All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm to 7pm and Weekends 4pm to 5pm

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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National Security
6:30 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

U.S. Reveals Failed Special Forces Mission To Rescue Hostages

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 7:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Men In America
3:58 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

From A Father And Son, What It Means To Be A Military Man

Mark Pierce enlisted in the military in 1970, served in Vietnam and retired in 2010. Years later, his two sons also joined the armed forces.
Courtesy of Mark Pierce

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:35 pm

Military service once defined the lives of many men in the United States, particularly before the end of the draft in 1973. But today, many younger adults have no direct family ties to the military at all.

For the men in Mark and Jeremy Pierce's family, however, military service is a tradition dating back to the Civil War.

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Book Reviews
3:58 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

'F' Is For Fraudster In A Family Novel For Our Modern Times

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:30 pm

A father takes his three sons to a hypnotist's show. Called onto the stage, the father's cool self-possession and confidence seem to prevail, and he walks away, claiming no effect. They leave the show, he drops his sons off and drives away. We learn later that he has taken his passport and emptied the family bank account. The boys will not see him again until they are adults.

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The Salt
3:58 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

No. 1 Most Expensive Coffee Comes From Elephant's No. 2

Elephants, unlike humans or civets, are herbivores. The fermentation happening in their gut as they break down cellulose helps remove the bitterness in the coffee beans.
Michael Sullivan NPR

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:30 pm

I s#&% you not: The world's most expensive coffee is now being produced in Thailand's Golden Triangle, a region better known for another high-priced, if illegal, export: opium.

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Health
3:20 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

The Momentum Of The Ice Bucket Challenge — And What It Means For ALS

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:30 pm

A recent fundraising challenge has gone viral on social media, calling attention to research into Lou Gehrig's disease. Audie Cornish talks with Forbes contributor Dan Diamond about the state of that research and where it goes from here after the fundraising success.

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The Two-Way
3:04 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

Many Seek Justice In Ferguson, Mo., But Will Have To Wait Awhile

A memorial sits at the site of Michael Brown's death in Ferguson, Mo. Any investigation into his shooting by a police officer is likely to take months.
Larry W. Smith EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:30 pm

Both the county case and the federal investigation into the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown are expected to take time, as are basic answers about the circumstances that led to the black teenager's death Aug. 9.

About two dozen people showed up Wednesday in front of the St. Louis County Courthouse to demonstrate against County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch, who is preparing to present evidence in the case to a grand jury.

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Parallels
2:17 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

In Syria, The U.S. Weighs A Range Of Unpalatable Options

Forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar Assad walk along a street in Mleiha, near the Damascus airport, during a tour organized by the Syrian government on Aug. 15.
Omar Sanadiki Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:35 pm

President Obama said Wednesday that the Islamic State is a cancer that threatens all governments in the Middle East. But that raises the question of what the U.S. could or should do.

Two former U.S. ambassadors to Syria, Robert Ford and Ryan Crocker, have advocated different approaches to a conflict where there are many different options. But none is appealing and there's no guarantee, or even a likelihood that U.S. action would ultimately determine the outcome.

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Around the Nation
2:13 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

EPA Wades Into Water Fight With Farmers

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:30 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Remembrances
2:13 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

Yogi Iyengar, Who Helped Bring Yoga To The West, Dies At 95

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:30 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

News
3:29 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Amid The Chaos In Ferguson, Another Police Shooting

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Middle East
3:29 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Blocked At The Border, Gaza Man's Hopes Of Escape Fade

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
3:22 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Doctors Without Borders: What We Need To Contain Ebola

Dr. Joanne Liu (left), international president of Doctors Without Borders poses with a member of the MSF medical team at the organization's Ebola treatment center in Kailahun, Sierra Leone.
P.K. Lee Courtesy of Doctors Without Border

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:51 pm

With the continuous uptick in the number of cases and deaths in the current Ebola outbreak, the few agencies that are on ground are stretched thin.

That includes Doctors Without Borders, also known as MSF. It's one of the main health care providers in West Africa, where there are more than 2,000 cases of Ebola and 1,200 deaths. Even with roughly 1,000 volunteers spread among the three Ebola-stricken countries, the agency says that still isn't enough.

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Goats and Soda
3:17 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Ebola In The Skies? How The Virus Made It To West Africa

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:37 pm

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the most explosive in history. One reason the virus spread so fast is that West Africa was blindsided. Ebola had never erupted in people anywhere close to West Africa before.

The type of Ebola causing the outbreak — called Zaire — is the deadliest strain. Until this year, it had been seen only in Central Africa, about 2,500 miles away. That's about the distance between Boston and San Francisco.

So how did it spread across this giant swath of land without anybody noticing?

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Ferguson Teachers Use Day Off As Opportunity For A Civics Lesson

Teachers with the Jennings School District pick up trash Tuesday on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Mo., the scene of nightly police clashes. Jennings and the neighboring Ferguson school district have canceled class due to ongoing unrest.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:30 pm

Chaos and unrest overnight have kept the National Guard in the suburban town of Ferguson, Mo., for a second day, and the local school district has canceled classes for the week. After two nights of violent clashes this week, neighboring Jennings School District is out of class, too.

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The Salt
2:21 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Specialty Food And Agriculture Startups Are Ripening In Greece

Ilias Smirlis (left) runs a small family farm in Kalamata, Greece. Before he met entrepreneur Sotiris Lymperopoulos, who runs the food service Radiki, he struggled to sell his produce outside Athens. "The demand for excellent products will always exist," Smirlis says. "The challenge is to find a market."
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Most mornings, Sotiris Lymperopoulos walks the craggy shoreline of the western Peloponnese, foraging for salty wild greens.

In his straw hat and shorts, snipping wild chicory, garlic and sea asparagus with a kitchen knife, he hardly looks like a poster boy for Greece's nascent startup culture. But the 35-year-old Athenian, who trained as an economist, found a viable niche in the country's post-crisis economy.

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A Closer Look At Sexual Assaults On Campus
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

As Kids Head To Campus, Parents Broach The Subject Of Sexual Assault

Onaja Waki (left) is about to start college in California, but she and her mother, Oneida Cordova, have been talking openly for years about the dangers of sexual assault.
Teresa Chin Youth Radio

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Rachel Swinehart has commandeered her family's living room in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. It's filled with large plastic tubs containing stuff like pink bedding and a coffee maker.

Rachel, 18, is about to head off to Shenandoah College, a small arts school in Virginia, where she'll study harp performance. In many ways, organizing her stuff is the easy part. Talking about the risks of college life — that's a bit harder.

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Latin America
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Once An Object Of Reverence, Brazilian Soccer's A Punchline

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

It's been over a month since the World Cup ended in Brazil, but the shame of the country's blowout loss remains. Once, Brazilians were welcomed in other countries with talk of Brazil's soccer dominance; now, everyone merely speaks of their historic defeat against Germany.

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All Tech Considered
3:21 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

How Long Do CDs Last? It Depends, But Definitely Not Forever

Many institutions have their archives stored on CDs — but the discs aren't as stable as once thought. There is no average life span for a CD, says preservationist Michele Youket, "because there is no average disc."
Sarah Tilotta NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:27 am

Back in the 1990s, historical societies, museums and symphonies across the country began transferring all kinds of information onto what was thought to be a very durable medium: the compact disc.

Now, preservationists are worried that a lot of key information stored on CDs — from sound recordings to public records — is going to disappear. Some of those little silver discs are degrading, and researchers at the Library of Congress are trying to figure out why.

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Environment
3:15 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

One Year After Calif. Rim Fire, Debate Simmers Over Forest Recovery

Maria Benech of the U.S. Forest Service surveys a severely burned patch of forest. Almost 40 percent of the burned area looks similar.
Lauren Sommer KQED

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 5:40 pm

Eric Knapp breaks apart a burned pine cone, looking for seeds — in his line of work this is considered a clue.

"Going into an area after a fire, you almost feel like CSI, you know, sleuthing," Knapp says.

He is standing in a part of the Stanislaus National Forest that was severely burned by the Rim Fire. Knapp, an ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service, is studying how forests recover.

"It's completely dead," he says. "These trees won't be coming back to life."

A lot of the forest was charred like this.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:14 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Met Opera Tentatively Settles With 2 Major Unions

The Metropolitan Opera has settled labor contracts with two of its largest unions.
Jonathan Ticler Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 4:32 pm

A labor crisis threatening to shut down New York's Metropolitan Opera — the largest opera house in the world — appears to have been averted. Two of the major unions announced a tentative settlement this morning. While agreements with 10 additional unions need to be reached by Tuesday night, this represents a major turning point in a bitter dispute.

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Music Reviews
2:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Album Review: 'The Voyager'

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 4:18 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Men In America
2:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

The Soldier's Guiding Paradox: 'Protect What You Love'

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 4:43 pm

Writer Elliot Ackerman, former Marine officer and veteran of five deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan, explains what being a man means to him: It's protecting what you love. Unfortunately, that notion is often at odds with the job of a soldier.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Iraq
2:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

The Man Behind The Islamic State

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 4:18 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Iraq
3:03 pm
Sun August 17, 2014

Yazidi Community In America Watches Events In Iraq With Horror

Lincoln, Neb., is home to a sizable community of Iraqi Yazidis — including Ismaeil Khalaf, shown here in his home watching the latest news about the Yazidi crisis in Iraq. Lincoln Yazidis petitioned for U.S. intervention to prevent the genocide of their friends and family.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Sun August 17, 2014 4:24 pm

For the past week, American warplanes and drones have been attacking militants from the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, in the Sinjar region of northern Iraq. The U.S. is working to prevent the genocide of an ethnic and religious minority known as the Yazidis.

A sizable group of Iraqi Yazidis lives in Lincoln, Neb. Sulaiman Murad is among them; he grew up in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, which has been at the heart of recent Islamic State violence. Murad translated for the U.S. military after the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and he moved to Lincoln in 2010.

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Around the Nation
3:03 pm
Sun August 17, 2014

Massive, Pricey Casino Fails After Two Years Of Operation

Originally published on Sun August 17, 2014 4:24 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Europe
3:03 pm
Sun August 17, 2014

Fighting Escalates In Eastern Ukraine As Key Cities Contested

Originally published on Sun August 17, 2014 9:13 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
3:03 pm
Sun August 17, 2014

In St. Louis Area, A Short Distance Can Make A Big Difference

Originally published on Sun August 17, 2014 4:24 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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All Tech Considered
3:41 pm
Sat August 16, 2014

A Night At The Museum ... With Robots

A robot, controlled from afar, moves in for a closer look.
Alexey Moskvin Tate Britain

Originally published on Sat August 16, 2014 5:36 pm

There are four robots roaming around the Tate Britain museum in London. Since Wednesday night, they've been roving the halls after hours, streaming video to the world as part of the After Dark project.

As the robots move through the museum, their little lights illuminate hundreds of statues and paintings — works of historic and contemporary British art — spread over roughly 20 rooms.

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Around the Nation
3:12 pm
Sat August 16, 2014

Sen. McCaskill On Ferguson: 'We're Going To Get All The Facts'

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Photography
3:09 pm
Sat August 16, 2014

In Work Of Ferguson Photographer, Snapshots Of Chaos

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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