National/World

Pages

Monkey See
9:03 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

'Parks And Recreation' Sets Off Into The Future

Amy Poehler as Leslie Knope.
Colleen Hayes NBC

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 7:49 am

After seven seasons, NBC's gently acerbic, lovingly rendered Parks and Recreation ended its run Tuesday night with an extension of the final season's voyage to 2017. In further flashes to a few years or even decades later, we learned about April and Andy's kids, Garry's future as a beloved eternal mayor with an ageless wife, Tom's many hustles to come, Donna's educational foundation, the park Ron will run, Leslie's brilliant career and the true partnership of equals that is her marriage to Ben.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:57 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel Faces Runoff In Re-Election Bid

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel (center and 8th Ward Alderwoman Michelle Harris join phone bank workers Tuesday on Election Day in Chicago. Emanuel was unable to clear the 50 percent threshold in the race, triggering a runoff election against a fellow Democrat in April.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 6:24 am

Amid turnout of only a third of registered voters, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is headed for a runoff in his re-election bid, according to figures released by the Chicago Board of Election Commissioners.

With 98.6 percent of precincts reporting, the former congressman and chief of staff for President Barack Obama leads with 45.37 percent of the vote, followed by Democratic Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia with 34 percent.

Emanuel required a vote of 50 percent plus one to avoid a runoff. The runoff election with Garcia is scheduled for April 7.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:56 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Guilty Verdict Returned In 'American Sniper' Murder Trial

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 6:18 am

A Texas jury reached a guilty verdict in the murder trial of Eddie Ray Routh, the ex-Marine charged with killing former U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, author of the memoir American Sniper.

Routh was sentenced to life in prison without parole for shooting Kyle and his friend Chad Littlefield to death at a gun range near Fort Worth in 2013. Defense lawyers had argued that Routh suffers from paranoid schizophrenia; Routh had pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:01 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu Rebuffs Senate Democrats' Meeting Request

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu walks past a window overlooking the Old City of Jerusalem.
Sebastian Scheiner AP

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 7:52 pm

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has declined an invitation to meet with two top Democratic senators.

As Reuters reports, Senators Dianne Feinstein, of California, and Dick Durbin, of Illinois, invited Netanyahu for a closed-door meeting during his scheduled trip to Washington next week.

Read more
It's All Politics
6:30 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Tables Have Turned As Senate Barrels Toward Homeland Security Deadline

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has offered Democrats a Department of Homeland Security funding bill without provisions, but Democrats still want a commitment from House Speaker John Boehner.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 11:45 pm

The Senate is speeding ahead into the first real deadline it's had since the beginning of the new Congress. In many ways, nothing has changed from past deadlines β€” lawmakers don't seem interested in resolving the matter with time to spare, rhetoric is hot and angry, and as always, one side is accusing the other of filibustering. Except this time it's the Republicans howling at the Democrats for being the obstructionists.

The script remains the same. The two sides have merely switched parts.

Read more
History
6:20 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Even Pickaxes Couldn't Stop The Nation's First Oil Pipeline

Tanks holding oil in Pithole, Pa., in 1868. Samuel Van Syckel built his first pipeline over just five weeks in 1865. At 2 inches in diameter, it was tiny by modern standards β€” but it was an engineering marvel.
Drake Well Museum/Courtesy of PHMC

One-hundred-fifty years ago, a man named Samuel Van Syckel built the nation's first commercial oil pipeline in the rugged terrain of northwestern Pennsylvania.

His pipeline transformed how oil is transported β€” and it would change the modern world, too β€” but not before a battle that makes the debate over the Keystone XL pipeline look meek by comparison.

Read more
Digital Life
2:59 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

A Stolen iPhone, A New Connection And Minor Celebrity In China

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:16 pm

Months after Buzzfeed writer Matt Stopera's phone was stolen, new pictures from China started uploading to his photo stream. He wrote about it and Chinese twitter, Weibo, picked it up. Kelly McEvers talks to Stopera about his stolen iPhone and newfound fame in China.

Shots - Health News
2:59 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Gerbils Likely Pushed Plague To Europe in Middle Ages

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:43 am

Gerbils are a beloved classroom pet, but they might also be deadly killers. A study now claims that gerbils helped bring bubonic plague to Medieval Europe and contributed to the deaths of millions.

Plague is caused by bacteria (Yersinia pestis) found in rodents, and the fleas that live on rodents. The rodent that's usually Suspect Zero is the rat.

Read more
Law
2:50 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Little-Known Laws Help Sex Trafficking Victims Clear Criminal Records

This woman, who has had her prostitution charge wiped away, says she got the lotus tattoo to cover up the brand of a former pimp. "Once they put their name on me, I was their property," she adds. She says she got the word "persist" tattooed as a reminder to keep moving forward.
Evie Stone NPR

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 7:05 am

Advocates for women arrested on prostitution charges want the justice system to adopt a different approach. They say instead of being locked up, many prostitutes should actually be considered victims of human trafficking. And they're starting to offer those women a way to clean up the criminal records left behind.

One of them lives in an apartment not far from Dallas. Inside, a 24-year-old woman pushes up her sleeve to show off a tattoo of a lotus flower. The deep purple ink covers up an older mark.

Read more
Code Switch
2:47 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Here's Where Emoji Skin-Tone Colors Come From

Here are the latest set of emoji.
AP

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 6:14 pm

In emoji news (one of my favorite types of weird news, ever): Apple this week released a beta operating system to its testers that finally includes noticeably browner β€” and, um, yellower β€” choices.

Read more
Parallels
2:27 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Jordan's King Balances Threats Abroad And Critics At Home

Jordanians marched in the streets of the capital Amman on Feb. 6 to show solidarity with the family of a pilot killed by the Islamic State in Syria. Jordanians also expressed support for the king's decision to take part in the U.S.-led coalition against ISIS.
Muhammad Hamed Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 6:27 am

Jordan's King Abdullah has faced a delicate balancing act ever since he ascended the throne in 1999 following his father's death. His country shares borders with Iraq, Syria and Israel among others, and there always seems to be trouble in the neighborhood.

His latest challenge has been to convince Jordanians that it's in the country's interest to play a prominent role in the U.S.-led coalition against the self-declared Islamic State.

Read more
Law
2:26 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Sniper Trial Could Be In Jury's Hands Soon

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
2:26 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Younger Women Hesitate To Say They're Having A Heart Attack

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 12:21 pm

Each year more than 15,000 women under the age of 55 die of heart disease in the United States. And younger women are twice as likely to die after being hospitalized for a heart attack as men in the same age group.

It doesn't help that women tend to delay seeking emergency care for symptoms of a heart attack such as pain and dizziness, says Judith Lichtman, an associate professor of epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health. "We've known that for a while," she says.

Read more
Asia
2:16 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Indonesian Authorities Worried About Return Of Islamic Radicals

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
2:16 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

FIFA Considers Proposal To Move 2022 Qatar World Cup To Winter

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
2:16 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

U.S. Diplomat Says Change In Immigration Policy For Cubans Is Not On The Table

Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs, Roberta Jacobson, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, in February.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:16 pm

The United States' long-time policy of automatically granting residence to Cubans who step foot on U.S. soil will not change "any time soon."

That's according to Assistant Secretary of State Roberta Jacobson, who will lead negotiations on reestablishing diplomatic ties with Cuba this Friday.

Read more
NPR Ed
2:16 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

College? Career Tech? In Nashville, Teens Do Both

John Scarborough, a fourth-year pharmacy student at Lipscomb University, talks to high schoolers during a vocational career training class.
Courtesy of Lipscomb University

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:16 pm

Schools don't like to use the V-word anymore β€” "vocational," as in "vocational education." Administrators say the word is outdated, along with the idea of offering job-training courses only to students who are going straight into the workforce.

Nashville, Tenn., is trying a new approach. The public school system there is encouraging every high school student, regardless of college plans, to take three career-training classes before they graduate.

Read more
Television
2:16 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Amid Declining Ratings, Cable Networks Speed Up Reruns To Make Room For Ads

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
2:15 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Will Vaping Reignite The Battle Over Smoking On Airplanes?

Those were the days: A stewardess lights a cigar for a passenger aboard an American Airlines flight in 1949.
Bettmann/CORBIS

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:50 am

My biggest concern while flying is whether my legs will fall victim to deep vein thrombosis from being crammed in the sardine can we call an airplane seat. But on the bright side, at least I'm not increasing my risk of lung cancer, emphysema and bronchitis because of secondhand smoke.

Read more
Goats and Soda
2:01 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

How Did A Celibate 82-Year-Old Buddhist Monk Contract HIV?

A so-called "smart" syringe can only be used once, so there's no chance a patient can be infected due to multiple usages.
Courtesy of Chris Black/WHO

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:32 pm

An 82-year-old celibate Buddhist abbot from Cambodia has been diagnosed with HIV. His doctor was the cause: He was reusing syringes and infected a reported 272 individuals, including babies and children.

Read more
NPR Story
12:38 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

19 Manatees Rescued From Storm Drain In Florida

Early this morning, 19 manatees were rescued from a drain pipe in Satellite Beach, Florida, south of Cape Canaveral. Florida has been experiencing colder than average temperatures, and the endangered animals were probably seeking warmer waters in the drainpipe.

Read more
NPR Story
12:38 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Revisiting Ransom Riggs' Latest 'Peculiar Children' Book

Ransom Riggsβ€˜ novel β€œHollow City” comes out in paperback today.Β It’s the second of his β€œMiss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children” series about children with supernatural powers.

Like its predecessor, β€œHollow City” is based on vintage black and white photographs that Riggs finds and writes stories around.

Read more
NPR Story
12:38 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Uber's New Turf: Mid-Sized Cities

Des Moines, Iowa, is one of the mid-sized cities where Uber is expanding. (Ron Reiring/Wikimedia Commons)

The car-for-hire service Uber has been elbowing its way into big cities across the country, sparking controversies with taxis and regulators.

Last month, the San Francisco-based company raised $1.6 billion in financing, which it is using to fund international expansion.

Closer to home, the company is setting its sights on mid-sized cities, looking to expand its market into areas where taxi service is not as much a part of the culture.

Read more
All Tech Considered
12:27 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Trouble Ahead? Searching For Google's Future

Google co-founder and CEO Larry Page says the company will place more focus on its key projects.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 4:07 pm

It is hard to imagine a world without the ubiquity of Google, and the tech giant is working hard to keep it that way. Google has perfected the art of search advertising on desktop and laptop, and it controls the widely used Android mobile OS, as well as YouTube and Nest. But is the company nimble enough to capitalize on the next best thing in tech?

Some tech industry observers aren't sure.

Read more
Television
12:27 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Fair Warning: Watch One 'Foyle's War' Episode, And You'll Want To Watch Them All

Michael Kitchen stars as Foyle, a widowed police superintendent in the coastal city of Hastings in England. His sidekick is his driver, Samantha Stewart, a vicar's daughter played by Honeysuckle Weeks.
Acorn TV/ITV

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 12:41 pm

The satisfying thing about TV crime shows is that they offer a sense of closure. The unsatisfying thing is how much of life they must leave out to do it. Like, history. Whether you're talking CSI or Sherlock, crime shows tend to take place in a weirdly hermetic universe where the characters may change β€” like in True Detective β€” yet the historical moment in which they live remains largely irrelevant background.

Read more
Author Interviews
12:27 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

After His Brother's Suicide, Writer Seeks Comfort In 'All The Wrong Places'

Philip Connors' first book Fire Season was about how he spent a few months every year for eight years as a fire lookout, living in a cabin and scanning the horizon with binoculars atop a 45-foot tower in a remote region of New Mexico.
Mark Ehling Courtesy of W.W. Norton & Co.

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 6:35 pm

When writer Philip Connors was in his 20s, he received a call from his mother that later haunted him: "You know, I spoke to your brother and he's been having trouble with his girlfriend β€” he sounded really down ... you should really call him."

"And when I hung up the phone, I thought to myself: 'Yeah, yeah, kid brother and his silly troubles with women, I'll get around to calling him. I'll call him in a few days, or maybe next week,' " Connors tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Feds Close Investigation Of George Zimmerman Without Pressing Charges

George Zimmerman answers questions from a Seminole circuit judge in Sanford, Fla., last November.
Joe Burbank AP

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 1:51 pm

Federal authorities have decided to close an investigation of George Zimmerman, the Florida man who shot and killed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin back in 2012.

The killing sparked protests and a national conversation on race. Zimmerman, who is white, was acquitted of murder of the unarmed black teenager by a Florida jury, but federal prosecutors were weighing whether to bring hate crime charges against Zimmerman.

Read more
The Salt
12:21 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Tea Tuesdays: The Chemis-Tea Of Pouring The Perfect English-Style Cuppa

Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 12:33 pm

Tea is a daily ritual for millions of Britons. And the British are very specific about how they take their cuppa: black, traditionally with milk and sugar. In 1946, George Orwell wrote an essay in which he claimed to have cracked the code to putting together the perfect cup of tea with milk. But taste preferences can be very individual, so his solution may not be your ideal brew.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:21 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Obama Vetoes Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 2:40 pm

Updated at 4:04 p.m. ET

The White House has notified the Senate that President Obama has, as promised, vetoed congressional legislation to approve the Keystone XL pipeline project.

"Through this bill, the United States Congress attempts to circumvent longstanding and proven processes for determining whether or not building and operating a cross-border pipeline serves the national interest," Obama said in the notification to the Senate.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:15 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

3 Missing Teenage Girls Now In Syria, British Police Say

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 3:13 pm

British police say three teenage girls believed to have run away to join Islamist extremists have now crossed into Syria. The girls, ages 15 and 16, left their London homes Feb. 17 and boarded flights for Istanbul. Police think they then crossed the border into Syria hoping to join up with militants from the so-called Islamic State.

Read more

Pages