KRWG

Michael Hernandez

Multimedia Reporter

Michael Hernandez is a multimedia reporter for KRWG Public Media. Watch his reports here at the region's homepage and on KRWG-TV's Newsmakers. You can also hear Michael's stories on KRWG-FM's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

 

A native Tucsonan, Hernandez is no stranger to Southwestern life.

 

He got his first taste of broadcast news from a young age. At two-and-a-half years old, ABC affiliate KGUN9 visited his home to feature him in a story about early childhood education. Hernandez would eagerly watch the evening news with his grandmother after school and credits growing up on classic PBS shows like Bill Nye the Science Guy, Reading Rainbow, ZOOM! and the Saturday night lineup of British comedies for igniting his passion for public media.

 

Hernandez completed a host of internships as an undergraduate at the University of Arizona. After stints at Tucson’s NBC and CBS news stations, Hernandez interned at Arizona Public Media where he hosted “Newsbreak,” a 90-second daily newscast and reported educational stories for NPR. Additionally, Hernandez worked for UATV, the university’s student-run broadcast station, and held positions including reporter, anchor and executive producer.

 

Hernandez is a 2017 graduate of the University of Arizona’s School of Journalism and is excited to begin his career in Las Cruces. He looks forward to meeting the people of the Mesilla Valley and reporting stories its residents care about most.

Michael Hernandez

Virtual charter schools are supposed to provide students with an online education equivalent to what they would receive at a physical school. But recent findings presented to the Legislative Education Study Committee show that hasn’t been the case in New Mexico.

Garrey Carruthers

After more than 32 years as a student and employee at New Mexico State University, outgoing Chancellor Dr. Garrey Carruthers is hanging his “guns up” at 78 years old.

Michael Hernandez

Las Cruces City Council and school district board members met at Oñate High School to discuss school safety issues including preventing gun violence, strengthening school security and addressing mental health.

New Mexico State University’s Board of Regents has selected two of its five chancellor finalists to lead the university in separate roles. 

NMSU Regents chose Dr. Dan Arvizu, former director of the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laborartory and NMSU engineering alumnus, to be the university’s next chancellor while Dr. John Floros will be campus president. Floros is dean at Kansas State University's College of Agriculture.

Arvizu and Floros will replace outgoing Chancellor Dr. Garrey Carruthers, who serves in both positions.

Michael Hernandez

Outdoor industry leaders from several Western states gathered indoors for a change at the first New Mexico Outdoor Economics Conference. Experts met to promote the physical and financial benefits public lands provide for tourists and businesses.

Low voter turnout seems to be a chronic issue in local elections, but recently passed legislation in New Mexico aims to turn that around. 

Michael Hernandez

Las Cruces City Council met to review the city’s proposed budget for the 2019 fiscal year, which totals about $394 million. Expenditures from the city’s general fund amount to $91.4 million, down 1.6 percent from last fiscal year.

Despite the reduced budget, City Manager Stuart Ed said the city is adding nearly 60 jobs, including a dozen firefighter-in-training positions and police service aides.

Michael Hernandez

Educators arrived at Las Cruces Public Schools job fair with résumés in-hand ready to fill positions as substitutes and full-time teachers.

The 24,300-student district is in the midst of a substitute teacher shortage. Chief Human Resources Officer Dr. Miguel Serrano said it’s nothing new.

Michael Hernandez

For people with mental health disorders, it can be difficult to get proper treatment, and even more so in prison.

Michael Hernandez

Virgin Galactic’s Executive Vice-President Jonathan Firth spoke to members of the Mesilla Valley Economic Development Alliance, or MVEDA, about the spaceflight tourism company’s latest operations at a recent forum. Firth said the company gets asked frequently about its activities in New Mexico.

Michael Hernandez

Despite its name, NMSU’s College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, or ACES college, doesn’t just focus on crops and livestock. Take the student-run ACES Foods manufacturing company as an example. Instructor Whitney Biel teaches Food Science & Technology students how to make their own creamy creations in the laboratory.

Michael Hernandez

Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ stop in Las Cruces comes after President Trump’s decision to deploy up to 4,000 National Guard troops along the U.S.-Mexican border. Sessions said the rate of illegal border crossings this year compared to 2017 is cause for concern.

“We saw a steep drop after President Trump’s inauguration… but we’re seeing increasing flows and worry that we might see more this summer. So, we’re going to step up our efforts to achieve zero tolerance and zero releases and 100 percent prosecution wherever possible,” Sessions said.

NMSU Chancellor Dr. Garrey Carruthers

New Mexico State University's Board of Regents announced its top five finalists for the university’s next chancellor.

Dr. Dan Arvizu, former director of the Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory and NMSU alumnus, New Mexico Higher Education Department Secretary Dr. Barbara Damron, Kansas State University College of Agriculture Dean Dr. John Floros, Missouri University of Science and Technology Provost and Vice Chancellor Dr. Robert Marley and Dr. Brian Stevenson, former president and vice chancellor of Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.

Sunshine laws are a key part of holding government accountable and helping democracy function. They require government agencies to make certain work they do available to the public, keeping the sun “shining” on their operations.

Garrey Carruthers

New Mexico State University's Board of Regents is in the final stages of finding a replacement for current Chancellor Garrey Carruthers after the board did not extend his contract last year. Carruthers has said he plans to retire after his contract period ends on July 1.

To help with the process, the board approved a 19-member search committee in November made up of stakeholders within and outside of the university.  NMSU Regent and Committee Chair Mike Cheney said a large committee was necessary to help narrow down the pool of more than 100 applicants.

Conservation Corps New Mexico

The nonprofit Conservation Corps New Mexico gives young adults 18 to 25 the chance to improve public lands across southern New Mexico and West Texas.

Michael Hernandez

First responders arrived at the collision near Interstate 70 and Mesa Grande Drive to the sight of mangled metal, splattered blood and crushed cans of beer.

Michael Hernandez

To mark the one-month anniversary of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida that killed 17 people, students nationwide walked out of their classrooms to remember the victims and call for an end to gun violence.

Michael Hernandez

Film Las Cruces has opened its studios to begin film productions and professionally train the next generation of crew members.

The 74,000-square-foot facility, located in the old Coca-Cola bottling plant near Interstate 10 and Main Street, can accommodate major motion pictures and television series as well as independent and student films and commercials.

Michael Hernandez

Organizers from NM Comunidades en Acción y de Fé along with Dreamers, clergy and others gathered in front of the federal courthouse in downtown Las Cruces to defend undocumented immigrants.

Michael Hernandez

New Mexico State University Police Chief Stephen Lopez hosted a forum with criminal justice students to review the history of gun legislation in the United States and address firearm safety concerns. Lopez, an NRA member himself, said gun control is not a black and white issue.

Michael Hernandez

Many children dream of going to space once they grow up. In the meantime, Alamogordo middle and high school students experienced the next best thing by meeting NASA astronauts in-person and live from the International Space Station.

Michael Hernandez

A handful of residents attended the first of three meetings to gather input on which community facilities should be updated using general obligation, or GO bonds.

Michael Hernandez

More than 1,100 students and their families signed up to become part of the Aggie Experience, the university’s largest recruitment day.

NMSU has seen enrollment decline in recent years, but that trend looks to be changing. The number of first-time freshmen enrolled in fall 2017 increased more than 11 percent from the year before. More than 5,200 students have already been admitted for the fall 2018 semester.

Michael Hernandez

Homegrown talent has given rise to a new semi-pro soccer club in Las Cruces.

FC Grande begins play this spring as members in the United Premier Soccer League, a pro-development league formed in 2011 with about 140 teams in more than 30 states.  FC Grande will compete in the league’s Southwest Conference.

Michael Hernandez

Getting young people to vote is easier said than done, but university students from Texas and New Mexico are trying.

Data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows about 46 percent of voters aged 18 to 29 cast ballots in the 2016 presidential election. That’s compared to 59 percent of people 30 to 44 years old, 67 percent of those aged 45 to 64, and 71 percent of voters 65 and older.

Michael Hernandez

Three of the four candidates in the Democratic race for New Mexico governor visited Truth or Consequences for a gubernatorial forum held in the state’s second congressional district.

New Mexico state senator Joseph Cervantes, Jeff Apodaca, the son of former New Mexico governor Jerry Apodaca, and Dr. Peter DeBenedittis debated their platforms at the first candidate forum hosted by the Democratic Party of Sierra County.

Roderico Y. Díaz

It has been called the "Silent Holocaust," but its survivors are unafraid to speak out.

Michael Hernandez

Researchers with UTEP’s Border Region Modeling Project presented their financial forecasts for Las Cruces, El Paso and Mexico’s Ciudad Juarez and Chihuahua City during a recent forum.

New Mexico, and Las Cruces in particular, has been slow to recover since the recession hit more than 10 years ago in December 2007.

Michael Hernandez

Being proactive in the community is the basis of civic engagement and a functioning democracy. That’s why Las Cruces residents and District 3 city councilor Gabe Vasquez gathered for a town hall at Lynn Middle School.

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