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NPR Story
1:12 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Jane Goodall Plants 'Seeds Of Hope'

Jane Goodall's new book "Seeds of Hope" is part memoir, part history of the plant world. (David Holloway)

Primatologist Jane Goodall is known for her groundbreaking work with the chimpanzees in Gombe National Park in Tanzania. But she also has a lifelong love of trees.

“To me, trees are living beings and they have their own sort of personalities,” she tells Here & Now’s Robin Young. “I’m not being scientific here, I’m just talking about the way it feels.”

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NPR Story
1:12 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

New Military Rules On Hair Create Controversy

This image provided by the U.S. Army shows new Army grooming regulations for females. The new regulations on how women may style their hair has drawn criticism from the Congressional Black Caucus and female African American soldiers. (U.S. Army/AP Photo)

There are now more than 17,000 signatures on a new White House petition, calling on the Obama administration to reconsider new Army regulations about hair and grooming.

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NPR Story
1:12 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

General Mills' New Privacy Policy Restricts Consumers' Right To Sue

If you download a coupon for a General Mills product like Reese's Puffs or Lucky Charms, or "like" a product on Facebook, you may be barred from suing company under General Mills' new privacy policy. (Mike Mozart/Flickr)

If you download a coupon for Cheerios or Cocoa Puffs, or “like” a General Mills product on Facebook, you may be barred from suing the company.

General Mills has changed its privacy policy. The policy’s new legal terms require consumers who interact with the company to use informal negotiation or arbitration rather than sue the company if they have a dispute.

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NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

ER Doctor Looks Back A Year After Marathon Bombing

A flag that says "Boston Medical Center Strong" waves outside of Boston Medical Center, a year after the Boston Marathon bombing. (Ron Medzon)

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 10:16 am

On this day a year ago, Bostonians got one of their first glimpses into the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing, when emergency room physician Ron Medzon came on our program.

“It was just one after another after another,” he said of the victims being brought into the hospital. “Every single person had a limb-threatening injury, a life-threatening injury. And I think 20 people came in over 40 minutes, which is just incredible.”

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NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Slow Start To Spring Housing Market

Usually as the weather heats up, so does the U.S. housing market. However, according to recent housing data, the market’s spring selling season is getting off to a slow start.

Despite expectations this past winter that warmer weather would rekindle growth, the market is seeing higher prices and mortgage rates, and a lack of houses for sale in some markets.

NPR Correspondent Chris Arnold discusses this slowdown with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

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NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

DJ Sessions: Blurring The Lines Between Rock, Jazz And Classical

Drummer David King, pianist Ethan Iverson and bassist Reid Anderson are the band The Bad Plus. (Jay Frahm)

In the latest installment of DJ Sessions, pianist Christopher O’Riley joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to talk about his favorite group that’s making waves in the classical community.

O’Riley says The Bad Plus is comprised of great composers. The jazz group is known for its famous covers of pop songs, like Black Sabbath’s “Iron Man.” But its latest album reinterprets Igor Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring.”

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Boston Marks First Anniversary Of Marathon Bombing

Flowers lie on the finish line of the Boston Marathon on the one year anniversary of the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing, on April 15, 2014 in Boston, Mass. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

A somber anniversary is being marked in Boston today. It’s the one-year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings.

The tribute is being held inside Boston’s Hynes Convention Center, just a few blocks from the marathon finish line where two bombs exploded on April 15, 2013.

Three people were killed and more than 260 people were injured, some losing limbs.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Deborah Becker of WBUR joins host Robin Young with details on the day’s events.

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

'Philomena' DVD Brings Real Philomena To New Audiences

Today, the DVD of the Oscar-nominated film “Philomena” is being released. One of the special features contained on the DVD is an interview with the real Philomena Lee. Her life story of being forced to give up her son for adoption and her long search for him inspired the film.

We spoke with Philomena and her daughter Jane Libberton, who helped Philomena with her search, back when the film was in theaters, and today we revisit that conversation.

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Talking Pot With Teens In Colorado

Adams City High in Commerce City, Colo., has about 2,000 students. During the 2010-2011 school year, 105 students were disciplined for drug or alcohol-related school offences. These students had almost twice as many unexcused absences, more than three times the number of days of school suspension, and almost a full grade point lower average GPA compared to students without drug/alcohol related offences. (Jenny Brundin/CPR)

When Colorado voters passed Amendment 64 back in November of 2012, they set in motion an effort that has focused on setting up a system for people to legally obtain recreational marijuana.

But there’s been less attention on how to keep pot away from those who aren’t supposed to use it — anyone under 21 years of age. Parents and educators are struggling to fill the void, with public health campaigns only in the planning stages.

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NPR Story
3:30 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

How To Start Conversations With Total Strangers

Rob Baedeker and Chris Colin are the authors of "What to Talk About: On a Plane, at a Cocktail Party, in a Tiny Elevator with Your Boss's Boss." (Ilana Diamond)

Have you ever gone up to an intriguing looking person at a party, tried to start a conversation and froze? Or perhaps you just babbled mundanely about the weather? Well, authors Chris Colin and Rob Baedeker can help.

Along with illustrator Tony Millionaire, they’ve published “What to Talk About: On a Plane, at a Cocktail Party, in a Tiny Elevator with Your Boss’s Boss” (excerpt below).

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NPR Story
3:30 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

'Blood Moon' Begins Series Of Lunar Eclipses

Path of the Moon through Earth's umbral and penumbral shadows during the Total Lunar Eclipse of April 15, 2014. (Fred Espenak via NASA.gov)

Stargazers are in for a treat if they’re willing to stay up late tonight. A rare lunar eclipse known as a blood-moon will begin tomorrow morning at about 2 a.m. Eastern time. The full eclipse will last from about 3 a.m. to 4:30 a.m.

Kelly Beatty, senior contributing editor for Sky & Telescope magazine joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain the phenomenon, which is part of a “tetrad,” and the best time to watch.

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NPR Story
3:30 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Development Forces Out Pronghorn Antelope

A housing subdivision, a golf course and roads are named after the antelope that have been squeezed out by development. (Laurel Morales/Fronteras Desk)

When we think of the American West, we picture wide open spaces. But roads, new homes and commercial buildings have cut across those spaces.

That development is having an impact on the pronghorn antelope, especially in one of the fastest-growing areas in the Southwest: Prescott Valley in northern Arizona.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Laurel Morales of Fronteras Desk reports.

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NPR Story
12:57 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Father-Son Team To Run One Last Boston Marathon

Rick and Dick Hoyt, Boston Marathon stalwarts since 1981, by the Hamilton Reservoir behind their home in Holland, Mass. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Later this month is the 118th running of the Boston Marathon, and this year’s race is especially significant because it’s the first time it’s being run since last year’s bombing at the finish line. Because of that attack, two people will be taking part in this year’s Boston Marathon who hadn’t intended to be there: Dick and Rick Hoyt.

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NPR Story
12:57 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Central African Republic Plagued By Ethnic Conflict As U.N. Pledges Help

A woman of the Pulaar ethnicity carries a baby on her back as she waits in line in the Begoua district, northeast of Bangui, to receive humanitarian and medical aid on April 9, 2014. (Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images)

As Rwanda commemorates the anniversary of the genocide there 20 years ago this week, its neighbor, the Central African Republic, continues to suffer brutal ethnic violence.

The United Nations Security Council voted unanimously yesterday to assemble a peacekeeping force to help stem the C.A.R. conflict.

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NPR Story
12:57 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

What's Behind The Auto Recall Surge?

Following GM and Toyota, BMW is the latest auto maker to issue a recall of thousands of its vehicles. (Ron Sombilon/Flickr)

BMW is the latest automaker to announce a car recall. Yesterday, the automaker announced it’s recalling 156,137 luxury cars and SUVs because of possible stalling issues.

This comes on the heels of Toyota’s recall announcement this week, and General Motors’ recent vehicle recall notices. There have been more than 11 million vehicle recalls so far this year, and it’s part of the rapid rise of recalls in the past five years.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Marking The 50th Anniversary Of The Civil Rights Act

This week, U.S. presidents are heading to Austin, Texas, to commemorate the 50-year anniversary of the the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Former presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush are all scheduled to speak in addition to President Obama at the Civil Rights Summit at the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

DJ Sessions: 'Vibey' And Melodic With Anthony Valadez

Brooklyn electro-soul duo Denitia and Sene are among the artists KCRW DJ Anthony Valadez introduces us to in the latest installment of Here & Now DJ Sessions. (Mats Bakken)

KCRW’s Anthony Valadez joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson for the latest installment of DJ Sessions.

From Brooklyn electro-soul duo Denitia and Sene to Toronto jazz trio BadBadNotGood, he brings us “vibey” and melodic sounds that might make you want to roll down your car window and drive.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Walmart Partners With Wild Oats To Sell Cheaper Organics

Wild Oats, a popular organic food brand in the 1980s, will soon be on the shelves in the grocery section of your local Walmart. Wild Oats products are projected to sell for 25 percent less than other national organic brands, and will likely bring about a huge shift in organics supply chain. (Bill Lile/Flickr)

Look out, Whole Foods. This month, Walmart will start offering a new line of organics about 25 percent cheaper than the national organic brands it already carries, and those sold by its competitors.

The giant retailer is partnering with Wild Oats to bring in a new line of organic products. Wild Oats was a popular health brand in the 1980s and was acquired by Whole Foods in 2007.

But the Federal Trade Commission challenged the purchase, saying it was concerned about loss of competition. Ultimately, Whole foods sold its holdings in Wild Oats in 2009.

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NPR Story
3:34 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Ukulele Sensation Jake Shimabukuro

Ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro performs in the Here & Now studios. (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 6:31 am

Jake Shimabukuro started playing ukulele at the age of 4 and soon fell in love with the instrument. As he tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson, ”My parents would have to take the ukulele away from me so that I would do things like my homework, eat dinner, or take a shower, you know I just loved it so much, every moment that I had free I wanted to strum the ukulele.”

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NPR Story
2:05 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

20 Injured In Stabbing At Pennsylvania High School

Nineteen students and a security guard were stabbed as the school day began today at Franklin Regional High School in Murrysville, Penn., outside of Pittsburgh. They are expected to survive.

Authorities say a student wielding two knives went on a rampage down one hallway in the school and was tackled by the school principal. The student is now in custody and being questioned.

Deanna Garcia of public radio station WESA in Pittsburgh joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with the latest.

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NPR Story
2:05 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

'Heartbleed' Security Flaw Exposes Millions Of Passwords

Experts have discovered a major flaw in the security software used by millions of websites. “Heartbleed,” as the vulnerability has been dubbed, is a bug that affects OpenSSL, a software that operates about two-thirds of all web servers.

OpenSSL is behind many sites that collect personal or financial information such as passwords, credit card info and emails. Although researchers discovered the coding error last week, the problem has been present for more than two years.

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NPR Story
2:46 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Debate Over 'Love Locks' On Paris Bridges

No one knows where this practice started, but hundreds of thousands of locks adorn bridges in Paris. (Carlo Occiena/Flickr)

“Love locks” can be found on bridges from Australia to Italy, and even in U.S. cities like Norfolk, Virginia. The padlocks are latched onto pedestrian bridges and inscribed with vows of love. The keys are tossed into the water below as an testament of unbreakable devotion.

No one knows where the practice started, but hundreds of thousands of these locks adorn bridges in Paris. Some say it was from the 2006 novel, “Ho Voglia Di Te” (I Want You), by Italian author Federico Moccia, while other believe it was at the Seoul Tower in Korea.

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NPR Story
2:46 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Bringing The Colorado River Back To Long-Dry Parts Of Mexico

An eight-week release of water from the Morelos Dam has filled parts of the Colorado River Delta that haven't seen water in nearly two decades, like this spot about 20 miles south of the dam. (Stina Sieg/KJZZ)

For the first time in almost 20 years, the Colorado River is flowing into northern Mexico through a dam that usually stops it. It’s called a pulse flow — a temporary release of water.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Stina Sieg of KJZZ traveled to see the effect it’s having on Mexico’s long-barren delta.

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NPR Story
2:46 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Water Crisis Not Over After West Virginia Chemical Spill

It’s been called one of the most serious episodes of drinking water contamination in U.S. history. Four months after thousands of gallons of the coal-washing chemical MCHM spilled from an unregulated above-ground storage tank into the Elk River, many people in and around Charleston, West Virginia, are still using bottled water.

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NPR Story
2:06 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Art Imitates Life For Transgender Artists

From the "Relationship" series, 2008–2013 by Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst. Courtesy of the artists and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles.

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 12:07 pm

The Whitney Biennial has been one of the art world’s hottest shows for new artists.

This year, artists Rhys Ernst and Zackary Drucker are grabbing attention with their photo series, “Relationship.”

The photos detail their developing relationship and their transitioning bodies, as each travels across the gender spectrum. Ernst is transitioning from female to male, while Drucker is transitioning from male to female.

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NPR Story
2:06 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Rwanda Marks Terrible Anniversary

Today, Rwanda and the world remember the beginning of one of the bloodiest periods in modern history.

It’s been 20 years since the Rwandan genocide resulted in the massacre of at least 800,000 ethnic Tutsis and moderate Hutus in just three months.

The BBC’s Prudent Nsengiyumva reports from Kigali.

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NPR Story
2:06 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

The Mystery Surrounding The Johnson Twins of Tennessee

Residents of Chattanooga, Tenn., are still puzzling over the mystery of Andrew Gary Johnson and Anthony Larry Johnson.

Police discovered the decayed bodies of the twin brothers in their home a little over a week ago. But investigators think the brothers — who were in their early 60s — died about three years ago.

How they died is a mystery.

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NPR Story
4:22 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

A Visit With Renowned Composer John Harbison

John Harbison is pictured at his home in Cambridge, Mass. (Robin Young/Here & Now)

In 2004, Pulitzer Prize-winning American composer John Harbison released “Songs America Loves To Sing – Old and New Music for Winds, Strings and Piano,” a compilation of recognizable choral preludes with a twist putting the spotlight on the true meanings of the work. It includes hymns like “What a Friend We Have in Jesus” and classics such as “Anniversary Song” — which we know as “Happy Birthday.”

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NPR Story
4:22 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

George W. Bush The Artist Makes His Formal Debut

Portraits of world leaders which are part of the exhibit "The Art of Leadership: A President's Diplomacy," are on display at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas, Friday, April 4, 2014. The exhibit of portraits painted by former President George W. Bush opens Saturday and runs through June 3. (Benny Snyder/AP)

Former President George W. Bush has found painting as his new passion to fill the void in his life after he left the White House.

In an interview on NBC’s “Today” show, Bush tells his daughter, Jenna Bush Hager, “I paint a lot because, as you know, I’m a driven person.”

The occasion was to highlight his portraits of world leaders, which he displays at his library in Texas.

One is of a grim-looking President Vladimir Putin.

Bush says “I got to know him very well. It became more intense as time went on.”

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NPR Story
4:22 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Earthquake Fear Rises In California

A picture taken on January 19, 1994 in Los Angeles shows a bulldozer tearing down a section of the Santa Monica Freeway that collapsed during the massive Northridge earthquake. A huge earthquake this week in Chile and two minor quakes in California are raising concerns if California is prepared in the even of another major earthquake.(Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

Geologists say this week’s huge earthquake in Chile is not directly related to two smaller Los Angeles-area earthquakes and one that struck off the Northern California coast recently, even though California has gone for an unusually long time without a significant quake.

In 1989, the Loma Prieta earthquake in San Francisco killed 63 and injured more than 3,700 people. In 1994, the Northridge earthquake in Los Angeles killed 57 people and injured more than 5,000.

Is California ready for the next big one?

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