Morning Edition

Weekdays 5am to 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Canadian Cat Cafe Closes Temporarily

Jan 6, 2016
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Appeals Court Reverses Tattoo Shop Ruling

Jan 5, 2016
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Good morning, I'm David Green. A legal case in Key West became an argument about - what else? - Jimmy Buffett lyrics. The city refused to allow a new tattoo shop, and they cited "Margaritaville" - the line about a brand-new tattoo; how it got here, I haven't a clue.

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And now let's hear about guns from a different perspective - some gun owners themselves. NPR's Eyder Peralta went to a gun shop in Virginia, where sales are up. Guns have been flying off the shelves of late as talk grows louder of new regulations.

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While most history courses start with the beginning of human civilization, roughly 10,000 years ago, Big History starts with the Big Bang. Humans don't get mentioned until halfway into the course. This is the second of three parts. Hear part 1.

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We are awash in a sea of information, but how do historians sift through the mountain of data? In the future, computer programs will be unreadable, and therefore worthless, to historians. This is the first of three stories. Hear part 2.

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Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Green Bay, Wis., kicked off the new year by parading a llama downtown. Why a llama? - you ask. Well. Mayor Jim Schmitt explained to TV station WBAY.

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Some people celebrated the holiday last night by attending a political rally for a presidential candidate.

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BERNIE SANDERS: Happy New Year.

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Jeb Bush is ending a challenging year. The son of a president and brother of a president started 2015 favored to win the Republican presidential nomination.

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