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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Supply Storehouses Keep Wildland Firefighters Supplied, Fed

Assistant manager Nicole Hallisey, right, and BLM fire spokesperson Jessica Gardetto in the Great Basin fire support cache at the edge of Boise's airport. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)

When wildfires break out and hundreds of responding firefighters need to be equipped and fed, their bosses order from a special warehouse.

There are 16 regional wildfire supply storehouses operated by the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and partner states.

Tom Banse of Here & Now contributor Northwest News Network got a tour of what you might call the Amazon.com for wildfire fighting in Boise, Idaho.

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NPR Story
11:52 am
Wed July 29, 2015

Garden-Inspired Cooking With Kathy Gunst

Kathy Gunst picks peas from her garden in Maine. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst gets much of the fresh produce she enjoys in the summer from her garden in southern Maine.

As she told host Jeremy Hobson, keeping a garden “is hours and hours” of work that she and her husband put in year-round. But “for me to come out in the morning and pick raspberries off my vine and pull together a lettuce for my lunch and know exactly what was in the soil, that it’s completely organic, that no one has sprayed it – the food just tastes so good.”

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NPR Story
11:52 am
Wed July 29, 2015

Microsoft Quietly Launches Windows 10

Visitors try out Windows 10, the latest operating system from US software giant Microsoft, during a launch event in Seoul on July 29, 2015. ( Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 1:09 pm

Microsoft is launching Windows 10 today without the usual midnight sales parties and marketing campaigns.

The company is hoping that users are happier with Windows 10, after Windows 8 was widely criticized when it was released in 2012. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson takes a look at what Windows 10 means for Microsoft with CNN’s Maggie Lake.

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NPR Story
12:41 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

What's The Best Way To Deal With Feral Cats?

The Humane Society of the United States estimates that there are about 50 million feral cats in the U.S. (taylar/Flickr)

Australia’s decision to kill 2 million feral cats is the latest event in a battle among cat lovers, bird lovers and even celebrities over cats and their impact on wildlife. Feral cats roam in solitude, but issues surrounding the treatment of homeless cats is tangled in both pet owner and non-pet owners’ lives.

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NPR Story
12:41 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

For Arizona Mining Towns, A Diverse Economy Is A Good Economy

Jerome, Arizona, is a mining town that has successfully become a tourist destination. (Carrie Jung/KJZZ)

Since 1875, the town of Superior, Arizona, has relied on copper mining to drive its economy. That reliance has come at a cost though, as many of Superior’s residents have lived through several cycles of mines opening and closing. But town officials are now hoping to put an end to that cycle. Carrie Jung from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports.

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NPR Story
12:41 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

The Benefits Of State-Of-The-Art Airports

Passengers maneuver through one of the cramped hallways at New York's LaGuardia Airport. Often ranked in customer satisfaction surveys as the worst airports in America, New York. (Frank Eltman/AP Photo)

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and Vice President Joe Biden unveiled a $4 billion plan yesterday to completely rebuild LaGuardia Airport.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Mitchell Moss about the role airports play in a region’s economy, and why it matters to have a state-of-the-art airport in a city. Moss is director of the Rudin Center for Transportation and Policy Management at NYU.

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NPR Story
12:47 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

In California Drought, Musicians Find Inspiration

Composer and professor Dr. Benjamin Boone created Waterless Music, a symphony about water and the lack of it in California. (Benjamin Boone)

Historical movements, wars and disasters around the globe have created signature sounds in music. Think freedom songs like “We Shall Overcome” or even Prince’s “Baltimore.” California is in its fourth year of drought and songs about a drying state are now emerging. From Here & Now’s contributing station Valley Public Radio, Ezra David Romero reports.

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NPR Story
12:47 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

China Stocks See Biggest Drop Since 2007

An investor walks past a screen that shows share prices in a security firm in Hangzhou, east China's Zhejiang province on July 27, 2015. China's benchmark Shanghai stock index slumped 5.22 percent in afternoon trade on July 27, dragged lower by worries over the economy. AFP PHOTO CHINA OUT (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Stocks in China slid dramatically today and yesterday, with the Shanghai Composite Index ending down 8.5 percent. The drops come after huge gains in the markets earlier this summer, and amid fears that the government is going to stop taking certain actions to prop up the market. Jill Schlesinger of CBS News joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.

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NPR Story
12:26 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

Psychiatrist: Walking Stimulates The Brain 'In Many, Many Ways'

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 12:47 pm

According to psychiatry professor and author John Ratey, something as simple as a walk can improve both physical and mental well being. Ratey is co-author of the book “Go Wild: Free Your Mind from the Afflictions of Civilization.” Last year, he and Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson went for a walk near the Charles River in Boston. Today we revisit that conversation.

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NPR Story
12:57 pm
Fri July 24, 2015

New Relationship With U.S. Promises Big Changes For Cubans

As the United States and Cuba slowly resume diplomatic relations, one of the biggest question marks has been what effect these changes will have on the people of Cuba.

The reopening of the barriers between the two countries offers new opportunities for improvement in the quality of life for Cubans, promising major growth in Cuban tourism and more freedom for the transfer of remittances – money sent from the U.S. that goes directly to people in Cuba.

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NPR Story
12:57 pm
Fri July 24, 2015

U.S. Takes Home Gold... In Math

Members of the U.S. International Mathematical Olympic team, including coach Poh-Shen Loh (far left), Ryan Aleweiss (middle) and Yang Liu (fourth from right) pose with their gold medals. (Courtesy Poh-Shen Loh)

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 6:38 am

On July 5, Americans around the country rejoiced when the women’s World Cup team brought home the gold medal, beating out 23 teams for soccer’s greatest prize.

At the same time, in Chiang Mai, Thailand, another American team was competing for victory. But instead of taking on 23 teams, this team took on participants from 103 other countries. And they won.

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NPR Story
12:57 pm
Fri July 24, 2015

Food Innovators Develop Seaweed That Tastes Like Bacon

Dulse, a type of seaweed, has for centuries been harvested in the wild and used in northern European cuisine. (Akuppa/Flickr)

Chefs working with the Food Innovation Center at Oregon State University have been experimenting with a patented, fast-growing new form of a seaweed called dulse, which has for centuries been harvested in the wild and used in northern European cuisine.

Researchers say their dulse, when fried, tastes like bacon. Vegans everywhere are rejoicing. Michael Morrisey, the center’s director, joins Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson to talk about the results.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Tulsa Braces For 100-Degree Weekend

Liz Moody, left, and Stephanie Russell, right, both of Forest Grove, Oregon, cover their heads with towls to keep cool as they watch the Japan-Canada World Cup of Softball game in Oklahoma City, Thursday, July 21, 2011. (Sue Ogrocki/AP)

NOAA’s National Climate Data Center reported this week that temperatures across the globe for the first six months of 2015 are the warmest on record.

While that is great for beachgoers, it also endangers millions of lives, as heat is the No. 1 weather-related killer in the United States.

One city that’s feeling the heat is Tulsa, Oklahoma, which has 100-degree temperatures forecast for the weekend.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Dunkin' CEO: Wages Should Go Up, But Not So Quickly

Dunkin' Brands Group President and CEO Nigel Travis, the parent company of Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins, celebrates their initial public offering outside the NASDAQ MarketSite on July 27, 2011 in New York City.(Mario Tama/Getty Images)

One of the nation’s most recognizable coffee chains, Dunkin’ Donuts, is expanding in the United States and abroad.

Dunkin’ Brands announced today that it opened 80 new Dunkin’ Donuts stores in the U.S. and 154 worldwide in the second quarter. The company is making a push into the coveted West Coast market, where the competition is brutal.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Wind, Dry Ground Fueling Wildfire In Washington State

Smoke from the Blue Creek fire billows over wheat fields east of Walla Walla, Washington, on July 21, 2015. (Anna King/Northwest News Network)

A wildfire sweeping through Glacier National Park in Montana is prompting more evacuations. Officials are clearing the small community of St. Mary, at the park’s eastern entrance. The fire has burned through more than six square miles.

Another wildfire has charred six square miles in Northern California, prompting evacuations about 30 miles north of Napa. And about a thousand firefighters are continuing to battle a blaze 10 miles east of Walla Walla, Washington. It’s only about 5 percent contained.

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NPR Story
2:01 pm
Wed July 22, 2015

Aurora Shooting Trial Enters Penalty Phase

Family members of Aurora Theater shooting victim Veronica Moser walk into the Arapahoe County Justice Center as opening arguments for the trial of Aurora Theater Shooting defendant James Holmes opened at the courthouse April 27, 2015 in Centennial, Colorado. (Photo by Marc Piscotty/Getty Images)

The trial of James Holmes, found guilty of the movie theater shooting rampage in Aurora, Colorado, that killed 12 people and injured 70 others, enters the penalty phase today.

Jurors will hear testimony before deciding whether Holmes will be sentenced to death or life in prison. Megan Verlee of Colorado Public Radio joins Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti with the latest.

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NPR Story
2:01 pm
Wed July 22, 2015

An American Music Playlist From The Man Behind Newport Folk Festival

The Rhode Island-based band Deer Tick is among those playing this year's Newport Folk Festival. (Courtesy)

This weekend’s Newport Folk Festival marks the 50th anniversary of what many believe is a defining moment for American music: when Bob Dylan put down his acoustic guitar and plugged in an electric one.

The moment has been written and talked about extensively, and people are still arguing today about whether it permanently changed the definition of American folk music.

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NPR Story
2:01 pm
Wed July 22, 2015

Volcker Bank Rule Takes Effect

Former Chairman of the Federal Reserve Paul Volcker, visits FOX Business Network's "CAVUTO: Coast To Coast" at FOX Studios on June 17, 2015 in New York City. (Monica Schipper/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 12:42 pm

Starting today, Wall Street banks have to comply with the Volcker Rule, considered one of the biggest new restriction they’ve faced in decades.

The rule bans taxpayer-insured banks from making bets on their own money, and banks fought it for years. But many have since fallen in line.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson takes a look at what the move will mean with Maggie Lake of CNN.

Guest

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NPR Story
1:33 pm
Tue July 21, 2015

Jet.com Launches With The Goal To Rival Amazon

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 1:37 pm

Jet logo via Facebook

The new online shopping service Jet.com launches today, and the company is trying to take on the likes of Amazon and Walmart.

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NPR Story
1:33 pm
Tue July 21, 2015

Delivery By Drone Is Hovering Closer To Reality

An employee of the US drone company Matternet shows a drone carrying a mail box of Swiss Post on July 7, 2015 at the airport of Bellechasse, western Switzerland during a press conference. Swiss Post started a series of test for parcel delivery by drone in the alpine country that has many isolated villages in valleys surrounded by mountains. (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)

Last week, a drone delivered 24 packages of medicine and supplies to a health fair in rural Virginia. The delivery marks the first FAA-approved delivery by drone and more are in the planning stages.

This is sure to interest a Silicon Valley startup, which has teamed up with the Swiss Post and Swiss WorldCargo. Matternet and the Swiss companies are joining in testing the commercial use of logistics drones.

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NPR Story
1:33 pm
Tue July 21, 2015

Old Photo Stirs Memories Of Bygone Vermont

Willis Hicks, an auctioneer who ran the Commission Sales in Cadys Falls, drew crowds at his auctions and caught the eye of not one, but two photographers: Nathan Benn, of National Geographic, and Vermont photographer Peter Miller. NATHAN BENN/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC PETER MILLER/VERMONT PEOPLE

Sometimes the memory of a person resurfaces in an unusual way. Earlier this year, Here & Now contributor Vermont Public Radio aired an interview with the National Geographic photographer Nathan Benn, whose photographs of Vermont in the 1970s were on display at a local exhibit.

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NPR Story
12:52 pm
Mon July 20, 2015

Snapshots Make Way To Fine Art Museum

Unidentified photographer, American, about 1950s. The gelatin silver print is part of the collection Unfinished Stories: Snapshots from the Peter J. Cohen Collection at the MFA. (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 1:46 pm

Some of us have dusty boxes filled with fading family snap shots. Sift through and there’s a chance you’ll find pictures of strangers. Mystery photos can be amusing and perplexing.

Collector Peter Cohen has rescued 50,000 “found” vintage photographs, and now about 300 are on display at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Andrea Shea of Here & Now contributor WBUR reports on Cohen’s quest to secure the snapshot’s place in history.

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NPR Story
12:52 pm
Mon July 20, 2015

What Will Latino Votes Mean For The 2016 Elections?

Republican presidential hopeful Senator Ted Cruz of Texas fields questions at The Family Leadership Summit at Stephens Auditorium on July 18, 2015 in Ames, Iowa. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 1:46 pm

A new poll from the Spanish-language broadcaster Univision has some bad news for Republicans. Democrats once again hold a big lead among Latino voters going into the next presidential campaign.

But there are a few bright spots for Republicans. Former Florida governor Jeb Bush has made big strides in closing the gap in a hypothetical matchup against Hillary Clinton, and both Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio have Latino parents.

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NPR Story
12:48 pm
Mon July 20, 2015

Greek Banks Reopen, As Some Austerity Measures Take Effect

A policeman stands guard as people queue to get money from ATMs as Greek banks reopened on Monday morning after three weeks of closure on July 20, 2015 in Athens, Greece. (Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 1:46 pm

Greek bank branches reopened today after being closed for three weeks in an effort to prevent a collapse of its banking system. But there are still many banking restrictions in place.

Meanwhile, some of the austerity measures enacted as a condition for a new bailout are taking effect this week. For instance, today Greeks are being hit by increases in the value-added tax on goods and services.

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NPR Story
1:41 pm
Fri July 17, 2015

Remembering The Civil Rights Activist Who Turned A Motel Into A Museum

The National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. D'Army Bailey founded the museum in 1991. (Sean Davis/Flickr)

D’Army Bailey, a civil rights activist, author and judge will be buried tomorrow in Memphis. He died Sunday at age 73.

Bailey is probably best remembered as the founder of the National Civil Rights Museum at the site of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, where Dr. Martin Luther King Junior was assassinated in 1968.

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NPR Story
1:12 pm
Fri July 17, 2015

FBI Joins Investigation Of Sandra Bland's Death In Texas Jail

Sandra Bland is pictured in this photo posted to her Facebook page in November 2014. (Facebook)

There is now a video of the arrest of Sandra Bland, the 28-year-old black woman who was found dead in her jail cell in Waller County, Texas, on Monday. She was initially pulled over last Friday for not using her signal when she changed lanes, and arrested for “assault on a public servant.”

In the video of her arrest, recorded by a bystander, you can see police on top of Bland. She is down on the ground, and she can be heard asking officers why they are being so rough with her.

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NPR Story
1:12 pm
Fri July 17, 2015

A Redhead Roundtable

According to author Jacky Colliss Harvey, the term "redhead" dates back to the 15th century, while negative portrayals of redheads come from red hair's association with Judas. (photodonny/Flickr)

Yesterday, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson spoke with Jacky Colliss Harvey about her new book “Red: A History of the Redhead.” In it, she charts the genetic, historical and cultural journey of redheads across the globe – the good and, yes, the bad.

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NPR Story
2:17 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Official: 4 Marines Killed, Along With Gunman

Police officers enter the Armed Forces Career Center through a bullet-riddled door after a gunman opened fire on the building Thursday, July 16, 2015, in Chattanooga, Tenn. (John Bazemore/AP)

A gunman unleashed a barrage of gunfire at two military facilities Thursday in Tennessee, killing at least four Marines, officials said. The suspect also was killed.

A U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss an ongoing investigation, told The Associated Press the death toll included the four U.S. Marines and the sole gunman believed responsible. Two others, a soldier and a police officer, were wounded, the official said.

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NPR Story
2:17 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

This Nashville Vinyl Factory Is Still Pressing Records

United Record Pressing operates out of the same cinderblock building on Chestnut Street that's been its home since 1962. The company originally opened in 1949, when it was called Southern Plastics. (Stephen Jerkins/Nashville Public Radio)

As vinyl pressing plants around the world shut down in the heyday of CDs, one historic vinyl factory remained operating in the same facility where it pressed The Beatles’ first American single in 1963.

United Record Pressing has presses from the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s – machines the company bought after other vinyl facilities closed shop.

Steve Haruch from Here & Now contributor Nashville Public Radio pays a visit to the United Record Pressing, a working museum of vinyl history.

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NPR Story
2:17 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

A New Threat To Coral Reefs: China's Man-Made Islands

Scientists say the dredging project that created the islands has done massive damage to the coral reefs and aquatic life in the area. (juska/Flickr)

China’s neighbors were alarmed to see it build five islands in the South China Sea earlier this year. They were equipped airstrips, ports and military supplies, and were a clear indication of China’s military ambitions in the disputed region.

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