All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm to 7pm and Weekends 4pm to 5pm

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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Around the Nation
3:48 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Zero-Tolerance Policing Is Not Racism, Say St. Louis-Area Cops

Police arrest a woman in Ferguson, Mo., protesting the shooting death of Michael Brown. Most officers in Ferguson and nearby Jennings are white, but the neighborhoods they police are predominantly African-American.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:28 pm

The protests that followed the shooting death this month of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., have rekindled long-standing complaints about racist policing, especially in the St Louis area.

Many male African-American residents there say police scrutinize them unfairly. "Every time you see a cop, it's like, 'OK, am I going to get messed with?' " says Anthony Ross. "You feel that every single time you get behind your car. Every time."

Now, police officers in and around St. Louis are becoming more vocal about defending themselves against the charges of bias.

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Men In America
3:22 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

What's A Writer Gotta Do To Get A Little Health Care Around Here?

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:29 pm

In my teens, I stumbled onto the wide trail of "the writer's bildungsroman," the coming-of-age stories that often gave me too much to identify with. That whispered clear messages while I slept and while I tried to imagine a life far, far outside the heat and farmlands of where I grew up.

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Media
2:45 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Foley's Mother: We Didn't Want Him To Go Back To Syria

Journalist James Foley in 2011. He was killed by Islamic State militants in Syria earlier this month.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 4:11 pm

The mother of slain journalist James Foley says in an interview with NPR's All Things Considered that the family did not want him to return to Syria after a brief trip back to the United States in 2011.

"We really did not want him to go back," Diane Foley tells host Melissa Block. "I must be honest about that," she says of her son, who was killed by Islamic State militants in Syria earlier this month.

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Around the Nation
2:45 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Shooting Range Accident Draws Focus On Children Handling Guns

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 4:08 pm

A tragedy at an Arizona shooting range this week has set off a debate about children using high-powered weapons, as well as America's gun culture. Shooting range owners are defending their industry as safe, criticizing this particular operator for allowing a small girl to use an Uzi.

Education
2:45 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Want To Widen Your Worldview? A Random Roomie Helps

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 4:08 pm

Melissa Block talks to Jesse Singal of New York Magazine, about his article titled "In Praise of the Rando Freshman Roommate." Research shows that when students are paired with roommates from different backgrounds, they tend to develop more tolerant attitudes.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Men In America
4:04 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Freemasonry Still Alive And Well, And (Mostly) Men-Only

Danny Done, 26, worshipful master of the Queen Anne Masonic Lodge in Seattle. The fraternity is "a really interesting social network that's not online," he says.
Martin Kaste NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 9:17 am

The members of the Queen Anne Masonic Lodge near downtown Seattle are on the young side. The guy in charge is 26.

Danny Done, the lodge's worshipful master, is lounging on his designated chair in the room reserved for private ceremonies.

His title comes with a top hat, though he avoids putting it on — he says it makes him look dorky. But he does like other aspects of Masonic regalia, like his Templar sword. Done uses it to point to a diagram on the wall that charts out the different kinds of Masonry.

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Law
3:49 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

In Settlement, Homeland Security Agrees To Reform 'Voluntary Departures'

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 10:53 am

The Department of Homeland Security is settling a lawsuit with the ACLU, which deals with immigrants who were improperly pushed to leave the country. The suit alleged that DHS agents coerced immigrants living in the U.S. illegally to take part in a process called "voluntary departure."

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Shots - Health News
3:04 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Life After Ice Buckets: ALS Group Faces $94 Million Challenge

Bill Gates, Martha Stewart, LeBron James, Lindsay Lohan, Kermit the Frog and Conan O'Brien all got icily drenched for charity.
via YouTube

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

The ALS ice bucket challenge continues to bring in huge donations this summer for efforts to cure and treat what's commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. As of today, the viral campaign has raised more than $94 million for the ALS Association. That's compared with $2.7 million raised by the group during the same time last year.

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Media
2:47 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

London 'Times' Goes Retro With Stereo Typing

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

Robert Siegel speaks to Patrick Kidd, the editor of The Times Diary, about the sounds of mechanical typewriters piped into the newsroom of The Times in London. The idea is that the sounds will increase energy levels and help reporters hit deadlines.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Parallels
2:47 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Before Leaving Afghanistan, U.S. Troops Must Declutter

A construction excavator demolishes a B-hut at the huge Bagram Air Field north of Kabul. The military used the structures as bunks and offices during the 13-year war but is tearing them down as most of the military prepares to leave by year's end.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

Sgt. 1st Class Tom Albert is with the Army's 2nd Engineers at the massive Bagram Air Field north of Kabul, and he's overseeing operation Clean Sweep here. It's a huge job, because American troops and equipment are scheduled to be out of Bagram and other bases by the end of the year.

The U.S. and Afghanistan are still trying to work out a deal that would allow nearly 10,000 military personnel to stay, but even that would be just a fraction of the force that's been here for the past 13 years.

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The Salt
4:39 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

Colorado's Pot Brownies Now Come With Instructions

Edibles available at LoDo Wellness Center, a retail marijuana and medical marijuana dispensary and grow facility in downtown Denver.
Matthew Staver Landov

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 7:48 am

When Colorado legalized recreational marijuana use earlier this year, it also opened the door for food products infused with the psychoactive ingredient, THC, to anyone over the age of 21. That means bakers and food companies now have to ensure new products aren't contaminated with foodborne pathogens. And they have to make sure they're not falling into the hands of children or are too potent to eat.

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The Salt
3:46 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

High Prices Aren't Scaring Consumers Away From The Meat Counter

Meat is displayed in a case at a grocery store in Miami in July. Pork and beef prices are up more than 11 percent since last summer.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 26, 2014 6:41 pm

You may have noticed when grilling steaks or hot dogs this summer that they cost more than they did last year. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, pork and beef prices are up more than 11 percent since last summer.

Supply and demand determine price, and the pork supply comes from places like Riley Lewis' hog farm near Forest City, Iowa.

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News
3:37 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

VA's Inspector General Finds Faked Data At Hospitals Across U.S.

Originally published on Tue August 26, 2014 6:07 pm

President Obama addressed the annual convention of the American Legion in North Carolina with a raft of new proposals for vets. The speech comes as the inspector general at the Veterans Affairs Department is releasing a report on the scandal over phony wait times at the Phoenix VA hospital.

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Europe
3:37 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

Report Details 16 Years Of 'Horrific Abuse' Of Children In U.K. Town

Alexis Jay, author of a report released Tuesday that documents the abuse of 1,400 children in Rotherham, England, says local authorities were aware of the problem for years and did nothing.
Dave Higgens PA Photos/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 26, 2014 6:07 pm

An investigation out on Tuesday documents the abuse of more than 1,400 children in Rotherham, England, and says local authorities were aware of the problem for years and did not respond.

Alexis Jay, who authored the report, used to be chief inspector of social work in Scotland.

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Goats and Soda
2:45 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

CDC Director On Ebola: 'We Are Definitely Not At The Peak'

Shops are closed in Monrovia's West Point neighborhood as part of a quarantine to contain the spread of Ebola.
Zoom Dosso AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 26, 2014 6:41 pm

On Monday, Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, arrived in Liberia to assess the Ebola outbreak. The situation "is overwhelming," he said.

The outbreak "really is a crisis and is affecting most if not all the counties in Liberia already," he told NPR from Monrovia, the capital city and first stop on a three-country visit. "This is absolutely unprecedented."

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Middle East
2:45 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

Decimated Tower Remains As Monument To Gaza War

Originally published on Tue August 26, 2014 6:07 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Hours before that cease-fire was announced, a tall office and apartment building in Gaza was hit in an Israeli airstrike. It was mostly destroyed, but not entirely. NPR's Philip Reeves reports that it's now a prominent emblem of the devastation there.

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Race
2:45 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

Tough Talks Involved In Growing Up Biracial, As Remembered By Son And Dad

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 12:28 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
4:34 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

Could A 2-Year-Old Boy Be 'Patient Zero' For The Ebola Outbreak?

A scientist tests a patient's blood for Ebola at the European Mobile Laboratory in Gueckedou, Guinea. The first cases reported in the outbreak occurred in a small village about eight miles outside Gueckedou.
Misha Hussain Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 5:53 pm

Back in early December, a little boy in southern Guinea caught a mysterious disease. He had a fever, was vomiting and had blood in his stool.

The boy died a few days later. Before he did, he passed the disease to his 3-year-old sister, his mother, his grandmother and a midwife. The latter was eventually hospitalized in Gueckedou, a nearby city of 200,000 people.

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Guilty And Charged
3:56 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

In Ferguson, Court Fines And Fees Fuel Anger

People line up to take part in an amnesty program to clear up outstanding misdemeanor arrest warrants in August 2013, in Ferguson, Mo. For those living on the economic margins, the consequences of even a minor criminal violation can lead to a spiral of debt, unpaid obligations, unemployment and even arrest.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 5:53 pm

To understand some of the distrust of police that has fueled protests in Ferguson, Mo., consider this: In 2013, the municipal court in Ferguson — a city of 21,135 people — issued 32,975 arrest warrants for nonviolent offenses, mostly driving violations.

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NPR Ed
3:39 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

Turnitin And The Debate Over Anti-Plagiarism Software

LA Johnson/ NPR

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 5:53 pm

Students are heading back to campus. And when they finish writing that first paper of the year, a growing number will have to do something their parents never did: run their work through anti-plagiarism software.

One company behind it is called Turnitin. And the database it uses to screen for potential plagiarism is big. Really, really big.

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Middle East
3:00 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

In Hostage Negotiation, Qatar Plays Middleman To Prove Its Worth

Originally published on Tue August 26, 2014 5:57 am

The small, gas-rich Arabian Gulf nation of Qatar played a key role in freeing U.S. hostage Peter Theo Curtis after nearly two years in Syria. For context on the release, Robert Siegel speaks with Shadi Hamid, of the Brookings Institution was based in Doha for four years. He's the author of Temptations Of Power: Islamists and Illiberal Democracy In A New Middle East.

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Around the Nation
2:45 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

Between A Town And Its Bears, A Star-Crossed Relationship

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 5:53 pm

Most people in the town of Old Forge, N.Y., want to refrain from feeding black bears. The trouble is, without the bears coming around as often as they do, North Country Public Radio's Natasha Haverty reports that the town could stand to lose a lot of its tourism.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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All Tech Considered
2:42 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

Some Call For More Sharing In Ridesharing

Lyft driver Danielle Kerley showcases the company's iconic mustache, which is displayed on cars used in the service.
Aarti Shahani NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 8:43 am

Taxicabs are fighting tooth and nail against Uber, the company that enables car owners to drive part time or full time for pay, like cabbies.

But behind this battle, there's another one brewing inside the world of ridesharing. Uber and its competitors in San Francisco are sparring over cash, over drivers, and over some basic values, too.

But a researcher says branding the startups Uber and Lyft as ridesharing services isn't quite accurate. Now, an emerging set of services promises to be more about sharing.

Chauffeur Vs. Your Friend With A Car

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Digital Life
4:27 pm
Sun August 24, 2014

For The First Time, Real Tattoos Make Their Madden Debut

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick is the only player in the newest edition of the Madden NFL video game franchise to have his signature tattoos faithfully rendered in the game.
EA Sports

Originally published on Sun August 24, 2014 5:13 pm

The NFL season is looming, and with it comes the new version of the Madden NFL video game — a franchise that has sold more than 100 million copies over the last 25 years.

Each year, Madden gets more and more realistic. "The NFL superstars definitely look like their real life counterparts would," says Samit Sarkar, a reporter for the gaming website Polygon.

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Sports
4:18 pm
Sun August 24, 2014

Bob Motley, Last Surviving Negro League Ump, Recalls Baseball History

Bob Motley, 91, seen here in an undated photo, is the last surviving Negro League umpire.
Motley Family Collection

Originally published on Sun August 24, 2014 5:18 pm

Bob Motley, a 91-year-old from Kansas City, Mo., has lived through remarkable times in our history.

His story is one of a black man in love with baseball. Racial integration didn't come to the major leagues until 1947, when Jackie Robinson broke the color line at first base for the Brooklyn Dodgers.

But it was another 19 years before a black man, Emmett Ashford, appeared behind home plate. In the interim, black umpires called balls and strikes in the Negro League.

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Television
3:24 pm
Sun August 24, 2014

Viewer Beware: Watching Reality TV Can Impact Real-Life Behavior

MTV's Jersey Shore starred, from left, Vinny Guadagnino, Angelina Pivarnick, Paul "DJ Pauly D" DelVecchio, Jenni "JWOWW" Farley, Ronnie Magro, Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi, Mike "The Situation" Sorrentino and Sammi "Sweetheart" Giancola.
MTV AP

Originally published on Sun August 24, 2014 5:13 pm

In the pilot episode of Jersey Shore, we're introduced in the first minute to the "new family": Snooki, JWoww, Vinny and the rest of the gang.

A few minutes later, Snooki has already questioned JWoww's sexual morals. Vinny is calling Snooki stupid. The new family is already getting gossipy and aggressive.

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U.S.
3:01 pm
Sun August 24, 2014

Powerful Earthquake Rattles Northern California

Originally published on Sun August 24, 2014 5:13 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Africa
3:01 pm
Sun August 24, 2014

With Confirmed Cases In Congo, Ebola Now In 4 West African Nations

Originally published on Sun August 24, 2014 6:53 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
3:01 pm
Sun August 24, 2014

American Journalist Freed After Nearly Two Years In Captivity

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 11:22 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

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Economy
3:01 pm
Sun August 24, 2014

Despite Economic Recovery, Millions Of Workers Stuck In Part-Time Jobs

Originally published on Sun August 24, 2014 5:13 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

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