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NPR Story
1:08 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

DJ Sessions: Vivaldi To Scarlatti

The London Symphony Orchestra performs during a rehearsal at the National Concert Hall in Taipei on March 6, 2014. d in Kaoshiung on March 7, 2014. AFP PHOTO / Mandy CHENG (Photo credit should read Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images)

For this week’s Here & Now DJ Sessions, Vic Di Geronimo, who hosts Classic Mornings on WILL Illinois Public Media in Urbana, Illinois, joins host Jeremy Hobson to talk classical music.

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NPR Story
1:08 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

The Case For A U.S. Surgeon General During Ebola Outbreak

In this Jan. 18, 2008 photo, former U.S. Surgeon General Richard Carmona speaks during a news conference in Austin, Texas. (Harry Cabluck/AP)

Two Dallas hospital nurses are still receiving treatment for Ebola after the contracted the virus while treating a patient who became infected with the disease while visiting Liberia.

The infected patients in the U.S. have caused national panic and last week, President Obama appointed Ron Klain as the “Ebola czar.” But the onset of panic and the nomination of a czar has brought attention to the fact that there is currently no U.S. surgeon general in office. While President Obama nominated Dr. Vivel Murthy to the office a year ago, he is still awaiting Senate confirmation.

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NPR Story
1:08 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

'Pee-Wee's Playhouse' Is Out On Blu-Ray

Actor Paul Reubens 'Pee-wee Herman' speaks onstage at the 10th Annual TV Land Awards at the Lexington Avenue Armory on April 14, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images)

Remember Pee-wee’s Playhouse? The show had a following among kids, teens and hip adults alike.

Now, a remastered version is coming out on Blu-Ray. But what exactly does it mean when a show like Pee-wee’s Playhouse – which was shot on film – is digitally remastered?

NPR’s TV critic Eric Deggans talks to Here & Nows Jeremy Hobson about the remastering of this cult classic and the history of the show.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Phillip Morris May Enter E-Cigarette Market

Most e-cigarettes use liquid nicotine, but tobacco giant Phillip Morris will release a smart e-cigarette, that uses heated tobacco. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Since electronic cigarettes were introduced in 2003, they have grown in popularity as an alternative to tobacco products. However, there may be new competition coming to the market as cigarette giant Phillip Morris’ patent for Heat Sticks, a smart e-cigarette that uses heated tobacco, has been approved.

Unlike other e-cigarettes that use liquid nicotine to create a tobacco-flavored vapor, Heat Sticks contain real tobacco that will heat up to a maximum of 660 degrees Fahrenheit, similar to a pipe.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Colorado Considers Another 'Personhood' Amendment

So-called “personhood” initiatives will be on the ballot in two states on Election day: Measure One in North Dakota and Amendment 67 in Colorado.

“Personhood” may be a familiar term to Colorado voters by now because they’ve rejected two such measures in recent elections.

Those previous two measures were designed to ban abortion, but supporters of Amendment 67 say that’s not their goal this time around.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Colorado Public Radio’s Megan Verlee explains.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Senate Tracker: South Dakota No Longer A Shoo-in For Republicans

Photograph of Republican senate candiate Mike Rounds. (roundsforsenate)

In this week’s installment of the Senate Tracker series, we turn to South Dakota, which had been considered safe for Republican candidate and former governor Mike Rounds.

However, after some controversy surrounding a visa program under his governorship, independent candidate Larry Pressler and Democrat Rick Weiland are gaining ground.

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NPR Story
12:45 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

E.O. Wilson On 'The Meaning Of Human Existence'

Naturalist E.O. Wilson, author of "The Meaning of Human Existence." (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Biologist and naturalist E.O. Wilson has written thirty books, won two Pulitzers, holds the title Professor Emeritus at Harvard and he is the world’s leading authority on ants.

Ants are featured in his new book, “The Meaning of Human Existence,” which has been longlisted for the National Book Award.

The book covers evolution, the coming of human consciousness, and humans’ ability to think about existence.

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NPR Story
12:45 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Stemming The Flow Of Central American Child Migrants

A police officer in Santa Ana, El Salvador teaches a group of sixth graders how to use computers as part of the GREAT program. (Jude Joffe-Block/KJZZ)

The once staggering number of Central American child migrants crossing the border has fallen dramatically in recent months.

But to discourage future migration flows, experts say the violence and poverty that helped trigger the exodus must be addressed.

In recent years, the U.S. spent $800 million on programs to address drug trafficking, gangs, and crime in Central America. And some of those programs are aimed specifically at helping young people.

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NPR Story
12:45 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

An End to Flight Restrictions In Dallas

A Southwest Airlines flight Boeing 737 flies over Bachman Lake near Dallas (brentdanley/Flickr)

Today is the first day that Dallas airline and aviation officials will not have to contend with the federal law known as the Wright amendment.

For 35 years, the law restricted flights out of Dallas’ Love Field Airport, as a way to protect a fledgling Dallas-Fort Worth airport.

But it was allowed to expire yesterday, after a compromise reached by Southwest, American Airlines, the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, and the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport.

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NPR Story
2:36 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

On Stage: Festival Seeks To Pass The Torch In Tango

A couple performing the Argentine tango at the Mesa Arts Center.(Garry Wilmore/Flickr)

On Friday we go “On Stage,” our look at what’s happening on the boards across the country.

This week, we go to New York City, where the Shall We Tango Festival is underway.

Polly Ferman, who is a touring pianist, created the festival.

She also created and directs the all-female tango group Glamour Tango.

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NPR Story
2:36 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

District Profile: A Cast Of Characters In Louisiana's Sixth

BATON ROUGE, LA - MARCH 17: Former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards, 86, announces his run for U.S. Congress at the Belle of Baton Rouge Hotel on March 17, 2014 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Edwards spent eight years in prision following a felony conviction arising from the licensing of riverboat casinos in his fourth term as Governor. (Photo by Sean Gardner/Getty Images)

In this week’s installment of our District Profile series, we turn to Louisiana’s Sixth congressional district where nine Republicans (including a dance instructor who calls herself the Sarah Palin of the South), three Democrats (including an ex-con) and one Libertarian will be on the ballot to fill the seat of Congressman Bill Cassidy, who is running for Senate.

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NPR Story
2:36 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Washington Post App: Reversing the Paper’s Problems?

Pictured is the Washington Post building on August 5, 2013. (Win McNamee/AFP/Getty Images)

In the past several years, The Washington Post has suffered serious financial troubles and a seeming inability to assert its place in the digital world.

But David Carr of The New York Times thinks that The Washington Post is headed back to its Watergate-reporting glory days. He says that Jeff Bezos, the Post’s new owner and founder and CEO of Amazon.com, is giving the paper the resources it needs to thrive.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

A Witness To History In Atlanta

Marshall Slack has been a waiter at Paschal's for over forty years. He even waited on Martin Luther King, Jr. (Jeremy Hobson/Here & Now)

Paschal’s Restaurant in Atlanta is well-known as a political hangout.

Lore has it that Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights leaders organized marches at the tables of the original restaurant.

“You had a mixture here at Paschal’s of not only so called movement leaders, you had regular folk as well who could intermingle with these people,” William Boone, a professor at Clark Atlanta University, said.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

A Snapshot Of Monrovia As Ebola Takes Its Toll

MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 15: A Liberian health worker speaks with families in a classroom now used as Ebola isolation ward on August 15, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. People suspected of contracting the Ebola virus are being brought to the center, a closed primary school originally built by USAID, while larger facililities are being constructed to house the surging number of patients. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Officials at the Texas Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas say the first Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States, Thomas Eric Duncan, has died.

Duncan arrived in Dallas on Sept. 20 from Liberia and fell ill a few days later. He was sent home after an initial visit to the emergency room, but taken back to the hospital on Sept. 28 and has been kept in isolation ever since.

Officials say 10 people had direct contact with Duncan while he was contagious.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

Airport Screenings To Begin For Ebola

The government plans to begin taking the temperatures of travelers from West Africa arriving at five U.S. airports as part of a stepped-up response to the Ebola epidemic.

Defense One tech editor Patrick Tucker tells Here & Now’s Robin Young that temperature screening and blood tests at airports are not an effective ways to stop people with Ebola from entering the U.S.

Tucker says the best method may be to do what we do stop terrorists from getting on a plane: background and contacts screening.

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NPR Story
2:23 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Senate Tracker: A Populist Democrat In Tennessee Threatens Incumbent

Gordon Ball (L) is challenging incumbent Lamar Alexander (R, no hat) in Tennessee. (Gordon Ball/Facebook; Lamar Alexander/Facebook)

In this week’s Senate Tracker, we turn to Tennessee, where Republican incumbent Lamar Alexander faces lawyer and Democrat Gordon Ball.

Bobby Allyn of WPLN, Nashville Public Radio, joins Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer to discuss the race.

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NPR Story
1:38 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Where Do Scientists Come From?

Where does scientific curiosity come from? Ari Daniel tries to find out. (Desirae/Flickr)

In science, a single question can be a powerful force.

It can open up an entire field of study. It can inhabit someone, shaping who they become. And it can jump inside other people, infusing them with a burning curiosity.

Recently, reporter Ari Daniel met someone captivated by these kinds of questions.

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NPR Story
1:38 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Explaining The Science Behind The Nobel Prize In Physics

A giant screen displays the images of (up, L to R) Japanese-born researchers Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamurawho received the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics on October 7, 2014 at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science in Stockholm, Sweden. (Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images)

Three scientists won this year’s Nobel prize in physics for work which led to the creation of LED light. Their breakthrough was in creating blue LEDs. Other researchers had produced red and green LEDS, but you need all three colors to make the bright white light emitted from LED light bulbs.

Two of the scientists are in Japan one is American Shuji Nakamura at the University of California Santa Barbara.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

Brighten Up Lunch With Kathy Gunst

A perfectly delicious lunch by Kathy Gunst: "green goddess" salad dressing, a thermos of soup, home made ginger ale and zucchini bread sandwich. (Qainat Khan/Here & Now)

Originally published on Fri October 3, 2014 3:46 pm

Running out of ideas for lunch? Here & Now Resident Chef Kathy Gunst joins Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young in the studio with tips and recipes — from soups and sandwiches to drinks — to brighten up the midday meal.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

District Profile: Two Republicans Face Off In Washington's Fourth

Dan Newhouse (L) and Clint Didier will face each other in Washington's fourth district, even though both are Republicans. (Weldon Wilson / Office of the Governor of Washington State; Clint Didier campaign)

In Washington’s fourth Congressional district, farmer Clint Didier will face state legislator Dan Newhouse in November.

Both are Republicans, but because of a quirk in Washington’s law, the two top vote-getters in the primary election run in the general election.

Northwest Public Radio‘s Rowan Moore Gerety joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the race.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

School Starts In Donetsk Amidst Shelling

The fighting between Ukrainian forces and the pro-Russian separatists who claim Donetsk as one of their strongholds delayed the start of the school year there.

However, as school was opening Wednesday morning, shells hit a school playground, killing at least ten people.

None of those who died were students because they had already gone inside the school building.

The BBC's James Coomarasamy, who was visiting another school at the time, reports.

Reporter

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Dean Of Boston Sports Journalism Celebrates 42 Years On The Job

Jonny Miller and Robin Young (Robin Young)

Originally published on Fri September 26, 2014 2:04 pm

One of the most-beloved sportscasters you’ve probably never heard of is Jonny Miller.

He’s covered professional sports in Boston for 42 years for CBS powerhouse, WBZ Radio.

He’s called the Helen Thomas of the local sports press corps, because he always gets to ask the first questions.

And he’s earned the respect of players and sports writers, because he does it all, while living with cerebral palsy.

Here & Now’s Robin Young profiles Miller and his long career.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Business Roundup: From Stocks To The Dollar

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on September 25, 2014 in New York City. US stocks saw their biggest downturn since July. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

U.S. stocks posted their biggest one-day drop since late July, amid concerns about global growth.

China is signaling it won’t undertake more aggressive stimulus measures and Europe’s economy is showing more signs of sluggishness.

Bloomberg News’ Michael Regan speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the shift.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

After Huge Debut, A Tough Week For Apple

In this photo taken on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014, people wait to buy the new Apple iPhone 6 and 6 Plus devices outside an Apple store in Hong Kong. The Apple's new devices were released on Friday in Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia and Japan. (Vincent Yu/AP)

It started out so well.

Thousands — no millions — of people lining up to buy the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus.

On Monday, Apple made an announcement: More than 10 million phones sold. A company record.

The new phones are bigger than previous generations; the 6 plus sports a 5 1/2 inch screen.

But that was part of the problem.

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NPR Story
1:41 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

The Lawyer Who Would 'Stop At Nothing To Win'

Lawyer Steven Donziger, left, walks with his clients who are members of Ecuador's indigenous Cofan tribe to Federal Court in New York for their hearing with lawyers for Texaco Monday, Feb. 1, 1999. The Ecuadorian rainforest was polluted by Texaco oil drilling. (Adam Nadel/AP)

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 4:43 pm

Bloomberg Businessweek senior writer Paul Barrett chronicles the 20 year long legal battle waged by human rights lawyer Steven Donziger in the book, “Law of the Jungle: The $19 Billion Legal Battle Over Oil in the Rain Forest and the Lawyer Who’d Stop at Nothing to Win It.

Donziger won compensation for Ecuadorian tribes whose land was polluted by Texaco oil drilling, but he then lost everything when the oil company sued him for dirty tactics.

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NPR Story
1:41 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

How To Translate Good Science Into Good Copy

Physicist Christina Love talks about her PhD thesis on dark matter at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Center City Philadelphia. She organized the event called "Start Talking Science"(Susan Philllips/WHYY)

The chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, told delegates at the opening ceremony of the UN Climate Summit in New York today that the IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report – compiled by hundreds of scientists – had three key findings:

One: Human influence on the climate is clear and growing.

Two: Quick and decisive action is needed to avoid destructive outcomes.

Three: There are means to limit climate change. That language is pretty simple and clear.

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NPR Story
1:41 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

What Will Be The Impact Of New Inversion Rules?

The Treasury Department has issued new rules governing corporate inversions after calls from President Barack Obama for "corporate patriotism." Obama is pictured here walking with Treasury Secretary Jack Lew (who was at the time the White House Cheif of Staff) on March 2, 2012. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Following through on a populist appeal from President Barack Obama for a new era of “corporate patriotism,” the Treasury Department stepped in Monday with new regulations designed to limit the ability of U.S. firms to seek refuge in lower tax countries.

The Treasury will make these so-called corporate inversions less lucrative by barring creative techniques that companies use to lower their tax bill. Additionally, the U.S. will make it harder for companies to move overseas in the first place by tightening the ownership requirements they must meet.

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NPR Story
2:52 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Terry Gilliam Goes Back To The Dystopian Future

Director Terry Gilliam (R) on the set of his new film, "The Zero Theorem." (Amplify)

In the new film “The Zero Theorem,” director Terry Gilliam gives us a dystopian yet fantastically colored and absurd future that will seem very familiar to fans of his films “Brazil” and “Twelve Monkeys.”

That’s no accident, Gilliam tells Here & Now’s Robin Young.

When he first read screenwriter Pat Rushin’s script, it was clear that Rushin had seen every film he’d made.

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NPR Story
2:52 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Robots On The Dairy Farm

Nate Tullar shows off his Lely robotic milker at Tullando, his family farm in Orford, New Hampshire. (Charlotte Albright/VPR)

In a bygone era, if you wanted milk from a cow, you had to get it by hand.

Then came machines that a farmer would attach to a cow’s udder to pump out the milk.

These days, on more and more farms, robots are doing that chore, resulting in lower labor costs, increased yields, and better knowledge for farmers about the health and productivity of their herds.

From the Here & Now Contributor’s Network, Vermont Public Radio’s Charlotte Albright has the report.

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NPR Story
1:32 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Unable To Vote, Scottish Americans Watching Closely From Afar

A selection of the British National Newspaper front pages are displayed on September 18, 2014 in London, England. Scots abroad are unable to vote in the Scottish referendum, but are watching closely as the vote unfolds today. ( Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Across Scotland today, people are headed to the polls to vote on a simple, but momentous question: Should Scotland be an independent country?

Only those currently living in Scotland are eligible to cast ballots, but many Scots living abroad are watching closely — along with the rest of the world.

Jack Crombie, who moved to the U.S. from Scotland 30 years ago, is the co-owner of the Duke of Perth, a Scottish pub in Chicago.

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