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Technology

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Equifax, an international credit reporting agency, has announced that a cybersecurity breach exposed the personal information of 143 million U.S. consumers. In a statement released Thursday, the Atlanta-based agency acknowledged that "criminals exploited a U.S. website application vulnerability to gain access to certain files."

Amazon made the sort of announcement Thursday morning that mayors dream about.

The tech juggernaut said it was looking for the right city in which to build its "HQ2": a second headquarters in North America, equal to its campus in Seattle. And it's going to make that selection process a public one, akin to how cities bid to host an Olympic Games.

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A massive shift happened, quietly, during the Obama years: Democrats got comfortable and gave up their lead in digital campaigning, Democratic and Republican political operatives say.

Republicans, meanwhile, itched to regain power and invested heavily in using the Internet to build political support.

Now, liberals in Silicon Valley want to shift the balance of power.

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET Friday

When North Korea conducted its latest nuclear test, the ground trembled more than 3,000 miles away in western Kazakhstan. Recording the shaking was AS059, an automated seismic station that's part of a global network designed to detect underground nuclear explosions.

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Dating sites claim to winnow a few ideal suitors out of a nigh-infinite pool of chaff. But the matches these algorithms offer may be no better than picking partners at random, a study finds.

Researchers asked about 350 heterosexual undergrads at Northwestern University to fill out questionnaires assessing their personalities and romantic preferences.

Zoë Quinn On #Gamergate

Sep 5, 2017

You may have heard of Gamergate, the 2014 Internet … event that exposed much of the world to the sexism and abuse that are rampant in some corners of online culture. But what do you know about the woman who was at the center of it?

Game designer and programmer Zoë Quinn dealt with a barrage of hateful, violent trolling. And she survived. She tells the story in her new book, “Crash Override.”

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America's business leaders are speaking out against President Trump's move to end DACA.

The president of Microsoft, Brad Smith, took a notable stand. He said not only will his company lobby for a legislative solution but also that Microsoft is calling on Congress to make immigration the top priority, before tax reform. And he is calling on other business leaders to follow suit.

Sometimes the true value of an invention isn't obvious until people start using it.

Consider what happened to inventor Nate Ball and his powered ascender. About 15 years ago, Ball was an undergraduate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology when the U.S. Army approached MIT with a request: Can somebody build a powered device that can pull somebody up a rope, like Batman does?

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It's Labor Day, so we're looking at jobs on this week's All Tech Considered.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

This is part of an occasional series: Is My Job Safe? These stories look at jobs that might be at risk because of technology and automation.

Over the last few years, many of my colleagues have asked me questions about cars. Recently at NPR West in Culver City, Calif., we got two electric chargers. When my colleague Melissa Kuypers said she wanted an electric car, I thought: perfect guinea pig for a little test.

How Technology Helped Rescuers

Sep 1, 2017

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This past week in Texas, we saw everyday citizens driving their boats to rescue folks who were stranded by Hurricane Harvey, a bit chaotic but a surprisingly organized chaos - complete with volunteer dispatchers.

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People who are growing up with smartphones are having less sex and drinking less alcohol than previous generations, some research indicates. Other studies also show this generation is more depressed, lonelier, more isolated and getting less sleep.

Psychologist Jean M. Twenge says these young consumers, a group she calls iGen, is “on the brink of a mental-health crisis.”

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It is not over yet. Harvey has battered the Texas-Louisiana coast for almost a week now. And while the storm has weakened - it's now a tropical depression - Harvey is still really dangerous for a whole lot of people in the region.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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I want to go very quickly now to Aarti Shahani, NPR's tech reporter. Aarti, why is this story involving Barry Lynn hitting such a nerve?

In a stats-driven sport like baseball, it seems we know everything there is to know about a player. From batting average to a pitcher's power finesse ratio.

Measuring a player's ability isn't limited to his or her skill. There's also a wealth of information in an athlete's body.

Regina Bateson doesn't look like a gambler, but that's what she's become — in the world of politics.

She just left her tenure-track job at MIT to run for Congress back home, in Northern California. She's a Democrat with zero campaign experience. And she needs to unseat the Republican incumbent in her solidly Republican district.

She's fighting this unlikely fight because technology — in the form of an online platform called Crowdpac.com — made her believe it's possible.

Uber says it has ended its tracking of users after they complete their rides — a practice that caused immediate concern when the company added it in November.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

When disaster strikes, stories often emerge about people who go above and beyond to serve others. People like Mattress Mack, the Houston business owner who invited Hurricane Harvey evacuees into his two giant furniture stores, even sending out trucks to pick up people who couldn't get there.

There is a lifesaving drug that owes its existence to moldy hay, sick cows and rat poison.

Many of Tropical Storm Harvey's stranded flood victims haven't been able to get through to 911, compounding their fears. That's when Facebook, Twitter and Nextdoor stepped in.

Annie Swinford is one of the many unofficial volunteers helping fellow Houstonians via the Facebook group Hurricane Harvey 2017 - Together We Will Make It.

How Silicon Valley Is Shaping The News

Aug 28, 2017

News publishing used to be a big priority for the press. Now, many newsrooms let tech companies worry about that.

The increasing involvement of social media platforms in how news is distributed has led to more content filtering and control over which stories get traction in your newsfeed. It’s also changed the economic model and organizational structure in traditional newsrooms.

Are we ready for social media to become the “mainstream media”?

The News And Your Newsfeed

Aug 28, 2017

When Facebook hired former news anchor Campbell Brown to lead its news partnerships, it was a response to critics who say the technology company is crossing the line from social media platform to just plain media.

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