Cabinet of Wonders
7:03 am
Fri May 25, 2012

A Starbucks... Where The Starbuck Used To Be

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 5:45 pm

John Wesley Harding opens with a lament for the Starbucks-ization of America. Musicians Josh Ritter, Edie Brickell, and Punch Brothers each give stellar performances. Raconteur Sarah Vowell and comedian Eugene Mirman give questionable life advice, while novelist Haley Tanner pays homage to a favorite writer. Harding and guests wrap the episode with a group song.

About The Perfomers

Her career in music began when Edie Brickell joined the band New Bohemians in the 80s. Edie Brickell & New Bohemians released Shooting Rubberbands at the Stars in 1988, which rose to #4 on the US Albums Chart. Singer/songwriter Brickell currently records with several collaborators. Her most recent project, The Gaddabouts, with Steve Gadd, released their second album Look Out Now! this past spring.

Punch Brothers are a five-person band started by former Nickel Creek member, Chris Thile, in 2006. The bluegrass quintet released their third album, Who's Feeling Young Now? and contributed a song to The Hunger Games soundtrack in early 2012.

Josh Ritter, who plays with The Royal City Band, is a musician famous for his Americana style, and narrative lyrics. Ritter's music mixes rock and folk. He recently published his debut novel, Bright's Passage, with Random House.

Russian-born comedian Eugene Mirman regularly appears on Comedy Central and the shows Flight of the Conchords and Delocated. He published The Will to Whatevs: A Guide to Modern Life in 2009, has hosted a radio show, and released two comedy albums. Mirman puts on a weekly comedy show "Pretty Good Friends" in Brooklyn.

Haley Tanner is an underground star. She released her debut novel, Vaclav and Lena in 2011. The story centers around two six-year-old Russian immigrants who meet in an English as a Second Language class in Brooklyn. Tanner's adventures have led her to work as a police dispatcher, waitress, parliamentary assistant, and bank teller.

Sarah Vowell explores social history and culture in her books, essays, documentaries, and news pieces. Vowell is a New York Times bestselling author of six nonfiction books, including her most recent, Unfamiliar Fishes. She was a contributing editor for This American Life for more than a decade, and was the voice of Violet in the 2004 American Academy Award-winning computer-animated feature, The Incredibles.

Watch Vowell discuss her role as a superhero below.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

JOHN WESLEY HARDING, HOST:

Welcome to the CABINET OF WONDERS on NPR. We're recording at Manhattan City Winery. Prepare your ears. Tonight's CABINET is overflowing. Josh Ritter is here. He's a songwriter and singer. No - he's a novelist; he's all three.

Sarah Vowell hits the trifecta as well. Journalist, raconteur - and the voice of Violet, for you "Incredibles" fans.

We've got Punch Brothers with their "Antifogmatic" bluegrass. Look it up. And who doesn't like to be read to? Haley Tanner is here; she's come armed with literature. Wait; there's even more. The supremely funny Eugene Mirman. And she's been a New Bohemian, she's been a Gaddabout but tonight, we've got her all to ourselves - Miss Edie Brickell.

Ladies and gentlemen, I'm John Wesley Harding, and I've got the key. The CABINET OF WONDERS is open.

(APPLAUSE)

(SOUNDBITE OF LIVE MUSIC)

HARDING: Welcome back to the CABINET OF WONDERS on NPR. Because the time is right for a little variety.

When the children have been good, that is - be it understood - good at mealtime, good at play, good all night and good all day, they shall have the pretty things this CABINET OF WONDERS brings. But naughty, romping girls and boys who tear their clothes and make a noise, spoil their pinafores and sheets, and deserve no special treats. Such as these shall never yet, enjoy this special CABINET. The door is locked. Your money is spent. May I present the CABINET, its contents and its discontents.

(SOUNDBITE OF LIVE MUSIC)

HARDING: Edie Brickell, Josh Ritter, Sarah Vowell, Punch Brothers, Haley Tanner and Eugene Mirman, all on one stage. What a sight.

Well, I do believe we have a very special and lovely show for you this evening. There's going to be some - there's going to be some very beautiful things on display when I'm off the stage.

This song I wrote about Atlantic Yards, which I hear has set loose a torrent of rats upon Brooklyn - highly unpleasant.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

HARDING: (Singing) There's a freeway where we played football in the fields. Apartments on the pitch at Highbury. There's a shed called Deer Creek, of which my one critique is, there's no creek now, and it's all deer-free.

(Singing) There's a Walgreens where there were no walls, just greenery. And a theme park in a palace in Tennessee. That tree there is a pylon but some things, you can rely on. There's a Starbucks where the Starbucks used to be.

(Singing) There's a Starbucks where the Starbucks used to be. There's a Starbucks where the Starbucks used to be. There's a hard luck story everywhere you look but oh, the glory, was the Starbucks where the Starbucks used to be.

(Singing) There's a stadium where we used to drink at Freddies. For a team that no one likes or wants or needs. They said they'd revitalized the place, now there's a million parking spaces. Maybe bedrooms for the homeless refugees.

(Singing) There's a chain store where mom and pop once prospered. They're divorced now, and they live in penury.

(Singing) Their kids grew up and moved away. I hear that happens anyway. And there's a Starbucks where they live, I guarantee.

(Singing) There's a Starbucks where the Starbucks used to be. There's a Starbucks where the Starbucks used to be. There's a hard luck story everywhere you look but oh, the glory, was the Starbucks where the Starbucks used to be.

(Singing) And I missed the old Starbucks, but the new one's just the same. It's got coffee, CDs, it's even got the same name. You know, I wouldn't have even noticed, oh, if you hadn't have told me. There's a Starbucks where the Starbucks used to be.

(Singing) There's a Starbucks where the Starbucks used to be. There's a Starbucks where the Starbucks used to be. There's a hard luck story everywhere you look but oh, the glory, was the Starbucks where the Starbucks used to be. There's a Starbucks where the Starbucks used to be. There's a Starbucks where the Starbucks used to be.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: On the lead guitar, David Nagler; bass, Eddie Carlson; and on the drums, Adam Gold.

OK. So for our first guest of the evening, I've written a poem. That's not unusual. Who gets invited to the CABINET? Performers who offer a double threat, the creme de la creme, the smartest set. And anyone who hasn't done it yet. Including those I know slightly via the Internet. And this woman whom I met at the vet. She's a genius, you'll love her writing. You'll love her manner. Author of "Vaclav and Lena," it's Haley Tanner.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Tell us about your earrings, Haley. Let's break the ice.

HALEY TANNER: These earrings. Yeah.

HARDING: Look at them.

TANNER: I'm a little person. I like big earrings. Helps - gives me some gravitas.

HARDING: Quite the opposite. Now... normally in - previously in CABINETS, we just have the authors come and read a chunk from their thing. I've got bored of that idea. So what I decided was, I would set the authors a task, and I - we'll see if it works tonight. It might not work.

I asked Haley to read to you the greatest first paragraph of any book. Haley, you're the first person to do this, and I thank you for participating. What have you got for us tonight?

TANNER: You are oh, so welcome. And I have "Even Cowgirls Get the Blues," by Tom Robbins.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Read us a paragraph.

TANNER: I shall. Can I say first that - I just said backstage, if you see a girl on the subway holding a well-thumbed copy of this novel, you should ask her out.

(LAUGHTER)

TANNER: OK. Are you ready? OK. OK.

(Reading) Welcome to the Rubber Rose ranch. It is the finest outhouse in the Dakotas. It has to be. Spiders, mice, cold drafts, splinters, corncobs, habitual stenches don't make it in this company. The hands have renovated and decorated the privy themselves. Foam rubber, hanging flower pots, a couple of prints by Georgia O'Keeffe - the cow skull period, fluffy carpeting, Sheetrock insulation, ashtrays, an incense burner, a fly strip, a photograph of Dale Evans, about which there is some controversy.

(Reading) There is even a radio in the outhouse, although the only radio station in the area plays nothing but polka. Of course, the ranch has indoor facilities, flush toilets in regular bathrooms, But they'd been stopped up during the revolution, and nobody had ever unstopped them. Plumbing was one thing the girls were poor at. Nearest Roto-Rooter man was 30 miles. Weren't any Roto-Rooter women anywhere, as far as the ranch hands knew.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: OK. So, you could have read any great first paragraph of any book in the world, and you chose to read - as far as I can tell - about a toilet.

TANNER: Yes. Yes. I wanted to read from this because when - when I was 16, I read this novel and it - it made me believe that being a writer could be fun, and adventuresome, and amazing and full of life. And not dusty, and full of cobwebs and sadness and ink-stained, lonely fingers.

HARDING: And now you've written a successful first novel; how have you revised that opinion?

(LAUGHTER)

TANNER: Oh, how wrong I was. No - it's - I think that there's - there's a little bit of fun in everything. I think there's an opportunity in every moment to take ourselves a little bit less seriously, and - and to metaphorically sit in an outhouse, listening to polkas.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Haley Tanner.

TANNER: Thank you so very much.

Thank you.

HARDING: It's getting very acoustic.

Conductor, when you receive a fare, punch in the presence of the passenger. Punch Brothers, punch with care. Punch in the presence of the passenger. I've done my research. Read Mark Twain. That is how they got their name. Ladies and gentlemen, they're not brothers, they're not called Punch. Punch Brothers.

(APPLAUSE)

CHRIS THILE: Thank you so much

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "MOVEMENT AND LOCATION")

THILE: (Singing) Did he ever live in those three and 20 years? For a thing but movement and location?) If she'd raised her voice, not her sparkling, shallow eyes. To indict my movement and location, would the battle be lost? You can watch the tape, you can try to hit your spots. But don't do it for anything but the thrill of movement and location, or the battle is lost.

(APPLAUSE)

THILE: Thank you. Thank you. Very nice.

Well, damn! Thank you very much. So the first song we played is - is called "Movement and Location." That's the first song off our - our brand-new record. We'll leave you with one off our last record which is - which is called "Antifogmatic." This is a song about - I think the most sensible base for an Antifogmatic - which is rye whiskey.

We are honored to be a part of this evening. I'm - I'm enjoying myself very much.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "RYE WHISKEY")

THILE: One, two, three, and...

(Singing) Rye whiskey makes the band sound better, makes your baby cuter. Makes itself taste sweeter. Oh, boy!

Rye whiskey makes your heart beat louder. Makes your voice seem softer, makes the back room hotter, oh, but rye thoughts aren't good thoughts, boys. Have I ever told you about the time I...

Rye whiskey wraps your troubles up into a bright-blue package, ties a bow around it. Oh, boy! Just throw it on a pile in the corner, see. You're not alone in not being alone tonight, but rye love isn't good love, boys. Have I ever told you about the time I...

I used to wake up bright and early. Got my work done quickly, held my baby tightly. Oh, boy! Rye whiskey makes the sun set faster, makes the spirit more willing. But the body weaker because rye sleep isn't good sleep, boys. Have I ever told you about the time I took it - and took her for granted? How I took it, and took her for granted? So let's take some, and take them all for granted. Huh!

(APPLAUSE)

THILE: Thank you very much. We're Punch Brothers, delighted to be here.

HARDING: So many more wonders in the CABINET. By all means, get a snack, but make sure you've cleaned up the crumbs before Josh Ritter and Edie Brickell see the mess you've made. It's the CABINET OF WONDERS on NPR.

(APPLAUSE)

(SOUNDBITE OF LIVE MUSIC)

HARDING: Welcome back to the CABINET OF WONDERS on NPR. I will now read my poem.

I met her by chance at an airport. She gave me a lift into town. I asked her, without any forethought, if she'd read us some verbs and some nouns. And imagine how superb if she threw in an adverb, but that's up to her, I thank her from the bottom of my bowel, it's Sarah Vowell. Sarah Vowell.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: I am now going to come down amongst you and see if I can find any cards with questions on them, that haven't been handed in. I'll come down - I'll come down, and Sarah and Eugene Mirman will answer questions from you. Eugene Mirman.

(APPLAUSE)

SARAH VOWELL: Hello.

EUGENE MIRMAN: Hello. Are you ready, Sarah, to...

VOWELL: Eugene and I are known for our wisdom.

MIRMAN: Agreed.

VOWELL: Within about a 10 block radius of here.

MIRMAN: It's true. Once you get to 14th, nobody knows. All right, here's a question: Which would you rather be married to - Mitt Romney, Newt, Sarah Palin? Sarah?

VOWELL: Oh, which one would I rather be...

MIRMAN: I think both of us.

VOWELL: You ...

MIRMAN: Mitt for his body.

VOWELL: Totally. And the hair. Don't forget the hair.

MIRMAN: And the hair. I don't know. Newt is clearly crazy, but he might be the most fun. And he would let me date other people.

(LAUGHTER)

MIRMAN: Sarah Palin, possibly, because she is, of the three, a lady.

VOWELL: Right.

MIRMAN: Which interests me.

VOWELL: And I don't - I mean, and for that reason, I probably couldn't marry her in her home state.

MIRMAN: No.

VOWELL: She - she'd definitely have to come here.

MIRMAN: So yeah, let's - let's see another one. Here's a question: Where should a young couple go on vacation?

VOWELL: Oh. Well, as someone who frittered away her 30s just going to national parks and stuff, and then turned 40 and realized hey, I'm going to die, and started making her way through the list of UNESCO World Heritage sites, I can recommend the wildebeest migration - although you have to kind of time that.

And even if you time it right, which I did, you still have to sit in a jeep with the Maasai warriors who are driving you around, waiting for the lazy wildebeest to decide to cross the river. And it's like, oh - you know - I can understand there's a crocodile there, the resident. But like, you know, if you've just been sitting there forever, waiting for them to cross the river.

So there's that. Find me after, because I have recommendations of ecclesiastical architecture.

MIRMAN: Give us a few.

VOWELL: Versailles - a little gaudy, but you do understand the revolution more.

(LAUGHTER)

MIRMAN: Should I be making an effort to befriend the random people at my table? Oh... I would say if they are attractive, or clearly have power.

VOWELL: And not when like - like, the writers are up here; just when the musicians are playing. I mean, I did - it's true.Wes, in his rhyme - I did meet Wes at a baggage claim. I don't know how old this person is but after a certain point, you stop saying, do I need to know more people? You know? Like I've passed that point. It's like, I don't get around to seeing the people I do know, so I would be like, oh - you know, like - you know that horrible feeling when you've just made a new friend, in your 40s? And you go oh, one more person to feel bad about not seeing.

(LAUGHTER)

HARDING: Sarah, Sarah...

VOWELL: What, what?

HARDING: Sarah. Are you still talking about when we met at the airport right now?

VOWELL: You can read into that however you want.

HARDING: Ladies and gentlemen, to my left, it's Sarah Vowell.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: I saw her at the ICA - that's in London, by the way. I'll translate. I saw her at the ICA in 1988. She sang her new song "What I Am," and I thought it was great. But how much greater to see what she is, 24 years later. Cooler than a Creamsicle...

(LAUGHTER)

HARDING: Edie Brickell.

EDIE BRICKELL: Hi.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: How are you feeling?

BRICKELL: I'm fine, thank you. How are you all feeling?

(APPLAUSE)

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "WHAT WOULD YOU DO")

BRICKELL: (Singing) Barely old enough to legally drive, she took off in her stepmother's van. A restlessness that blew her over the line, like the wind inside an aluminum can. At a pay phone in a doughnut shop, she called a friend back home. We're all worried, and they've called the cops. Are you crazy? Where have you gone?

(Singing) She said, what would you do if you were me? When it's suicide to stay, and murder to leave?

(Singing) She ran out of gas down in New Mexico, and got a job at a local cafe. Friday nights, they featured live rock and roll; she fell in love with a boy who played. He had soulful eyes and Indian blood. No intention of hangin' around. All he took was his harmonica and her heart when he left town.

(Singing) He said, what would you do if you were me? When it's suicide to stay, and murder to leave?

(Singing) She never married but she did have a child, a sweet, young girl by the name of Sioux. She had spirit and a heartbreaking smile. And some beat-up moccasin boots. They had nothing but each other's love, an apartment by the tracks. And when came the day that Sioux grew up, she said someday, I'll be back.

(Singing) Oh now, what would you do if you were me? When it's suicide to stay, and murder to leave?

(APPLAUSE)

BRICKELL: Thanks a lot. Thanks.

Thank you. This is a new one, not yet released, as was "Wicked William."

HARDING: Which is good, because they can't judge us against the recorded performance. I like it.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "WICKED WILLIAM")

BRICKELL: (Singing) Romance is a fairy tale. A beautiful fantasy set up to fail. Follow that, the breadcrumb trail, to the movies. I was a believer, in love with love. I was a believer, always dreaming of love.

(Singing) White horses will get muddy. Shiny normally doesn't stay that way. Nobody can make you happy; if you can't do it, how can they? I was a believer, in love with love. I was a believer, always dreaming of love.

(Singing) Like a tidal wave. Love, like a brighter day. Love, there's somebody made just for me. Love that was meant to be. Love that was destiny. Love for somebody who's true to me, yeah.

(Singing) I was a believer, in love with love. I was a believer, always dreaming of love. Like a tidal wave. Love, like a brighter day. Love, there's somebody made just for me. Love that was meant to be. Love that was destiny. Love for somebody who's true to me.

(Singing) When you take my hand, oh, you take me back to the days when I believed. To the days when I believed.

(APPLAUSE)

BRICKELL: Thank you.

HARDING: Thanks so much.

BRICKELL: Thank you.

HARDING: Edie Brickell.

BRICKELL: Thank you all.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: It's time for us to re-stock the CABINET. We promise we won't be long. This is NPR.

HARDING: Hello. We're still here. Where have you been? I'm John Wesley Harding. This is the CABINET OF WONDERS on NPR, where words, music and comedy have a go at an open marriage.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: You're so nice to me. Let's have a little interstitial music.

(SOUNDBITE OF LIVE MUSIC)

HARDING: Ladies and gentlemen, Daniel Felsenfeld.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Well, I couldn't be happier. You're very lucky people. When I first toured with him, we were younger and fitter - though I could have been his baby sitter. He was designated driver. Now he's designated hitter. Many tours later, still not bitter; ladies and gentlemen, Josh Ritter.

(APPLAUSE)

JOSH RITTER: Thank you.

Thank you very, very much for having me here. This is - this is really beautiful.

HARDING: That's OK.

RITTER: Rock and roll.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "GALAHAD")

RITTER: (Singing) The angel of the holy grail saw Galahad come riding, so he took the holy grail off the shelf. And inside the holy chapel made for holy grail hiding the angel could be seen to smile to himself. If you're the great Sir Galahad, from now on, said the angel, may all angels call me blessed of my race. If you're not the great Sir Galahad, I warn you, keep on riding. And if you are, I pray you'll let me see your face.

(Singing) Galahad took off his helmet, said good angel, look upon me. Fear not, for I bring tidings of great joy. For long years, the grail you've guarded. Now you get to let me drink it. How happy must be angels thus employed.

(Singing) Well, the favors that you shower upon me, a simple angel, said the angel, your magnificence abounds. Take your boots off, great Sir Galahad. By your astounding beauty, whatever ground you stand on turns to holy ground.

(Singing) Galahad took off his boots and he watched the ground quite closely, and the angel smiled to himself again. He said, I can't believe I'm asking but Sir Galahad, please tell me, what is it that makes you want to go to heaven? In heaven, there's no lamb chops. Queen Guinevere's for hand (BLEEP), marijuana, Kenny Rogers or ecstasy. Perhaps you've come by some mistake to me. This seems more error than knight errantry.

I'm not sure I can sing this on the radio, actually, so...

(LAUGHTER)

RITTER: (Singing) Yes, and what about the stable boys? I know you think they're handsome. And some of them, they think you're awful handsome, too. And sitting up in heaven, you'll still think about them often. When you're an angel, thinking's all that you can do.

(Singing) At this, Sir Galahad got angry. Angel, he said, don't you tempt me. I wish to go to heaven and not to hell. So when women call me handsome, when the stable boys look lonesome, I'll hold my virtue very firmly by myself.

(LAUGHTER)

(Singing) I guarantee you'll hold it often, said the angel. Oh, one more thing, before you drink the wine, please take your armor off. I got to carry you to heaven. And despite what you'd imagine, I have trouble bearing heavy things aloft.

(CHEERS)

(Singing) Sir Galahad stood naked in a pile of his armor, his boots and helmet scattered all around. His perfect lips, they sipped the grail. His perfect heart commenced to fail. His perfect body fell upon the ground. The angel lit a cigarette and when he was sure Galahad was dead, he picked all of his clothes up off the floor. Then I put on his boots and armor. I laid his body on the altar. Put his helmet on, and I headed for the door.

(APPLAUSE)

RITTER: Thank you.

Awesome. Thank you very much.

Thank you very much. I want to invite up my friends Punch Brothers, right now.

(APPLAUSE)

RITTER: Fantastic.

RITTER: This song is called "Another New World."

(APPLAUSE)

RITTER: ...and I'm - I'm really thrilled to be here with these guys, man.

UNIDENTIFIED AUDIENCE MEMBER #1: Whoo!

UNIDENTIFIED AUDIENCE MEMBER #2: Love you!

UNIDENTIFIED AUDIENCE MEMBER #3: We love you!

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "ANOTHER NEW WORLD")

RITTER: (Singing) The leading lights of the age all wondered amongst themselves what I would do next. And after all that I'd found in my travels around the world, was there anything left? Gentlemen, I said, I've studied the maps. And if what I am thinking is right, there's another new world at the top of the world, for whoever can break through the ice.

(Singing) I looked round the room in that way I once had, and I saw that they wanted belief. So I said, all I got are my guts and my God, then I paused. And the Annabel Lee. Oh, the Annabel Lee - I saw their eyes shine - the most beautiful ship in the sea. My Nina, my Pinta, my Santa Maria, my beautiful Annabel Lee.

(Singing) That spring, we set sail. The crowd waved from shore and onboard, the crew waved their hats. But I never had family, it's just the Annabel Lee, so I didn't have cause to look back. I just set the course north and I studied the charts and towards dark, I drifted towards sleep. And I dreamed of the fine, deep harbor I'd find past the ice, for my Annabel Lee.

(Singing) And after that it got colder. The world got quiet. It was never quite day or quite night. And the sea turned the color of sky, turned the color of sea, turned the color of ice. Till at last, all-around us was vastness; one vast glassy desert of arsenic white. And the waves that once lifted us, sifted instead into drifts against Annabel's sides. And the crew gathered closer, at first for the comfort, but each morning would bring a new set, of tracks in the snow, leading over the edge of the world, till I was the only one left.

(Singing) And after that, it gets cloudy, but it feels like I lay there for days and maybe for months. And Annabel held me, the two of us happy, just to think back on all we had done.

(Singing) We talked of the other new worlds we'd discover, as she gave up her body to me. And as I chopped up her mainsail for timber, I told her of all that we still had to see. And, as the frost turned her mooring to nine-tail and the wind lashed her sides in the cold, I burned her to keep me alive every night in the loving embrace of her hold. And I won't call it shelter.

(Singing) What brought me back here, to the old world, to drink and decline? Pretend that the search for another new world was well worth the burning of mine. But sometimes at night in my dreams comes the singing of some unknown tropical bird. And I smile as I sleep, thinking Annabel Lee has finally made it to another new world.

(Singing) Yeah, sometimes at night in my dreams, comes the singing of some unknown tropical bird. And I smile in my sleep, thinking Annabel Lee has finally made it to another new world.

(APPLAUSE)

RITTER: Punch Brothers.

HARDING: Josh Ritter. Punch Brothers.

Let's get the band back up here. And I'm going to read a poem of goodbye to you, before we sing our last song this evening. It's been beautiful. I'd like a round of applause, please, for the performers this evening and those include...

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: ...hold on. Hold on. And those include, great friend to the CABINET, Eugene Mirman.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Sarah Vowell. Josh Ritter. Edie Brickell. Punch Brothers. Haley Tanner. The English U.K. And now...

UNIDENTIFIED AUDIENCE MEMBER #4: Whoo!

HARDING: ...a moment's quiet. Our CABINET is now ended.

UNIDENTIFIED AUDIENCE MEMBERS: Ahhh.

HARDING: Don't patronize me. Our CABINET is now ended. These, our actors, as I foretold you, were all spirits and are melted into air - thin air. And, like the baseless fabric of this Vivienne Westwood suit, the brilliant songs, the thought-provoking readings, the surly comics, the great City Winery itself, yea, all which it inherit shall dissolve. And, like this insubstantial pageant faded, leave not a guitar pick behind.

We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep. Ladies and gentlemen, the CABINET is closed.

(APPLAUSE)

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

HARDING: Thanks so much for coming.

(Singing) Singing a song in the morning. Singing it again at night. I don't even know what I'm singing about, but it makes me feel I feel all right, yeah, yeah. It makes me feel I feel all right.

(Singing) Singing a song in the morning. Singing it again at night. I don't even know what I'm singing about, but it makes me feel I feel all right.

Go Mick!

(Singing) It makes me feel I feel all right.

Here we go.

BRICKELL: (Singing) Singing a song in the morning. Singing it late at night. I don't even know what I'm singing about, but it makes me feel, I feel all right. It makes me feel, I feel all right. Whoo! Whoo!

THILE: (Singing) Singing a song in the morning. Singing it again at night. I don't even know what I'm singing about, but it makes me feel, I feel all right.

HARDING: Violin!

THILE: (Singing) It makes me feel, I feel all right.

HARDING: (Unintelligible) now, you got it. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.