All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm to 7pm and Weekends 4pm to 5pm

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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News
3:29 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Amid The Chaos In Ferguson, Another Police Shooting

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Middle East
3:29 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Blocked At The Border, Gaza Man's Hopes Of Escape Fade

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
3:22 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Doctors Without Borders: What We Need To Contain Ebola

Dr. Joanne Liu (left), international president of Doctors Without Borders poses with a member of the MSF medical team at the organization's Ebola treatment center in Kailahun, Sierra Leone.
P.K. Lee Courtesy of Doctors Without Border

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:51 pm

With the continuous uptick in the number of cases and deaths in the current Ebola outbreak, the few agencies that are on ground are stretched thin.

That includes Doctors Without Borders, also known as MSF. It's one of the main health care providers in West Africa, where there are more than 2,000 cases of Ebola and 1,200 deaths. Even with roughly 1,000 volunteers spread among the three Ebola-stricken countries, the agency says that still isn't enough.

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Goats and Soda
3:17 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Ebola In The Skies? How The Virus Made It To West Africa

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:37 pm

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the most explosive in history. One reason the virus spread so fast is that West Africa was blindsided. Ebola had never erupted in people anywhere close to West Africa before.

The type of Ebola causing the outbreak — called Zaire — is the deadliest strain. Until this year, it had been seen only in Central Africa, about 2,500 miles away. That's about the distance between Boston and San Francisco.

So how did it spread across this giant swath of land without anybody noticing?

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Ferguson Teachers Use Day Off As Opportunity For A Civics Lesson

Teachers with the Jennings School District pick up trash Tuesday on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Mo., the scene of nightly police clashes. Jennings and the neighboring Ferguson school district have canceled class due to ongoing unrest.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:30 pm

Chaos and unrest overnight have kept the National Guard in the suburban town of Ferguson, Mo., for a second day, and the local school district has canceled classes for the week. After two nights of violent clashes this week, neighboring Jennings School District is out of class, too.

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The Salt
2:21 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Specialty Food And Agriculture Startups Are Ripening In Greece

Ilias Smirlis (left) runs a small family farm in Kalamata, Greece. Before he met entrepreneur Sotiris Lymperopoulos, who runs the food service Radiki, he struggled to sell his produce outside Athens. "The demand for excellent products will always exist," Smirlis says. "The challenge is to find a market."
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Most mornings, Sotiris Lymperopoulos walks the craggy shoreline of the western Peloponnese, foraging for salty wild greens.

In his straw hat and shorts, snipping wild chicory, garlic and sea asparagus with a kitchen knife, he hardly looks like a poster boy for Greece's nascent startup culture. But the 35-year-old Athenian, who trained as an economist, found a viable niche in the country's post-crisis economy.

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A Closer Look At Sexual Assaults On Campus
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

As Kids Head To Campus, Parents Broach The Subject Of Sexual Assault

Onaja Waki (left) is about to start college in California, but she and her mother, Oneida Cordova, have been talking openly for years about the dangers of sexual assault.
Teresa Chin Youth Radio

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 3:16 pm

Rachel Swinehart has commandeered her family's living room in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. It's filled with large plastic tubs containing stuff like pink bedding and a coffee maker.

Rachel, 18, is about to head off to Shenandoah College, a small arts school in Virginia, where she'll study harp performance. In many ways, organizing her stuff is the easy part. Talking about the risks of college life — that's a bit harder.

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Latin America
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Once An Object Of Reverence, Brazilian Soccer's A Punchline

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

It's been over a month since the World Cup ended in Brazil, but the shame of the country's blowout loss remains. Once, Brazilians were welcomed in other countries with talk of Brazil's soccer dominance; now, everyone merely speaks of their historic defeat against Germany.

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All Tech Considered
3:21 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

How Long Do CDs Last? It Depends, But Definitely Not Forever

Many institutions have their archives stored on CDs — but the discs aren't as stable as once thought. There is no average life span for a CD, says preservationist Michele Youket, "because there is no average disc."
Sarah Tilotta NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:27 am

Back in the 1990s, historical societies, museums and symphonies across the country began transferring all kinds of information onto what was thought to be a very durable medium: the compact disc.

Now, preservationists are worried that a lot of key information stored on CDs — from sound recordings to public records — is going to disappear. Some of those little silver discs are degrading, and researchers at the Library of Congress are trying to figure out why.

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Environment
3:15 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

One Year After Calif. Rim Fire, Debate Simmers Over Forest Recovery

Maria Benech of the U.S. Forest Service surveys a severely burned patch of forest. Almost 40 percent of the burned area looks similar.
Lauren Sommer KQED

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 5:40 pm

Eric Knapp breaks apart a burned pine cone, looking for seeds — in his line of work this is considered a clue.

"Going into an area after a fire, you almost feel like CSI, you know, sleuthing," Knapp says.

He is standing in a part of the Stanislaus National Forest that was severely burned by the Rim Fire. Knapp, an ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service, is studying how forests recover.

"It's completely dead," he says. "These trees won't be coming back to life."

A lot of the forest was charred like this.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:14 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Met Opera Tentatively Settles With 2 Major Unions

The Metropolitan Opera has settled labor contracts with two of its largest unions.
Jonathan Ticler Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 4:32 pm

A labor crisis threatening to shut down New York's Metropolitan Opera — the largest opera house in the world — appears to have been averted. Two of the major unions announced a tentative settlement this morning. While agreements with 10 additional unions need to be reached by Tuesday night, this represents a major turning point in a bitter dispute.

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Music Reviews
2:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Album Review: 'The Voyager'

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 4:18 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Men In America
2:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

The Soldier's Guiding Paradox: 'Protect What You Love'

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 4:43 pm

Writer Elliot Ackerman, former Marine officer and veteran of five deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan, explains what being a man means to him: It's protecting what you love. Unfortunately, that notion is often at odds with the job of a soldier.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Iraq
2:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

The Man Behind The Islamic State

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 4:18 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
3:03 pm
Sun August 17, 2014

Fighting Escalates In Eastern Ukraine As Key Cities Contested

Originally published on Sun August 17, 2014 9:13 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
3:03 pm
Sun August 17, 2014

In St. Louis Area, A Short Distance Can Make A Big Difference

Originally published on Sun August 17, 2014 4:24 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

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Iraq
3:03 pm
Sun August 17, 2014

Yazidi Community In America Watches Events In Iraq With Horror

Lincoln, Neb., is home to a sizable community of Iraqi Yazidis — including Ismaeil Khalaf, shown here in his home watching the latest news about the Yazidi crisis in Iraq. Lincoln Yazidis petitioned for U.S. intervention to prevent the genocide of their friends and family.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Sun August 17, 2014 4:24 pm

For the past week, American warplanes and drones have been attacking militants from the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, in the Sinjar region of northern Iraq. The U.S. is working to prevent the genocide of an ethnic and religious minority known as the Yazidis.

A sizable group of Iraqi Yazidis lives in Lincoln, Neb. Sulaiman Murad is among them; he grew up in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, which has been at the heart of recent Islamic State violence. Murad translated for the U.S. military after the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and he moved to Lincoln in 2010.

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Around the Nation
3:03 pm
Sun August 17, 2014

Massive, Pricey Casino Fails After Two Years Of Operation

Originally published on Sun August 17, 2014 4:24 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

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All Tech Considered
3:41 pm
Sat August 16, 2014

A Night At The Museum ... With Robots

A robot, controlled from afar, moves in for a closer look.
Alexey Moskvin Tate Britain

Originally published on Sat August 16, 2014 5:36 pm

There are four robots roaming around the Tate Britain museum in London. Since Wednesday night, they've been roving the halls after hours, streaming video to the world as part of the After Dark project.

As the robots move through the museum, their little lights illuminate hundreds of statues and paintings — works of historic and contemporary British art — spread over roughly 20 rooms.

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Around the Nation
3:12 pm
Sat August 16, 2014

Sen. McCaskill On Ferguson: 'We're Going To Get All The Facts'

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Photography
3:09 pm
Sat August 16, 2014

In Work Of Ferguson Photographer, Snapshots Of Chaos

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
3:58 pm
Fri August 15, 2014

Even With $100 Million, WHO Says It Will Take Months To Control Ebola

A health worker cleans his hands with chlorinated water before entering an Ebola screening tent at the Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone. More than 300 Sierra Leoneans have died of the disease.
Michael Duff AP

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 7:50 pm

When public health officials warn that it's likely to take many months to bring the Ebola outbreak in West Africa under control, it's not because they're facing a single huge challenge.

"If there was just one solid, large chunk we could slice out, we would," says WHO spokeswoman Nyka Alexander, at the agency's regional coordination center in Conakry, Guinea. "But it's so many little things that add up to the outbreak."

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Politics
3:14 pm
Fri August 15, 2014

Left And Right Unite In Criticizing Ferguson Police Response

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon speaks during a news conference in St. Louis. Nixon ordered the Missouri State Highway Patrol to take over the supervision of security in Ferguson.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 7:50 pm

The police response to this week's protests in Ferguson, Mo., has been criticized on both sides of the aisle as heavy-handed.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon — a two-term Democrat — ordered an overnight change in police tactics. He brought in state troopers, who walked side-by-side with demonstrators.

"This is a place where people work, go to school, raise their families and go to church. A diverse community. A Missouri community. But lately it's looked more like a war zone, and that's unacceptable," he said at a press conference Thursday.

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Law
2:57 pm
Fri August 15, 2014

Ferguson Officer's Motives In Police Shooting Remain Murky

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 6:02 pm

New information was released Friday about the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager in Ferguson, Mo. The police chief finally released the name of the officer who shot Michael Brown and an incident report listing Brown as a suspect in a recent convenience store robbery. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is promising a full investigation.

Sports
2:09 pm
Fri August 15, 2014

Baseball Owners Call Up Commissioner Bud Selig's Relief

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 6:02 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
2:09 pm
Fri August 15, 2014

Russian Military Vehicles Reportedly Move Into Ukraine

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 6:02 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
2:09 pm
Fri August 15, 2014

Massive Neighborhood Rehab Gives Detroiters A Much-Needed Boost

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 6:02 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Shots - Health News
3:58 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

A Virtual Outbreak Offers Hints Of Ebola's Future

Kenyan health officials take the temperatures of passengers arriving at the Nairobi airport on Thursday. Kenya has no reported cases of Ebola, but it's a transportation hub and so is on alert.
Simon Maina AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 6:07 pm

While the Ebola outbreak continues to rage in West Africa, it is also unfolding — in a virtual sense — inside the computers of researchers who study the dynamics of epidemics.

Policymakers look to these simulations to get a sense of how the outbreak might spread. They also can use them to run experiments to see which public health measures should take priority.

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Music Interviews
3:58 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

In 10 Songs, A Pair Of Brothers Beat Tracks Across History

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 4:35 pm

Ethan Johns' sophomore album, The Reckoning, follows the tale of two brothers as they travel across the 1850s American frontier. Johns developed the idea for the epic 19th century journey while traveling himself. Listen to Johns' story, and his music, at the audio link above, check out a hand-picked playlist of his favorite songs on Spotify.

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Around the Nation
3:14 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

Once-Dilapidated City Train Stations Enjoying A Renaissance

Denver's Union Station, which was remodeled to include restaurants, stores and a hotel, reopened last month.
Gary C. Caskey UPI/Landov

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 9:49 am

With its new restaurants and stores, Denver's recently reopened Union Station is bustling now. But five years ago, it would have been empty.

"If you would have come down here on a Saturday, there would have been no one in here," says Walter Isenberg, who runs Sage Hospitality, one of the main architects of Union Station's resurgence. "It would have been this vacant, desolate hall. Ceilings were peeling, kind of in some major disrepair."

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