Here & Now

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

What Do We Have To Teach Plato?

A marble statue of ancient Greek philosopher Plato stands in front of the Athens Academy, in Athens. (Dimitri Messinis/AP)

In her book “Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won’t Go Away,” philosopher and writer Rebecca Newberger Goldstein imagines Plato on a U.S. book tour, speaking at Google, on a cable TV show and debating child-rearing at the 92nd Street Y in New York City.

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Tension Remain High In Ukraine

In Kiev today, Vice President Joe Biden said Russia must stop talking and start acting to defuse the crisis in Crimea.

The vice president’s visit comes as three men killed in an attack on a pro-Russian camp on Sunday were buried.

The BBC’s Natalia Antelava is visiting the town of Lugansk, a pro-Russian stronghold, and reports on the debate between those loyal to Kiev and those loyal to Moscow.

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

North Korea Steps Up Nuclear Activity Ahead Of Obama Visit

President Obama arrives in Japan on tomorrow amid reports that North Korea might carry out a fourth underground nuclear test to coincide with the president’s trip.

The reports about the possible test come from the South Korean Defense Ministry, which says it has spotted several activities related to a possible nuclear test in Punggye-ri in North Korea.

Jim Walsh, an expert on North Korea and international security, discusses this with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

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NPR Story
1:09 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

South Korean President Condemns Captain Of Sunken Ferry

Boats and cranes surround the site of the submerged 'Sewol' ferry off the coast of Jindo on April 21, 2014. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)

On Monday, South Korean President Park Geun-hye likened the actions and decisions of the captain and some of the crew members of the sunken ferry in Sewol as “unforgivable, murderous behavior.”

The disaster has left some 300 people missing or dead. Journalist Jason Strother joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson from Seoul with the latest.

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NPR Story
12:57 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Remembering Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter

Rubin "Hurricane" Carter is pictured in February 2010. (Paul Kane/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 2:18 pm

Middleweight boxing champion Rubin “Hurricane” Carter died on Sunday at age 76. He was twice wrongly convicted in a 1966 triple murder. Celebrities rallied for his release, but after his second conviction, many fell away.

Thom Kidrin was among the few who kept up support and lobbied relentlessly for Carter’s release. In 1985, a federal judge ruled Carter had been wrongly convicted.

Kidrin joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss his friend’s life and legacy.

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NPR Story
12:52 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Song Of The Week: 'Animals'

The band The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger consists of Sean Lennon and his girlfriend and fellow musician Charlotte Kemp Muhl. (Courtesy of the artist)

NPR music writer and editor Stephen Thompson introduces Here & Now’s Robin Young to the song “Animals” by the band The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger.

The band consists of John Lennon’s son, Sean Lennon, and his girlfriend and fellow musician Charlotte Kemp Muhl.

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NPR Story
1:24 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Boston Is Ready To Run Again

The finish line of the Boston Marathon, located on Boylston Street, is seen on April 16, 2014 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Alex Trautwig/Getty Images)

One of the biggest fields ever will assemble in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, for the 118th Boston Marathon on Monday morning, which is Patriots’ Day in Massachusetts. It’s the first Boston Marathon since the bombings near the finish line last April.

This year, 36,000 people will be running, including elite athletes from all around the world. African runners have dominated the Boston Marathon for more than two decades and they are the favorites again this year.

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NPR Story
1:24 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Boston Marathon Inspires At Children's Cancer Clinic

A mural in MGH’s pediatric cancer clinic tells the story of the hospital’s marathon team, which was founded by Dr. Howard Weinstein, chief of MGH’s pediatric hematology-oncology program, in 1998. (Courtesy of MGH)

While the Boston Marathon will be the center of international attention this year, the marathon has always been a focal point at a Boston clinic that treats children with cancer.

For each of the past 16 marathons, many patients at the pediatric cancer program at Massachusetts General Hospital have been paired with runners — using the race’s symbol of endurance and strength to the youngsters undergoing cancer treatment.

Two former patients ran last year but were stopped before the finish line because of the bombings.

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NPR Story
1:24 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

First Embryonic Stem Cells Cloned From Adults

For the first time, scientists have successfully grown stem cells from adults using cloning techniques.

This development, published in Thursday’s online edition of the journal Cell Stem Cell, brings scientists closer to developing patient-specific lines of cells that can be used to treat medical ailments.

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NPR Story
1:12 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Jane Goodall Plants 'Seeds Of Hope'

Jane Goodall's new book "Seeds of Hope" is part memoir, part history of the plant world. (David Holloway)

Primatologist Jane Goodall is known for her groundbreaking work with the chimpanzees in Gombe National Park in Tanzania. But she also has a lifelong love of trees.

“To me, trees are living beings and they have their own sort of personalities,” she tells Here & Now’s Robin Young. “I’m not being scientific here, I’m just talking about the way it feels.”

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NPR Story
1:12 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

New Military Rules On Hair Create Controversy

This image provided by the U.S. Army shows new Army grooming regulations for females. The new regulations on how women may style their hair has drawn criticism from the Congressional Black Caucus and female African American soldiers. (U.S. Army/AP Photo)

There are now more than 17,000 signatures on a new White House petition, calling on the Obama administration to reconsider new Army regulations about hair and grooming.

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NPR Story
1:12 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

General Mills' New Privacy Policy Restricts Consumers' Right To Sue

If you download a coupon for a General Mills product like Reese's Puffs or Lucky Charms, or "like" a product on Facebook, you may be barred from suing company under General Mills' new privacy policy. (Mike Mozart/Flickr)

If you download a coupon for Cheerios or Cocoa Puffs, or “like” a General Mills product on Facebook, you may be barred from suing the company.

General Mills has changed its privacy policy. The policy’s new legal terms require consumers who interact with the company to use informal negotiation or arbitration rather than sue the company if they have a dispute.

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NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Slow Start To Spring Housing Market

Usually as the weather heats up, so does the U.S. housing market. However, according to recent housing data, the market’s spring selling season is getting off to a slow start.

Despite expectations this past winter that warmer weather would rekindle growth, the market is seeing higher prices and mortgage rates, and a lack of houses for sale in some markets.

NPR Correspondent Chris Arnold discusses this slowdown with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

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NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

DJ Sessions: Blurring The Lines Between Rock, Jazz And Classical

Drummer David King, pianist Ethan Iverson and bassist Reid Anderson are the band The Bad Plus. (Jay Frahm)

In the latest installment of DJ Sessions, pianist Christopher O’Riley joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to talk about his favorite group that’s making waves in the classical community.

O’Riley says The Bad Plus is comprised of great composers. The jazz group is known for its famous covers of pop songs, like Black Sabbath’s “Iron Man.” But its latest album reinterprets Igor Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring.”

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NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

ER Doctor Looks Back A Year After Marathon Bombing

A flag that says "Boston Medical Center Strong" waves outside of Boston Medical Center, a year after the Boston Marathon bombing. (Ron Medzon)

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:15 am

On this day a year ago, Bostonians got one of their first glimpses into the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing, when emergency room physician Ron Medzon came on our program.

“It was just one after another after another,” he said of the victims being brought into the hospital. “Every single person had a limb-threatening injury, a life-threatening injury. And I think 20 people came in over 40 minutes, which is just incredible.”

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Boston Marks First Anniversary Of Marathon Bombing

Flowers lie on the finish line of the Boston Marathon on the one year anniversary of the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing, on April 15, 2014 in Boston, Mass. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

A somber anniversary is being marked in Boston today. It’s the one-year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings.

The tribute is being held inside Boston’s Hynes Convention Center, just a few blocks from the marathon finish line where two bombs exploded on April 15, 2013.

Three people were killed and more than 260 people were injured, some losing limbs.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Deborah Becker of WBUR joins host Robin Young with details on the day’s events.

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

'Philomena' DVD Brings Real Philomena To New Audiences

Today, the DVD of the Oscar-nominated film “Philomena” is being released. One of the special features contained on the DVD is an interview with the real Philomena Lee. Her life story of being forced to give up her son for adoption and her long search for him inspired the film.

We spoke with Philomena and her daughter Jane Libberton, who helped Philomena with her search, back when the film was in theaters, and today we revisit that conversation.

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Talking Pot With Teens In Colorado

Adams City High in Commerce City, Colo., has about 2,000 students. During the 2010-2011 school year, 105 students were disciplined for drug or alcohol-related school offences. These students had almost twice as many unexcused absences, more than three times the number of days of school suspension, and almost a full grade point lower average GPA compared to students without drug/alcohol related offences. (Jenny Brundin/CPR)

When Colorado voters passed Amendment 64 back in November of 2012, they set in motion an effort that has focused on setting up a system for people to legally obtain recreational marijuana.

But there’s been less attention on how to keep pot away from those who aren’t supposed to use it — anyone under 21 years of age. Parents and educators are struggling to fill the void, with public health campaigns only in the planning stages.

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NPR Story
3:30 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

How To Start Conversations With Total Strangers

Rob Baedeker and Chris Colin are the authors of "What to Talk About: On a Plane, at a Cocktail Party, in a Tiny Elevator with Your Boss's Boss." (Ilana Diamond)

Have you ever gone up to an intriguing looking person at a party, tried to start a conversation and froze? Or perhaps you just babbled mundanely about the weather? Well, authors Chris Colin and Rob Baedeker can help.

Along with illustrator Tony Millionaire, they’ve published “What to Talk About: On a Plane, at a Cocktail Party, in a Tiny Elevator with Your Boss’s Boss” (excerpt below).

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NPR Story
3:30 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

'Blood Moon' Begins Series Of Lunar Eclipses

Path of the Moon through Earth's umbral and penumbral shadows during the Total Lunar Eclipse of April 15, 2014. (Fred Espenak via NASA.gov)

Stargazers are in for a treat if they’re willing to stay up late tonight. A rare lunar eclipse known as a blood-moon will begin tomorrow morning at about 2 a.m. Eastern time. The full eclipse will last from about 3 a.m. to 4:30 a.m.

Kelly Beatty, senior contributing editor for Sky & Telescope magazine joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain the phenomenon, which is part of a “tetrad,” and the best time to watch.

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NPR Story
3:30 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Development Forces Out Pronghorn Antelope

A housing subdivision, a golf course and roads are named after the antelope that have been squeezed out by development. (Laurel Morales/Fronteras Desk)

When we think of the American West, we picture wide open spaces. But roads, new homes and commercial buildings have cut across those spaces.

That development is having an impact on the pronghorn antelope, especially in one of the fastest-growing areas in the Southwest: Prescott Valley in northern Arizona.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Laurel Morales of Fronteras Desk reports.

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NPR Story
12:57 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Father-Son Team To Run One Last Boston Marathon

Rick and Dick Hoyt, Boston Marathon stalwarts since 1981, by the Hamilton Reservoir behind their home in Holland, Mass. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Later this month is the 118th running of the Boston Marathon, and this year’s race is especially significant because it’s the first time it’s being run since last year’s bombing at the finish line. Because of that attack, two people will be taking part in this year’s Boston Marathon who hadn’t intended to be there: Dick and Rick Hoyt.

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NPR Story
12:57 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Central African Republic Plagued By Ethnic Conflict As U.N. Pledges Help

A woman of the Pulaar ethnicity carries a baby on her back as she waits in line in the Begoua district, northeast of Bangui, to receive humanitarian and medical aid on April 9, 2014. (Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images)

As Rwanda commemorates the anniversary of the genocide there 20 years ago this week, its neighbor, the Central African Republic, continues to suffer brutal ethnic violence.

The United Nations Security Council voted unanimously yesterday to assemble a peacekeeping force to help stem the C.A.R. conflict.

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NPR Story
12:57 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

What's Behind The Auto Recall Surge?

Following GM and Toyota, BMW is the latest auto maker to issue a recall of thousands of its vehicles. (Ron Sombilon/Flickr)

BMW is the latest automaker to announce a car recall. Yesterday, the automaker announced it’s recalling 156,137 luxury cars and SUVs because of possible stalling issues.

This comes on the heels of Toyota’s recall announcement this week, and General Motors’ recent vehicle recall notices. There have been more than 11 million vehicle recalls so far this year, and it’s part of the rapid rise of recalls in the past five years.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Marking The 50th Anniversary Of The Civil Rights Act

This week, U.S. presidents are heading to Austin, Texas, to commemorate the 50-year anniversary of the the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Former presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush are all scheduled to speak in addition to President Obama at the Civil Rights Summit at the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

DJ Sessions: 'Vibey' And Melodic With Anthony Valadez

Brooklyn electro-soul duo Denitia and Sene are among the artists KCRW DJ Anthony Valadez introduces us to in the latest installment of Here & Now DJ Sessions. (Mats Bakken)

KCRW’s Anthony Valadez joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson for the latest installment of DJ Sessions.

From Brooklyn electro-soul duo Denitia and Sene to Toronto jazz trio BadBadNotGood, he brings us “vibey” and melodic sounds that might make you want to roll down your car window and drive.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Walmart Partners With Wild Oats To Sell Cheaper Organics

Wild Oats, a popular organic food brand in the 1980s, will soon be on the shelves in the grocery section of your local Walmart. Wild Oats products are projected to sell for 25 percent less than other national organic brands, and will likely bring about a huge shift in organics supply chain. (Bill Lile/Flickr)

Look out, Whole Foods. This month, Walmart will start offering a new line of organics about 25 percent cheaper than the national organic brands it already carries, and those sold by its competitors.

The giant retailer is partnering with Wild Oats to bring in a new line of organic products. Wild Oats was a popular health brand in the 1980s and was acquired by Whole Foods in 2007.

But the Federal Trade Commission challenged the purchase, saying it was concerned about loss of competition. Ultimately, Whole foods sold its holdings in Wild Oats in 2009.

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NPR Story
3:34 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Ukulele Sensation Jake Shimabukuro

Ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro performs in the Here & Now studios. (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 6:31 am

Jake Shimabukuro started playing ukulele at the age of 4 and soon fell in love with the instrument. As he tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson, ”My parents would have to take the ukulele away from me so that I would do things like my homework, eat dinner, or take a shower, you know I just loved it so much, every moment that I had free I wanted to strum the ukulele.”

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NPR Story
2:05 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

'Heartbleed' Security Flaw Exposes Millions Of Passwords

Experts have discovered a major flaw in the security software used by millions of websites. “Heartbleed,” as the vulnerability has been dubbed, is a bug that affects OpenSSL, a software that operates about two-thirds of all web servers.

OpenSSL is behind many sites that collect personal or financial information such as passwords, credit card info and emails. Although researchers discovered the coding error last week, the problem has been present for more than two years.

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NPR Story
2:05 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

20 Injured In Stabbing At Pennsylvania High School

Nineteen students and a security guard were stabbed as the school day began today at Franklin Regional High School in Murrysville, Penn., outside of Pittsburgh. They are expected to survive.

Authorities say a student wielding two knives went on a rampage down one hallway in the school and was tackled by the school principal. The student is now in custody and being questioned.

Deanna Garcia of public radio station WESA in Pittsburgh joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with the latest.

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