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Greg Allen

As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and human interest features. He moved into this role in 2006, after four years as NPR's Midwest correspondent.

Allen was a key part of NPR's coverage of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, providing some of the first reports on the disaster. He was on the frontlines of NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, arriving in New Orleans before the storm hit and filing on the chaos and flooding that hit the city as the levees broke. Allen's reporting played an important role in NPR's coverage of the aftermath and the rebuilding of New Orleans, as well as in coverage of the BP oil spill which brought new hardships to the Gulf coast.

As NPR's only correspondent in Florida, Allen covered the dizzying boom and bust of the state's real estate market, the state's important role in the 2008 presidential election and has produced stories highlighting the state's unique culture and natural beauty, from Miami's Little Havana to the Everglades.

Allen has spent more than three decades in radio news, the first ten as a reporter in Ohio and Philadelphia and the last as an editor, producer and reporter at NPR.

Before moving into reporting, Allen served as the executive producer of NPR's national daily live call-in show, Talk of the Nation. As executive producer he handled the day-to-day operations of the program as well as developed and produced remote broadcasts with live audiences and special breaking news coverage. He was with Talk of the Nation from 2000 to 2002.

Prior to that position, Allen spent three years as a senior editor for NPR's Morning Edition, developing stories and interviews, shaping the program's editorial direction, and supervising the program's staff. In 1993, he started a four year stint as an editor with Morning Edition just after working as Morning Edition's swing editor, providing editorial and production supervision in the early morning hours. Allen also worked for a time as the editor of NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Allen was a reporter with NPR member station WHYY-FM in Philadelphia from 1987 to 1990.

His radio career includes serving as the producer of Freedom's Doors Media Project — five radio documentaries on immigration in American cities that was distributed through NPR's Horizons series — frequent freelance work with NPR, Monitor Radio, Voice of America, and WHYY-FM, and work as a reporter/producer of NPR member station WYSO-FM in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

Allen graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1977, with a B.A. cum laude. As a student and after graduation, Allen worked at WXPN-FM, the public radio station on campus, as a host and producer for a weekly folk music program that included interviews, features, live and recorded music.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: Marco Rubio's bid for the Republican presidential nomination is gaining momentum. And as his standing has improved, the Florida senator is having to answer questions about his personal finances again. Over the weekend, Rubio's campaign tried to put some of those questions to rest by releasing old American Express statements. NPR's Greg Allen reports from Miami. GREG ALLEN, BYLINE: Over a 22-month...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript GREG ALLEN, BYLINE: I'm Greg Allen in Miami. Never mind love. The main reason Brazilians come to Florida is to shop. At Electric Avenue in downtown Miami, a store that specializes in photography and video equipment, manager Walter Rojter says the declining value of the Brazilian real has hurt business. How much? WALTER ROJTER: I don't know, maybe 20 percent. ALLEN: Rojter says the Brazilians who do come in buy less and are...

Jeb Bush is trying to jump-start his campaign this week, with a new focus and a new slogan: "Jeb Can Fix It." That's meant to highlight his two terms as governor of Florida, but it might also apply to his lackluster campaign. Bush's hopes to dominate the race as front-runner are a distant memory, with outsider candidates like Donald Trump and Ben Carson leading the field since the summer. But lately, Bush has been fighting more fiercely with a man he once mentored, Marco Rubio. When Bush was...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: As soon as Puerto Rico's huge debt problem surfaced, a lot of people started calling it America's Greece or Greece in the Caribbean. Puerto Rico has $72 billion of debt. It's nearly out of cash. Today, the White House shared its plans for getting the U.S. territory out of this mess. It would allow Puerto Rico to restructure its debt through bankruptcy and set up a financial control board to oversee...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Corey Jones was a drummer in his church band. The African-American man was 31 years old when he was killed by a police officer last weekend in South Florida. The Sheriff's office and state attorney in Florida's Palm Beach County are investigating. And as NPR's Greg Allen reports, the case is starting to get national attention. GREG ALLEN, BYLINE: Early Sunday morning, Corey Jones was on his way home...

White sand, waves, water and cars? People have been driving on the hard-packed sand of Daytona Beach for more than a century. Races were held on the beach until they were moved to the Daytona International Speedway in 1959. After the racers left, cars and trucks continued to cruise on the sand. But now, there's a debate raging about whether it's finally time to ban vehicles on Daytona Beach. Like many locals, Cassie Brown has a favorite spot on Daytona Beach — one she visits almost every day...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: There are few neighborhoods in Miami better known or would with more history than Little Havana. It was once primarily a Jewish neighborhood. But by the early '60s, it became home to the city's growing Cuban exile community. Community activists and preservationists now say Little Havana is endangered. NPR's Greg Allen reports that developers have targeted the area and the city is considering zoning...

In Florida, federal and state officials have quarantined 85 square miles of farmland to combat a destructive pest: the Oriental fruit fly, which attacks hundreds of varieties of fruits and vegetables. The invasive insect was first detected near Miami a few weeks ago. Since then, authorities have banned the transport of most fruits and vegetables from one of the nation's most productive agricultural areas. It's called the Redland, a part of Miami-Dade County named for its pockets of red clay....

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Puerto Rico has unveiled a plan aimed at restoring financial stability and reducing the island's $72 billion debt. The plan announced today by Governor Alejandra Garcia Padilla cuts spending and increases revenue through improved tax collection. But Puerto Rico also seeks to save billions in the short term by renegotiating its debt with lenders. Here's NPR's Greg Allen. GREG ALLEN, BYLINE: Governor...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: This past week, tropical storm Erika was a reminder of the difficulty of forecasting hurricanes. Forecasters said they expected the storm would intensify into a hurricane with a possible U.S. landfall. Over the weekend, Erika defied those forecasts and dissipated, still bringing heavy rain and flooding to parts of Florida and South Carolina. NPR's Greg Allen reports on the push to improve hurricane...

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans today is smaller than when the storm hit, with 110,000 fewer people than the nearly half-million who had lived there. But the city's recovery is a story that varies with each neighborhood. In some neighborhoods, like the Lower Ninth Ward, many residents never returned. Others, like the French Quarter, have seen many newcomers and now have more households than they did in 2005. With new residents, a different mix of people now calls the city home...

A Florida judge will draw up new maps for the state's 27 congressional districts. After meeting in a two-week special session, Florida's House and Senate adjourned without agreeing on what the maps, ordered by the State Supreme Court, should look like. This was the Florida Legislature's third attempt to draw congressional maps that comply with the state Constitution. Under an amendment adopted by voters in 2010, Florida's Legislature must compile maps for congressional and legislative...

The flooded streets and destroyed homes of the New Orleans neighborhood known as the Lower Ninth Ward were among the most powerful and iconic images from Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath 10 years ago. Now, much of New Orleans is back — more than half of the city's neighborhoods have recovered some 90 percent of their pre-storm population. That's not the case for the Lower Ninth. Today, there's a feeling of desolation on nearly every block of the predominantly African-American neighborhood....

Florida is a state with nearly a half million more registered Democrats than Republicans. You wouldn't know it, though, from the state's seats in Congress — 17 of the 27 congressional seats are held by Republicans. A lot of factors play into that: the concentration of Democrats in urban areas, the talent Florida's Republican Party has for turning out its voters. But another factor is how the congressional district maps are drawn. In a momentous ruling Thursday, Florida's Supreme Court has...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In Florida, the official state animal triggers mixed feelings. The Florida panther has been on the endangered species list for nearly 50 years. From a low point in the 1970s when there were only about 20 panthers in the wild, the species has rebounded. Now, nearly 200 range throughout southwest Florida. And some officials, ranchers and hunters in the state say that may be about enough. Florida panthers are a subspecies of the cougar or mountain lion. They're slightly smaller than their...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: Puerto Rico appears to have narrowly avoided default, making a key last-minute deal yesterday and paying hundreds of millions of dollars to creditors. With a stagnant economy, more than $72 billion in debt and little cash, the U.S. territory remains in deep trouble. But on the streets of San Juan, NPR's Greg Allen reports, the signs of a crisis can be hard to see. GREG ALLEN, BYLINE: At La Fortaleza,...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: That's the debt crisis in the Mediterranean. Closer to home in the Caribbean, Puerto Rico is facing a fiscal crisis of its own. After years of borrowing to cover budget shortfalls, the U.S. territory is more than $72 billion in debt and faces some important deadlines tomorrow. The governor there, Alejandro Garcia Padilla, gave a televised address last night. In it, he warned residents that there would...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: The governor of Puerto Rico delivered some hard truths yesterday. He says the U.S. territory is unable to pay its debt. Puerto Rico owes more than $72 billion, and with deadlines looming, the governor asked Wall Street lenders to give the island more time. NPR's Greg Allen reports. GREG ALLEN, BYLINE: For Puerto Rico, this is an important week. Lawmakers in the Commonwealth's House and Senate have...

Gov. Alejandro Garcia Padilla said Monday that international creditors need to lighten Puerto Rico's nearly $73 billion public debt burden. In a televised speech, Garcia said, given the state of its economy, Puerto Rico's public debt is unpayable. He cited a report by a former chief economist of the World Bank that recommends lenders consider easier terms for the island. Padilla said he will go further and seek a multi-year moratorium on debt payments to allow the island time to rebuild its...

The Supreme Court decision Friday that upheld the right of same-sex couples to marry was one for the history books. Obergefell v. Hodges was exalted by gay rights groups and their supporters, and condemned by those who believe that marriage should be reserved for one man and one woman. Opponents of same-sex marriage say that the fight is far from over. In fact, many of them did not wait long before raising the idea of passing a constitutional amendment to ban it. The prospect that the attempt...

Following comments Donald Trump made about Mexican immigrants during his presidential announcement last week, Univision, the nation's largest Spanish-language TV network, has announced it is cutting ties with Trump and dropping plans to broadcast the Miss Universe Pageant. Trump, the businessman and now-presidential candidate, co-owns the pageant. "When do we beat Mexico at the border?" Trump said during his lengthy presidential announcement speech at Trump Tower in New York. "They're sending...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Marco Rubio, at just 44, is the youngest major presidential candidate in the 2016 field. The Florida senator is one of the rising stars of the Republican Party — and the roots of that rise started in a small city just outside Miami. West Miami is less than a square mile. It's a tight-knit community of just over 6,000 people. This is where Marco Rubio grew up. Tania Rozio has lived in West Miami for nearly 50 years and takes me on a tour of the town she calls "a little gem." There's the park...

The island of Puerto Rico is caught in an economic crisis . While the rest of the U.S. is seeing economic growth, Puerto Rico is struggling to emerge from nine years of recession. The poor economy has spurred hundreds of thousands to leave the island. The U.S territory is more than $72 billion in debt, running low on cash and on the verge of default. It's led many to call it the Greece of the Caribbean. Joseph Rosenbloom, who directs municipal credit research at investment firm...

Ten years ago, the U.S. experienced its busiest hurricane season ever recorded. The year saw 28 named storms — 15 of them hurricanes — including Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast. Four major hurricanes hit the U.S. in 2005, beginning in July with Hurricane Dennis. Dennis brought a storm surge, tornadoes and lots of rain when it came ashore on Florida's panhandle on July 10 . In the U.S., it killed at least three people and caused more than $2.5 billion in damage. And Dennis...

Puerto Rico used to produce some of the best coffee in the world — but that was more than a century ago. Today, Puerto Rico's coffee crop is just a fraction of what it was then, and little is exported. But there's a movement on the island to improve quality and rebuild Puerto Rico's coffee industry. The U.S. territory is still America's leading coffee producer, ahead of Hawaii, the only other part of the country where it's grown in any sizable amount. (As The Salt has reported , there is some...

As a U.S. territory with tropical weather and beautiful beaches, Puerto Rico has a lot going for it. But there are downsides to living on an island. A big one is the cost of energy. All the electricity on the island is distributed by the government-owned Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority , also known as PREPA. Power on the island costs more than in any U.S. state, except Hawaii. And that's not the biggest problem. "PREPA is very damaged, very distressed," says Lisa Donahue , an expert on...

Although it's a tropical island, perhaps surprisingly, Puerto Rico produces very little of its own food. After decades of industrialization, the U.S. territory imports more than 80 percent of what's consumed on the island. There are signs, though, the trend is changing. One place you can see it is in Orocovis, a small town in Puerto Rico's mountainous interior. At an elementary school there, Dalma Cartagena has for 15 years tended the seeds of an agricultural movement. Cartagena teaches...

The island of Puerto Rico is many things: a tropical paradise, a U.S. territory and an economic mess. After years of deficits, state-owned institutions in Puerto Rico owe investors some $73 billion. That's four times the debt that forced Detroit into bankruptcy two years ago. The bill is now due. One of the most visible signs of the crisis is a tent city on the plaza in front of Puerto Rico's historic Capitol building in San Juan. For several weeks, a group of protesters has been camped out,...

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