Here & Now

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NPR Story
12:43 pm
Fri July 3, 2015

Kids Books Feature Famous Figures As Children

Cover of

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NPR Story
12:43 pm
Fri July 3, 2015

John Adams Wanted Independence Day On July 2, Not July 4

Founding Father John Adams thought that America's independence day celebration should be on July 2, not July 4. July 2, 1776 was day the Continental Congress voted for independence. (Karsun Designs Photography/Flickr)

As the Founding Fathers established the United States of America, they had their eyes on the future and they knew they were making history. But not everyone had the same opinion of the timeline of that history.

Most thought the big day was July 4, when then Continental Congress approved the text of the Declaration of Independence and sent it to the printer. But John Adams believed July 2, 1776, was the really the big day.

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NPR Story
12:43 pm
Fri July 3, 2015

Conservationist Madison Stewart Stands Up For Sharks

Recent attacks in North Carolina have heightened the negative public perception of sharks. But for 21-year-old Australian Madison Stewart, sharks are almost family.

Since she was in her early teens, Stewart has made it her mission to preserve and educate the world about the creatures she feels so passionate about.

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NPR Story
2:27 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Professor Says Jefferson Davis Statue Should Be Removed, Preserved

A statue of Jefferson Davis is seen on the University of Texas campus in Austin, Texas.(Eric Gay/AP)

Confederate flags are coming down across the South as governments and institutions respond to calls to remove symbols of a racist past. At the University of Texas at Austin, thousands of students have petitioned the school to remove a statue of Jefferson Davis, who was president of the Confederate States of America during the Civil War.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

How The 'Modern Family Effect' Is Changing Public Opinion About Gay Rights

ABC's "Modern Family" has won five Emmy Awards, and was renewed for its seventh season on May 7. (ABC)

Last Friday the Supreme Court made a landmark decision for gay rights. But another institution has also played a significant role in changing American public opinion about this issue: Hollywood.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans talks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about the “Modern Family effect” and how television has changed the way Americans think about gay relationships.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

DJ Session: Sounds For The Holiday Weekend

Bilal is a classically trained vocalist from Philadelphia, and was swept up into the neo-soul movement in the early-2000s. He released his newest album, "In Another Life," on June 30. (Courtesy)

For the upcoming holiday weekend, this week’s edition of the Here & Now DJ Sessions features KCRW’s Anthony Valadez, with new music from the artist Bilal, a trained opera singer who has now gone in a very different direction. He also shares songs from U.K. artist LA Priest, Canadian singer and musician Mocky and Argentine DJ/producer Chancha Via Circuito.

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NPR Story
1:06 pm
Wed July 1, 2015

Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter Among Social Media Sites Moving Into News

Facebook is millennials’ No. 1 source for political news, according to a recent study by Pew Research Center. Now, other social media outlets are trying to get on board.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with media analyst John Carroll about social networks’ stampede to become news outlets and get journalists on staff.

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NPR Story
1:06 pm
Wed July 1, 2015

A Lost 1961 Documentary On Homosexuality Is Rediscovered

"The Rejected" was one of the first television documentaries to openly address sexual orientation. (KQED)

The Supreme Court’s recent ruling on same-sex marriage is a striking reminder of the strides LGBT Americans have made toward acceptance in recent years.

But it wasn’t very long ago that the broader society treated them with scorn. That’s clear from a 1961 television documentary called “The Rejected.” It was one of the first to openly address sexual orientation, and was considered progressive at the time.

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NPR Story
1:06 pm
Wed July 1, 2015

Some Clerks In Alabama, Arkansas Resist Issuing Marriage Licenses

Protesters waive a rainbow flag on the front lawn of the Rowan County Judicial Center, Tuesday, June 30, 2015, in Morehead, Ky. The protest was being held against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis, who, due to the ruling of the Supreme Court of the United States and her own religious beliefs, has refused to issue any marriage licenses in the county. (Timothy D. Easley/AP)

After the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage, couples in states around the country rushed to courthouses to get marriage licenses. Many states that had been hold-outs, including Michigan, shifted policies very quickly.

But in some places in the South, including counties in Alabama, clerks are pushing back. One clerk in Arkansas has reportedly quit in opposition. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR reporter Debbie Elliott about the trend.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Tue June 30, 2015

With Pluto On Its Horizon, NASA Spacecraft Nears Target

In this artists rendering, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft approaches Pluto. (NASA)

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 2:51 pm

On July 15, NASA’s unmanned spacecraft New Horizons is expected to encounter its primary target of Pluto. It’s a project nine years in the making, and with 3 billion miles recorded, it is the longest, farthest and fastest-ever space mission.

“Time flies when you’re having fun,” Alan Stern, who leads the mission, told Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson. “We’ve crossed the entirety of the solar system and now we’re on Pluto’s doorstep.”

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Tue June 30, 2015

Obama To Expand Overtime Pay For Millions

President Barack Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. The Obama administration will propose requiring overtime pay for workers who earn nearly $1,000 per week, three individuals familiar with the plan said Monday, June 29. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/ AP Photo)

President Obama announced this week that the Labor Department will expand overtime pay, in a move the administration estimates would impact 5 million U.S. workers. That would double the income threshold at which employers can avoid paying overtime.

Right now, only salaried employees earning less $23,660 a year are eligible for overtime. This rule would raise that threshold so that employees making up to $50,660 a year would get paid overtime.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Tue June 30, 2015

What Makes A Word? Making Sense Of The Argle-Bargle

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia addresses the ACC America, Association of Corporate Counsel Washington Metropolitan (WMACCA) Chapter, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012, in McLean, Va. (Luis M. Alvarez/AP)

Its been a busy week for the Supreme Court. Not surprisingly, that means it has been a busy week for linguists. Consider that in the last few days we’ve heard Justice Antonin Scalia use both jiggery-pokery and mummeries.

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NPR Story
12:37 pm
Tue June 30, 2015

Chorus Helps Trans Men And Women Find Their Voice

Chorus members Laurie Wolft (left) and George Hastie (right) pose for a photo with choral director Sandi Hammond. (Eileen Bolinsky)

Originally published on Wed July 1, 2015 6:49 am

A new chorus in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is helping transgender men and women find their voices – and community. The Butterfly Music Transgender Chorus was founded by Sandi Hammond, a singer and vocal teacher, who wanted to help trans men and women learn to use their changing voices in a safe space.

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NPR Story
11:32 am
Tue June 30, 2015

Google Is Manipulating Search Results, Study Finds

(cogdog/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 1:36 pm

Google may offer the benefit of filtering a world of data into a digestible stream of links, but new research says those results are subject to manipulation.

The study, authored by top legal and economic scholars from Columbia and Harvard University, but paid for by Google rival Yelp, says the search engine giant knowingly buries its competitors. Google refutes the findings.

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NPR Story
11:32 am
Tue June 30, 2015

Christie Says He's Running In 2016 To 'Change The World'

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie stands with his wife, Mary Pat Christie, second from left, and their children, from left, Patrick, Sarah, Bridget and Andrew while speaking to supporters during an event announcing he will seek the Republican nomination for president, Tuesday, June 30, 2015, at Livingston High School in Livingston, N.J. (Julio Cortez/AP)

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has launched a 2016 campaign for president.

The Republican governor formally announced his plans in a Tuesday morning event in the gymnasium of his old high school.

He says both political parties “have failed our country” in an announcement speech calling for more compromise in politics.

Christie was once thought to be a leading White House contender, but his star has faded over the last year. He’s been hurt by a traffic scandal involving senior aides and a lagging state economy.

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NPR Story
11:32 am
Tue June 30, 2015

Housing The Homeless With Health Care Dollars

Certified medical assistant Michael Thomas checks Nebbitt’s height for his chart. Nebbitt suffers from seizures, heart disease and depression. (Heidi de Marco/KHN).

When homeless people with chronic diseases get off the streets and get the care they need, their health improves and they use emergency rooms less. But does that mean health care dollars should be used to house them?

Los Angeles County has been doing just that, and now California wants to expand the effort statewide. Anna Gorman from Here & Now contributor Kaiser Health News reports.

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NPR Story
2:30 pm
Mon June 29, 2015

Smart Meters: An Experiment In Power Grid Innovation

John Phelan with Fort Collins Utilities inspects the smart meter at his home. (Dan Boyce)

Our electricity system is changing rapidly around us. New sources of renewable power are meeting technologies that can crunch unprecedented amounts of data. It’s all leading to a major shakeup for how utilities do business. Dan Boyce from Here & Now’s contributor Inside Energy takes us to Fort Collins, Colorado, for a peek into our utility’s possible future.

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NPR Story
2:30 pm
Mon June 29, 2015

How Historic Was Last Week? A Historian Puts It In Context.

President Barack Obama sings "Amazing Grace" as he delivers the eulogy for South Carolina state senator and Rev. Clementa Pinckney during Pinckney's funeral service June 26, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

President Obama won a series of huge victories in the Supreme Court last week, including health care and same sex marriage. And officials in South Carolina called for the removal of the Confederate flag from the state capitol grounds after nine African Americans were gunned down in a Charleston church. Here & Now’s Robin Young asks historian Julian Zelizer to put the week into historical context.

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NPR Story
2:30 pm
Mon June 29, 2015

High Stakes Financial News: From Greece To China

A Chinese stock investor monitors share prices at a securities firm in Fuyang, in China's Anhui province on June 19, 2015. Shanghai shares plunged 6.42 percent on June 19, ending a torrid week as the benchmark index was hit by tight liquidity and profit-taking after a powerful surge over the past year. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

There are a number of dramatic economic stories in the news today. In Greece, banks and markets are closed, as the country edges towards a default and or exit from the eurozone.

Meanwhile, Puerto Rico’s governor now says that the commonwealth cannot pay its $72 billion in debts. And in China, stocks have tumbled into a bear market, despite a move by the central bank there to cut interest rates to a record low.

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NPR Story
2:11 pm
Fri June 26, 2015

Obama Delivers Rousing Eulogy For Rev. Pinckney

U.S. President Barack Obama delivers the eulogy for South Carolina state senator and Rev. Clementa Pinckney during Pinckney's funeral service June 26, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Suspected shooter Dylann Roof, 21, is accused of killing nine people on June 17th during a prayer meeting in the church, which is one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

President Barack Obama has delivered a rousing eulogy for Rev. Clementa Pinckney, who was among nine who were slain at an African-American church in South Carolina last week.

“The nation shares in your grief,” Obama said Friday at the funeral for Pinckney, 41, who was shot and killed during a Bible study at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Eight others also died.

“What a good man,” Obama said. “What an example he set.”

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NPR Story
12:41 pm
Fri June 26, 2015

Kentucky Will Recognize Same-Sex Marriage Starting Today

Fourteen states must lift their bans on same-sex marriage, after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry anywhere in the United States. One of the states that must lift its ban is Kentucky. Joseph Lord of Here & Now contributing station WFPL in Louisville joins host Jeremy Hobson with details.

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NPR Story
12:41 pm
Fri June 26, 2015

Opponent Of Same-Sex Marriage Reacts To Ruling

James Campbell, a Scottsdale, Ariz., lawyer representing nearly two dozen current and former New Mexico legislators, talks to reporters outside the New Mexico Supreme Court building on Wednesday Oct. 23, 2013 in Santa Fe, N.M. after making arguments in a case that could determine whether gay marriage is legal statewide. Campbell said the legislature, not the court, should decide the issue of same-sex marriage. He is an attorney for a conservative Christian law group called Alliance Defending Freedom. (Barry Massey/AP)

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled to extend the right to marry to same-sex couples in all 50 states. Among those who oppose the ruling is Jim Campbell, senior counsel for the Alliance Defending Freedom. He speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

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NPR Story
12:41 pm
Fri June 26, 2015

A Conversation With San Antonio's First Black Female Mayor

Ivy Taylor was initially appointed as interim mayor of San Antonio, following Julian Castro's departure to serve in the Obama administration. She won reelection on June 13, 2015. (Facebook)

On his final day broadcasting from Texas, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson sits down with San Antonio Mayor Ivy Taylor, who took the oath of office this week.

He asks her about San Antonio’s rapid growth, housing prices, a controversy over an anti-discrimination ordinance that protects members of the LGBT community, and the recent departure of the ride-sharing services Uber and Lyft from San Antonio.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Wild Animal Selfies Lead To Injuries, Charges

When people take selfies with wild animals, they may be putting themselves or the animals at risk. (jentwen/Instagram)

More and more people are putting themselves and wild animals in danger, all in the name of a cool selfie. The trend of taking exciting selfies and videos has resulted in injured animals and animal harassment charges for the humans involved.

Vicki Croke, host of WBUR’s The Wild Life blog joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about the abuse of animals in pursuit of a good selfie.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Social Media Buzz: From #Charleston To #SCOTUS

Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Julia Turner, editor-in-chief of Slate, about what’s trending on social media.

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NPR Story
1:36 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

California Lawmakers Pass Bill Requiring Vaccines For School Entry

Christy Pritchard carries her son, Zachary, 3, as she waits to appear before the Assembly Health Committee to voice her opposition to a measure mandating that schoolchildren be vaccinated at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, June 9, 2015. (Rich Pedroncelli/AP)

The California State Assembly has passed a bill that would require all children – except for those with medical wavers – to receive vaccinations before attending school. Current law allows for personal belief exemptions.

Many California parents choose not to vaccinate their children out of fear that it will cause autism or other medical problems, but medical professionals assert that there is no risk of such side effects.

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NPR Story
1:18 pm
Wed June 24, 2015

Boston Marathon Bomber Apologizes For The First Time

Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev apologized for the deadly attack for the first time Wednesday just before a judge was set to formally sentence him to death.

“I am sorry for the lives that I’ve taken, for the suffering that I’ve caused you, for the damage that I’ve done – irreparable damage,” the 21-year-old college student said, breaking more than two years of public silence.

To the victims, he said: “I pray for your relief, for your healing.”

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NPR Story
1:18 pm
Wed June 24, 2015

What Is The Supreme Court Doing Behind The Scenes?

The Supreme Court is scheduled to rule on two landmark cases in the next few days – same-sex marriage and the Affordable Care Act. Advocates and critics of the death penalty are also watching for a ruling on the constitutionality of some lethal injection drugs.

But why do all these big cases come at the same time? What goes on behind the scenes of the Supreme Court as a session winds down? Here & Now’s Robin Young asks NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg.

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NPR Story
1:18 pm
Wed June 24, 2015

CEO Activism And The Corporate Battle Against The Confederate Flag

A search for Confederate flags in Google Shopping on June 24, 2015, did not match any shopping results. (Screenshot)

As politicians across the South are stepping in to call for the removal of the Confederate battle flag and other symbols of the Confederacy, big businesses are also joining the fray. Wal-Mart, eBay, Amazon and others have promised to pull merchandise tied to the flag, in some cases adding strong arguments against the products.

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NPR Story
1:28 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

Garlic Scapes, Green Garlic And Roasted Garlic: Recipes And Tips

Clockwise from top left: garlic scapes, mature garlic and green garlic. (Kathy Gunst)

Of all the ingredients she uses in her dishes, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst prizes garlic above all. “Garlic is the spine of all my cooking. I cannot imagine cooking without it,” she told host Robin Young.

Kathy gave us this primer on garlic scapes, green garlic and roasted garlic. She also brought us these four recipes:

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