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Where cultures collide, misunderstandings and foolhardy assumptions happen. Just about one week in, these Winter Olympics already have showcased some choice cultural gaffes. Here's hoping this post doesn't require multiple updates.

Let's acknowledge at the outset that despite its name, Iceland can be brilliantly, beautifully green. But the country lies far north of the equator, and a small part of it has an ice cap. One Icelander even made waves this week for posting a photo of herself hanging out laundry in chest-deep snow.

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Howard says he just wanted to meet the cheerleaders.

He and the beaming, beautiful North Korean cheering section were both at the women's ice hockey game, watching the unified Korean team take on Japan at the Pyeongchang Winter Games. So, he figured, why not just bop over to where they were sitting in the stands, bringing his own fun-sized unification flag — and his hi-top haircut, his black glasses, and his tasteful bit of girth about the midsection.

So what if he happened to look like Kim Jong Un?

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

To the sound of an instrumental version of The Beatles' "A Day in the Life" — and the coordinated chanting of North Korea's tightly controlled cheering squad — figure skaters Ryom Tae Ok, 19, and Kim Ju Sik, 25, took to the ice Wednesday in their Olympic debut.

The athletes earned a personal best in their short program and were well-received by the crowd in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

Fierce and howling winds at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics have led to safety concerns and thrown the alpine skiing schedule into disarray. The gusts, which reached up to 50 miles per hour, led the local government to issue emergency alerts on the Korean mobile phone network warning of fire dangers and flying debris — and asking people to secure any outdoor equipment or furniture.

The strong winds meant that once again, U.S. skier Mikaela Shiffrin's first medal race in South Korea would be put off.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

When we invited our buddy Sam Sanders, of the It's Been A Minute podcast, to talk to us about the Winter Olympics, we didn't even remember that in 2014, he helped NPR cover the Winter Olympics in Sochi. As it turned out, in addition to his usual insight and thoughtfulness, Sam possesses relevant experience!

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

Shaun White pulled off a gold-medal comeback in the halfpipe, and Japan's Ayumu Hirano won silver on the strength of a phenomenal second run.

CORRECTION: An early version of this story reported that White had won silver — that was reported after the second run had completed. On his third run, White won gold.

Finland has a tendency to beguile. Saunas are so important that both the president and prime minister keep official ones. The country has the most heavy metal bands per capita. It's experimenting with a basic income.

Since she was a little girl, Ashley Caldwell has been in constant motion: jumping out of her crib, tumbling off the couch, leaping down stairs, flipping on a trampoline.

So it seems fitting that now, at 24, Caldwell is the reigning women's world champion in aerials skiing — a sport in which she somersaults and spins through the air, some 60 feet off the ground.

Erin Hamlin was shut out from the podium in the women's singles luge at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics on Tuesday, as Germany went 1-2 and Canada took the bronze.

Hamlin, who in 2014 became the first American to win an Olympic medal in singles luge (winning bronze) finished with a combined time that was 0.680 behind the winner, Natalie Geisenberger, over four runs down the track at Alpensia's Olympic Sliding Center in South Korea.

It's the second consecutive gold for Geisenberger, who also won in Sochi. Her cumulative time was 3:05.232.

Chloe Kim blew away the field and the crowd at the Pyeongchang Games in South Korea, winning the gold medal in the women's snowboard halfpipe. The win ticks another box in the career of Kim, who at 17 is already regarded as one of the best snowboarders in U.S. history.

Kim won with a score of 98.25, in a competition that never saw her trail another snowboarder. Her fellow American Arielle Gold won bronze, and Kelly Clark narrowly missed the podium after sitting in third place for two runs.

Big air. Big victories. Big emotion: They're all par for the course at any Olympics.

Big winds, on the other hand, are a big problem.

Over the past few days Pyeongchang, home of the 2018 Winter Games, has seen wind gusts up to 45 mph — more than enough to wreak havoc with winter sports that remain on the ground, let alone those where athletes fling themselves into the air.

The high winds prompted the postponement of the women's giant slalom race, a major downhill event.

Remember this name: Maame Biney.

The short track speedskater just turned 18; she's not even out of high school. But she is already one of the biggest U.S. names at the Winter Olympics.

U.S. figure skaters won the bronze medal in the team event on Monday, in an action-packed tournament that saw Mirai Nagasu land a historic jump – and in which Adam Rippon and other Americans showed they're in fine form at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

"This is literally a dream come true for all of us," Nagasu said, in comments transcribed by the Olympics news service. "I think I speak on behalf of the team. We're super excited and we're at a loss for words. I'm really proud of my team."

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Carlos Cordeiro is the new president of the U.S. Soccer Federation, succeeding his boss, Sunil Gulati, in a final vote over the weekend that concluded a contentious race.

U.S. snowboarder Jamie Anderson won the women's snowboard slopestyle competition at the Winter Olympics in South Korea on Monday, successfully defending the gold medal she won at the Sochi Olympics in 2014.

Anderson won after high winds delayed the competition at Phoenix Snow Park — and the conditions almost wrecked her medal-winning performance.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The life of a top U.S. snowboarder is an expensive one. Some top boarders come from wealthy backgrounds. But Jonathan Cheever, who's going to his first Olympics this year, has supported himself with a family trade. He's a plumber.

Snowboard cross is an aggressive sport. Several snowboarders race side-by-side down a twisting course, edging past each other all way to the finish line.

"There's bumps, jumps, turns," Cheever says. "Snowboarders reach speeds of up to 65, 70 miles an hour."

Chris Mazdzer has used his runners to etch himself a place in history.

The 29-year-old won silver in singles luge on Sunday, becoming the first American man ever to medal in the event. His podium finish ends a drought that extends to the sport's Olympic debut back in 1964.

Also on that podium were Austria's David Gleirscher, who won gold in a shocker of his own, and bronze medalist Johannes Ludwig of Germany.

The host of the Winter Olympics, South Korea, excels in the summer game of archery. They grabbed gold medals in all four categories in Rio.

But the tiny Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan may be less than awed. Bhutan claims archery for its national sport, and archers pay no heed to the plunging temperatures of winter when they compete propelling arrows across a field.

And if you think of archery as a decorous game, think again.

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

She's not what we expected: not stiff, but smiling. That's what people are saying in South Korea, as they consider the unprecedented visit by Kim Yo Jong, the sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, who has raised her profile dramatically at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

The U.S. women's hockey team opened tournament play with a win on Sunday, defeating Finland 3-1, in a tense and physical game at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

The U.S. team came out skating at a furious pace, pushing Finland well back into their own end and firing off shots on goal. But Finland eventually built their own momentum, organizing themselves and putting together dangerous possessions. Their defense, led by captain Jenni Hiirikoski, settled in.

Vice President Mike Pence is facing backlash for his staunch efforts to ignore North Korean officials at the Winter Olympic Games, even as the two Koreas continued their temporary truce, marching and competing as one team.

Pence's cold demeanor toward the North Koreans at the Pyeongchang games was overshadowed by friendly cooperation between the North and South. The vice president also drew criticism from some openly gay members of Team USA, who questioned his role at the Olympics due to his anti-LGBT views.

Snowboarder Redmond Gerard — more commonly known as simply "Red" — has won the first U.S. medal in Pyeongchang, taking a gold medal at the Winter Olympics with a stunning comeback win in the men's slopestyle final.

"It was awesome. I just told myself that I want to land a run and I was a little bummed on my first two runs because I fell a couple of times," Gerard said, in comments relayed by the Olympics' news service. "I'm just so happy that it all worked out."

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