Arts/Life

Movie Reviews
10:17 am
Thu October 30, 2014

In 'Goodbye To Language,' Jean-Luc Godard Seeks New Ways To Make Pictures

Jean-Luc Godard's dog Roxy appears in his new film, Goodbye To Language.
Kino Lorber

Even the most ordinary movies can be seductive, as Jean-Luc Godard knows all too well. In the 1960s, he was besotted with American commercial cinema, even as he rejected the U.S. policies that led it to make war in Vietnam.

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Movie Reviews
9:55 am
Thu October 30, 2014

'The Great Invisible' Views An Environmental Catastrophe From Many Sides

Latham Smith in The Great Invisible.
Oil Documentary, LLC

The Great Invisible, Margaret Brown's soft-spoken documentary about the aftermath of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, recognizes that disasters — from shootings to extreme weather events — often beget entrenchment. Tragedies tend to drive us to our most defensive ideological corners, from which we can see little beyond more impassioned arguments for our own side. The film acknowledges this instinct toward simplistic polarization, but then softly, compellingly tries to push against it.

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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Thu October 30, 2014

Book News: Remembering Poet Galway Kinnell, Whose Song Said Everything

Poet Carolyn Forche stands with her friend and mentor Galway Kinnell (right) during a trip to Japan to attend the Asian Writers Congress in 1983.
Courtesy of Carolyn Forche

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 8:47 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

When Galway Kinnell accepted the post of Vermont's State Poet in 1989, the honor didn't come without a bit of polite disagreement. No writer had occupied the post since Robert Frost more than 25 years earlier, and with the revival came also a desire among some to change its name — from "state poet" to something more august, something along the lines of, say, laureate.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu October 30, 2014

I'm Not Scary, I'm Just Drawn That Way: Great Comics For Halloween

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 10:49 am

Ready for a Halloween scare? These graphic novels and compilations are just the ticket. A creepy cult, alien monsters, gravediggers and ghosts populate their spooky pages. Even the Great Pumpkin makes an appearance in all his glory. Read these books next to a flickering fire and you're guaranteed to get the shivers.

Etelka Lehoczky has written about books for The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times and Salon.com. She tweets at @EtelkaL

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Remembrances
2:46 am
Thu October 30, 2014

'Lastness': Award-Winning Poet Galway Kinnell Dies At 87

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 4:28 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Movie Interviews
4:16 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

At 83, Filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard Makes The Leap To 3-D

Jean-Luc Godard's dog, Roxy, is prominently featured in Goodbye to Language, wandering through the countryside, conversing with the lake and the river.
Kino Lorber Inc.

Back in the 1960s Jean-Luc Godard made his name in the French New Wave by breaking cinematic rules. Some 40 years later, he's still doing things his own way. Now, at age 83, he's taking on 3-D in a new film called Goodbye to Language, which shared the Jury Prize at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival.

There are elements of Goodbye to Language you might find in any Hollywood movie — people arguing, a shootout — and even a dog, the director's own. (Roxy wanders the countryside conversing with the lake and the river that want to tell him what humans never hear.)

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The Salt
4:02 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Decoding The Food And Drink On A Day Of The Dead Altar

Elaborately decorated skulls are crafted from pure sugar and given to friends as gifts. The colorful designs represent the vitality of life and individual personality.
Karen Castillo Farfán NPR

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 10:22 am

A version of this story was originally published on Nov. 1, 2012.

Sugar skulls, tamales and spirits (the alcoholic kind) — these are things you might find on ofrendas, or altars, built this time of year to entice those who've passed to the other side back for a visit. These altars in homes and around tombstones are for Day of the Dead, or Dia de los Muertos, a tradition on Nov. 1 and 2originating in central Mexico.

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Author Interviews
11:44 am
Wed October 29, 2014

The Incredible Story Of Chilean Miners Rescued From The 'Deep Down Dark'

Miner Claudio Yanez applauds as he is carried away on a stretcher after being rescued from the collapsed San Jose mine where he had been trapped with 32 other miners for over two months in 2010 near Copiapo, Chile.
Hugo Infante AP

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 1:06 pm

The disaster began on a day shift around lunchtime at a mine in Chile's Atacama Desert: Miners working deep inside a mountain, excavating for copper, gold and other minerals, started feeling vibrations. Suddenly, there was a massive explosion and the passageways of the mine filled up with a gritty dust cloud.

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The Two-Way
8:38 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Book News: Young Adult And Kids' Lit Boost E-Book Revenue

It's partly because of bookshelves like these — and their digital equivalents — that publishers have had a positive open to 2014.
Blackred iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 7:19 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

E-book sales are standing on the shoulders not of giants, but of a much smaller set. According to new statistics released by the Association of American Publishers, the first seven months of 2014 showed marked growth in e-book revenue — largely thanks to young adult and children's literature.

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Movies
3:00 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Marvel's Next Films To Have More Diverse Leads

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 6:12 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Book Reviews
2:40 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Book Review: 'Belzhar' By Meg Wolitzer

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 4:30 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And now, a new young adult novel by a beloved writer which takes its inspiration from Sylvia Plath. You might be able to tell since it's called "Belzhar." Gabrielle Zevin has our review.

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The Salt
2:40 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

To Make Bread, Watch The Dough, Not The Recipe

Sourdough loaves made by Fromartz with a bolted white flour from Anson Mills in South Carolina that he says reminded him of the wheat he'd tasted in southern France.
Samuel Fromartz

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 8:29 am

Journalist Samuel Fromartz works at home on a quiet street near the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C. He's a journalist, and editor-in-chief of the Food and Environment Reporting Network.

On a recent morning, I went to visit him and found several unread newspapers piled on his front step. "I've been a little busy," Fromartz explains.

He's not too busy to make bread, though.

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Dance
2:38 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

At 83, Dancer Carmen De Lavallade Looks Back At A Life Spent Onstage

Christopher Duggan

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 10:50 am

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Author Interviews
12:38 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

A Candid Memoir From Comedian Amy Poehler? 'Yes Please'

Amy Poehler plays Leslie Knope on Parks and Recreation, which will air its final season next year. Poehler says, "It's a privilege in television to be able to have a proper goodbye."
Colleen Hayes NBC

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 1:40 pm

When comedian Amy Poehler was in her 20s, she read her boyfriend's journal and found out that he didn't think she was pretty.

"It was almost like an itch being scratched, which was, 'Aha! I knew that you didn't think I was pretty!' ... And then it was followed by a real crash because ... my ego was bruised," Poehler tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

Poehler says it taught her that the earlier you figure out your "currency," the happier you'll be. For Poehler, that meant not leaning on her looks to be successful.

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The Two-Way
8:26 am
Tue October 28, 2014

Book News: 2 Popular Books May Be Coming To TV

Karen Russell's novel Swamplandia! was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2012.
Michael Lionstar

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Soon, a remote control may be as good as a bookmark for readers hoping to return to the worlds of two popular, and critically acclaimed, books.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue October 28, 2014

'Slow Regard' Is A Riddle, Wrapped In A Mystery, Living In An Underground Tunnel

In the foreword to his new novella The Slow Regard of Silent Things, Patrick Rothfuss gives the reader a warning: "If you haven't read my other books, you don't want to start here." The other books he's referring to are The Name of the Wind and The Wise Man's Fear, the first two installments of his bestselling fantasy series The Kingkiller Chronicle.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue October 28, 2014

The Battle For Dreamland, Revisited In 'Nemo'

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 10:53 am

Once, a cartoonist went to battle for dreamland. It was 1905, hot on the heels of Freud's supremely unsettling The Interpretation of Dreams, and the cartoonist was Winsor McCay. He didn't bring intellectual theories to the fight, but something more potent: beauty. With Little Nemo in Slumberland, his groundbreaking newspaper comic, he presented a dream world that was as sublime as it was reassuring to his Edwardian readers.

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Arts/Life
3:06 pm
Mon October 27, 2014

International Contemporary Circus Act, Cirko de Mente to Perform in Las Cruces

LAS CRUCES, NM - Cirko de Mente, the Mexican contemporary circus company, will be in Las Cruces for an evening performance at the Rio Grande Theatre on Saturday, November 15, 2014 from 7-8:30 p.m. The circus group is performing their latest show "Familia Rosso."

The show depicts a comical feud between two families for control of the "circus mafia." Intended for audiences of all ages, the performance features contemporary circus techniques including clavas, juggling knives and hats, acrobatic pizzas, balance and aerial dance. 

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Book News & Features
2:27 pm
Mon October 27, 2014

75 Years Of 'Colossal Poets' And Live Literature At NYC's 92nd Street Y

W.H. Auden at the 92nd Street Y Poetry Center in 1966.
Diane Dorr-Dorynek Courtesy of the 92nd Street Y

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 10:58 am

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Author Interviews
1:45 pm
Mon October 27, 2014

The Man Behind Wonder Woman Was Inspired By Both Suffragists And Centerfolds

The man behind the most popular female comic book hero of all time, Wonder Woman, had a secret past: Creator William Moulton Marston had a wife — and a mistress. He fathered children with both of them, and they all secretly lived together in Rye, N.Y. And the best part? Marston was also the creator of the lie detector.

Harvard professor and New Yorker contributor Jill Lepore reveals this and other surprising details about Marston in the new book The Secret History of Wonder Woman.

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The Salt
11:07 am
Mon October 27, 2014

Gladiator Gatorade? Ancient Athletes Had A Recovery Drink, Too

This gladiator tombstone was excavated in a cemetery for these ancient power athletes in what was once Ephesus, in modern-day Turkey.
Courtesy of PLOS ONE

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 8:44 am

So it's A.D. 150, and you've just had a long day at the gym (or ludus), thrusting and parrying with your fellow Roman gladiators. What do you reach for to replenish your sapped strength? A post-workout recovery drink, of course.

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Race
9:08 am
Mon October 27, 2014

Today's Irish Dancers Step Away From Stereotype

Julia O'Rourke (center) wins the 2014 World Irish Dancing Championships. Here, she poses with the top five performers in her age group.
Jimmy McNulty FeisPix

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 2:03 pm

When Riverdance debuted 20 years ago, Irish step dancers — whether citizens of Ireland or any other country — looked, well, stereotypically Irish. The red-haired, freckle-faced lass doing a jumpy jig still comes to mind for many. But the All Ireland Dancing Championships, currently underway in Dublin, will show how that image no longer reflects the reality.

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Parallels
2:36 am
Mon October 27, 2014

Love Is Saying 'Sari': The Quest To Save A South Asian Tradition

Courtesy of Sandip Roy

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 12:13 pm

My parents were married for more than 40 years, happily. But my mother says her greatest joy is stacked in her closet: her saris, or, as Bengalis say it, shaaris.

"Because sari is my passion, maybe my first love is sari," my mother says, giggling.

There are about 200 saris in there, many older than me. My mother danced on stage in a sari. She went to college in a sari. And wherever she went on holiday, she found the sari shop.

"I went to Paris, I got French chiffon. I must look for a sari, first thing," she recalls.

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Movie Interviews
2:36 am
Mon October 27, 2014

Watch This: Crime Writer James Ellroy Recommends — What Else? — Noir Films

James Ellroy's novels include The Black Dahlia, The Big Nowhere and, most recently, Perfidia. He lives in Los Angeles, the setting for much of his work.
Christopher Polk Getty Images for AFI

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 6:49 am

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This Week's Must Read
3:48 pm
Sun October 26, 2014

After The Blackwater Convictions, A Book On Iraq's Nightmarish Reality

The family of Ibrahim Abid, who was killed when guards employed by security company Blackwater opened fire at Baghdad's Nisour Square in 2007, visits his grave on Dec. 9, 2008.
Hadi Mizban AP

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 6:58 am

Back in 2007, a shooting in Iraq caught the attention of many in the U.S.

Four security guards working for the company Blackwater shot and killed at least 14 Iraqi civilians in a traffic circle in Baghdad. Last week all four were pronounced guilty by a federal jury.

For our series, This Week's Must Read, author and Air Force veteran Brian Castner reflects on this news by turning to literature.

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The Two-Way
3:17 pm
Sun October 26, 2014

LeVar Burton Reads 'Go The [Expletive] To Sleep'

Former Reading Rainbow host LeVar Burton reads from the 2011 best-seller Go the [bleep] to Sleep.
YouTube

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 6:42 am

In case any over-exhausted parents might wonder if they're hallucinating, we can assure you: Former Reading Rainbow host LeVar Burton did actually give a reading of the 2011 best-seller Go the [bleep] to Sleep this weekend.

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Book Reviews
3:18 am
Sun October 26, 2014

The Freaky, Fabulous, Feminist 'Secret History' Of Wonder Woman

cover crop
Knopf

Group sex parties. Polygamy. Bondage. What could such things have to do with Wonder Woman? Fortunately, there's no connection between those titillating concepts and the famous Amazon — certainly not in Jill Lepore's new book.

Just kidding! In fact, The Secret History of Wonder Woman relates a tale so improbable, so juicy, it'll have you saying, "Merciful Minerva!" It turns out that decades of rumors were true: The red-white-and-blue heroine, conceived during World War II, had a decidedly bohemian progenitor.

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Author Interviews
3:17 am
Sun October 26, 2014

The Serious History Of Hocus Pocus In 'Penguin Book Of Witches'

Originally published on Sun October 26, 2014 2:38 pm

Throughout history, witches have taken on many forms: As women with a mystical relationship to the natural world. Or as endearing characters in pop culture (cue the Bewitched theme song). But historian Katherine Howe's new book recalls a time when witchcraft wasn't just a crime, it was enough to get you killed.

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The Salt
4:17 pm
Sat October 25, 2014

A New Lending Library — For Your Kitchen

Originally published on Sun October 26, 2014 11:50 am

Fondue sets, ice cream makers and juicers. Fun kitchen gadgets to have, but frankly, who has the cash or counter space? The Kitchen Library understands, so it just rents out those appliances.

We're talking four-day access to myriad cool kitchen contraptions. In addition to the aforementioned gadgets, the library is also home to a chocolate fountain, a creme brulee set, hand mixers and slow cookers. There are more than 100 items in the inventory.

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My Big Break
3:10 pm
Sat October 25, 2014

No Small Feat: The NBA's Shortest Player Never Gave Up

Charlotte Hornets guard Muggsy Bogues (works his way around New York Knicks guard Chris Childs in the first half of the NBA Eastern Conference playoffs on April 24, 1997.
Bill Kostroun AP

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 11:22 am

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

At 5 feet, 3 inches, Tyrone Bogues, better known as Muggsy Bogues, holds the record as the shortest player in NBA history.

He was drafted by the Washington Bullets in 1987, but he's best-known for playing with the Charlotte Hornets alongside Alonzo Mourning and Larry Johnson.

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