Here & Now

Weekdays, noon to 2pm

NPR's midday news magazine.  

Genre: 

Pages

NPR Story
2:17 pm
Fri May 1, 2015

Former Chris Christie Ally Pleads Guilty In 'Bridgegate' Case

David Wildstein, former Port Authority appointee of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, leaves the Federal Court on May 01, 2015 in Newark. Wildstein pleaded guilty on charges after a federal probe into the George Washington Bridge Case. (Kena Betancur/Getty Images)

David Wildstein, a former Port Authority official in New Jersey, pleaded guilty today to playing a role in shutting down lanes of traffic during rush hour on the George Washington Bridge, a move taken as political retribution against the Mayor of Fort Lee, New Jersey, who refused to support New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s bid for re-election.

Wildstein was a known Christie ally, as well as one of the governor’s childhood friends.

Read more
NPR Story
2:17 pm
Fri May 1, 2015

Lincoln History Told Through Tree Rings

Arborist Guy Sternberg points to the rings on the cross section of the oak tree that shaded the funeral choir at Oak Ridge Cemetery when Abraham Lincoln’s body arrived in Springfield in 1865. (Peter O'Dowd)

In 1992, the Lincoln Vault Oak was cut down to protect Abraham Lincoln’s burial vault.

At the president’s funeral in 1865, the tree stood just a few feet from the event, shading the funeral choir.

When the tree was finally cut down, local arborist Guy Sternberg salvaged the massive stump and began a dissection project that peeled back the layers of history to reveal clues about that day.

Sternberg speaks with Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd about what he was able to learn.

 

Read more
NPR Story
2:17 pm
Fri May 1, 2015

Grooveshark Shuts Down After Battle With Music Industry

(danilobe/Flickr)

The free music streaming service Grooveshark has closed down its service after a six-year legal battle with the music industry.

The closure of the service, owned by Escape Media, is part of a settlement with Universal Music Group, Sony Music and Warner Music Group, in which the company issued a formal apology in lieu of paying damages to the labels.

Read more
NPR Story
1:03 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

Aid Worker In Nepal Says Drones Might Help Survey Remote Areas

Nepalese villagers wait for relief aid from an Indian Army helicopter at Uiya village, in northern-central Gorkha district on April 29, 2015. Hungry and desperate villagers rushed towards relief helicopters in remote areas of Nepal, begging to be airlifted to safety, four days after an earthquake killed more than 5,000 people. (Saijad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images)

The death toll in Nepal continues to climb after a devastating earthquake over the weekend. Sean Casey, an aid worker with the International Medical Corps, joins Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins from Kathmandu to discuss the response methods.

Casey says his organization is exploring the use of drones to get a view of how remote villages were affected by the earthquake. Access to many of those villages has been hampered by the damage from the earthquake.

Read more
NPR Story
1:03 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

Archaeologists Dig Deep At George Washington's Boyhood Home

Stones mark the corners of George Washington's boyhood home, discovered by George Washington Foundation archaeologists in 2008. The Rappahannock River flows in the distance. (Courtesy of the George Washington Foundation)

When people think of George Washington’s home, Mount Vernon, Va., usually comes to mind – but that’s just where he lived later in life. Our first president spent most of his childhood at Ferry Farm in Fredericksburg, Va.

The house itself has long since been destroyed, but after years of excavation, archaeologists have found its exact location, along with hundreds of thousands of artifacts. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Matthew Schwartz of WAMU went there to hear the tale.

Read more
NPR Story
1:03 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

Lincoln's Legacy Inspires Greek Family Business In Decatur

The Lincoln Square Lounge in Decatur, Ill. (Peter O'Dowd)

When President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train left Indianapolis on May 1, 1865, it turned north to Chicago. But Here & Now’s series Tracking Lincoln is going due west to Decatur, Illinois.

Lincoln lived near Decatur long before he became president. It’s said that he made his first public speech right there in the center of town, where a statue of the young president-to-be now stands.

Read more
NPR Story
12:27 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

A Short History Of The Public Radio Tote Bag

(NPR.org)

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 1:50 pm

Adrienne LaFrance speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young about the history of the public radio tote bag, and why it’s become so identified with NPR and fundraising.

While tote bags may be the most associated with public radio fundraising, NPR does have an array of merchandise people can get for their support.

Read more
NPR Story
12:27 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

Placebo Effect: It Might Not Be In Your Head After All

(v1ctor/Flickr)

The “placebo effect” is the idea that a pill or treatment with no medicinal ingredient can help or cure a person because he or she believes it will — that the idea of treatment can be as important as treatment itself.

The clinical research into placebos goes back to 1978, when researchers found that some dental patients got as much relief from a placebo pill as others did from a narcotic painkiller.

Read more
NPR Story
12:27 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

Japanese Prime Minister Calls For Stronger U.S.-Japan Trade Pact

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe addresses a joint session of Congress at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., on April 29, 2015, as U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (left) and House Speaker John Boehner listen. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

On Wednesday, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe addressed a joint meeting of the House and Senate. He urged them to strengthen economic and trade ties between the U.S. and Japan while talking up a trade deal known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership or TPP.

U.S. lawmakers are divided over the idea of supporting broader trade with Japan. Democrats especially want to protect the American car market, while Japan is looking for the U.S. to remove obstacles to Japanese car and part imports.

Read more
NPR Story
12:33 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

David Breashears Describes Devastation At Everest Base Camp

This photo provided by Azim Afif, shows the scene at Everest Base Camp, Nepal on Tuesday, April, 28, 2015. On Saturday, a large avalanche triggered by Nepal's massive earthquake slammed into a section of the Mount Everest mountaineering base camp, killing a number of people and left others unaccounted for. Afif and his team of four others from the Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) all survived the avalanche. (Azim Afif via AP)

David Breashears is an American filmmaker and climber who’s well aware of the dangers of Mount Everest.

He’s summited five times, and he was on the mountain filming in May 1996 when a sudden blizzard killed eight climbers, among them his friends. His film about that event, the first IMAX movie shot on the mountain, aired in 1998.

Read more
NPR Story
12:33 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Indianapolis: Tensions Stir As Murder Rate Surges

Indianapolis Police Chief Rick Hite blames the murders on the same kind of drug crimes that New York and other major cities went through in the 1980s. (Peter O'Dowd)

Police in Indianapolis are struggling to contain a surge in murders. Last year police counted 138 homicides – a 44 percent jump from 2012.

Patrol Officer Lona Douglas works on the city’s west side in one of six neighborhoods designated as a high-crime area. On a recent afternoon, I was with her as she responded to a potential burglary.

Read more
NPR Story
12:25 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Recipes: Healthy Salads With Spring Produce

Fresh ramps, greens and radishes from the farmer's market. (Kathy Gunst)

From asparagus and fava beans to ramps and radishes, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst is reveling in spring produce and thinking of ways to turn it into healthy salads. She shares her ideas with hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, along with these four recipes:

Read more
NPR Story
12:41 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

An Audio Postcard From A Columbus Barbershop

Peter gets a hair cut from Jim Morris in Columbus, Ohio. (Peter O'Dowd)

Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd is retracing part of the route that Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train took 150 years ago. The train was carrying the body of the late president and was making its way to Springfield, Illinois from Washington, D.C.

Read more
NPR Story
12:41 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

James Brown Documentary Wins A Peabody Award

The HBO film “Mr. Dynamite: The Rise of James Brown” won a Peabody Award this week. When the documentary first premiered, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson spoke with the filmmaker, Alex Gibney, longtime Brown trombonist Fred Wesley and Michael Veal, a professor of ethnomusicology. We revisit that conversation.

Read more
NPR Story
12:41 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Drone Strike Deaths Raise Questions

President Barack Obama makes a statement in the Brady Briefing room at the White House April 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. President Obama talked about a US drone strike that targeted a suspected al Qaeda compound in Pakistan but inadvertently killed an American and Italian being held hostage by the group. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Italy says it wants more information from the United States about how an Italian aid worker was killed in a U.S. drone strike on the Afghan-Pakistani border.

Read more
NPR Story
12:37 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

'Full House' Is Latest Old TV Hit To Be Revived

The '90s sitcom will return as "Fuller House" on Netflix. John Stamos will reprise his role, along with some – though not all – of his costars. (ABC)

Originally published on Sun April 26, 2015 7:16 pm

If “Full House” was a major part of your childhood, you might get a kick out of this. Netflix announced this week that it’s coming back – as “Fuller House.”

John Stamos – or Uncle Jesse – will produce the new series, and will also reprise his role, along with some of his old co-stars (though not all).

“Full House” is just the latest in a parade of old favorites that seem to be returning to television. There’s also “Arrested Development,” “The X-Files,” “Coach,” “Twin Peaks,” “Boy Meets World” (reimagined as “Girl Meets World”), “Bewitched” and the list goes on.

Read more
NPR Story
12:37 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

Social Media Buzz: From Senate Cook To Jamaican Dance Halls

Senate cook Bertrand Olotara is pictured in this screenshot from a Guardian video.

Mike Barry of The Guardian joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to look at how the news is reverberating on social media. The stories include:

Read more
NPR Story
12:37 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

Proposal To Close Loophole Looks At Who Is A Farmer

Farmer Levi Greuel spends a sunny Saturday afternoon fixing up his farm equipment and tearing down an old wooden barn in preparation for planting season. (Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media)

Big farms are collecting taxpayer dollars that they haven’t necessarily earned, by taking advantage of a loophole in government subsidy rules, according to regulators, members of Congress and the U.S. Government Accountability Office.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is taking aim at what is known as the “actively engaged” loophole, which has been gaping for nearly three decades, by changing the qualifications for some subsidy payments.

Read more
NPR Story
1:36 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

India’s Tiny Community Of Wild Asian Lions

A female Asiatic lion in the Gir forest. (Rupal Vaidya/Wikimedia Commons)

The Modi government in India is considering a proposal to replace the tiger – the iconic symbol of India since the 1970s – with the lion. Vicki Croke of WBUR’s The Wild Life joins Here & Now hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson with details on the tiny community of wild Asian lions – a remnant of a once much larger population.

Read more
NPR Story
1:36 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Judy Clarke: Marathon Bomber's High-Profile Lawyer

Judy Clarke, second from right, the lawyer representing shooting suspect Jared Lee Loughner, walks towards a federal court building with lawyer Reuben Cahn, right, Wednesday, June 29, 2011, in San Diego. (Gregory Bull/AP)

The marathon bombing trial is now in the sentencing stage. The 12 jurors will decide whether or not Dzhokhar Tsarnaev will get the death penalty. If the lawyer representing Tsarnaev has her way, the 21-year-old will spend his life in prison and not be put to death.

Read more
NPR Story
1:36 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Financial Stories In Court: Flash Trader And AIG

Traders shout orders in the S&P 500 futures pit at the CME Group in Chicago near the close of trading, Thursday, May 6, 2010. The stock market had one of its most turbulent days ever with the Dow Jones industrials plunging nearly 1,000 points in half an hour before recovering two-thirds of its losses. (Kiichiro Sato/AP)

Navinder Sarao is making an initial court appearance in the U.K., after he was arrested yesterday by British authorities on U.S. charges that he helped cause what’s known as the “flash crash,” when the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell by 1,000 points on May 6, 2010.

CNN’s Maggie Lake joins Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson to take a look at this case, as well as the trial over the 2008 government bailout of American International Group, or AIG. Closing arguments are being delivered today.

Read more
NPR Story
12:50 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Comedy Central Hit 'Inside Amy Schumer' Returns Tonight

Comedy Central's 'Inside Amy Schumer' returns tonight. (Inside Amy Schumer Facebook Page)

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 3:15 pm

The season premier of “Inside Amy Schumer” airs on Comedy Central tonight. The sketch comedy series recently won a Peabody award, and was also just picked up for a fourth season.

The show’s star, comedian Amy Schumer, hosted the MTV Movie Awards on April 12, and will soon be starring in a Judd Apatow film, out this summer.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks to NPR TV critic Eric Deggans about the show and its star.

Guest

Read more
NPR Story
12:50 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Photographing Armenian Lives Around the World

Catedral Apostólica Armênia São Jorge - São Paulo, Brazil - "There is a small area of land in Asia Minor that is called Armenia, but it is not so. It is not Armenia. It is a place. There are only Armenians, and they inhabit the earth, not Armenia, since there is no Armenia. There is no America and there is no England, and no France, and no Italy. There is only the earth." -William Saroyan in The Armenian and The Armenian (Scout Tufankjin)

April 24 marks the 100th anniversary of what most historians refer to as the Armenian Genocide, when 1.5 million ethnic Armenians were killed by the Ottoman government in modern day Turkey. Millions more fled, in a diaspora that spans the globe.

“The only stories I could find were about the genocide. As if 1915 had ended the Armenian story.”

Read more
NPR Story
12:50 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Blue Bell Recalls All Products Following Deadly Listeria Outbreak

Blue Bell is voluntarily recalling all of its products after the bacteria listeria was found in two cartons of Blue Bell ice cream in March. (Randy OHC/Flickr Creative Commons)

Blue Bell Creameries is voluntarily recalling all of its products after the bacteria listeria was found in two cartons of Blue Bell ice cream in March.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday that tests indicate the outbreak started from plants in Texas and Oklahoma.

Five adults have been sickened, and three have died. Officials in Kansas say listeriosis didn’t cause the deaths, but it may have been a contributing factor. Blue Bell distributes ice cream and other frozen desserts to about half of the United States.

Read more
NPR Story
1:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Australia's Kevin Rudd On U.S.-China Relations

President Obama smiles as a group of children wave flags and flowers during a welcome ceremony held by Chinese President Xi Jinping on Nov. 12, 2014. (Andy Wong/AP)

Time magazine just released its list of the 100 most influential people in the world. One of the names on the list is China’s premier Xi Jinping.

That comes as no surprise to former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, who writes in Time that Xi looks like he’s on track to pass Chairman Mao as China’s most powerful leader.

But what about beyond China? What influence does Xi have on the global stage – especially with the United States?

Read more
NPR Story
1:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Millions Of 'Boomerang Buyers' Could Reshape Housing Market

Signs are seen outside a foreclosed home and a house for sale February 24, 2009 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 1:53 pm

The first wave of millions of homeowners who lost their home to foreclosure may soon be on the market to get back into buying real estate.

These so-called “boomerang buyers” are now past the seven-year window they need to begin repairing their credit to qualify to buy a new home.

CBS News business analyst Jill Schlesinger tells Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins about these boomerang buyers and how they may change the housing market in the next decade.

Read more
NPR Story
1:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

75-Year-Old Figure Skater Won't Let Stroke Stop Her

Patricia competes to the song 'The Rose'. (Quick Silver Shots)

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 10:04 am

Patricia McNamara, 75, of Orange County, Calf. started skating in her late 40s, and she’s participated in every one of the U.S. Adult Figure Skating Championships since the Adult Nationals event started in 1995.

“I feel like the best of myself is really being expressed.”

She says skating helped her recover from breast cancer, and she’s hoping it helps her fully recover from a stroke seven years ago, in which she lost some muscle control on her left side.

Read more
NPR Story
12:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

2015 Boston Marathon Preview

A worker adjusts lights on the photo bridge near the Boston Marathon finish line Thursday, April 16, 2015, on Boylston Street in Boston. The 119th Boston Marathon will be run on Monday. (Steven Senne/AP)

The 119th Boston Marathon, the world’s oldest, will be run on Monday. The 26.2-mile race starts in rural Hopkinton, Mass., and takes the runners through several other communities before finishing in downtown Boston.

That’s where two bombs exploded during the 2013 race, killing three people and injuring more than 260. The attack sparked increased security for spectators and runners that will remain in place for the second year.

Read more
NPR Story
12:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

DJ Sessions: Swing And Vintage Jazz

Artie Shaw plays the clarinet on Sept. 10, 1941. The clarinetist and bandleader's recording of "Begin the Beguine" epitomized the Big Band era. (AP)

Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson is broadcasting from Washington, D.C., and sits down with Rob Bamberger, the longtime host of “Hot Jazz Saturday Night” on WAMU in Washington. Bamberger brings us sounds from Jelly Roll Morton to Artie Shaw and His Orchestra.

Read more
NPR Story
12:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Obama Immigration Policy Up For Debate In Federal Court

The John Minor Wisdom U.S. Courthouse, home of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, New Orleans, Louisiana. (Bobak/Wikimedia Commons)

In November, President Obama announced executive actions that would allow 5 million undocumented immigrants to stay in the country and obtain work permits. Not long after, a Texas judge ordered a freeze on those actions.

Today the Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in New Orleans will be hearing arguments from federal lawyers and 26 states opposing Obama’s order on whether to lift the freeze and allow his policies to move forward, or to leave the immigration policies in limbo.

Read more

Pages