All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm to 7pm and Weekends 4pm to 5pm

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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World
3:19 pm
Sat April 25, 2015

Solving Crimes With Pollen, One Grain Of Evidence At A Time

Dallas Mildenhall, New Zealand's forensic pollen expert, peers at samples through a microscope.
Courtesy of David Wolman

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 4:23 pm

Some murder cases are harder to solve than others. The investigation into the killing of Mellory Manning — a 27-year-old woman who was assaulted and murdered in 2008 while working as a prostitute in Christchurch, New Zealand — confounded police.

They conducted an investigation and interviewed hundreds of people, but months later, they still had no solid leads.

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World
3:10 pm
Sat April 25, 2015

Turkey's Armenian Artists Honor Their Community's Past

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 4:23 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Music
3:10 pm
Sat April 25, 2015

Beauty Pill's 'Steven and Tiwonge' Is And Isn't A Protest Song

Chad Clark of Beauty Pill wrote "Steven and Tiwonge" around how the two characters viewed a single object of affection.
Jon Pack Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 4:23 pm

On Sunday's All Things Considered, you'll hear Beauty Pill's amazing story of how close Chad Clark came to dying before a single note of Beauty Pill Describes Things As They Are could be recorded.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Parallels
3:24 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Clearing The Tangled Path For Land Ownership In The West Bank

One of the first homes going up on land bought and sold as part of a Canadian-Palestinian investment firm's effort to properly register plots. Much land in the West Bank is not registered and has no title deed, creating problems for economic development.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 4:55 pm

High on a West Bank hilltop, the extended Dissi family gathered on a recent weekend for a day out in the Palestinian countryside.

Aunts, uncles and cousins came to see the half-built weekend home of Taysier Dissi, an electrician and father of three. The concrete-block shell, with windows set and stairs roughed in, is placed just right for the view.

This will be the family's getaway from their home in the cramped confines of Jerusalem's often tense Old City. Dissi paid about $30,000 for one-third of an acre here, bought from a Palestinian-Canadian company, UCI.

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Africa
3:22 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Lawless Libya: The Jumping Off Point For Migrants Heading To Europe

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 4:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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U.S.
3:22 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

What's That Smell? The Beautiful Tree That's Causing Quite A Stink

Callery pear trees in Pittsburgh. The smell of the invasive trees has been compared to rotting fish and other stinky things.
Luke H. Gordon Flickr

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 8:33 pm

It's springtime in Pittsburgh, and throughout the city, Callery pear trees are sprouting beautiful, white blossoms.

But that's just the problem. Simply put, these trees stink.

"This whole place smells like dead fish," says Sheila Titus. "I mean everywhere. Everywhere you see one of these trees with the white on them."

Titus has lived in her home in the now-hip neighborhood of Lawrenceville for 49 years. Two decades ago, her grandson and his 7th grade class planted a row of Callery pears across the street from her house.

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Movie Interviews
2:24 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Marfa's Mexican-Americans Remember 'Giant' And Southwest Segregation

The 1956 film Giant was nominated for 10 Academy Awards and won a Best Director Oscar for George Stevens. Above, James Dean sits on set with Robert Marquez, left, and Joe Vasquez of Marfa, Texas.
Richard C. Miller, 1955

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 12:15 am

In 1956, the film Giant (based on the 1952 novel by Edna Ferber) took a piercing look at the Texas myth. It traced the rise of power from cattle ranchers to oil barons and examined the tensions between whites and Latinos. The film was nominated for 10 Academy Awards and won a best director Oscar for George Stevens.

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Health
2:24 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

HIV Outbreak In Indiana Grows With Nearly 140 Confirmed Cases

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 4:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
2:24 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Keith Murdoch, Father Of Media Baron, Disclosed Disaster At Gallipoli

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 4:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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All Tech Considered
3:44 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

Biometrics May Ditch The Password, But Not The Hackers

Biometrics are increasingly replacing the password for user identification.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 5:03 pm

Passwords get hacked — a lot. In an effort to move beyond passwords, big companies are embracing biometric technology: the use of fingerprints, iris scans or voice recognition for user identification.

To heighten security, smartphones are being outfitted with biometric features. But, ditching passwords for biometrics may not make the hackers go away.

Selfie Security

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Space
3:44 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

'That's What Hubble Can See': A Tribute To The Space Telescope

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 5:29 pm

NPR has this tribute to the Hubble Space Telescope — a parody of Iggy Azalea's "Trouble."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
3:44 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

Lawmakers Urge Boehner To Act On Obama's Use Of Force Request

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 5:03 pm

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Animals
2:46 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

Return Of Horses A Sign Of Spring On Michigan Island

Every spring, hundreds of horses are ferried from their winter hiatus in the Upper Peninsula for a good grooming and harness fitting, before beginning their summer jobs pulling carriages.
Amy Robinson WCMU

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 9:00 am

Spring has a lot of faces around the country, like the cherry blossoms in Washington, D.C., and the sap run in Vermont. On one Michigan island, it's horses that are the harbinger of the season.

Mackinac Island draws a million visitors a year for its scenery, fudge and horses. Cars aren't allowed on the island, and every spring, hundreds of horses are ferried from their winter hiatus in the Upper Peninsula for a good grooming and harness fitting, before beginning their summer jobs pulling carriages.

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Planet Money
2:46 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

'We Built A Robot That Types': The Man Behind Computerized Stock Trading

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 5:03 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
2:46 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

Award-Winning Poets Write For Passersby In New York

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 5:03 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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In New York City, commuters traveling near ground zero today were greeted by an unusual sound - typewriters. And tapping away on them - poets writing verse on demand. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang stopped by to see some of them at work in lower Manhattan.

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The Salt
4:47 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Buzz Over Bee Health: New Pesticide Studies Rev Up Controversy

A honeybee forages for nectar and pollen from an oilseed rape flower.
Albin Andersson/Nature

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 9:58 am

It has been about a decade since beekeepers and scientists began documenting a decline in honeybee populations and other important pollinators.

Even if you're not a lover of bees or honey, you should know that bees are critically important to our food supply. They help pollinate billions of dollars of crops each year, from apples and carrots to blueberries and almonds.

So if bees are threatened, ultimately, the production of these crops will be threatened, too.

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Music Interviews
4:41 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

The Nearly Lost Story Of Cambodian Rock 'N' Roll

Cambodian band Baksei Cham Krong.
Mol Kamach Courtesy of Argot Pictures

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:25 pm

The tragic story of Cambodia in the '60s and '70s is well-known: It became engulfed in the Vietnam War, then more than a million Cambodians died under the Khmer Rouge regime. Doctors, lawyers, teachers — educated people — were targeted in the communist takeover. So were artists and singers.

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Remembrances
3:47 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Julian Koenig, Well-Known Adman, Named Earth Day

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 5:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Environment
3:31 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

White House Climate Change Policy Faces Legal Hurdle

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 5:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World
3:31 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Yemen Crisis Creates Even Tougher Challenge For U.S. In Middle East

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 5:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Where does Washington figure in all of this? Well, we're going to ask Nicholas Burns. He's professor of the practice of diplomacy and international politics at Harvard's Kennedy School. Welcome to the program once again.

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Business
2:31 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Comcast, Time Warner Push For Merger Approval Amid Opposition

Federal regulators are considering whether to approve the proposed $45 billion merger of Comcast and Time Warner Cable.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 6:17 am

Officials of Comcast and Time Warner Cable met Wednesday with federal regulators to discuss the companies' proposed $45 billion merger. The deal would create a single company that would control large parts of the cable TV and broadband Internet markets.

A published report said recently that Justice Department staff members have decided to oppose the deal on antitrust grounds. But company officials are using a lot of firepower to get the deal approved.

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Performing Arts
2:31 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Actors' Equity Implements $9 Minimum Wage For LA's Small Theaters

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 5:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
2:31 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

California Senate Committee Approves Bill Removing Vaccine Exemptions

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 5:59 pm

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The Salt
4:33 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

At Last: Kentucky Authorities Bust Ring Behind Great Bourbon Heist

Pappy Van Winkle bourbons at Bourbons Bistro in Louisville, Ky. The spirit was pricey even before a heist at the distillery.
Noah Adams/for NPR

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 10:56 am

Finally, the great Kentucky bourbon mystery has been solved.

Back in 2013, more than 200 bottles of aging Pappy Van Winkle bourbon vanished from a locked, secure area of the Buffalo Trace distillery in Frankfort, Ky. Even before the heist, the bottles were rare — some fetched as much as $1,000 in private sales.

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Law
4:25 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Too Often, Some Say, Volunteer Officers Just Want To Play Cop

Robert Bates (left), a Tulsa County, Okla., reserve deputy, leaves his arraignment Tuesday with his attorney. Bates fatally shot a suspect who was pinned down by officers, raising alarms about volunteer police officers who wear badges and carry guns.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 8:58 am

Bob Ball is a real estate investor in Portland, Ore., but that's just his day job. For the past 20 years, he has also been a volunteer cop.

"When I was new, it was the best time of my life. I got to go out there and wear a white hat and help people and make a difference in my community, one little piece at a time," Ball says. "That's a very, very fulfilling thing to do."

This is real police work. On one occasion, Ball had to pull his gun on a guy threatening a woman with a knife.

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NPR Ed
3:16 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Teaching Students To Hear The Music In The Built World

Architecture professor Diana Agrest evaluates her students' work during a class critique at Cooper Union in New York.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:31 am

What makes a great teacher great? That's the question at the heart of 50 Great Teachers, from the NPR Ed Team.

Diana Agrest believes architecture is so much more than a marriage of form and function. For more than four decades, she's been trying to get her students to believe that too.

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The Salt
3:16 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Millions Of Chickens To Be Killed As Bird Flu Outbreak Puzzles Industry

Chickens stand in their cages at a farm near Stuart, Iowa, in 2009. This week, bird flu hit a large poultry facility in Iowa. It's not clear how the virus is evading the industry's biosecurity efforts.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 11:08 am

Bird flu has been striking chicken and turkey farms in parts of the West and Midwest. This past week, it hit a flock of millions egg-laying chickens in northeastern Iowa. Update 4/22/2015: The USDA now says that around 3 million birds were affected in the Iowa facility — down from a previous estimate of 5 million.

Our original post continues below.

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Sports
3:16 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

MLB To Debut 'Statcast' Tracking Technology Tonight

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 4:25 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
4:29 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

At 50 Years Old, The Challenge To Keep Up With Moore's Law

Intel Corp. co-founder Gordon Moore holds up a silicon wafer at Intel headquarters in Santa Clara, Calif., in 2005. Moore's prediction 50 years ago, called Moore's Law, has been the basis for the digital revolution.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 7:40 pm

Fifty years ago this week, a chemist in what is now Silicon Valley published a paper that set the groundwork for the digital revolution.

You may never have heard of Moore's law, but it has a lot do with why you will pay about the same price for your next computer, smartphone or tablet, even though it will be faster and have better screen resolution than the last one.

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Shots - Health News
3:35 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Federal Panel Revisits Contested Recommendation On Mammograms

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 3:29 pm

In 2009, I was among the scrum of reporters covering the controversial advice from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that women in their 40s think twice about regular mammograms. The task force pointed out that the net benefits in younger women were small and said women should weigh the pros and cons of screening before making a decision.

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