Arts/Life

Movie Interviews
1:24 am
Thu October 2, 2014

David Fincher Talks 'Gone Girl,' Avoids Spoilers (Hooray!)

Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike star as Nick and Amy Dunne in the new psychological thriller Gone Girl.
Merrick Morton 20th Century Fox

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 3:02 am

You almost can't talk about the movie Gone Girl — or the book it's based on — without massive spoilers. But we're going to try with director David Fincher.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:02 am
Wed October 1, 2014

Book News: Roxane Gay's Got A Brand-New Bag — The Butter

Roxane Gay has said that she'll be making a "concerted effort" to publish people of color and queer writers.
Jay Grabiec

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 8:12 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Come Oct. 15, author Roxane Gay will be adding a bit of flavor to The Toast. The website, co-founded by Nicole Cliffe and Mallory Ortberg, announced Tuesday that it has brought Gay on board to head up a sister site called, naturally, The Butter.

Read more
Television
2:59 am
Wed October 1, 2014

FX's 'The Bridge' Finds Authenticity In Spanish-Language Scenes

Demian Bichir, left, and Diane Kruger star in FX's cross-border crime drama The Bridge.
Bryon Cohen AP

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 7:06 am

It's the best show that you're probably not watching.

As FX's The Bridge ends its ratings-challenged second season Wednesday, it has told a sprawling story about two detectives — one in El Paso, Texas, and one in Juarez, Mexico — pursuing a Mexican drug cartel.

This year, much of the story has centered on reluctant hero and Mexican police detective Marco Ruiz, who's chasing cartel boss Fausto Galvan. Almost all of those moments are filmed in Spanish, helping flesh out characters who tend to remain mere stereotypes in other shows.

Read more
Book Reviews
2:34 pm
Tue September 30, 2014

Book Review: 'Once In The West'

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 4:46 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And now some poetry to end this hour of our program. Christian Wiman is a Texan, a cancer patient and a Christian, all of which inform his writing. He's just published a book of poems called "Once In The West," and Tess Taylor has this review.

Read more
Author Interviews
2:34 pm
Tue September 30, 2014

'How To Cook Everything Fast'? Bittman Says Skip The Prep

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 4:46 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Author Interviews
11:21 am
Tue September 30, 2014

'All The Truth Is Out' Examines How Political Journalism Went Tabloid

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 11:26 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Read more
Monkey See
10:21 am
Tue September 30, 2014

The Strange, Split 'Selfie' Pilot

Social Media superstar Eliza Dooley has 263,000 followers who hang on to her every post, tweet and selfie. But she needs help from Henry (John Cho).
Nicole Wilder ABC

The pilot of the ABC show Selfie, starring Karen Gillan and John Cho in a Pygmalion update built on the notion that being obsessed with Twitter is the new Flawed But Fixable Personality Problem, is only about 22 minutes long — a little less. Given that pilots always have to contain a certain amount of pure exposition, that barely seems like enough time for the pilot to have both good parts and bad parts.

Read more
Monkey See
9:23 am
Tue September 30, 2014

'Gone Girl,' Take Two: The Very, Very Spoiled Edition

Rosamund Pike plays Amy Dunne, whose mysterious disappearance turns her husband into a murder suspect.
Merrick Morton Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 9:56 am

Please understand that this post contains information about the plot of Gone Girl that has the capacity to rob it of many of its best and most delicious surprises for anyone not already aware of them. It's most appropriate for people who have already either read the book or seen the film, or for people who don't plan to read the book or see the film, or for people who don't like to be surprised, or for people who read the Wikipedia summary of a mystery before they watch it, or for people who hate having a good time.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:16 am
Tue September 30, 2014

Book News: First-Ever Kirkus Prize Picks 18 Finalists

Mr_Vector iStockphoto

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Clear some space at this season's awards festivities: It's time to make room for 18 more writers. This morning, Kirkus Reviews shared with NPR the finalists for its first annual writing award, the Kirkus Prize — six writers each in fiction, nonfiction and young readers' literature.

Read more
Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue September 30, 2014

In A Desolate Montana, 'The Ploughmen' Unearths Dark Truths

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 11:43 am

Valentine Millimaki, a sheriff's deputy in central Montana, is the officer who's called upon whenever someone goes missing. In the past, he has found people either safe or clinging to life, if barely. But for over a year, he's only found corpses, dead of exposure or suicide or murder. "Valentine Millimaki did not bring back angels," writes novelist Kim Zupan in The Ploughmen, "No, I did not, he thought. Souls did not aspire on his watch to safety or heaven but came trestled roughly from the dark woods, trapped in the alabaster statuary of rigid flesh."

Read more
Monkey See
4:07 am
Tue September 30, 2014

'Gone Girl': A Missing Wife And A Cloud Of Suspicion

Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) finds himself the chief suspect behind the shocking disappearance of his wife Amy (Rosamund Pike), on their fifth anniversary.
Merrick Morton Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 10:40 am

At the opening of Gone Girl, Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) is literally a man on the street. Standing by his trash cans in the half-light of an early morning at his gorgeous Missouri home in a T-shirt and sweatpants, he is what might be mistaken for "comfortable," but he is painfully, powerfully ordinary. And in keeping with the title, he is about to learn that his wife, Amy (Rosamund Pike), is missing. Suspicious to both the authorities and the audience, Nick has lost his wife to either an act of violence he committed or an act of violence he did not commit.

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:35 am
Tue September 30, 2014

Vaccine Controversies Are As Social As They Are Medical

Daniela Chavarriaga holds her daughter Emma as Dr. Jose Rosa-Olivares administers a measles vaccination at Miami Children's Hospital.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 1:11 pm

When essayist Eula Biss was pregnant with her son, she decided she wanted to do just a bit of research into vaccination. "I thought I would do a small amount of research to answer some questions that had come up for me," she tells NPR's Audie Cornish. "And the questions just got bigger the more I learned and the more I read."

Read more
Book Reviews
4:03 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

Novelist Caitlin Moran Wryly Shows 'How To Build A Girl'

Cover detail
HarperCollins

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 4:29 pm

Caitlin Moran's weekly column for The Times, has gained fans all across the U.K. With humor and a wry, self-deprecating wit, she writes on a wide range of topics that include government, technology, beauty and pop culture — all of which become, under her feisty gaze, feminist issues.

Read more
Book Reviews
2:14 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

Book Review: 'All The Truth Is Out: The Week Politics Went Tabloid'

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 4:30 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In May 1987, Sen. Gary Hart stepped up to a microphone and pulled out of the race for president. Hart spoke not only about his decision, but about a sea change he perceived in how the media covered national politics.

Read more
The Salt
2:04 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Pizza Cake

And this is what we got.
NPR

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 3:07 pm

I generally don't like cake, because it is too sweet, too bland in texture, and doesn't have enough pork products. So I was excited to see this recipe pop up on Buzzfeed.

Read more
Author Interviews
12:10 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

Lena Dunham On Sex, Oversharing And Writing About Lost 'Girls'

Lena Dunham's new collection of personal essays about her relationships, friendships and obsessive-compulsive disorder has received rave reviews.
Autumn de Wilde Courtesy of Random House

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 10:33 pm

Lena Dunham's character on the HBO series Girls would be envious of Dunham.

On the show, about a group of friends in their 20s, Hannah is a writer who got and lost two book deals. One of her ambitions is to "lock eyes with The New York Times book critic Michiko Kakutani."

Read more
The Two-Way
5:21 am
Mon September 29, 2014

Book News: Listen To The First-Timers Nominated For PEN Prize

urbancow iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 7:40 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

On Sunday night, the finalists for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize got together in an intimate Manhattan bar to read the books for which they were nominated. The winner of the annual prize, which recognizes one outstanding debut work of fiction, will be announced this evening at the PEN Literary Awards Ceremony.

Read more
Book Reviews
5:03 am
Mon September 29, 2014

'Rooms' Is Haunted By People (And Ghosts) That Can't Let Go

I have a friend whose parents died when she was a teenager, leaving her the house. They had been sick for a long time, and so the accumulation of stuff that generally accompanies any suburban existence was traumatically amplified: the dining room had two sets of furniture, the living room had three.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:23 am
Mon September 29, 2014

'Equalizer' Devotes Time To Character Development, Graphic Violence

Denzel Washington stars as a retired intelligence officer in The Equalizer.
Scott Garfield Sony Pictures

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 5:17 am

When star Denzel Washington and director Anton Fuqua collaborated on 2001's Training Day, the film won Washington an Oscar and changed the trajectory of his career. Now they are together again.

The Equalizer is unapologetic in its excessive, frequently grotesque violence. But because it's got Denzel Washington as its star, it's more interested in character development than you might guess.

Read more
Business
3:46 pm
Sun September 28, 2014

Movie Theaters Hope To Add Another Dimension To Their Profits

Theaters that call themselves 4-D use lights, moving seats, fog and even sprays of water and air to give moviegoers a unique experience — one they hope audiences will consider worthy of higher ticket prices.
Ernesto López Ruiz Courtesy of CJ E&M America

Originally published on Sun September 28, 2014 5:06 pm

Some experimental features have been popping up in movie theaters lately. One of them is a so-called 4-D experience. It's hard to describe in words exactly what a 4-D movie experience feels like, but here's one attempt: it is intense.

During a recent screening of Guardians of the Galaxy in 4-D at the Regal Cinemas LA Live theater, the seat moved up and down and side to side, like a simulator ride. There were strobe lights; fog seemed to come out of the walls and little jets of water sprayed over the seats.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:06 pm
Sun September 28, 2014

Inaugural Poet Recalls A Closeted Childhood Of Cultural Tension

Originally published on Sun September 28, 2014 6:13 pm

When Richard Blanco read his poem "One Today" at President Obama's inauguration in January 2013, he was the youngest poet ever to read at a presidential inauguration. But more attention went to Blanco's other distinctions: he was the first Latino, the first immigrant and the first openly gay poet to get that commission.

Read more
Author Interviews
5:56 am
Sun September 28, 2014

'Guests' Is A Story Of Mystery, Manners And Dramatic Love

Originally published on Sun September 28, 2014 1:21 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Read more
Author Interviews
5:56 am
Sun September 28, 2014

From Glass To Artificial Light: The Innovations That Got Us To 'Now'

Originally published on Sun September 28, 2014 1:21 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Read more
Author Interviews
3:18 pm
Sat September 27, 2014

Virtual Reality, Corporeality Collide In Cronenberg's First Novel

Canadian filmmaker David Cronenberg has directed Stereo, Crimes of the Future, Fast Company, The Brood, The Dead Zone, The Fly, Naked Lunch, M. Butterfly, Crash, A History of Violence, A Dangerous Method and many more.
Myrna Suarez Simon & Schuster

Originally published on Sat September 27, 2014 5:14 pm

Before he attained widespread respectability with films like A History of Violence and Eastern Promises, director David Cronenberg was best known for helping create a genre known as "body horror." Think of the exploding head in Scanners or body parts dropping off in The Fly.

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:40 am
Sat September 27, 2014

Not My Job: 'Eat, Pray, Love' Author Gets Quizzed On Dieting, Blasphemy, Hate

Jennifer Schatten The Penguin Group

Originally published on Sat September 27, 2014 10:31 am

Elizabeth Gilbert was a successful magazine writer in New York when she went through a life crisis and decided to travel the world. When she got back, her book Eat Pray Love become one of the biggest best-sellers of the past decade, along with its sequel Committed. Her latest novel is called The Signature of All Things.

Read more
Fine Art
9:07 am
Sat September 27, 2014

Confined In China, Ai Weiwei Directs Alcatraz Exhibit From Afar

Ai Weiwei's With Wind greets visitors to his exhibit, "@Large," on Alcatraz Island in San Francisco.
Jan Sturmann Courtesy FOR-SITE Foundation

Originally published on Sat September 27, 2014 3:03 pm

The old federal prison on Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay is one of the city's top tourist attractions. Beginning Saturday, it's also the site of an installation by one of China's most famous dissident artists, Ai Weiwei.

The work, "@Large" explores themes of freedom and confinement. Finding freedom under restriction is a worthy challenge, Ai says. Confined to China himself, the artist had to pull it all off without setting foot in the U.S.

Read more
Author Interviews
7:09 am
Sat September 27, 2014

Writer Paul Theroux: The Short Story Is 'Diabolically Hard To Master'

Paul Theroux is known for both his fiction and travel writing. His books include The Great Railway Bazaar and The Old Patagonian Express.
Steve McCurry Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originally published on Sat September 27, 2014 10:21 am

A master of the short story has a new collection to remind us how there's nothing short about how long a well-told story can linger in our minds. Paul Theroux is one of the most highly-acclaimed writers in the English language. His novels include The Mosquito Coast and The Lower River, and his travel books include Dark Star Safari: Overland From Cairo to Capetown.

Theroux's new collection is Mr. Bones: Twenty Stories. He tells NPR's Scott Simon about the book's title story and how he knows when a short story collection is done.

Read more
Movie Interviews
6:02 am
Sat September 27, 2014

'Art & Craft' Explores How One Forger Duped More Than 45 Museums

Landis works on a "Picasso" at his home. His materials — including magic markers and frames from Wal-Mart — are not those of a "proper" forger, says filmmaker Sam Cullman.
Sam Cullman Courtesy of Oscilloscope Laboratories

Originally published on Sat September 27, 2014 9:07 am

For nearly 30 years, art forger Mark Landis duped dozens of museums into accepting fakes into their collections. His stunts made headlines around the world. But Mark Landis never asked for money so he never went to jail. Now his paintings and drawings are in a touring exhibition called Intent to Deceive, and he's the subject of a new documentary called Art & Craft.

Read more
Book Reviews
5:03 am
Sat September 27, 2014

'Love Is The Drug' For A Teen Caught In A Dystopian D.C.

Though some dystopias are bound to seem more plausible than others, the nature of these stories, especially those written for young adults — the heightened fable of the premise (with all the eye-rolling this can sometimes provoke) and the realistic teenage psyches being mapped on top of them — usually means that the books open in an established status quo. Complaints about these high-concept stories often, and with varying legitimacy, exist in the Hows. The overarching question: How do these new orders ever begin?

Read more
The Salt
5:03 am
Sat September 27, 2014

Culinary Diplomacy Takes Texan Chef To The Land Of Grilled Yak

As you may have heard, America's diplomats are struggling these days with a few distracting and unpleasant events in far-off parts of the world. But they're rising to the challenge: They're sending in the chefs.

The U.S. State Department launched a Diplomatic Culinary Partnership two years ago in order to "elevate the role of culinary engagement in America's formal and public diplomacy efforts." Some of the country's most renowned chefs have volunteered to help out, joining the department's "Chef Corps."

Read more

Pages