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NPR Story
12:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

2015 Boston Marathon Preview

A worker adjusts lights on the photo bridge near the Boston Marathon finish line Thursday, April 16, 2015, on Boylston Street in Boston. The 119th Boston Marathon will be run on Monday. (Steven Senne/AP)

The 119th Boston Marathon, the world’s oldest, will be run on Monday. The 26.2-mile race starts in rural Hopkinton, Mass., and takes the runners through several other communities before finishing in downtown Boston.

That’s where two bombs exploded during the 2013 race, killing three people and injuring more than 260. The attack sparked increased security for spectators and runners that will remain in place for the second year.

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NPR Story
12:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

DJ Sessions: Swing And Vintage Jazz

Artie Shaw plays the clarinet on Sept. 10, 1941. The clarinetist and bandleader's recording of "Begin the Beguine" epitomized the Big Band era. (AP)

Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson is broadcasting from Washington, D.C., and sits down with Rob Bamberger, the longtime host of “Hot Jazz Saturday Night” on WAMU in Washington. Bamberger brings us sounds from Jelly Roll Morton to Artie Shaw and His Orchestra.

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NPR Story
12:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Obama Immigration Policy Up For Debate In Federal Court

The John Minor Wisdom U.S. Courthouse, home of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, New Orleans, Louisiana. (Bobak/Wikimedia Commons)

In November, President Obama announced executive actions that would allow 5 million undocumented immigrants to stay in the country and obtain work permits. Not long after, a Texas judge ordered a freeze on those actions.

Today the Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in New Orleans will be hearing arguments from federal lawyers and 26 states opposing Obama’s order on whether to lift the freeze and allow his policies to move forward, or to leave the immigration policies in limbo.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Study: Many Mothers Don't Wait Long Enough Between Pregnancies

Pregnant mom. (travelingtribe/Flickr)

The typical time between pregnancies for American mothers is 2.5 years, according to new research. Doctors say that is a healthy amount of time to wait. But a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that nearly a third of women space their births too close – fewer than 18 months between pregnancies.

The study found that “while there is no consensus on optimal IPI [interpregnancy interval], research has shown that short intervals (less than 18 months) and long intervals (60 months or more) were associated with higher risks of adverse health outcomes.”

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Oklahoma City Bombing Juror Looks Back

The McVeigh jury members address the media during a news conference in Denver, Colo., Saturday, June 14, 1997. From right to left are: Roger Brown, Fred Clarke, Doug Carr, Diane Faircloth, James Osgood, Tonya Stedman, Mike Leeper, Ruth Meier, Jonathon Candelaria, Martha Hite and Vera Chubb. (Michael S. Green/AP)

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 7:03 am

Just past the two-year anniversary of the bombing of the Boston Marathon, another horrific anniversary approaches. Oklahoma City residents will never forget April 19, 1995, when a bomb blast tore through the Alfred P. Murrah federal building, killing 168 people and injuring several hundred others.

Police tracked down Timothy McVeigh, a 26-year-old Persian Gulf War veteran and right-wing militia sympathizer. He was put on trial and ultimately put to death.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Social Media Buzz: Clinton's Logo, Ricky Gervais' Giraffe Tweet, Cheryl's Birthday

Hillary Clinton's new logo is a blue H with a red right-pointing arrow.

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 2:22 pm

Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign has a new logo that’s causing buzz. British comedian Ricky Gervais set the Internet aflutter by tweeting a photo of hunter Rebecca Francis posing beside a dead giraffe. And Singapore T.V. host Kenneth Kong posted a logic problem on Facebook about finding Cheryl’s birthday, that has gone viral.

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NPR Story
12:21 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

HBO On Trial For 'Fabricating' Child Labor Story

Host Bryant Gumbel speaks onstage during the 'Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel' panel at the HBO portion of the 2015 Winter Television Critics Association press tour at the Langham Hotel on January 8, 2015 in Pasadena, California. (Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 1:14 pm

In a federal court this week, the British sportswear and equipment supplier Mitre Sports International is claiming HBO defamed the company in a 2008 segment of "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel" called "Children of Industry."

The segment portrayed the story of children under the age of 14 hand-sewing Mitre soccer balls for little to no money. Mitre claims that the interviews were edited to be misleading, that parts of the story were fabricated and that the children were coerced to say what they did on camera.

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NPR Story
12:21 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

'Institutional Memory' Of U.S. Senate To Retire

Don Ritchie, historian of the U.S. Senate, speaks at the 53rd annual United States Senate Youth Program on Mar. 9, 2015, in Washington, D.C. (Jakub Mosur and Erin Lubin)

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 12:52 pm

On this day in 1861, a day after Fort Sumter fell, President Lincoln ordered up 75,000 troops. Within days, volunteers swarmed to Washington. It was decided that some would stay in the U.S. Senate chamber, which had only been in use for two years. Upwards of 4,000 troops took up residence, and soon the chamber was described as filthy and “alive with lice.”

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NPR Story
12:21 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Not All Almonds Are Equal When It Comes To Water Use

(mynameisharsha/Flickr)

The agriculture industry in California accounts for 80 percent of the state’s total water use, so when Governor Jerry Brown’s recent mandatory water restrictions didn’t include farmers, he got a lot of flak.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Police Weapon Use Under Fire, As More Videos Emerge

A video released by police shows North Charleston officer Michael Slager using a taser on the motorist after he had been pinned to the ground. (Screenshot)

Bob Bates, the 73-year-old reserve police officer in Tulsa, Oklahoma, who fatally shot a man after police say he confused his gun for his taser, now faces a second-degree manslaughter charge.

Meanwhile, in North Charleston, South Carolina, more video has surfaced showing another violent arrest by officer Michael Slager. Slager is being charged with murder after fatally shooting an unarmed motorist who tried to flee a traffic stop.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Saturday Night Live's Cecily Strong

Cecily Strong joined Saturday Night Live in 2012. (Courtesy of NBC)

Cecily Strong is joining the impressive list of female comedians who are taking their talent beyond the Saturday Night Live stage.

Strong has been asked to host the White House Correspondents Dinner later this month, and she is appearing in her first movie, “The Bronze,” which hits theaters this summer.

Strong is famous on SNL for her recurring character the “girl you wish you hadn’t started a conversation with at a party” on Weekend Update – a sketch she once hosted.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Russia-Iran Arms Deal Could Complicate Nuclear Talks

Russia's President Vladimir Putin (L) shakes with his Iran's counterpart Hassan Rouhani during their bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the fourth Conference on Interaction and Confidence Building Measures in Asia (CICA) summit in Shanghai on May 21, 2014. (Alexey Druzhini/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia is closing in on a deal that would send Russian missiles to Iran. Russian President Vladimir Putin approved the delivery of S-300 surface-to-air-missiles on Monday. A similar deal fell through back in 2010 under pressure from Western governments.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Study: Majority Receiving Public Assistance Are Working Poor

Nelson Mejia, who began as a full time employee two weeks ago, works at the food court in a Target on August 5, 2011 in Miami, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

A study out today finds nearly three-quarters of people who receive public assistance benefits from the government belong to a working family.

The report from University of California, Berkeley, says low-wage jobs have left federal and state governments holding the tab for higher medicaid, food stamp and child subsidy payouts. Researchers say the cost to taxpayers is now $153 billion a year.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Singer Ledisi On 'Selma' And 'Intimate Truth'

Ledisi performs at The Epitome of Soul Award honoring Stevie Wonder on October 11, 2014 in Memphis, Tennessee. (Greg Campbell/Getty Images)

R&B and jazz singer Ledisi portrayed gospel legend Mahalia Jackson in the movie “Selma.” In the film, she comforts an anxious Martin Luther King Jr. with an arresting version of “Take My Hand, Precious Lord.” Ledisi has been out on tour for her new album, “The Intimate Truth,” and speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Cuba Eyes Economic Gain With Thaw In U.S. Relations

Cuba's President Raul Castro speaks during a meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama on the sidelines of the Summit of the Americas at the ATLAPA Convention center on April 11, 2015 in Panama City. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. President Barack Obama and Cuban leader Raul Castro made history this weekend when they sat down together in Panama.

The men were attending the Summit of the Americas. It was the first time the United States attended the summit since it began in the 1990s.

Obama stressed the economic benefits that thawed U.S.-Cuban relations would bring to both countries, but the president did not announce that Cuba would be removed from the U.S. State Sponsors of Terrorism list.

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NPR Story
12:43 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Deadly Fashion: Norwegian Bloggers Experience Life In A Sweatshop

In the show “Sweatshop,” several Norwegian fashion bloggers flew to Cambodia, where they lived and worked in the clothing industry.

The three fashionistas – Frida, Ludwig and Anniken – not only saw, but experienced the hardships of Cambodian clothing workers, including low pay, terrible working conditions and sleeping on a cold, hard floor.

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NPR Story
12:43 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Malcolm Gladwell Wrestles With David And Goliath Stories

Author Malcolm Gladwell is known for taking an alternate tack to conventional thinking, in books like “The Tipping Point” and “Outliers.”

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NPR Story
12:43 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Street Art Meets Ballet In Miami

Heatscape by Justin Peck.

At the Miami City Ballet tonight, the dancers are sharing the stage with a backdrop that includes the face of wrestler Andre the Giant.

That’s what happens when one of the country’s most sought-after choreographers teams up with one the country’s most famous street artists.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Alicia Zuckerman of WLRN reports.

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NPR Story
12:20 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

As Price Of Oil Falls, Drilling Rigs In Colorado Feel The Pinch

A disassembled rig sits in a field east of Greeley, Colo. (Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio)

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 10:25 am

Half of Colorado’s drill rigs have gone idle since the end of October. The decline in the oil economy’s growth here is directly tied to the low price of oil. Economic experts aren’t sure where prices are headed, and that translates into economic uncertainty and layoffs. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Grace Hood of Colorado Public Radio reports.

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NPR Story
12:20 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

'Forget It, Jake, It's Chinatown': California's Historic Drought Has Cinematic Feel

Jack Nicholson portrays a private investigator in Los Angeles in the 1930's, endangered when a seemingly routine case uncovers the private scandals of the city's leading family, in "Chinatown." 1974 photo. (CBS Television Network via AP)

The photos and stories of California’s historic drought seem cinematic because they are. The 1974 film “Chinatown” involves a fictional Los Angeles mayor making the case for building an aqueduct to bring water from farm areas to Los Angeles, to supply water for people to move to the city.

Kevin Starr, history professor at the University of Southern California, says comparing the present-day drought to the California of “Chinatown” is especially apt.

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NPR Story
12:20 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

7 Out Of 10 Americans Worried About Finances

(TradingAcademy.com/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 8:23 pm

New surveys out this month suggest Americans still don't understand the value of saving. Millennials are not saving, primarily because of student debt and low wages.

But it's not just young people. The National Foundation for Credit Counseling released a survey showing seven in 10 Americans still say they are consistently worried about their finances.

There is evidence that Americans have gotten better at managing credit card debt, but bottom line, the survey finds people are not getting their finances in good order.

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NPR Story
1:32 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

Tsarnaev Convicted On All Charges In Marathon Bombing

A jury has convicted Dzhokhar Tsarnaev of all 30 counts he faced stemming from the 2013 bombing of the Boston Marathon.

Tsarnaev was found guilty Wednesday on charges that included conspiracy and use of a weapon of mass destruction. Of the 30 charges, 17 are punishable by death.

Tsarnaev’s lawyers admitted he participated in the bombings, but said his now-dead older brother was the driving force behind the deadly attack.

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NPR Story
1:32 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

Police Chief 'Sickened' By S.C. Shooting Video

Anthony Scott holds a photo of himself, center, and his brothers Walter Scott, left, and Rodney Scott, right, as he talks about his brother at his home near North Charleston, S.C., Wednesday, April 8, 2015. Walter Scott was killed by a North Charleston police officer after a traffic stop on Saturday. The officer, Michael Thomas Slager, has been charged with murder. (Chuck Burton/AP)

A white South Carolina police officer who claimed he killed a black man in self-defense has been fired and faces murder charges after a bystander’s video recorded him firing eight shots at the man’s back as he ran away. The city’s mayor also said he’s ordered body cameras to be worn by every single officer on the force.

The officer, Michael Thomas Slager, has been fired, but the town will continue to pay for his health insurance because his wife is eight months pregnant, said North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey, who called it a tragedy for two families.

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NPR Story
1:32 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

A New Kind Of Nuclear Reactor?

Steam billows from the cooling towers at Exelon's nuclear power generating station February 17, 2006 in Byron, Illinois. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Nuclear energy is fraught. What do you do with the spent radioactive fuel rods? What happens if there’s a meltdown? These worries have led many to write the whole thing off, and some to rebel against it. But a startup in Cambridge, Mass., thinks things can be different – like, revolutionary different. Ari Daniel, with Here & Now’s tech partner IEEE Spectrum, has our story.

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NPR Story
12:50 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

TV Owns Your Sunday Nights

Season 5 of the critically acclaimed TV show, Game Of Thrones, premiers on HBO this Sunday night. (Helen Sloan/HBO/Facebook)

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 3:02 pm

If you have plans Sunday night, NPR’s TV critic Eric Deggans says you may want to cancel.

This Sunday, April 12, there are new episodes of nine critically-acclaimed television shows, including AMC’s “Mad Men,” HBO’s “Game of Thrones” and CBS’s “The Good Wife.”

Deggans tells Here & Now’s Robin Young exactly why there are so many great shows on Sunday, how to manage the watch-load throughout the week and whether television can keep up with this golden age.

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NPR Story
12:50 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

Run Like Meb: Training Tips From An Olympic Marathoner

Meb Keflezighi's new book is a guide for runners training for the marathon. He is the 2014 Boston marathon winner and an Olympian. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Meb Keflezighi has been running at a world class level for more than a decade, going back to his first Olympic Games in 2000. He knew he wasn’t ready to win a medal in that race, but he knew that if he kept training and working hard someday the medals and the victories would come. They have.

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NPR Story
12:50 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

Low Oil Prices Hurt Recycling Industry

A former World War II bomber hangar in Binbrook, U.K., is used by CK Group to house materials for recycling. (Georgi Kantchev/The Wall Street Journal)

Low oil prices are starting to have an impact on an industry that might surprise people – recycling.

As The Wall Street Journal reports, “Plastic is often derived from oil, and there used to be money in recycled scrap. Not anymore. The fall in oil prices has dragged down the price of virgin plastic, erasing the recyclers’ advantage.”

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks to Georgi Kantchev of The Wall Street Journal about the impact of oil prices on recycling.

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NPR Story
1:33 pm
Mon April 6, 2015

How Long Would It Take To Fall From One Side Of Earth To The Other?

How long would it take to fall through the Earth? Alex Klotz's new calculation is four minutes shorter than previous accepted answer. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio)

The question is often posed to physics students who have always given answers under the assumption that Earth has uniform mass. But now, Alex Klotz, a McGill University grad student, has come up with a new calculation that challenges this concept.

His findings were published in the American Journal of Physics – a publication of the American Association of Physics Teachers.

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NPR Story
1:33 pm
Mon April 6, 2015

Remembering Victor Gotbaum, 93, New York Labor Leader

Victor Gotbaum speaks at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., on November 19, 1977. (MSG/AP)

Victor Gotbaum, one of the nation’s most powerful and prominent labor leaders during the 1970s and 80s, has died. Gotbaum led a New York branch of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), during a tense era in American labor history. He is also credited with helping New York City avoid bankruptcy in 1975. Victor’s daughter, Rachel Gotbaum, has worked with Here & Now and WBUR for years as a producer and reporter.

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NPR Story
1:33 pm
Mon April 6, 2015

Pro-Russian Forces May Challenge Ukraine's Fragile Ceasefire

A Russia-backed rebel enters the destroyed building of Donetsk Airport just outside Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, Thursday, April 2, 2015. OSCE monitors accompanied by pro-Russian rebels visited the ruins of Donetsk Airport and nearby areas to monitor the situation on the ground and discuss the observance of February’s cease-fire. (Mstyslav Chernov/AP)

Is Ukraine’s fragile ceasefire in danger? That’s what retired General Wesley Clark, the former supreme commander of NATO thinks.

Clark tells Defense One he believes pro-Russian forces are getting ready for a spring offensive that could run into May – May 9 to be exact, or what is known as Victory Day or V-E Day in Russia.

“We see planning in Russia to celebrate this. It would be wonderful for Putin if he could wrap up his conquest and celebrate it on that day if the allies are boycotting his celebration,” said Clark in an interview with Patrick Tucker.

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