All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm to 7pm and Weekends 4pm to 5pm

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a3ace1c8428d5e1222b4|5182a3a6e1c8428d5e122298

Pages

Animals
4:25 pm
Tue August 4, 2015

At This Summer Camp, Some Of The Best Friends Are Marine Mammals

Campers at the Pacific Marine Mammal Center in Laguna Beach, Calif., learn how to care for sick and injured marine mammals β€” from cleaning an animal covered with oil to rescuing a stranded baby sea lion. Stuffed toy seals are stand-ins.
Gloria Hillard for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 8:49 pm

Summer camp typically brings to mind s'mores, campfires and the beach, but for some kids in Southern California, it's all about marine mammals. Day camp at the Pacific Marine Mammal Center in Laguna Beach teaches children to care for the sick and stranded baby sea lions and elephant seals. (Check out the center's live poolside webcam.)

"It's sad that they have to come in, but it's good that they're coming in to get rehabilitated," says camper Jameson Ibe, 11.

Read more
The Salt
3:51 pm
Tue August 4, 2015

Judge Strikes Down Idaho 'Ag-Gag' Law, Raising Questions For Other States

Laws in Montana, Utah, North Dakota, Missouri, Kansas, Iowa and North Carolina have also made it illegal for activists to smuggle cameras into industrial animal operations.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 6:25 pm

Idaho's so-called "ag-gag" law, which outlawed undercover investigations of farming operations, is no more. A judge in the federal District Court for Idaho decided Monday that it was unconstitutional, citing First Amendment protections for free speech.

But what about the handful of other states with similar laws on the books?

Read more
Business
3:39 pm
Tue August 4, 2015

The Soy Car Seat: Are Companies Doing Enough For The Environment?

A worker at Ford's assembly plant in Wayne, Mich., installs back seats made from soy-based foam in a Ford C-Max.
Jason Margolis NPR

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 6:02 pm

It's earnings season on Wall Street, and investors are again looking to quarterly reports to gauge the health of companies. Some environmentalists are looking to so-called "sustainability reports" β€” how companies are improving their ecological footprints. But not all environmentalists are putting so much stock in these reports.

Andrew Hoffman, at the University of Michigan, breaks environmentalists into two colors, or rather shades of a color. First, the perspective of the "dark greens":

Read more
Book News & Features
2:29 pm
Tue August 4, 2015

These Books Amp Up The Adrenaline In Summer Reading

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 6:02 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Around the Nation
2:29 pm
Tue August 4, 2015

Drought Drives California Fires To Unprecedented Speeds

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 9:41 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And we turn now to Mark Ghilarducci. He's director of the California Governor's Office of Emergency Services, and he joins us from the State Emergency Operations Center just outside Sacramento.

Welcome to the program.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:29 pm
Tue August 4, 2015

'All You Can Do Is Pray': Wildfire Rages In Northern California

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 9:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Predictions of a catastrophic wildfire season are turning out to be right. There are nearly two-dozen large fires burning in California fed by shrubs and trees that are bone-dry from years of drought.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Energy
2:27 pm
Tue August 4, 2015

For Some States, New Emissions Rules Will Force A Power Shift

President Obama's environmental plan won't be so hard for states that have moved to cut emissions. But for others it will be more difficult.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 6:02 pm

Almost as soon as it was unveiled, opponents were lining up to oppose President Obama's new plan to limit carbon emissions. The new rules would require states to lower their carbon emissions by nearly a third over the next decade and a half.

The rules will deal a big blow to some energy sectors β€” especially coal. But there are also industries that will benefit from the plan.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:30 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Could Your Child's Picky Eating Be A Sign Of Depression?

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 8:52 am

One of the frequent trials of parenthood is dealing with a picky eater. About 20 percent of children ages 2 to 6 have such a narrow idea of what they want to eat that it can make mealtime a battleground.

A study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics shows that, in extreme cases, picky eating can be associated with deeper trouble, such as depression or social anxiety.

Read more
NPR Story
3:29 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

From The Eye Of The Hurricane To Near Oblivion: Katrina's Forgotten Town

Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina made landfall near Pearlington, Miss., a tiny town on the border with Louisiana. A home currently under construction there adheres to new FEMA standards for elevation.
David Schaper NPR

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 8:52 am

When Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast 10 years ago, the eye of the storm made landfall near a tiny speck of a town at the mouth of the Pearl River on the Louisiana border with Mississippi.

To say Katrina β€” one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in U.S. history β€” nearly wiped Pearlington, Miss., off the map isn't entirely true. The fact is, Pearlington was so small that it wasn't even on many maps.

Read more
The Salt
3:29 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

Not only did the family trade their urban life for one in a beautiful valley surrounded by mountains and trees, but they also earn $300,000 a year.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 8:52 am

Kim Pil-Gi left his construction job in Seoul, South Korea, three months ago. Now he happily spends his days handling grubs: squirming, writhing, beetle larvae, each one about as thick as a grown man's thumb. He sits at a tray, sorting them by size.

"At the construction company a lot of the time I'd wake up at 6 in the morning and work all night through to the next day," he says. "That was really hard for me."

Read more
Author Interviews
4:04 pm
Sun August 2, 2015

'Kids Love To Be Scared': Louis Sachar On Balancing Fun And Fear

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 4:37 pm

Louis Sachar knows a few things about writing for kids. His first book, Sideways Stories From Wayside School, came out in 1978 β€” and the wacky collection is still in print.

His 1999 Newbery Medal winner, Holes, centers on a boy wrongly confined to a juvenile detention facility. It's mysterious and creepy, and it's still flying off the shelves.

So if he says kids will love a scary eco-bioterror-mystery-thriller-comedy, you just might trust him.

Read more
Remembrances
3:26 pm
Sun August 2, 2015

Remembering 'Rowdy' Roddy Piper, The Wrestler So Tough, He Wore A Kilt

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 4:37 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Now let's take moment to remember one of the icons of pro wrestling.

(SOUNDBITE OF WRESTLING MATCH ANNOUNCEMENT)

Read more
Law
3:23 pm
Sun August 2, 2015

Acquitted Of Extreme Corruption, Former Officers Now Sue For Defamation

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 9:16 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more
Food
3:20 pm
Sun August 2, 2015

Confronting A Shortage Of Eggs, Bakers Get Creative With Replacements

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 4:37 pm

Eggs are becoming more expensive and scarce recently because so many chickens have died from avian flu. So bakers, in particular, are looking for cheaper ingredients that can work just as well. (This story previously aired on All Things Considered on July 22, 2015.)

Author Interviews
5:21 pm
Sat August 1, 2015

Aviator Beryl Markham Soars Again In 'Paris Wife' Author's New Book

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 11:31 am

Beryl Markham was the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic from East to West. The British-born Kenyan woman was also a racehorse trainer, a writer and a fearless adventurer.

Once famous as an aviation pioneer, she's largely dropped out of the public consciousness. But novelist Paula McLain has put her back in the spotlight β€” as the protagonist of her new novel, Circling the Sun.

Read more
Law
4:18 pm
Sat August 1, 2015

A Lawyer's Advice For Black Men At Traffic Stops: 'Comply Now, Contest Later'

Demonstrators hold up a placard of a man with his hands up during the "Justice For All" march in Washington, DC last December. Numerous protests have brought attention to police violence against people of color. One lawyer, while emphasizing that police are responsible for behaving professionally, also wants to give black men advice on how to survive encounters with police.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 4:55 pm

It's been nearly a year since a police officer shot and killed Michael Brown, an unarmed African-American 18-year-old, in Ferguson, Mo. Since then, more deadly police encounters across the country have prompted anger, activism and reform.

Many of those incidents began with traffic stops β€” routine events that quickly turned deadly. And attorney Eric Broyles says that the risks for citizens are not distributed evenly.

Read more
My Big Break
3:15 pm
Sat August 1, 2015

Reggie Watts, Man Of Many Voices, Improvised His Way To Success

Reggie Watts calls his form of entertainment "disinformationist." He disorients his audience, sometimes talking non-sense and switching seamlessly between accents β€” all improvised on the spot.
Kyle Christy

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 4:55 pm

As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Read more
Books
3:10 pm
Sat August 1, 2015

A Look Back On 'Middle Passage': The Evolution Of A Literary Classic

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 4:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more
Book News & Features
3:10 pm
Sat August 1, 2015

76 Years Later, Lost F. Scott Fitzgerald Story Sees The Light Of Day

F. Scott Fitzgerald's story "Temperature" β€” which was found as an unpublished manuscript β€” appears in the new issue of The Strand Magazine.
AP

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 4:55 pm

Andrew Gulli has an unusual passion: finding unpublished short stories by famous American authors. He searches through libraries and archives, finds works, researches to confirm they've never been published β€” then publishes them in the literary magazine he edits, The Strand.

Read more
Law
4:37 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

Juvenile Justice System Failing Native Americans, Studies Show

Sgt. Barbara Johnson and Corrections Lt. Robbin Preston run the Tuba City Juvenile Detention Center on the Navajo Nation.
Laurel Morales NPR

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 5:53 pm

State courts are twice as likely to incarcerate Native teens for minor crimes such as truancy and alcohol use than any other racial and ethnic group, according to the Tribal Law and Policy Institute. And juvenile detention facilities around the country have a disproportionately high number of Native American youth, according to an Indian Law and Order Commission report.

Read more
Goats and Soda
4:37 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

Ebola Vaccine Hailed As 'Game Changer' In Fight Against The Virus

A woman receives the rVSV-ZEBOV Ebola vaccine at a clinical trial in Conakry, Guinea. The vaccine appears effective after only one shot.
Cellou Binani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 5:53 pm

Doctors Without Borders is calling it a "champagne moment." The World Health Organization says it's a "game changer."

In a small trial, an experimental vaccine protected 100 percent of participants who were at high risk for the virus. Although the results are preliminary, they offer new hope of finally stamping out the virus in West Africa β€” and preventing the next epidemic.

Read more
Environment
4:37 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

As Beijing Prepares To Host Winter Olympics, Where Will It Get The Snow?

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 5:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Music Interviews
3:24 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

What Does It Mean To Be A Child Prodigy In Jazz?

Joey Alexander, 12, recently released his debut album.
Rebecca Meek Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 5:53 pm

What do Mozart, Herbie Hancock and Michael Jackson have in common? For one, their musical talent was discovered early β€” they were all considered child prodigies.

Read more
NPR Ed
2:42 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

The Plan To Give Pell Grants To Prisoners

Education Secretary Arne Duncan (second from left) speaks with inmate Terrell Johnson, a participant in the Goucher College Prison Education Partnership.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 5:53 pm

Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Attorney General Loretta Lynch made a rare joint appearance on Friday β€” in prison.

They visited a state-run facility in Jessup, Md., to announce a new plan meant to help some of the 700,000 inmates who are released each year.

It's a pilot program to give prisoners access to federal Pell Grants that would pay for college classes behind bars.

"The cost-benefit of this does not take a math genius to figure out," Duncan said. "We lock folks up here, $35-40,000 every single year. A Pell Grant is less than $6,000 each year."

Read more
Europe
2:36 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

As Migrants Attempt Trip To The U.K., Many Who Make It Are Minors

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 5:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Sports
2:28 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

International Olympic Committee Chooses Beijing For 2022 Winter Games

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 5:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

China's capital, Beijing, became the first city in the world to be chosen to host both the summer and winter Olympic Games. It beat out a bid from Kazakhstan. NPR's Anthony Kuhn has the reaction from Beijing.

Read more
Planet Money
2:28 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

Letting Go Of The Wheel: How Google Is Easing People Into Self-Driving Cars

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 5:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Law
2:28 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

Justice Report Accuses St. Louis County Family Court Of Racial Bias

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 5:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
U.S.
3:59 pm
Thu July 30, 2015

Many Colleges Have Armed Police Squads, But Are They Worth The Risk?

On Wednesday, Hamilton County prosecutor Joe Deters announced murder and manslaughter charges against University of Cincinnati police Officer Ray Tensing for the traffic stop shooting death of motorist Samuel DuBose. During the press conference, Deters said that "being police officers shouldn't be the role of this university."
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 7:20 am

American college campuses are increasingly patrolled by armed police officers β€” and it's a trend that burst into public view Wednesday, when a University of Cincinnati officer was charged with murder in the shooting death of a black motorist during a traffic stop. But this arming of college cops is causing some worries.

When prosecutor Joe Deters announced the indictment of University of Cincinnati Officer Ray Tensing on Wednesday, he had harsh words about the officer's competence, saying he should never have been a cop.

Read more
Parallels
3:59 pm
Thu July 30, 2015

Amid Political Dysfunction, Beirut Residents Suffer The Stench Of Garbage

A Lebanese woman covers her nose as she walks past piles of garbage on a Beirut street.
Hassan Ammar AP

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 6:04 pm

Beirut is usually one of the pleasanter places in the Middle East β€” a bright, cosmopolitan city squeezed between the Mediterranean Sea and a green ridge of mountains. But for the past two weeks or so, the stench from mounds of festering garbage has filled its gaudy streets.

"The trash is climbing up, the mountain is getting higher and higher," says one immaculately dressed, middle-aged woman with a perfect bouffant, wrinkling her nose. She wouldn't give her name because she criticizes powerful people β€” Lebanon's politicians, whom she holds responsible for the garbage crisis.

Read more

Pages