Here & Now

Weekdays, noon to 2pm

NPR's midday news magazine.  

Genre: 

Pages

NPR Story
2:36 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Kentucky Driver Stranded 19 Hours With No End In Sight

Seth Slifer tweeted this photo with the note, "It's been 15 hours now and we haven't moved. It's a wonderful start to my vacation, and I should've brought a buddy." (Seth Slifer/Twitter)

In Kentucky, hundreds of people have been stranded in their cars and trucks since last night because of a storm that dumped over 20 inches in parts of the state. The stranded drivers are primarily on I-65 and I-24.

Seth Slifer from Franklyn, Tenn., is among those stranded on I-65. He spoke with Here & Now’s Robin Young by cellphone about the scene and how he’s holding up.

Read more
NPR Story
2:36 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

4 Recipes For Beet Lovers

(chrisandjenni/Flickr)

Growing up, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst hated beets. But now she’s become a beet convert, using them in salads and even beet hummus. Kathy shares recipes for her favorite beet dishes with hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson.

Read more
NPR Story
2:36 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Philadelphia Police Commissioner On Policing And Ferguson

Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey (right) listens while U.S. President Barack Obama makes a statement to the press, after meeting with members of his Task Force on 21st Century Policing, March 2, 2015 in Washington, D.C. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

After months of anticipation, the United States Justice Department has released a scathing report on the Ferguson Police Department, following the death last year of a young unarmed black man by a white police officer.

The report comes just a few days after the White House Task Force on 21st Century Policing presented guidelines for law enforcement across the country.

Read more
NPR Story
1:46 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Mobile Gaming Prepares To Overtake Traditional Video Games

Mobile phone app designer Fung Kam-keung, CEO and founder of Awesapp Limited, plays on a smartphone with one of his latest app game called 'Yellow Umbrella' at the Awesapp Limited office in Hong Kong on October 23, 2014. (Nicholas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 1:49 pm

Mobile games – the apps you download onto your phone or tablet – used to be a bit of an afterthought in the gaming industry, behind the bigger console and computer markets.

But mobile games are growing fast, and are reaching millions of users who don’t consider themselves gamers.

The mobile gaming industry held its annual awards dinner last night, and the game Monument Valley took the Grand Prix.

Read more
NPR Story
1:17 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

70 Years After Hitler's Death, Germany To Republish 'Mein Kampf'

One of two rare copies of "Mein Kampf," signed by the young Nazi leader Adolf Hitler and due for auction, are pictured in Los Angeles, California on February 25, 2014. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

Adolf Hitler’s manifesto “Mein Kampf” is a rambling, hate-filled, disjointed and sometimes unintelligible blueprint for the Third Reich. When a new annotated edition of the book is published in Germany in January 2016, it will mark the first time in almost 70 years that the text will be found in German bookstores.

After the war, the occupying allies banned the book, and the rights passed to Hitler’s home state of Bavaria. But the copyright expires at the end of the year, and all 16 German states have agreed that the book can be re-released, as long as it contains annotations.

Read more
NPR Story
1:17 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Smarter Robots In The Works

CoBot, short for Collaborative Robot, is designed to be an office helper. The bots, made by a team at Carnegie Mellon University led by professor Manuela Veloso, can navigate around a building on their own. They are also smart enough to know when to ask humans for help, such as to press buttons and open doors. (cs.cmu.edu)

Having robot office helpers could be pretty handy. But today’s machines are nowhere close to the smart, free-roaming robots you see in movies. Right now, robots couldn’t get around a building without tripping on chairs or getting stuck behind doors.

From Here & Now’s tech partner IEEE Spectrum, Prachi Patel reports on a new bot that will work better in human environments.

Read more
NPR Story
12:43 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

What Makes Or Breaks A TV Remake?

David Tenant (right) and Olivia Colman (left) star in the popular drama 'Broadchurch.' (Broadchurch/Facebook)

British television’s crime drama “Broadchurch,” about a young boy’s murder in a seaside town, has been an absolute success, and returns tomorrow for a second season.

Meanwhile, the American remake of the same show, “Gracepoint” was a flop and Fox canceled it after just one season.

Read more
NPR Story
12:43 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Speeding Up The Game Of Baseball

Juan Perez #2, Gregor Blanco #7 and Hunter Pence #8 of the San Francisco Giants celebrate after defeating the Washington Nationals on October 4, 2014. The game was the longest of the 2014 season, ending in the 18 innings. (Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

Major League Baseball’s spring training games are underway in Florida and Arizona – and clocks are ticking. After last season’s average game lasted a record 3 hours and 2 minutes, the push is on to speed things up.

Doug Tribou of NPR’s Only A Game joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to explain how the league plans to do that, and how the players are reacting.

Read more
NPR Story
12:43 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Supreme Court To Hear Challenge To Health Care Subsidies

Oral arguments begin tomorrow in a closely watched Supreme Court case that could dismantle the Affordable Care Act and eliminate health insurance for more than eight million Americans. (Susan Walsh/AP)

Oral arguments begin tomorrow in a closely watched Supreme Court case that could dismantle the Affordable Care Act and eliminate health insurance for more than eight million Americans.

The case centers on one phrase in the law – “established by the State.”

The four plaintiffs in King V. Burwell, funded by conservative groups including Competitive Enterprise Institute, argue that “the State” refers solely to the 16 states that have set up their own exchanges, not the federal government, which established exchanges in 34 states.

Read more
NPR Story
1:12 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Warren Buffett's Letter To Shareholders Only Hints At Successor

Billionaire investor Warren Buffett speaks at an event called, "Detroit Homecoming" September 18, 2014 in Detroit, Michigan. (Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)

There’s long been speculation about who will take the reins as CEO of Berkshire Hathaway when Warren Buffett steps down.

This weekend, that speculation continued as Buffett repeated that he had identified his successor. His vice chair Charlie Munger, in a separate letter, named two Berkshire employees – Ajit Jain and Greg Abel – as among those likely to get the job.

Read more
NPR Story
1:12 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Iraq Launches Offensive Against ISIS

This image posted on a militant website on Saturday, June 14, 2014, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, appears to show militants from the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant leading away captured Iraqi soldiers dressed in plain clothes after taking over a base in Tikrit, Iraq. (AP Photo via militant website)

Backed by allied Shiite and Sunni fighters, Iraqi security forces today began a large-scale military operation to recapture Saddam Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit from the extremist group that calls itself the Islamic State.

The offensive is seen as a major step in a campaign to reclaim a large swath of territory in northern Iraq controlled by ISIS.

Read more
NPR Story
1:12 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Revisiting The Pre-WWII Chinese Nightclubs With Author Lisa See

A promotional playbill from the Forbidden City nightclub, which was in business from the late 1930s to the late 1950s. (Wikimedia Commons)

Last year, Chinese American author Lisa See spoke with us about her latest book, “China Dolls.” The book tells the story of popular Chinese nightclubs in San Francisco in the late 1930s.

With the release of the paperback edition of the novel this week, we revisit Here & Now host Robin Young’s conversation with Lisa See.

Read more
NPR Story
1:24 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

After Red Carpet Controversy, A Look At The History Of Dreadlocks

Actress Zendaya attends the 87th Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood & Highland Center on February 22, 2015 in Hollywood, California. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

On Sunday’s glamorous Academy Awards red carpet, Disney star Zendaya Coleman decided to shake things up and wear dreadlocks extensions with her Oscar gown.

The following day when the E! network’s Fashion Police aired, the show’s co-host Giuliana Rancic commented that the 18-year-old woman looked like she smelled of “patchouli oil” or “weed.”

Read more
NPR Story
12:58 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Young Singers Beat The Odds To Sing With National Honor Choir

Fifth graders (from left) Claire Thompson, Sophia Porreca and Tamilyn Lechuga all attend Kunsmiller Creative Arts Academy. (Courtesy Denver Public Schools)

Tonight and tomorrow, 1,200 students from across the country will perform with the National Children’s Honor Choir in Salt Lake City.

It’s one of the most prestigious junior choruses in the country. Among them will be three students from a school in southwest Denver, where more than three-quarters of the kids qualify for free or reduced lunch.

Read more
NPR Story
12:58 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

'Star Trek' Star Leonard Nimoy Dies At 83

Actor Leonard Nimoy arrives at the premiere of Paramount Pictures' 'Star Trek Into Darkness' at the Dolby Theatre on May 14, 2013 in Hollywood, California. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 1:36 pm

Leonard Nimoy, known around the world as Spock on “Star Trek,” died this morning at age 83. Nimoy, of course, was more than just Spock. He was a poet, a photographer and a musician. But he touched a chord as the brainy, unflappably logical, half-human half-Vulcan Spock.

Read more
NPR Story
12:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

For A Glimpse At A GOP Presidential Hopeful, Head To CPAC

Volunteers walk by a stand at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at National Harbor, Maryland, outside Washington, D.C. on February 26, 2015. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 2:03 pm

The Conservative Political Action Conference, known as CPAC, usually attracts the country’s most die-hard conservative activists. This year it’s also attracting nearly a dozen – depending on how you count – Republican presidential hopefuls for 2016.

NPR’s Don Gonyea is there and joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about who’s at CPAC to show off their stuff, and how they might try to win hearts and minds.

Read more
NPR Story
12:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

That Political Bumper Sticker Could Cost You Your Job

(kenudigit/Flickr)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 8:17 am

‘Tis the season to speculate who’s going to run for president, who will make it through the primary, who will ultimately end up in Oval Office.

But before you slap a bumper sticker on your car, or hang a political cartoon at work, you might want to think twice. Because it turns out that either of those could get you fired. And in most states in the country, labor laws will not protect you.

While federal law bars employers from firing workers for race, religion or gender, there is no protection for freedom of political speech or action.

Read more
NPR Story
12:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Remote Mexican Villages Build Their Own Cell Networks

Peter Bloom of Rhizomatica meets with the authorities in Tlahuitoltepec Mixe, Oaxaca. Rhizomatica is a non-profit group in Oaxaca city that has helped 16 remote villages install and operate their own cell phone networks. (rhizomatica.org)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 1:17 pm

Cellphones are just about everywhere these days. But in remote, rural places the key ingredient – a cell network – is often missing. In the U.S., long-distance users pay a surcharge into the Universal Service Fund, which the government uses to pay network operators to provide affordable phone access in rural or low-income areas.

Read more
NPR Story
12:57 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Senate Dems Agree To GOP Plan To Fund Homeland Department

Senate Democrats on Wednesday signed onto a Republican plan to fund the Homeland Security Department without the immigration provisions opposed by President Barack Obama. The announcement by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid put the Senate on track to pass the bill as a partial agency shutdown looms Friday at midnight.

The House’s response was uncertain. Earlier Wednesday, House Republicans reacted tepidly at best to the plan from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who proposed decoupling the issue of DHS funding from immigration.

Read more
NPR Story
12:57 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Will Elizabeth Warren's Populist Message Shape 2016?

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks during a hearing before Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee February 10, 2015 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 4:51 pm

Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren is an unusual rookie politician. The freshman senator has a seat at the leadership table and a loudspeaker many veteran politicians would envy. Her fans are hoping she’ll run for president in 2016, but Warren insists she’s not. So what is Senator Warren’s emerging role in the Democratic Party? From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Asma Khalid of WBUR reports.

Read more
NPR Story
12:57 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Refinery Strike Continues Into Fourth Week

Members of the United Steelworkers Union and other supporting unions picket outside the BP refinery on February 10, 2015 in Whiting, Indiana. Workers at the BP refinery walked off the job Sunday morning after failing to reach an agreement on a new contract. They join workers at other oil refineries and plants in the first nationwide refinery strike since 1980. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

A nationwide oil refinery strike continued this week and expanded to 15 plants. The United Steelworkers union organized the walkout, after the union’s contract with oil companies expired.

One of the latest refineries to be impacted is the Motiva Enterprises refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, the largest of its kind in the country. CNN’s Maggie Lake joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

Read more
NPR Story
12:38 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Uber's New Turf: Mid-Sized Cities

Des Moines, Iowa, is one of the mid-sized cities where Uber is expanding. (Ron Reiring/Wikimedia Commons)

The car-for-hire service Uber has been elbowing its way into big cities across the country, sparking controversies with taxis and regulators.

Last month, the San Francisco-based company raised $1.6 billion in financing, which it is using to fund international expansion.

Closer to home, the company is setting its sights on mid-sized cities, looking to expand its market into areas where taxi service is not as much a part of the culture.

Read more
NPR Story
12:38 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Revisiting Ransom Riggs' Latest 'Peculiar Children' Book

Ransom Riggs‘ novel “Hollow City” comes out in paperback today. It’s the second of his “Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children” series about children with supernatural powers.

Like its predecessor, “Hollow City” is based on vintage black and white photographs that Riggs finds and writes stories around.

Read more
NPR Story
12:38 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

19 Manatees Rescued From Storm Drain In Florida

Early this morning, 19 manatees were rescued from a drain pipe in Satellite Beach, Florida, south of Cape Canaveral. Florida has been experiencing colder than average temperatures, and the endangered animals were probably seeking warmer waters in the drainpipe.

Read more
NPR Story
12:42 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Redesigning Houston's METRO System Without Breaking The Bank

Maps of the existing Houston transit system (left) and the new plan (right). (transitsystemreimagining.com)

While parts of the nation saw serious failures in public transit in the last few weeks, Houston was busy approving a new transit project that would overhaul the entire METRO bus network without increasing operating costs.

The plan seeks to broaden the system, allowing riders to get to most areas of the city without relying on infrequent buses. But that comes with a trade-off: by cutting low-rider routes, some may be left without public transportation.

Read more
NPR Story
12:42 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

White House Pushes For Tougher Rules On Retirement Funds

Today, the Obama administration is expected to show its support of a Department of Labor proposal about Americans’ retirement savings.

The measure would require brokers to act in their client’s best interest, meaning that it would be harder for them to push people towards high-fee products and funds, but industry officials say it’s unnecessary and could be bad for investors.

Jill Schlesinger of CBS News joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the proposal and its implications.

Read more
NPR Story
12:42 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Oversight Of Home Caregivers Said To Be Lacking

Toni Giusto keeps a box within reach filled with the pens, paper and letters to keep her busy. (Heidi de Marco/KHN)

With the aging of the U.S. population, more elderly and disabled people than ever are receiving care in their own homes.

In California, the state pays for relatives and other caregivers for low-income residents. The program has a $7 billion budget and serves nearly half a million people.

But there’s concern that there’s not enough oversight to keep people safe. Anna Gorman of Kaiser Health News has the story.

Read more
NPR Story
2:25 pm
Fri February 20, 2015

Greece And Eurozone Creditors Reach Deal, Official Says

Greece and its European creditors have reached a deal over the country’s request to extend its bailout.

An official close to discussions, who spoke only on condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to comment publicly, says a deal was reached between the two sides at Friday’s meeting of finance ministers in Brussels.

The official said that, as part of the agreement, Greece could “present a first list of reform measures by Monday” for the country’s debt inspectors to assess.

Read more
NPR Story
2:25 pm
Fri February 20, 2015

A Mother's Battle Against Medical Errors

Alyssa Hemmelgarn reading a book. Alyssa died shortly after being diagnosed with leukemia. (Courtesy of Hemmelgarn family)

Hundreds of thousands of people in the U.S. die from medical errors every year. It is the third leading cause of death in the United States.

Carole Hemmelgarn is on a mission to help medical professionals avoid errors. She says the healthcare system failed her family and her daughter.

“I had a 9-year-old daughter, named Alyssa, and she was diagnosed with leukemia on a Monday and she died 10 days later,” said Hemmelgarn.

Read more
NPR Story
2:25 pm
Fri February 20, 2015

Home Sick? Try These Recipes

Kathy Gunst's avgolemono soup (Greek-style chicken-lemon-orzo soup) with Meyer lemon and dill is a delicious, soothing and healing winter soup. (Kathy Gunst)

What do you like to eat when you’re sick? Chicken soup? The comfort foods you grew up with? Something hot and spicy? Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst brings in some of her ideas, including her ginger tea, Greek lemon soup and her own chicken soup recipe.

Read more

Pages