Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Pages

The Two-Way
5:36 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Friday Prayers In Muslim Countries Bring Wider Anti-American Protests

A Sudanese demonstrator burns a German flag as others shout slogans after torching the German embassy in Khartoum during a protest against a low-budget film mocking Islam on Friday. Around 5,000 protesters in the Sudanese capital angry over the amateur anti-Islam film stormed the embassies of Britain and Germany, which was torched and badly damaged.
Ashraf Shazly AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 4:33 pm

Anti-American protests — some peaceful, some not — have been seen in many parts of the Islamic world today, as Friday prayers became an opportunity for many to express anger over a film produced in the U.S. that denigrates the Prophet Muhammad.

The Atlantic Wire has a good map that shows where the protests are happening.

Update at 6:17 p.m. ET. Seven Dead:

Read more
The Two-Way
1:22 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Monkey, New To Science, Found In Central Africa

Researchers have identified a new species of African monkey, locally known as the lesula.
Maurice Emetshu, Noel Rowe PLOS ONE/AP

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 9:19 pm

It would seem difficult to overlook something as large as a new species of monkey, but scientists had no idea about the lesula until just a few years ago when conservation biologist John Hart discovered a specimen being kept as a pet in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

In retrospect, the monkey's striking, almost humanlike face should have made it hard to miss, and Hart, who spoke with All Things Considered host Melissa Block, is the first to admit that this new monkey was apparently not such a mystery to the Congolese themselves.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:30 am
Thu September 13, 2012

Mob Attacks U.S. Embassy In Yemen As Clashes Spread Over Anti-Islam Film

A mob in Yemen attacks the U.S. Embassy during a protest against a film they say insults the Prophet Muhammad, in the capital, Sanaa, on Thursday.
Yahya Arhab EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 5:03 am

Update 8:21 ET. Two Slain Americans Identified:

Two of the security personnel who were killed Tuesday along with Ambassador Chris Stevens and Information Management Officer Sean Smith have been identified. They are Tyrone S. Woods and Glen A. Doherty, both security personnel who died helping protect their colleagues. Both men were former Navy SEALs, according to a statement from U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Here's more from the statement:

Read more
The Two-Way
1:16 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Russia's Medvedev Says Female Punk Rockers Should Go Free

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 6:07 pm

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev says the three jailed members of the politically radical punk rock band Pussy Riot should have their sentences commuted to time served.

"In my view, a suspended sentence would be sufficient, taking into account the time they have already spent in custody," The Associated Press quoted Medvedev as saying during a televised meeting with members of his United Russia Party.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:12 am
Wed September 12, 2012

Striking Chicago Teachers And City Still 'Miles Apart' On Contract

Chicago public school teachers and their supporters picket in front of the Chicago Public Schools headquarters.
Scott Olson Getty Image

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 9:23 am

As a strike by Chicago's schoolteachers enters a third day, the president of their union says negotiators are still "miles apart" from an agreement to get 350,000 students back in the classroom, the Chicago Tribune reports.

The talks were set to resume Wednesday morning, but Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis said there had been only "centimeters" of progress and that the union and city were still "kilometers apart."

Read more
The Two-Way
7:13 am
Wed September 12, 2012

Pakistan Factory Fires Kill More Than 300

A man tries to identify body of his relative at a mortuary following a huge fire at a garments factory in Karachi, Pakistan.
Rehan Khan EPA /Landov

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 11:13 am

The death toll from two factory fires in Pakistan has reached 314, most of them killed by suffocation when they were unable to escape the buildings, officials said Wednesday.

The fires in a shoe factory in Lahore and a garment factory in the southern port city of Karachi, broke out Tuesday night. The Karachi fire killed at least 289 people, while the other 25 deaths were reported at the Lahore factory.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:09 am
Wed September 12, 2012

U.S. Ambassador To Libya, Three Other Americans Killed In Benghazi Attack

The U.S. Consulate in Benghazi was in flames during a protest by an armed group angry over a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.
Esam Omran Al-Fetori Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 5:13 pm

Update at 7:02 p.m. ET. The U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other staff members were killed in an attack against the American consulate in Benghazi, last night. The attack happened over an American-produced film that criticized the prophet Muhammad.

Here's the latest on the story:

-- Quoting U.S. officials, the AP reports that the Pentagon is moving two warships toward the Libyan coast. CNN is also reporting the move.

-- The remains of all four Americans killed in Libya have been recovered.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:29 am
Tue September 11, 2012

The Mysterious Case Of China's Disappearing Heir Apparent

Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping addresses the opening ceremony of the autumn semester of the Party School of the Communist Party of China in Beijing on Sept. 1.
Xinhua, Li Tao AP

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 9:21 pm

In the rarefied air of China's leadership circle, anything that strays from strict protocol becomes grist for the rumor mill.

So it is with the mysterious and sudden disappearance of Xi Jinping, the presumptive heir to President Hu Jintao.

Xi, 59, has inexplicably missed a series of important meetings with foreign dignitaries in the past week, including one with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in Beijing. The last time anyone saw him in public was Sept. 1.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:35 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Lower-Key Ceremonies For This Year's Sept. 11 Commemoration

A woman looks at flowers at the Flight 93 National Memorial on Monday ahead of the anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks in Shanksville, Pa.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

UPDATE at 9:00 ET:

President Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama and White House staffers observed a moment of silence on the White House South Lawn to remember the nearly 3,000 people killed in terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.

After the silence, three bell tolls were struck and a bugler played taps.

Here's our earlier post:

Ceremonies to commemorate the nearly 3,000 people killed 11 years ago today in the worst-ever terrorist attacks on U.S. soil are decidedly lower key this time around.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:56 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Chicago Classrooms Are Empty For A Second Day

Striking teachers in Chicago manned the picket lines for a second day today as parents again scrambled to occupy their stay-at-home kids.

Some 350,000 of the district's students are locked out of their classrooms because city officials and thousands of teachers represented by the Chicago Teachers Union have yet to reach a contract. The strike is the first by public school teachers in the Chicago in 25 years.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:03 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Top Al-Qaida Leader Reportedly Killed in Yemen

Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula's second-in-command has been killed in Yemen, a government website reports.

Saudi national Saeed al-Shehri was killed in the Hadramawt area of southern Yemen along with six other militants, according to the website and ministry of defense officials quoted by the BBC.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:27 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Government To Sell Controlling Interest In Bailed-Out AIG

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 7:59 am

Remember the dark days of 2008 when insurer American International Group Inc., better known as AIG, nearly collapsed under the weight of the mortgage crisis before Washington rode to the rescue to the tune of $182 billion?

Then there was the public outrage when AIG executives got millions in bonuses after receiving the largest of all of the Wall Street bailouts.

Since then, the New York-based insurance giant has been essentially a government-owned enterprise, with Uncle Sam holding a controlling share.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:47 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Chicago Teachers On Strike, Affecting 350,000 Students

Members of the Chicago Teachers Union distribute strike signage at the Chicago Teachers Union strike headquarters on Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012 in Chicago.
Sitthixay Ditthavong AP

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 2:58 pm

Teachers in Chicago walked off the job Monday after contract negotiations fell through, leaving 400,000 students in the nation's third-largest district shut out of their classrooms.

Contract talks broke down late last night, and by Monday morning Chicago public school teachers, many wearing red T-shirts and carrying signs, were picketing around the city for the first time in a quarter-century.

Read more
It's All Politics
12:12 pm
Fri September 7, 2012

Deflating Jobs Report May Not Move The Needle On The Election

President Obama spoke at a campaign event at Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth, N.H., on Friday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 12:52 pm

It wasn't what President Obama was hoping for: another disappointing jobs report the morning after he accepted the Democratic nomination and asked Americans to stay the course.

The U.S. economy added just 96,000 jobs last month, according to the Labor Department, and a drop in the unemployment rate to 8.1 percent was mostly due to people giving up on job searches.

Read more
Asia
11:40 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Little Islands Are Big Trouble In The South China Sea

Last month, Japanese police officers arrested activists holding Chinese and Taiwanese flags who landed on Uotsuri Island, one of the islands of Senkaku (in Japanese), which is known as Diaoyu in Chinese.
Masataka Morita AP

A storm has been brewing for decades in the South China Sea, and it has nothing to do with the weather.

Instead, it's a virtual typhoon of competing claims over tiny, uninhabited island chains that ring the South China Sea and reach even farther north. They all have one thing in common: China has claimed control of them.

Read more
Around the Nation
1:42 pm
Wed August 29, 2012

Isaac's Size, Speed Help It Pack A Heavyweight Punch

People walk in the storm surge from Hurricane Isaac along Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans. Isaac was later downgraded to a tropical storm as it continued to grind its way through the Gulf Coast, dropping torrential rain and generating dangerous storm surges.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 10:28 am

Isaac might not be in the same league as Hurricane Katrina seven years ago, but the latest storm to batter Louisiana's Gulf Coast is punching above its weight class in more ways than one, scientists say.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:42 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Floods, Power Outages In Isaac's Wake

Rescue workers transport residents trapped by rising water from Hurricane Isaac in the River Forest subdivision on Wednesday in LaPlace, Louisiana. The large Level 1 hurricane slowly moved across southeast Louisiana, dumping huge amounts of rain and knocking out power across the Gulf Coast.
Chris Graythen Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 10:04 pm

The Latest at 10:20 p.m. ET. More Than 650,000 Power Outages In La.

That tidbit emerged in a letter from gov. Bobby Jindal to President Obama in which he requested expedited major disaster declaration for the state as a result of damage caused by Isaac.

Here's more from the letter:

Read more
It's All Politics
7:51 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Romney Campaign Official: We Could Win Without Florida

There are lots of ways to get to 270 and they don't all involve Florida's 29 electoral votes, according to Rich Beeson, the national political director for the Mitt Romney Campaign.

Beeson, speaking with Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep on Tuesday, says the Sunshine State would be nice to have in the red column, but it's not a sine qua non for clinching victory in November.

Read more
Sports
3:55 pm
Fri August 24, 2012

Can Livestrong Survive Armstrong's Fall?

The ubiquitous Livestrong wristband was introduced in 2004 and quickly became a cultural icon.
Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

Lance Armstrong may soon be stripped of his seven Tour de France titles, but many supporters are sticking by him — if not as the celebrity cyclist, then as the relentless advocate for cancer survivors.

That's encouraging news for his Livestrong foundation, which must deal with the delicate matter of a scandal-tainted figurehead.

Read more
Health
12:01 pm
Sun August 19, 2012

Dallas Deploys Old Weapon In New Mosquito Fight

Mike Stuart of Dynamic Aviation speaks to the media this week about the type of plane used for aerial spraying in Dallas. The city and county are conducting aerial spraying to combat the nation's worst outbreak of West Nile virus, which has killed at least 10 people and sickened about 200.
LM Otero AP

The recent outbreak of West Nile virus in the Dallas area has led to a new round of large-scale spraying for mosquitoes — a method of treating outbreaks that has generations of success, and even nostalgia, behind it.

Although the overall mosquito-killing strategy has changed little since the days when it was pioneered during construction of the Panama Canal a century ago, the chemicals used have become much safer for everything and everyone involved, save the mosquitoes, experts say.

Read more
Space
8:03 am
Thu August 9, 2012

Man On The Moon: Saving America's 'One Small Step'

Apollo 17 commander Eugene A. Cernan takes a Lunar Roving Vehicle for a spin at the Taurus-Littrow landing site during the 1972 mission.
Harrison H. Schmitt NASA

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 4:57 am

It wasn't that long ago the United States owned the moon, or at least it seemed that way.

Read more
Religion
3:02 pm
Mon August 6, 2012

In Recent Years, Sikhs No Stranger To Violence

Members of the Milwaukee-area Sikh community gather Monday in Oak Creek, Wis., to learn more information about a shooting spree that left six people dead. Sikhs have faced a number of attacks in the U.S. in recent years.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 6:48 am

As Sikhism spread far and wide in the past century, it has been no stranger to discrimination and violence.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:58 am
Mon August 6, 2012

Sikh Temple Shooting Suspect's Ties To White Supremacists Being Probed

Wade Michael Page, in a photo released by police.
Oak Creek Police

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 1:54 pm

The latest developments related to Sunday's shooting at a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis., in which six people were killed and three injured before, authorities say, the gunman was killed by police:

Update at 3:47 p.m. ET. Obama Says Events Should Lead To "Soul Searching":

President Obama gave televised statements about the shooting which he called "terrible, tragic."

Read more
Economy
2:01 pm
Thu August 2, 2012

What Can We Do To Fix The Economy?

Courtesy of Jared Bernstein

U.S. employment is stalled, growth is anemic, and the Federal Reserve has decided not to take action for at least another month.

Most economists weren't expecting the Federal Open Markets Committee, which sets the Fed's monetary policy, to announce another round of quantitative easing — a fancy term that basically means the central bank buys bonds to increase the money supply and make borrowing cheaper — at this week's meeting. Still, that's exactly what a number of them think is needed.

Read more
Asia
3:06 pm
Tue July 31, 2012

India's Power Woes A Classic Story Of Supply, Demand

Muslim girls study by candlelight Monday inside a madrasa, or religious school, in Noida, on the outskirts of New Delhi. Three regional power grids collapsed, causing a massive power outage that blacked out more than half of India.
Parivartan Sharma Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 12:25 pm

It might be too early to say what the exact cause of India's latest massive power outage is, but in its simplest form, it probably has something to do with supply and demand –- not enough of the former and too much of the latter.

The outage, which left more than 670 million of the country's 1.2 billion people without power, snarled traffic, shut down electric trains and idled some businesses. Indian officials say they are rapidly restoring power, but it's unclear how soon the situation will be back to normal.

Read more
Environment
1:40 pm
Wed July 25, 2012

Massive Ice Melt In Greenland Worries Scientists

Images released Tuesday show the extent of surface melt on Greenland's ice sheet on July 8 (left) and July 12 (right). Measurements from three satellites showed that on July 8, about 40 percent of the ice sheet had undergone thawing at or near the surface. By July 12, 97 percent of the ice sheet surface had thawed.
AFP/Getty Images/NASA

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 2:53 pm

A pair of NASA satellite images taken just four days apart tells a potentially worrying story of melting ice in the polar summer.

The first, snapped from orbit on July 8, shows about 40 percent of the Greenland ice sheet shaded in pink or red to illustrate probable or confirmed surface melting. The second photo, taken on July 12, shows nearly the entire land mass — 97 percent — blotched in a red hue.

Read more
Economy
10:21 am
Wed July 25, 2012

When It Comes To Tax Cuts, Neither Side Is Blinking

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 12:43 pm

Taxes may be certain, but growth and job creation aren't.

As the U.S. edges closer to a year-end "fiscal cliff," Democrats and Republicans haven't budged in their fight over expiring tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans — and how best to help the middle class and get the country back to work.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:20 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

Penn State Sanctions Charter 'Unprecedented' Ground, Author Says

NCAA President Mark Emmert answers questions about the sanctions against Penn State's football team during a news conference in Indianapolis, Monday, July 23, 2012. The NCAA slammed Penn State with an unprecedented series of penalties in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal.
Michael Conroy AP

The sanctions slapped on Penn State football in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse scandal charter a new territory in punishment by the NCAA, a sports author said today.

"I think it is unprecedented in terms of taking away wins. That's a huge blow," says Ted Kluck, author of several books on sports, including Game Time: Inside College Football.

Read more
It's All Politics
2:03 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

Who 'Owns' The Bush Tax Cuts?

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 2:53 pm

They're called the Bush tax cuts for a reason. And when they were passed in the early 2000s, most Democrats opposed them.

Cut to a decade later: President Obama is calling for a second extension in as many years of the "temporary" cuts, but it won't come without a fight from congressional Republicans.

Given the apparent role reversal, who owns the George W. Bush-era tax cuts now: Democrats or Republicans?

Read more
The Two-Way
1:07 pm
Fri July 6, 2012

Yahoo, Facebook Reportedly In Ad Deal

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 1:52 pm

Yahoo and Facebook have agreed to re-sheath their patent swords and play nice — at least for now.

The two companies have struck a broad advertising partnership as part of a deal to end a patent dispute, Kara Swisher reports on the technology blog All Things Digital, quoting "sources close to the situation."

Read more

Pages