Morning Edition

Weekdays 5am to 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



And let's go behind the scenes of a show that began just after the Vietnam War ended and premieres its 41st season in a much-changed world tomorrow night.


Adventures In Airport Securty

Oct 2, 2015

Customs agents in Paris seized 115 live scorpions.

They'd come from Cameroon, bound for the U.S., marked as samples for medical research though the shipper sells "animal companions."

Screeners in Denver noticed bottles labeled T-N-T. They cleared the area.

And they found the bottles held bath salts.

They bottles labeled T-n-T were wedding favors at the marriage of people whose names both start with T.

How To Take A Selfie With Your Dog

Oct 2, 2015

When you're trying to take a selfie with your dog, telling your pet to "say cheese" probably won't elicit a smile.

But a tennis ball perched on top of a smartphone is a real attention getter.

The "pooch selfie" is a simple attachment that allows dog owners to attach the fluffy ball.

It's been a hit on Kickstarter. Now to the bigger challenge — getting cats to focus.

The largest police department in the country is changing the way it deals with the use of force by its officers.

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Kristen Brady was standing in a parking lot yesterday. It was the middle of the morning in Roseburg, Ore. She was chatting with a friend when they heard what they thought was a car backfiring.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



A Fake Letter About Fake Deer In Wisconsin

Oct 1, 2015

Fake deer snuck into Wisconsin's annual deer count the past two years.

At least according to a letter sent out on Department of National Resources stationary.

Residents were asked to remove deer lawn ornaments so that they wouldn't be included in this years count.

The department took to Facebook on Wednesday to dispute the story, saying the letter is fake.

But many Wisconsinites had fun with it on Facebook.

Including this concern: "What about the very important annual gnome census?"

You know the British slogan: Keep calm, and carry on.

That attitude saw the British through World War II, and Americans through the financial crisis.

But apparently it does not apply when Facebook crashes.

Numerous police departments report receiving calls when the site goes down.

The last time it happened, Britain's Independent noticed that the Kingston police tweeted: please don't call us.

Houston, Texas, police also tweeted an advisory: "We cannot fix Facebook."

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



A giant clothing retailer has broadened its notion of what a model looks like. H&M produced an ad with an unusually wide variety of people.


UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Look fake. Look chic. Look sheikh. Take a stand.

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It's a typical morning at the Dupont Veterinary Clinic in Lafayette, La. Dr. Phillip Dupont is caring for cats and dogs in the examining room while his wife, Paula, answers the phone and pet owners' questions. Their two dogs are sleeping on the floor behind her desk.

"That's Ken and Henry," Paula says, pointing to the slim, midsize dogs with floppy ears and long snouts. Both dogs are tan, gray and white, with similar markings. "I put a red collar on Ken and a black collar on Henry so I can tell who's who."

Dog Drives His Owner's Truck Into A Lake

Sep 30, 2015

This could happen to any dog owner. A man in Ellsworth, Maine, walked his Yorkshire terrier.

Which wanted to fight another dog. So the man put his terrier in his truck.

And the dog put the truck in gear.

It started rolling, downhill, 75 feet, into a lake.

And sank in 10 feet of water.

A family friend dove in to rescue the dog, and it's easy to imagine that dog's face - freshly bathed, completely oblivious, wondering where's the food.

Not all was lost in the sinking of the Titanic. And several of its artifacts will be auctioned online Wednesday.

They include a lunch menu offering grilled mutton chops ... and a ticket for the ship's Turkish baths.

Both survived in the pocket of a passenger who jumped into the "Money Boat," a notorious lifeboat taken over by a handful of millionaires who left everybody else behind.

The crumpled menu is expected to sell for $50,000.

At a Catholic Mass at the Magyar Szentek Plébánia church, in a leafy riverside area of Budapest, there is no extra collection for refugees. No canned food drive. No charity bake sale.

This church, like many across Hungary, is caught in the middle of a debate on how to help refugees — or whether even to help at all.

Pope Francis has called on all of Europe's Catholics to take in refugees, but in Hungary, a predominantly Catholic country, church leaders have been hesitant.

Larry Goldstein is trying to find drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease. A biologist in cellular and molecular medicine at the University of California, San Diego, Goldstein also just started testing something he hopes will enable paralyzed people to walk again.

For both lines of research, he's using cells from aborted fetuses.

"The fetal cells are vital at this time because, to our knowledge, they have the best properties for the kinds of experiments that we need to do," Goldstein says.

On the 18th floor of the Atlanta Financial Center, tech entrepreneurs recently pitched to potential investors over wine and brie.

John Duisberg, co-founder of Cooleaf, which makes a mobile app for employee engagement, tells the crowd he needs $500,000 to double the size of his company. It's got most of that money secured.

Two years ago, it was a different story.

Doctors To Get 70,000 New Medical Codes

Sep 29, 2015

Doctors are getting a billing system that's sure to cause headaches.

Introduced by the federal government, 70,000 new medical codes will describe diagnoses in detail.

Like this:

Crashed in a spacecraft? That's V95.41XA.

Walked into a lamppost? Twice? That's W220.2XD.

Others include, "Problems in relationship with in-laws..."

"Other contact with a squirrel ..."

And, "Underdosing of caffeine."

Not included: death via paperwork.

The New York Jets lost their game over the weekend. But they got some encouragement.

The singer Gladys Knight showed up late for the game. As soon as she did, the Jets scored.

And she later called into the weekly radio show of coach Todd Bowles. She says if the Jets make the Super Bowl, she will sing for him in person.

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From his first moments on air, new host Trevor Noah gave fans The Daily Show they have known and loved for years, with a few upgrades.

There were new graphics and a new desk, but the same old frat rock guitar music in the intro and the same show-closing Moment of Zen. Noah even began his hosting gig last night by talking about the guy he was succeeding, recently departed Daily Show host Jon Stewart.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



An Extra Point That's Drawn Extra Attention

Sep 28, 2015

An extra point in football is usually uneventful, a mere afterthought.

But in Texas, kicker Luis Aranda of Midland's Robert E. Lee High School turned his attempt into a viral video.

His kick cleared the defensive line, but was far to low. The ball smacked a referee in the head, knocking off his cap. The ball ricocheted upward, hitting the crossbar and bouncing over for a successful attempt.

Robert E. Lee went on to beat El Dorado, of El Paso, 35-16.

Talk about a family road trip that seemed endless.

A family of 6 from Argentina spent a half-year driving through 13 countries in a VW bus so they could reach Philadelphia and see Pope Francis.

The family kept a blog documenting their journey. And it turns out the pope was following along and asked to meet them on Sunday.

The pontiff praised the family for the way they "live life with joy."

But did add, with a smile, "You are crazy."