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NPR Story
1:34 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

How Important Is Speaking Chinese For American Business?

Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg, left, speaks during a dialogue with students as a newly-appointed member to the advisory board for Tsinghua University School of Economics and Management in Beijing, China. (Tsinghua University via AP)

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg tried to appeal to a Chinese audience recently by speaking in Mandarin. Some audience members appreciated the gesture, others did not. Derek Thompson of The Atlantic spoke with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about how many business leaders are learning Chinese, and whether it can help a business.

Guest

  • Derek Thompson, business editor for The Atlantic. He tweets @DKThomp.
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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Aretha Franklin's New Album Further Proves She’s Queen Of Cover Songs

Aretha Franklin performing at the Ottawa Jazzfestl (Mike Bouchard/Flickr Creative Commons)

This week saw the release of “Aretha Franklin Sings the Diva Classics,” with Franklin singing songs made famous by Adele, Barbra Streisand and Etta James. Here & Now pop culture critic Renee Graham joins host Robin Young to take a listen to the album.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Parliament The Day After: A Canadian Lawmaker Describes The Ordeal

Canadian MP David McGuinty, who represents the Ottawa area, was among those who were in Parliament on lockdown until late yesterday evening. (Twitter)

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 2:39 pm

Canada’s Parliament is back to business today, less than 24 hours after a lone shooter killed a soldier at the country’s War Memorial, and was later killed by Parliament’s Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, inside a crowded hallway.

Members of Parliament broke into spontaneous applause that lasted minutes as Vickers entered the floor of the House of Commons. He held back tears as hundreds of MPs honored what many are calling heroic actions that saved many lives.

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Colorado Backs Away From Pot Edibles Ban

A baked food made of marijuana is seen at Perennial Holistic Wellness Center medical marijuana dispensary, which opened in 2006, on July 25, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

This week public health officials proposed banning all marijuana-infused edibles except for hard candy and liquid drops, but backed away from the idea after critics said it would violate the state’s voter-approved legalization of recreational marijuana, which took effect in January.

A working group has until next year to come up with ways to regulate the sale of edibles, which now constitutes up to 40 percent of the lucrative marijuana industry in Colorado.

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Hoping For Turnaround, Target Offers Free Shipping

Retail giant Target is offering free shipping and bolstering advertising in an attempt to bring in business over the holiday season, amid slowing sales, a troubled expansion in Canada and last year’s massive data breach.

CNN’s Maggie Lake joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to talk more about this business move and what it means for customers.

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

How Do You Judge A Secretary Of State?

Secretary of State John Kerry has a lot on his plate these days, including the fight against ISIS, Ebola, tensions with Russia and the possible nuclear deal with Iran.

He’s been traveling around the world, including a stop in Berlin today, to deal with these issues, just as past secretaries of state have done.

Is it too soon to judge his performance, and how does one even go about rating the success of a secretary of state?

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NPR Story
1:08 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

DJ Sessions: Vivaldi To Scarlatti

The London Symphony Orchestra performs during a rehearsal at the National Concert Hall in Taipei on March 6, 2014. d in Kaoshiung on March 7, 2014. AFP PHOTO / Mandy CHENG (Photo credit should read Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images)

For this week’s Here & Now DJ Sessions, Vic Di Geronimo, who hosts Classic Mornings on WILL Illinois Public Media in Urbana, Illinois, joins host Jeremy Hobson to talk classical music.

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NPR Story
1:08 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

The Case For A U.S. Surgeon General During Ebola Outbreak

In this Jan. 18, 2008 photo, former U.S. Surgeon General Richard Carmona speaks during a news conference in Austin, Texas. (Harry Cabluck/AP)

Two Dallas hospital nurses are still receiving treatment for Ebola after the contracted the virus while treating a patient who became infected with the disease while visiting Liberia.

The infected patients in the U.S. have caused national panic and last week, President Obama appointed Ron Klain as the “Ebola czar.” But the onset of panic and the nomination of a czar has brought attention to the fact that there is currently no U.S. surgeon general in office. While President Obama nominated Dr. Vivel Murthy to the office a year ago, he is still awaiting Senate confirmation.

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NPR Story
1:08 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

'Pee-Wee's Playhouse' Is Out On Blu-Ray

Actor Paul Reubens 'Pee-wee Herman' speaks onstage at the 10th Annual TV Land Awards at the Lexington Avenue Armory on April 14, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images)

Remember Pee-wee’s Playhouse? The show had a following among kids, teens and hip adults alike.

Now, a remastered version is coming out on Blu-Ray. But what exactly does it mean when a show like Pee-wee’s Playhouse – which was shot on film – is digitally remastered?

NPR’s TV critic Eric Deggans talks to Here & Nows Jeremy Hobson about the remastering of this cult classic and the history of the show.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Phillip Morris May Enter E-Cigarette Market

Most e-cigarettes use liquid nicotine, but tobacco giant Phillip Morris will release a smart e-cigarette, that uses heated tobacco. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Since electronic cigarettes were introduced in 2003, they have grown in popularity as an alternative to tobacco products. However, there may be new competition coming to the market as cigarette giant Phillip Morris’ patent for Heat Sticks, a smart e-cigarette that uses heated tobacco, has been approved.

Unlike other e-cigarettes that use liquid nicotine to create a tobacco-flavored vapor, Heat Sticks contain real tobacco that will heat up to a maximum of 660 degrees Fahrenheit, similar to a pipe.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Colorado Considers Another 'Personhood' Amendment

So-called “personhood” initiatives will be on the ballot in two states on Election day: Measure One in North Dakota and Amendment 67 in Colorado.

“Personhood” may be a familiar term to Colorado voters by now because they’ve rejected two such measures in recent elections.

Those previous two measures were designed to ban abortion, but supporters of Amendment 67 say that’s not their goal this time around.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Colorado Public Radio’s Megan Verlee explains.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Senate Tracker: South Dakota No Longer A Shoo-in For Republicans

Photograph of Republican senate candiate Mike Rounds. (roundsforsenate)

In this week’s installment of the Senate Tracker series, we turn to South Dakota, which had been considered safe for Republican candidate and former governor Mike Rounds.

However, after some controversy surrounding a visa program under his governorship, independent candidate Larry Pressler and Democrat Rick Weiland are gaining ground.

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NPR Story
12:45 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

E.O. Wilson On 'The Meaning Of Human Existence'

Naturalist E.O. Wilson, author of "The Meaning of Human Existence." (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Biologist and naturalist E.O. Wilson has written thirty books, won two Pulitzers, holds the title Professor Emeritus at Harvard and he is the world’s leading authority on ants.

Ants are featured in his new book, “The Meaning of Human Existence,” which has been longlisted for the National Book Award.

The book covers evolution, the coming of human consciousness, and humans’ ability to think about existence.

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NPR Story
12:45 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Stemming The Flow Of Central American Child Migrants

A police officer in Santa Ana, El Salvador teaches a group of sixth graders how to use computers as part of the GREAT program. (Jude Joffe-Block/KJZZ)

The once staggering number of Central American child migrants crossing the border has fallen dramatically in recent months.

But to discourage future migration flows, experts say the violence and poverty that helped trigger the exodus must be addressed.

In recent years, the U.S. spent $800 million on programs to address drug trafficking, gangs, and crime in Central America. And some of those programs are aimed specifically at helping young people.

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NPR Story
12:45 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

An End to Flight Restrictions In Dallas

A Southwest Airlines flight Boeing 737 flies over Bachman Lake near Dallas (brentdanley/Flickr)

Today is the first day that Dallas airline and aviation officials will not have to contend with the federal law known as the Wright amendment.

For 35 years, the law restricted flights out of Dallas’ Love Field Airport, as a way to protect a fledgling Dallas-Fort Worth airport.

But it was allowed to expire yesterday, after a compromise reached by Southwest, American Airlines, the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, and the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport.

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NPR Story
2:36 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

On Stage: Festival Seeks To Pass The Torch In Tango

A couple performing the Argentine tango at the Mesa Arts Center.(Garry Wilmore/Flickr)

On Friday we go “On Stage,” our look at what’s happening on the boards across the country.

This week, we go to New York City, where the Shall We Tango Festival is underway.

Polly Ferman, who is a touring pianist, created the festival.

She also created and directs the all-female tango group Glamour Tango.

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NPR Story
2:36 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

District Profile: A Cast Of Characters In Louisiana's Sixth

BATON ROUGE, LA - MARCH 17: Former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards, 86, announces his run for U.S. Congress at the Belle of Baton Rouge Hotel on March 17, 2014 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Edwards spent eight years in prision following a felony conviction arising from the licensing of riverboat casinos in his fourth term as Governor. (Photo by Sean Gardner/Getty Images)

In this week’s installment of our District Profile series, we turn to Louisiana’s Sixth congressional district where nine Republicans (including a dance instructor who calls herself the Sarah Palin of the South), three Democrats (including an ex-con) and one Libertarian will be on the ballot to fill the seat of Congressman Bill Cassidy, who is running for Senate.

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NPR Story
2:36 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Washington Post App: Reversing the Paper’s Problems?

Pictured is the Washington Post building on August 5, 2013. (Win McNamee/AFP/Getty Images)

In the past several years, The Washington Post has suffered serious financial troubles and a seeming inability to assert its place in the digital world.

But David Carr of The New York Times thinks that The Washington Post is headed back to its Watergate-reporting glory days. He says that Jeff Bezos, the Post’s new owner and founder and CEO of Amazon.com, is giving the paper the resources it needs to thrive.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

Airport Screenings To Begin For Ebola

The government plans to begin taking the temperatures of travelers from West Africa arriving at five U.S. airports as part of a stepped-up response to the Ebola epidemic.

Defense One tech editor Patrick Tucker tells Here & Now’s Robin Young that temperature screening and blood tests at airports are not an effective ways to stop people with Ebola from entering the U.S.

Tucker says the best method may be to do what we do stop terrorists from getting on a plane: background and contacts screening.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

A Witness To History In Atlanta

Marshall Slack has been a waiter at Paschal's for over forty years. He even waited on Martin Luther King, Jr. (Jeremy Hobson/Here & Now)

Paschal’s Restaurant in Atlanta is well-known as a political hangout.

Lore has it that Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights leaders organized marches at the tables of the original restaurant.

“You had a mixture here at Paschal’s of not only so called movement leaders, you had regular folk as well who could intermingle with these people,” William Boone, a professor at Clark Atlanta University, said.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

A Snapshot Of Monrovia As Ebola Takes Its Toll

MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 15: A Liberian health worker speaks with families in a classroom now used as Ebola isolation ward on August 15, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. People suspected of contracting the Ebola virus are being brought to the center, a closed primary school originally built by USAID, while larger facililities are being constructed to house the surging number of patients. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Officials at the Texas Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas say the first Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States, Thomas Eric Duncan, has died.

Duncan arrived in Dallas on Sept. 20 from Liberia and fell ill a few days later. He was sent home after an initial visit to the emergency room, but taken back to the hospital on Sept. 28 and has been kept in isolation ever since.

Officials say 10 people had direct contact with Duncan while he was contagious.

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NPR Story
2:23 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Senate Tracker: A Populist Democrat In Tennessee Threatens Incumbent

Gordon Ball (L) is challenging incumbent Lamar Alexander (R, no hat) in Tennessee. (Gordon Ball/Facebook; Lamar Alexander/Facebook)

In this week’s Senate Tracker, we turn to Tennessee, where Republican incumbent Lamar Alexander faces lawyer and Democrat Gordon Ball.

Bobby Allyn of WPLN, Nashville Public Radio, joins Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer to discuss the race.

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NPR Story
1:38 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Where Do Scientists Come From?

Where does scientific curiosity come from? Ari Daniel tries to find out. (Desirae/Flickr)

In science, a single question can be a powerful force.

It can open up an entire field of study. It can inhabit someone, shaping who they become. And it can jump inside other people, infusing them with a burning curiosity.

Recently, reporter Ari Daniel met someone captivated by these kinds of questions.

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NPR Story
1:38 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Explaining The Science Behind The Nobel Prize In Physics

A giant screen displays the images of (up, L to R) Japanese-born researchers Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamurawho received the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics on October 7, 2014 at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science in Stockholm, Sweden. (Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images)

Three scientists won this year’s Nobel prize in physics for work which led to the creation of LED light. Their breakthrough was in creating blue LEDs. Other researchers had produced red and green LEDS, but you need all three colors to make the bright white light emitted from LED light bulbs.

Two of the scientists are in Japan one is American Shuji Nakamura at the University of California Santa Barbara.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

Brighten Up Lunch With Kathy Gunst

A perfectly delicious lunch by Kathy Gunst: "green goddess" salad dressing, a thermos of soup, home made ginger ale and zucchini bread sandwich. (Qainat Khan/Here & Now)

Originally published on Fri October 3, 2014 3:46 pm

Running out of ideas for lunch? Here & Now Resident Chef Kathy Gunst joins Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young in the studio with tips and recipes — from soups and sandwiches to drinks — to brighten up the midday meal.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

District Profile: Two Republicans Face Off In Washington's Fourth

Dan Newhouse (L) and Clint Didier will face each other in Washington's fourth district, even though both are Republicans. (Weldon Wilson / Office of the Governor of Washington State; Clint Didier campaign)

In Washington’s fourth Congressional district, farmer Clint Didier will face state legislator Dan Newhouse in November.

Both are Republicans, but because of a quirk in Washington’s law, the two top vote-getters in the primary election run in the general election.

Northwest Public Radio‘s Rowan Moore Gerety joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the race.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

School Starts In Donetsk Amidst Shelling

The fighting between Ukrainian forces and the pro-Russian separatists who claim Donetsk as one of their strongholds delayed the start of the school year there.

However, as school was opening Wednesday morning, shells hit a school playground, killing at least ten people.

None of those who died were students because they had already gone inside the school building.

The BBC's James Coomarasamy, who was visiting another school at the time, reports.

Reporter

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Dean Of Boston Sports Journalism Celebrates 42 Years On The Job

Jonny Miller and Robin Young (Robin Young)

Originally published on Fri September 26, 2014 2:04 pm

One of the most-beloved sportscasters you’ve probably never heard of is Jonny Miller.

He’s covered professional sports in Boston for 42 years for CBS powerhouse, WBZ Radio.

He’s called the Helen Thomas of the local sports press corps, because he always gets to ask the first questions.

And he’s earned the respect of players and sports writers, because he does it all, while living with cerebral palsy.

Here & Now’s Robin Young profiles Miller and his long career.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Business Roundup: From Stocks To The Dollar

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on September 25, 2014 in New York City. US stocks saw their biggest downturn since July. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

U.S. stocks posted their biggest one-day drop since late July, amid concerns about global growth.

China is signaling it won’t undertake more aggressive stimulus measures and Europe’s economy is showing more signs of sluggishness.

Bloomberg News’ Michael Regan speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the shift.

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2:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

After Huge Debut, A Tough Week For Apple

In this photo taken on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014, people wait to buy the new Apple iPhone 6 and 6 Plus devices outside an Apple store in Hong Kong. The Apple's new devices were released on Friday in Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia and Japan. (Vincent Yu/AP)

It started out so well.

Thousands — no millions — of people lining up to buy the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus.

On Monday, Apple made an announcement: More than 10 million phones sold. A company record.

The new phones are bigger than previous generations; the 6 plus sports a 5 1/2 inch screen.

But that was part of the problem.

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