National/World

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Hours after releasing a partial transcript of Orlando gunman Omar Mateen's 911 phone call with police during the deadly shooting that left 49 victims dead, the FBI has released a new version of the record — one that includes Mateen's pledge of allegiance to ISIS.

The Justice Department's decision to redact references to ISIS and its leader from the transcript took many observers by surprise, particularly as many media outlets, including NPR, have reported that Mateen had pledged his support for ISIS and its leader during phone calls with police.

The United Kingdom votes Thursday on a proposal to leave the European Union. Last week, voters appeared to favor a Brexit for the first time since polling began on the referendum, but after the murder of MP Jo Cox, “Remain” is on top once again.

Nonetheless, economists are nervous that the move could have ripple effects for economic growth, trade and finance across Europe.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd discusses the economic implications of Brexit with Marcel Fratzscher, president of The German Institute for Economic Research.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET:

The Justice Department and FBI have now released the full transcript of Orlando shooter Omar Mateen's 911 call, which includes his naming the Islamic State and leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. In a joint statement, the agencies said they had withheld the names because they "did not want to provide the killer or terrorist organizations with a publicity platform for hateful propaganda" but decided to do so after the issue had become a "distraction" to the investigation.

Original post follows:

"Ca."

When Ranwa Yehia heard her nearly 3-year-old son, Nadeem, making this sound, she got cold shivers all over her body. After three months of saying "cat," Nadeem couldn't say the whole word anymore.

Shortly after, Yehia was told she could no longer bring her son to his nursery school unless the family could get another teacher to shadow him in class.

What was going on with Nadeem?

Oakland's mayor was blunt:

"I'm here to run a police department, not a frat house," Libby Schaaf said at a press conference on Friday.

A number of police officers in the California city have been accused of sexual misconduct; others have allegedly sent racist texts. Now three police chiefs have resigned over the course of just over a week.

For years, if Costco customers wanted to shop with a credit card, the retail giant required them to pay with an American Express card. But as of Monday, the giant big-box retailer and its 81 million customers are switching over to AmEx's rival, Visa.

Why should anybody care? Well, if you don't shop at Costco, there's probably not much reason. But, if you are one of the millions of Americans who like to buy 12-packs of paper-towel rolls or 30-pound boxes of frozen beef patties, then here's what you need to know:

Great Britain will vote Thursday on whether to remain in the European Union or to leave it, to exit — hence the name for the vote: "Brexit."

Ever since the United Kingdom joined the European Union's precursor, the Common Market, in 1973, it has been a rocky relationship. So before going to Britain, I visited a country where the relationship with the EU is anything but rocky, to see how the EU works at its best — and whether it might ever work that well for the United Kingdom.

By now we know that Zika is dangerous for pregnant women and their future babies. The virus can cause devastating birth defects.

But what about for infections after babies are born? Or in older children? Is Zika a danger for them?

So far, all the evidence suggests probably not. But there are a few caveats.

Let's start with what we know.

The curse was over.

On Sunday Night, the Cleveland Cavaliers beat the Golden State Warriors and took home the NBA championship.

It was the Cavs' first-ever NBA title.

It fulfilled a promise LeBron James made two years ago, when he returned to his hometown and swore he'd win them a championship.

Although home to the world's largest oil reserves, Venezuela seems to be running out of almost everything these days: food, medicine, electricity, even beer.

It's not every day that an actress has a television show written specifically for her, but that's exactly what happened with Ellie Kemper and the Netflix series Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.

"I still am not sure what in my face screams 'bunker-cult victim' to [show creators Robert Carlock and Tina Fey], but something did, so they went with that," Kemper jokes to Fresh Air's Ann Marie Baldonado.

During his three-hour attack on an Orlando nightclub, gunman Omar Mateen spoke to police negotiators for nearly 30 minutes, according to partial transcripts that the FBI released Monday. But his victims — people trapped in the club — were also on their phones, detailing the situation for police.

Toward the end of the standoff, survivors of the attack also told police "the shooter said he was going to put four vests with bombs on victims within 15 minutes," the FBI says.

When you think about fish, it's probably at dinnertime. Author Jonathan Balcombe, on the other hand, spends a lot of time pondering the emotional lives of fish. Balcombe, who serves as the director of animal sentience for the Humane Society Institute for Science and Policy, tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that humans are closer to understanding fish than ever before.

"Thanks to the breakthroughs in ethology, sociobiology, neurobiology and ecology, we can now better understand what the world looks like to fish," Balcombe says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

By refusing to hear an appeals, the Supreme Court on Monday let stand a lower court ruling that left in place assault weapons bans in New York and Connecticut.

The high court declined to hear an appeal of a case decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

Updated at 7:40 p.m. ET with Senate votes

To virtually no one's surprise, the Senate failed to advance any of the four gun control proposals — two offered by Democrats, and two by Republicans — that came in response to last week's mass shooting in Orlando, Fla.

Here are the results:

June 19, 2016, is a day I'll remember for the rest of my life.

Father's Day. The last class of my daughter's first swim lessons. The day history changed forever, especially for those of us from Cleveland.

Updated at 6:20 p.m. ET

Donald Trump has parted ways with his campaign manager and close ally, Corey Lewandowski.

The move appears to be a reaction to the presumptive GOP nominee's sagging poll numbers and weeks of difficulty as he prepped for a tough general-election fight with Hillary Clinton.

Hours after his abrupt exit, Lewandowski gave a pair of television interviews in which he put a positive spin on his exit.

A solar-powered airplane took off from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport early Monday, in a bid to have the Solar Impulse 2 craft cross the Atlantic Ocean and land in Spain on Thursday.

"Specificity is the soul of narrative" is a thing John Hodgman likes to say when he's hearing cases on the smart and funny Judge John Hodgman podcast, and it's applicable to documentary film, too. Documentaries devoted to a topic with heft do better if they can find a particular angle, a particular way into the question.

The number of refugees, asylum-seekers and internally displaced people around the world has topped 65 million, the United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees said Monday.

As of December 2015, there were 65.3 million displaced people, according to a report from the refugee agency. It's the first time in the organization's history the number has surpassed 60 million — and represents a nearly 10 percent increase over last year's total, of 59.5 million.

Cleveland Celebrates NBA Championship Title

Jun 20, 2016
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Something's wrong in America's classrooms.

According to new data from the Education Department, black students — from kindergarten through high school — are 3.8 times more likely to be suspended than white students.

Now the really bad news.

This trend begins in preschool, where black children are already 3.6 times more likely to be suspended than white students.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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