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Sports

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Milagros "Mili" Hernandez loves soccer, and she's good at it. Really good. At age 8, the short-haired Nebraska girl plays on an Omaha club team with 11-year-olds.

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Nashville rookie Frederick Gaudreau scored the game-winning goal and goalie Pekka Rinne stopped 23 shots Monday night as the Predators evened the Stanley Cup series with a 4-1 win over the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Game 4 in Nashville, Tenn., was tied 1-1 until Gaudreau beat Matt Murray 3:45 into the second period. Calle Jarnkrok, Viktor Arvidsson and Filip Forsberg also scored for the Predators.

Pittsburgh's lone goal came from Sidney Crosby in the first period.

"It's hard to win when you score one goal," Penguins coach Mike Sullivan said after the game.

Alex Honnold has shocked the sport of climbing by reaching the peak of El Capitan without using ropes, climbing one of the world's largest monoliths in less than four hours with little gear other than a bag of chalk.

When Colby Palmer started his freshman year at Virginia Commonwealth University, some students approached him in his dorm and asked whether he wanted to play quidditch.

Palmer had read all of the Harry Potter books and knew about the sport but said he felt reluctant to try it out.

"My impressions of quidditch was just that it's for nerds by nerds — that they wouldn't be like people who I would find things in common with," Palmer says.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And now it's time for sports.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The New York Mets lost 7 to 1 to the Milwaukee Brewers on Wednesday, but the real loser was their mascot, Mr. Met. Mr. Met has a huge white baseball of a head dappled with red stitching and embellished with a perpetual grin.

There's good news and bad news for the Cleveland Cavaliers following their 113-91 loss last night to the Golden State Warriors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals.

Their bad news first.

They lost.

Their good news? The reasons they lost were pretty clear. Meaning they don't have to dig too deeply to understand what they have to correct for Game 2. Or try to correct.

Cleveland turned the ball over 20 times. Compared to four for the Warriors.

"Twenty turnovers in the Finals definitely is not going to get it done," said Cleveland point guard Kyrie Irving.

The wait for the finals is finally over. Well, at least for game one. Follow along with with NPR reporters and fans before and during tonight's game here or on Twitter:

  • Tom Goldman, Sports Reporter at NPR
  • Mike Urycki, Reporter at Ideastream/WCPN Cleveland
  • Laura Roman, Social Media Editor at NPR, LeBron James/Cavs Fan
  • Christianna Silva, Digital Intern at NPR, Warriors Fan

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's still early in the French Open, but the tournament has already seen a remarkable show of sportsmanship. On Thursday, Juan Martín del Potro climbed over the net to console his opponent, Nicolás Almagro, who was visibly upset by an injury that forced him to withdraw from their match.

The score in their second-round match was tied at one set apiece when del Potro served — and Almagro was unable to move on the opposite baseline, his head down as he tried to cope with the realization that a recurring knee injury would end his run at Roland Garros.

For NBA fans, grumbly and otherwise, the wait is almost over. The Finals, finally, begin tonight.

The news conference was supposed to be about the start of the NBA finals Thursday — but the first question to Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James wasn't about how he'll deal with the Warriors' Draymond Green. It was about how he's dealing with racist graffiti at his house in Los Angeles.

A Preview Of The NBA Finals

May 31, 2017

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When A Catfish Is An 'Instrument Of Crime'

May 31, 2017

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Renowned sports writer and commentator Frank Deford, 78, died on Sunday, just a few weeks after his last piece aired on Morning Edition. He had recorded 1,656 commentaries for NPR over nearly 40 years.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now let's remember Frank Deford, who died at 78. His sportswriting career included decades of commentaries on this program. Frank Deford could rage against the practice of allowing soccer games to end in a tie.

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On a November night in 1986, a crowd gathered in Las Vegas for an event that was hyped as "Judgement Day." Muhammad Ali was there, along with celebrities Sylvester Stallone, Eddie Murphy and Rob Lowe. (Hey, it was the '80s.) At the center of it all was a boxing ring with a referee and two fighters: Mike Tyson and Trevor Berbick.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Updated 1:10 a.m. ET Tuesday:

Tiger Woods released a statement Monday night blaming medications for his arrest on a DUI charge in Florida.

"I understand the severity of what I did and I take full responsibility for my actions.

"I want the public to know that alcohol was not involved. What happened was an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications. I didn't realize the mix of medications had affected me so strongly.

Updated at 4:11 p.m. ET

Through nearly four decades, at least five presidential administrations and seemingly countless Super Bowls and World Series, NPR listeners could depend on at least one thing in the ever-unpredictable world of athletics: Frank Deford. A mainstay on Morning Edition, the Hall of Fame sportswriter was public radio's scholar of sports for some 37 years before hanging up his cleats earlier this year.

The Definitive Best-Looking NHL Player

May 29, 2017

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. The Stanley Cup Finals start tonight. That's exciting for hockey fans. Less exciting - media day. So the Nashville Predators' P.K. Subban had a little fun. He played the role of reporter - for example, asking teammate Mike Fisher...

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No one in the history of the NBA has been a louder proponent of the underhanded free throw than Rick Barry. The unorthodox technique — sometimes known as the "granny" — earned the Hall of Famer the title of one of the best free throw shooters of all time.

Barry swears by its accuracy, but players hardly ever use it.

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

For the athletes, the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio were full of triumph and defeat, victory laps and tears, all the usual themes. But the legacy of those games for the host city...

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Jim Bunning, an imposing Hall of Fame pitcher and a cantankerous, resolutely conservative U.S. Senator from Kentucky, died Friday at age 85.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And now it is time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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