Here & Now

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NPR's midday news magazine.  

One of Denver’s oldest movie rental stores is now one of the city’s last. Video One has survived the rise and fall of mega chains like Blockbuster and it’s still here during the age of online streaming. But as arts reporter Corey Jones of Here & Now contributor Colorado Public Radio explains, Video One may need to close its doors.

Carole Soule and her husband Bruce Dawson run Miles Smith Farm in Loudon, New Hampshire. They produce meat, and have Scottish Highlander cattle, pigs, rabbits, a couple horses, chickens and geese.

Soule says farming is important in New Hampshire and she is taking advantage of primary season to give the farming community more attention. She has attended several candidate events, and even brought her animals along to some of them.

She spoke with Here & Now‘s Robin Young at her farm.

During her election road trip covering the New Hampshire primary, Here & Now‘s Robin Young stopped by Toni Halla‘s general store in Canterbury, N.H. Halla runs the Canterbury Country Store with her husband, Joe. Many residents were at the store as well, and they were eager to talk politics.

Chipotle locations across the country are closed Monday for a few hours, for a company-wide food safety meeting.

The chain has been struggling since October with a string of E. coli outbreaks and norovirus incidents that have sent its sales and stock plummeting. Though there have been no new reports of illnesses since early December, and the CDC last week declared that Chipotle’s E. coli outbreak appears to be over, the company is still working to regain customer confidence.

10 Things To Know About New Hampshire

Feb 8, 2016

Every four years, national presidential candidates descend upon the Granite State, with the national media in tow. While much of the focus is on the primary race tomorrow, we decided to do a little digging about what sets this state apart from the other 49.

Here are the 10 things you should know about New Hampshire:

Last night Beyoncé performed during the Super Bowl 50 halftime show. It seemed to be business as usual: leotard, hair blowing thanks to a wind machine and a squad of dancers backing her up. But was it business as usual?

The lyrics to her new song “Formation,” which was released on Saturday are more racially driven than anything she has ever sung before.

[Youtube]

More than four months after Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder announced a 10-point plan to remedy the drinking water crisis in Flint, the source of the problem remains present. Like many older cities, Flint is full of lead pipes.

As lead poisoning captures the attention of presidential candidates, Gerald Markowitz reminds Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd that the problem is anything but new.

Despite regulatory efforts that span decades, lead persists in paint, pipes and many other places.

After decades crafting funk, soul and disco hits with the seminal R&B band Earth, Wind & Fire, Maurice White died in his sleep on Thursday, according to his brother. He was 74.

White revealed he’d been living with Parkinson’s disease in 2000, the same year Earth, Wind & Fire joined the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Ten years later, White was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame, along with several of his bandmates.

Earth, Wind & Fire Songs In This Segment

“That’s the Way of the World”

World leaders pledged a total of $10 billion Thursday to help millions of victims of Syria’s civil war – even as diplomatic efforts to end the conflict stuttered and stalled.

Leaders attending an international donors’ conference in London committed almost $6 billion in aid for 2016, with the rest to be handed over by 2020, British Prime Minister David Cameron said. But the funding commitments came as military bombardments in Syria intensified and tentative peace talks in Geneva were on hold.

Here is a look at what some countries have pledged for 2016 and beyond:

Comedian Bob Elliott died on Tuesday at the age of 92. For more than 40 years, he and the late Ray Goulding were “Bob and Ray,” delighting radio and television audiences with their deadpan comedy.

Bob Elliot also fathered a comedic dynasty. His son Chris Elliott and Chris’s daughter Abby Elliot have both been cast members of “Saturday Night Live.”

How Much Does Your Personal Trainer Make?

Feb 4, 2016

Regular gym goers know January is the worst. It's the time when all those people who usually don't show up crowd into classes and hog the equipment in an effort to meet those New Years resolutions.

Whether you're a gym rat or an occasional exerciser, you probably don't realize that though that personal trainer or group class leader has abs you'd pay big money for, they usually don't have an enviable salary. Laura Rice from Here & Now contributor Texas Standard takes a look at the economics.

No games will be played, but tomorrow is still a big day for college football. As per National Signing Day tradition, the best 17 and 18-year-old high school players from around the country are set to officially announce which college they will play for.

Increasingly, the day, and the hype around it, have provided fodder to the critics who say college football is anything but amateur. To discuss the big day, college football analyst John Bacon joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

Remembering President Garfield

Feb 2, 2016

As the Republicans move toward their convention in Cleveland this summer, it’s still anyone’s guess who the nominee will be. Things were even less clear over a century ago, when James A. Garfield emerged as the surprise choice at a brokered convention, back in 1880. Garfield won the White House, but his term was cut short by an assassin’s bullet.

Should Quarterly Earnings Reports Matter?

Feb 2, 2016

A flurry of quarterly earnings reports came in today, including those of Exxon, where profits fell more than 58 percent in the fourth quarter, and BP, where profits went down 91 percent in the same period.

The folks in the Hawkeye State get first say in the presidential race. Caucus history dates back to the 1968 convention and the anti-war violence in the streets of Chicago. People were fed up with the top-down system for picking presidential nominees. Reforms were passed and Iowa jumped to take advantage, scheduling its caucus first in 1972. Here & Now’s Alex Ashlock looks at the history of Iowa caucuses.

For this week’s edition of the Here & Now DJ Sessions, host Jeremy Hobson sits down with Anne Litt of KCRW in Santa Monica. She shares new music from Charlie Hilton, M. Ward and Mexrrissey. Mexrrissey is a play on the name of the British artist Morrissey.

The cost of investing in some basic stock funds is falling, as firms try to attract new customers, many of whom are younger and skeptical of paying hefty fees. According to Morningstar, the number of funds that cost $10 or less for every $10,000 invested has more than doubled in recent years, from 40 in 2010, to more than 100 today. This puts pressure on companies to make money elsewhere. Jill Schlesinger of CBS News joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain.

In Washington D.C., one of the places to find movers and shakers is The Bombay Club, a block from the White House. For nearly 30 years at The Bombay Club, turbaned waiters with white gloves have been serving refined Indian dishes to presidents, as well as tourists, long before Indian food became popular in the U.S.

Across the nation, hospitals are paying fines to the government when patients are readmitted to the hospital within 30 days. That can cost medical centers millions and doctors are looking for ways to reduce that readmission rate.

As Casey Kuhn from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports, one rural city in Arizona has kept patients out of the hospital by sending paramedics to their homes.

It’s been a mixed bag for retail so far this year, with announcements from Macy’s and Wal-Mart of store closings, while online shopping numbers continue to tick up. As the market finds its balance, some customers have fewer and fewer options when it comes to shopping.

Neil Saunders, managing director of the retail research firm Conlumino, talks with Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti about why some parts of the U.S. might become “retail deserts.”

When the sanctions on Iran were lifted earlier this month, as a result of the nuclear deal, we also got news that four Americans would be released from Iran, as part of a prisoner swap. Separate from that swap, another American, Matthew Trevithick, was being released.

Avoid Tax Identity Theft By Filing Early

Jan 28, 2016

Another reason to dread tax season: the Internal Revenue Service says it paid out $63 billion in fraudulent tax refunds between 2011 and 2014. That means someone posing as you could walk away with a refund check with your name on it.

Shawn Novak teaches tax policy at Arizona State University. He’s also a former tax adviser for the U.S. Senate Finance Committee. He joins Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd to discuss the problem, and ways to avoid becoming a victim.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is now investigating the NFL over its ticketing practices – specifically, whether it is illegally pricing tickets on the resale market using a mechanism known as “resale price floors.” Bloomberg has been covering the story, and Mike Regan of Bloomberg joins Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd with details.

Oprah announced this week on Twitter that she lost 26 pounds – good news for her, but even better news for Weight Watchers, the program she says she used. Weight Watchers saw its stock increase by 20 percent yesterday after the announcement.

The diet company has struggled in recent years with competition from new diet apps and online services. Oprah purchased 10 percent of the company in October. Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Maggie Lake of CNN about Oprah Winfrey and her effect on the company.

Guest

Acorn TV Streams Shows From Abroad

Jan 27, 2016

After the acclaimed period drama “Downton Abbey” wraps up its final season, what new shows can Anglophiles latch onto? The Acorn TV streaming service brings beloved British programs, along with productions from Canada, Australia and New Zealand, to subscribers’ devices. NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans speaks to Here & Now's Robin Young about Acorn TV's roots and growing popularity.

Guest

With U.S. stocks off to a dismal start in 2016 and China’s economic growth slowing, Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with Harvard economist Larry Summers. Summers says there’s a 1 in 3 chance the U.S. is heading for a recession. He also says he’s supporting Hillary Clinton for the presidency.

Interview Highlights: Larry Summers

Are you worried about the volatility of the stock market and the direction of the U.S. economy?

Authorities say the armed group occupying the national wildlife preserve in Oregon was given “ample opportunity” to leave peacefully.

Greg Bretzing, the FBI’s Portland special agent in charge, said at a news conference Wednesday that authorities took a deliberate and measured response to those who took over Malheur National Wildlife Refuge on Jan. 2. He says they’re working to safely remove those who are still occupying the site.

At a forum in Iowa this week, an undecided young voter questioned Hillary Clinton’s honesty, while Bernie Sanders was pressed to acknowledge that he’d raise taxes to pay for his universal health care plan.

In the Republican race, Donald Trump continued to discredit Ted Cruz, while Cruz insisted he wouldn’t engage in personal attacks. Here & Now‘s political analysts take a look at the unfolding week in politics, ahead of next Monday’s caucuses in Iowa.

In Texas yesterday, a grand jury that was investigating possible misconduct by Planned Parenthood cleared the organization, and instead indicted two anti-abortion activists, David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt.

The grand jury was called after undercover videos released last summer purportedly showed Planned Parenthood officials talking about selling fetal tissue.

Meanwhile in Florida, lawmakers advanced legislation yesterday that would essentially make abortion illegal in the state.

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