in Siberian Indoor Championships last weekend abruptly withdrew from competition when drug testers arrived at the event.

According to the Russian sports website Championat, as many as 36 athletes cited various illnesses for withdrawing from the competition at the city of Irkutsk.

Former NASCAR superstar Dale Earnhardt Jr. found out even the best drivers may have to stay off the roads in a snowstorm.

Wednesday morning after he helped pull another car out of a ditch, his pickup skidded off the road and rammed into a tree.

On Twitter Earnhardt said he lost control of his truck on a snow-covered road and warned other North Carolina drivers to avoid his fate. "[North Carolina] stay off the roads today/tonight. 5 minutes after helping these folks I center punched a pine tree," he wrote.

When South Korea hosts the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang next month, a combined North Korea-South Korea women's hockey team — the countries' first-ever joint team — will attract a lot of attention. So will the sight of athletes from the two Koreas, divided for some 70 years, marching together in the opening ceremony on Feb. 9.

When North and South Korean athletes march out to the opening ceremony at next month’s Winter Olympics, they’ll do so under a single flag. And the two nations will field a women’s ice hockey team together as well.

It’s a big diplomatic step, but as CNN reports, not everyone is excited about the development.

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