Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who works with NPR's Morning Edition and Digital Media group. In addition to coordinating Web features, he frequently contributes to NPR's blogs, from The Two Way and All Tech Considered to The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to leading the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell trains both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between departments. Other shows he has worked with include All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and Talk of the Nation.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, as well as editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division. He also worked at the network's video and research library.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as editor-in-chief of The Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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The Two-Way
2:51 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

For Some Kids, Summer Camp Includes Seeing Dad In Prison

In the Father to Child Summer Camp Behind Bars program, kids can bond with their fathers while staying at a campground near prison. Geray Williams, an inmate at the North Branch Correctional Institution in Cumberland, Md., gets a hug from his son Sanchez during the weeklong camp in 2010.
Timothy Jacobsen AP

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:57 pm

The idea of taking a child to prison for a week may bring to mind visions of "Scared Straight" programs. But the Father to Child Summer Camp Behind Bars does just that — and the goal is to let kids bond with their fathers, who might be incarcerated far from their families.

The unique summer camp lodges children at a campground near prisons in Maryland and North Carolina, according to Here & Now, the show from WBUR and NPR. The kids visit their fathers in prison each day.

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The Two-Way
10:05 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Williams Sisters Win At U.S. Open, Move To Second Round

Venus Williams hits a forehand during her first-round win over Kirsten Flipkens of Belgium Monday.
Matthew Stockman Getty Images

Serena Williams dispatched Francesca Schiavone, 6-0, 6-1, in the first round of the U.S. Open Monday night, in a game played under the lights at Arthur Ashe Stadium in New York.

With the win, Serena Williams, 31, joined her older sister Venus in the second round — only the second time this year that both players have advanced past the opening round of a Grand Slam event. That last happened in the Australian Open, seven months ago.

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The Two-Way
8:22 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Tesla Sales Hum In California, Beating Porsche, Land Rover

Tesla Motors has outsold several luxury carmakers in California in 2013, on the strength of its Model S, seen here in the foreground. The Telsa Roadster is behind it.
James Lipman Telsa

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 10:33 am

It's been a good year for Tesla Motors, the luxury electric car maker, particularly in California, where it's selling more cars than Porsche, Jaguar, Lincoln, or Buick. In 2013, the company has sold 4,714 cars in the state, according to the California New Car Dealers Association.

Here's a rundown of the state's vehicle sales rankings:

  • Tesla: 4,714
  • Porsche: 4,586
  • Land Rover: 4,022
  • Volvo: 2,982
  • Lincoln: 2,230
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The Two-Way
3:10 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Which U.S. Agencies Have Taken The Most Furlough Days?

In May, the Housing and Urban Development agency closed for a day, as employees were placed on furlough. The HUD and other agencies were reportedly forced to take a fraction of the furlough days that had been threatened earlier in 2013.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 7:36 am

The threat of furloughs loomed large early in 2013, when mandatory budget cuts seemed certain to force federal workers to skip anywhere from 10 to 22 days of work without pay this year. A new tally by Federal News Radio shows that many agencies have taken fewer than half the days they had predicted.

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Amateur Ko Wins LPGA Event Again; Says Goodbye To $300K Again

Lydia Ko of New Zealand reacts as she birdies the final hole to win her second consecutive Canadian Women's Open Sunday. Because Ko is an amateur, she didn't receive the winner's check for $300,000.
Stephen Dunn Getty Images

Lydia Ko, the New Zealand golfer who last year became the youngest person ever to win an LPGA event, has played her way into the record books again. By successfully defending her title at the Canadian Women's Open this past weekend, Ko, who's now 16, is the only amateur to win two LPGA events.

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The Two-Way
10:01 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Amanda Knox Won't Attend New Italian Trial, Lawyer Says

In 2011, Amanda Knox spoke to the media after arriving in the U.S., following a years-long criminal case against her in the death of a roommate in Italy. A new trial for Knox is planned to begin in Florence, Italy, next month.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 10:27 am

Amanda Knox, whose murder conviction was overturned in 2011, will not travel to Italy for a new trial in the stabbing death of a fellow student. In May, Italy's supreme court ordered Knox to be tried again, along with her former boyfriend, Italian Raffaele Sollecito.

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The Two-Way
8:51 am
Mon August 26, 2013

New Salinger Books Will Arrive In 2015, Authors Say

A new biography claims that unpublished fiction is on the way from late author J.D. Salinger, seen here at right posing with a friend, Donald Hartog, in 1989.
AP

A stream of fiction and stories written by reclusive author J.D. Salinger will be published between 2015 and 2020, according to a new biography about the writer of The Catcher in the Rye, who died in 2010. Some of the books will reportedly revisit beloved Salinger characters such as Holden Caulfield.

The claims come from David Shields and Shane Salerno, co-authors of the biography Salinger, which will be published next week. Days later, Salerno's documentary film of the same name will be released (and in January, it will air on PBS).

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

U.S. Soldier Sentenced To Life In Afghan Village Attacks

Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, foreground, is seen in a courtroom sketch earlier this week, as prosecutor Lt. Col. Jay Morse, right, speaks to the jury. Bales was sentenced to life in prison without parole Friday.
Peter Millett AP

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 2:14 pm

A military jury has sentenced Robert Bales, the U.S. Army staff sergeant who admitted to killing 16 Afghan civilians in 2012, to life in prison without parole. During the punishment hearings held this week, Bales was confronted by family members of victims and people who survived the attacks of March 11, 2012.

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The Two-Way
11:14 am
Fri August 23, 2013

Calif. Wildfire Nearly Doubles In Size, Burns Into Yosemite Park

A Colorado-based firefighter monitors a backfire while battling the Rim Fire in Groveland, Calif., on Thursday. The Rim Fire continues to burn out of control and has grown to more than 105,000 acres, officials said Friday.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 10:52 pm

Updated at 12:35 a.m. Saturday: Emergency For San Francisco

Calif. Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency for San Francisco because of the wildfire's threat to public utilities there.

The fire is 150 miles from the city, but Brown said the fire jeopardizes San Francisco's power lines and stations in the fire area. The city has already had to shut down two of its three hydroelectric power stations, the AP reports.

Further damage could have an impact on San Francisco's power supply.

Our Post From Late Friday:

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The Two-Way
9:46 am
Fri August 23, 2013

Vin Scully Says He'll Return To Dodgers' Booth For 65th Year

Legendary broadcaster Vin Scully has told the Los Angeles Dodgers that he'll return for his 65th year. Here, he waves to the crowd before throwing out the first pitch before a game last season.
Stephen Dunn Getty Images

Broadcaster Vin Scully has been the voice of the Los Angeles Dodgers for longer than the Dodgers have been in California. And he'll return for his 65th season next year, the team said Friday, extending a streak that includes 25 World Series and the Brooklyn Dodgers' lone title, from 1955.

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The Two-Way
8:41 am
Fri August 23, 2013

Outfielder Ryan Braun Issues An Apology But Skimps On Details

Ryan Braun, the former league MVP who has been suspended for the remainder of the 2013 season, issued an apology for his actions Thursday.
Jeff Curry Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 11:40 am

One month after he accepted a 65-game suspension that ended his season, Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun has issued a statement in which he apologizes for his actions. But the note, posted online by the Brewers, falls far short of the full disclosure many fans and analysts say they expect from the 2011 National League Most Valuable Player.

You can read Braun's full statement here.

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The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

Detroit's Packard Complex Could Sell Below $100,000 If Deal Fails

Detroit's abandoned Packard car plant, seen here in a 2010 photo, could eventually sell for $21,000 if a development deal falls through, a Wayne County official says.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 4:10 pm

The Packard plant, which once symbolized the might of America's auto industry, is at risk of heading to auction if a pending development deal fails. If that happens, The Detroit Free Press reports, the 35-acre site eventually could be sold "for as little as $21,000," a figure that comes from Wayne County Deputy Treasurer David Szymanski.

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The Two-Way
11:57 am
Thu August 22, 2013

King's Dream Is Not Yet Reality, Americans Say In Survey

Under Construction: A recent survey of Americans found that fewer than half believe the U.S. has made substantial progress toward racial equality. Here, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., is boxed in by scaffolding as work is done on it.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 1:01 pm

Fewer than half of all Americans say the United States has made substantial progress in treating all races equally, according to a new poll released by the Pew Research Center Thursday. The results were announced days before the 50th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s iconic "I Have A Dream" speech on the National Mall.

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The Two-Way
9:16 am
Thu August 22, 2013

Tourist Dies Of Shark Attack In Hawaii, Part Of Alarming Rise

As reports of shark attacks have risen, Hawaiian officials announced a plan Tuesday to study the sharks' movements. A German tourist who had been attacked in Maui last week died Wednesday.
Oskar Garcia AP

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 11:22 am

A German tourist in Hawaii who was attacked by a shark last week has died of her injuries, according to hospital officials in Maui. Jana Lutteropp, 20, lost her arm in the attack during a snorkeling trip last Wednesday. She is the first person to die from a shark attack in Hawaii in more than nine years.

After Lutteropp was attacked less than 100 yards from the coast at Palauea Beach, she was helped by Rick Moore, a California high school teacher who plunged into the surf to swim her back to shore.

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The Two-Way
8:02 am
Thu August 22, 2013

Lawyer Rejects Guantanamo 'Fifty Shades Of Grey' Claim

Books in the detainees library at the U.S. Naval Base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, are seen in this Aug. 8, 2013, photo. A prisoner at the facility handed over a copy of Fifty Shades of Grey to his lawyer.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 9:20 am

Weeks after detainees at Guantanamo Bay were said to be voracious readers of Fifty Shades of Grey, one lawyer says that, at least in his client's case, that idea is bogus.

Attorney James Connell says his client, Ammar al-Baluchi, turned over a copy of the bestselling erotic novel and had never heard of it before guards gave him a copy on Monday.

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The Two-Way
4:44 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

Soldier Who Admitted To Massacre Hears From Afghan Survivors

A courtroom sketch shows an Afghan man named Faizullah testifying in a courtroom at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., on Tuesday. His father and brother were shot and wounded when Staff Sgt. Robert Bales attacked their village in Kandahar province last year.
Peter Millett AP

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 4:11 am

Details of the massacre of 16 Afghans by a U.S. soldier last spring are emerging in a courtroom near Tacoma, Wash., where survivors of that attack traveled to confront Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales. A six-member military jury is hearing testimony at a sentencing hearing for Bales.

At least seven people made the trip from Afghanistan to Washington state to speak at the hearing at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, where Bales' Army unit is based.

The AP describes the night in question:

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The Two-Way
3:18 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

Secret Court: NSA Surveillance Program Was Unconstitutional

An image taken from the FISA court opinion released Wednesday. The document reveals instances in which the court saw the NSA overstepping in its surveillance efforts.
NPR

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 6:53 am

A secret federal court found that the National Security Agency violated the civil rights of Americans when it collected thousands of emails and other digital messages between Americans, according to a 2011 opinion released Wednesday.

The FISA court ruled parts of the program to be unconstitutional and ordered them to be revised. The government made changes and the court signed off on the program in November of 2011.

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The Two-Way
10:37 am
Wed August 21, 2013

No Positive Tests For Doping At This Year's Tour De France

There were no positive doping tests during the 2013 Tour de France, officials say. Here, Chris Froome, the overall winner, steps into the anti-doping control bus after a stage in the race.
Pascal Guyot AFP/Getty Images

Hundreds of samples taken from riders in this summer's Tour de France found no signs of doping, officials say. The epic race, which was put on for the hundredth time in 2013, has been at the center of recent doping scandals.

Anti-doping officials say they took 202 blood and urine samples before the race began, and an additional 419 during competition. Nearly 200 of those samples were taken with the goal of creating a "biological passport" for riders, to establish a baseline of their body chemistry.

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The Two-Way
8:17 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Tech Giants Launch Internet.org, A Global Plan To Widen Access

A new project announced by Facebook seeks to make it more affordable to access the Internet via cellphones around the world. In Africa, 16 percent of the population currently uses the Internet. Here, a man looks for a network signal in Somalia.
Roberto Schmidt AFP/Getty Images

Citing the billions of people worldwide who can't access the Internet, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and the leaders of other technology firms are launching an ambitious project to narrow the digital divide Wednesday. The plan focuses on widening access via mobile phones.

"There are huge barriers in developing countries to connecting and joining the knowledge economy," Zuckerberg says. "Internet.org brings together a global partnership that will work to overcome these challenges, including making Internet access available to those who cannot currently afford it."

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The Two-Way
3:21 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

More College Students Rely On Federal Aid, Study Says

For the first time, a majority of students got federal help to attend college, according to a new U.S. survey. Here, people walk on the Columbia University campus in July.
Mario Tama Getty Images

The percentage of U.S. undergrads who rely on the federal government for financial aid soared above 50 percent in the most recent survey from the National Center for Education Statistics. The data show that for the first time, a majority of students got federal help.

NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports for our Newscast unit:

"The new figures from the National Center for Education Statistics shows that from 2007 to 2011, the percentage of undergraduate students who depend on federal loans and grants jumped from 47 percent to 57 percent.

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The Two-Way
12:58 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

In First Meeting Since 1970s, Afghanistan Tops Pakistan In Soccer

Afghanistan's soccer players dance to celebrate beating Pakistan, in a friendly match played Tuesday in Kabul.
Rahmat Gul AP

Soccer fans are strutting in Afghanistan today, after their national team defeated neighboring Pakistan, 3-0, in a friendly match sponsored by FIFA, soccer's governing body. Before Tuesday's match in Kabul, the two teams had not played each other in more than 30 years.

Afghan media relished the win, with the Pajhwok news agency declaring, "Afghanistan lash Pakistan in historic soccer duel."

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The Two-Way
12:00 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Citing Privacy Worries, Tech And Legal Site Groklaw Shuts Down

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 6:38 am

The website Groklaw, which for 10 years demystified complex issues involving technology and the law, is shutting down. Editor Pamela Jones writes that she can't run the site without email, and that since emails' privacy can't be guaranteed, she can no longer do the site's work.

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The Two-Way
8:50 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Australian's Shooting Death Echoes From Oklahoma To Melbourne

A tribute page to Christopher Lane, an Australian college baseball player who was shot and killed in Oklahoma last week, has drawn thousands of responses on Facebook.
Facebook

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 4:20 pm

The killing of an Australian man who was in the U.S. on a baseball scholarship has brought grief to his hometown and to the small Oklahoma town where he was shot to death. Three teens have been arrested for the crime; one suspect says they simply had nothing better to do, the police report.

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The Two-Way
2:52 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

For World Humanitarian Day, U.N. Joins With Kid President, Beyonce

In Haiti, an Argentinean U.N. doctor carries a sick baby to a helicopter, to be taken to Port-au-Prince for treatment. The photo is part of a gallery honoring World Humanitarian Day.
UN Photo/Marco Dormino Marco Dormino

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The Two-Way
11:48 am
Mon August 19, 2013

No Ski Lift For You, Swiss Government Tells Kim Jong Un

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 11:49 am

A multimillion-dollar deal to provide ski lifts for a resort in North Korea has been cancelled, after Switzerland's government decided the plan violated U.N. sanctions forbidding the export of luxury items to the country.

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The Two-Way
9:40 am
Mon August 19, 2013

End Of The Rainbow: Swedish Athlete Repaints Nails Red

Sweden's Emma Green Tregaro sports red nails as she waits to compete in the women's high jump final at the 2013 IAAF World Championships in Moscow. Green Tregaro was told her rainbow-colored nail violated track's rules against political statements.
Adrian Dennis AFP/Getty Images

Emma Green Tregaro, the Swedish athlete who painted her fingernails the colors of a rainbow to show support for gay rights, has repainted her nails red, after track and field's governing body warned that her nails flouted its ban on political statements at events.

Green Tregaro, who finished fifth in the high jump Saturday at the world championships in Moscow, had initially painted her fingernails as a subtle way to protest Russia's recent passage of a law banning gay "propaganda."

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The Two-Way
7:58 am
Mon August 19, 2013

University Pages: LinkedIn Launches New College Profiles

The new University Pages on LinkedIn show which businesses employ a college's graduates, and the sectors of the economy in which they work.
LinkedIn

The professional connections site LinkedIn is launching a new section of its social network Monday: University Pages targets younger users who want to connect with colleges. More than 200 schools now have profile pages, according to LinkedIn. As part of the new effort, the company also dropped its minimum age to 14 in the U.S.

The new college profiles allow prospective students to see how many of a school's graduates are on LinkedIn, as well as a breakdown of the main fields in which they work. The pages also list the top employers of alumni.

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The Two-Way
2:51 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Painter Created Million-Dollar Forgeries In Queens Garage, Officials Say

An anonymous painter in New York City created dozens of art forgeries, which sold for more than $80 million, according to prosecutors. The man isn't facing charges — but those who helped sell his Abstract Expressionist canvases as the work of artists such as Jackson Pollock and Robert Motherwell are in trouble.

For NPR's Newscast unit, Joel Rose reports:

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The Two-Way
1:19 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Hell With The Lid Off: Coffee Drinkers' Plight Exposed In Canada

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 1:38 pm

"Is this coffee, or is this Fight Club?" That's the question Bryan Hansen of Calgary, Canada, says he asked himself after his coffee lid betrayed him — yet again — leading him to fire off a letter of complaint to the Tim Hortons café chain, sending it to the attention of its "Lid Manager."

Hansen's fiercely funny note won fans on Reddit and elsewhere, as fellow customers stood up to say they, too, had been suffering in (scalded) silence because of the coffee and pastry stores' flip-top lids.

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The Two-Way
10:12 am
Fri August 16, 2013

A 'Dilemma Zone' For Red-Light Cameras: Safety Vs. Cash

Traffic engineers face "a new conundrum" in dealing with red-light cameras such as this one in New Mexico, according to a recent study looking at how cameras are operated and the perception that they are used to generate revenue.
Susan Montoya Bryan AP

What's the point of a red-light camera — to make intersections safer or to generate revenue? That's the question prompted by researchers at the University of Tennessee, who say the cameras are sometimes used in ways that are more likely to make money than to improve safety.

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