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Donald Trump has chosen Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his vice presidential running mate, a source with direct knowledge confirms to NPR's Mara Liasson.

A rollout in New York City had been planned for Friday at 11 a.m., but Trump tweeted Thursday evening that "in light of the horrible attack in Nice, France," he was postponing that announcement.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Updated 4:00 a.m. ET Friday:

The French interior minister says 84 people have been killed. The four new reported deaths are thought to come from the list of critically injured.

Updated 11:00 p.m. ET Thursday:

A truck drove into a crowd celebrating Bastille Day in Nice, France, killing dozens of people on Thursday evening. The French interior minister says 80 people have been killed and 18 are in critical condition.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg told NPR's Nina Totenberg that earlier comments she made about presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump were "incautious."

NSA Boss Says U.S. Cyber Troops Are Nearly Ready

17 hours ago

The director of the National Security Agency says his first few dedicated cyber troops will be operational by early fall but the nation can't wait for the full unit to be ready.

The military's Cyber Mission Force, which will eventually contain 6,200 people split into 133 teams, is the largest single unit dedicated to operating in computer networks. It's intended to both attack and defend computer systems around the world.

Orlando police say a break-in occurred last night at the Pulse nightclub, where the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history occurred last month.

It happened "just hours after police released the business back to its owners," as Reuters reports.

A sitting duck. That's what South America was a few years ago when Zika first struck. The continent had never recorded a case of the mosquito-borne virus. And everyone was susceptible.

"So you get this huge raging epidemic that blows through the population, usually very fast and infects a pretty high percentage of the population," says Justin Lessler, an epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Ever feel as though you're not getting ahead financially?

Join the club. The very big club.

A new study shows that across the world's 25 advanced economies, two-thirds of households are earning the same as, or less than, they did a decade ago.

Thursday morning, the Republican National Committee released its list of convention speakers. It's a lot of politicians and business people, with five Trump family members mixed in. I looked them up and broadly categorized them. After my first pass, here's how it broke down:

After years of bitter debate and legislative stalemate over the labeling of genetically modified ingredients, a compromise proposal sailed through Congress in breathtaking speed over the past three weeks.

The House of Representative passed the measure on Thursday with solid support from both Democrats and Republicans. It now goes to the White House, where President Obama is expected to sign it.

In the wake of last week's shootings, Facebook has seen a significant spike in flagged content, with users calling out each other's posts as racist, violent and offensive. According to Facebook employees, the company is having a very hard time deciding who is right or how to define hate speech.

Unpublished, and re-published

We are haunted by the original Ghostbusters, but it is a mostly benevolent haunting: a Class III apparition, at best. Indelible moments from the film have caused little disturbances in pop-culture's memory hole over the last 32 years — the rad Ray Parker Jr. theme music, the Marshmallow Man, the library chase that's become a part of the fabric of New York itself.

In The Infiltrator's opening scene, Bob (Bryan Cranston) swaggers through a Florida bowling alley. He's just about to make a massive drug deal when he feels a burning pain in his chest. The cause is a ready-made metaphor: Bob is an undercover cop, and the microphone strapped to his torso has overheated, making his secret identity a searing liability.

Let's get the exposition dump out of the way first: In Drake Doremus' leaden sci-fi/romance Equals, an apocalyptic Great War has eradicated nearly all mankind and rendered 99.6% of the land uninhabitable. The surviving humans have colonized under the governing body called "The Collective," which has taken drastic steps to repopulate the species and eliminate the threat of another conflict wiping them out again.

Tony Robbins is huge. Really: the life coach/motivational speaker/practical psychologist/whatever-you-want-to-call-him stands 6'7" in his socks. He's built an empire to match — one that includes an apparently vast global following and a raft of best-selling books on how to do almost anything. His packed seminars sell for $5,000 a pop to those with problems common enough, sensational enough, or devastating enough to merit a life-makeover from Robbins and his team.

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Most of the front door of Rachel Taylor's little yellow house in White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., is pasted with paw prints where her dog struggled to get inside during the flood last month. He was too big to carry through the rising waters.

Across the street, nestled between two battered houses, an empty lot is marked by a cross with an array of flowers and photos — a small memorial for a family washed away by the torrent.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

The Senate passed legislation Wednesday that addresses a nationwide opioid crisis. It expands treatment options and considers addiction a disease instead of a law-enforcement issue.

The measure now goes to President Barack Obama, although Democrats say it isn’t adequately funded. Meanwhile, lawmakers will leave Washington at the end of the week without passing bills on guns or funding for Zika virus treatment.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson gets the latest from NPR’s Susan Davis.

It used to be that the candidates didn’t even attend political party nominating conventions. Then, they evolved into four-day celebrations of the parties’ nominees.

Harvard University historian Jill Lepore speaks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about some notable moments at American political conventions.

Interview Highlights: Jill Lepore

On the emergence of the legislative caucus, and its political impact

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

A lot has been said about the difficulty Donald Trump has had getting the Republican establishment behind him. But one man has always backed him in the Senate: Republican Jeff Sessions of Alabama.

They're the odd couple of politics: a New York City tycoon and a guy from the deep South. One man is mild-mannered. The other, famous for bold exaggerations.

But Trump and Sessions are linked by their shared hard-line view on one central issue: immigration.

And Sessions too has had a controversial political career.

This piece was inspired by NPR's summer recommendation series, Read, Watch, Binge!

Over the next two weeks, Republicans and Democrats will gather in Cleveland and Philadelphia for a ritual that has become almost entirely ceremonial: Each party will "select" pre-selected presidential candidates.

An electronic billboard hangs on the side of a towering government building in eastern Cairo, the home of Egypt's statistical agency, CAPMAS. In an alarming red, the billboard ticks off the estimated number of Egyptians, and on a recent day it said there were more than 91 million. Or 91,034,024, to be precise.

The 2016 Emmy Award nominations were announced Thursday morning in Los Angeles. The full list of nominations is here.

Although HBO's hit Veep received the most comedy nominations, the ABC show Black-ish was nominated in three top categories, including best comedy series and best lead actor and actress in a comedy series.