Arts/Life

Author Interviews
3:09 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

'Don't Be Afraid Of The Bullets' A Memoir Of Reporting In Yemen

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Books
2:58 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Remembering Bertrice Small, One Of The Original 'Avon Ladies'

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 6:09 pm

Decades before Fifty Shades of Grey and George R.R. Martin, we had Bertrice Small, the romance legend and industry pioneer who died Tuesday at 77.

Small was part of a group of female writers, known collectively as "The Avon Ladies" (others were greats like Johanna Lindsey and Rosemary Rogers), who transformed the romance novel in the late '70s, taking it from tame and sexless (think Barbara Cartland) to fiery and sensual — and creating some of the first classics of modern romance.

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Shots - Health News
12:48 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

From Naked Mole Rats To Dog Testicles: A Writer Explores The Longevity Quest

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 4:42 pm

When journalist Bill Gifford turned 40, his friends gave him a cake shaped as a tombstone with the words, "R.I.P, My Youth." As he reflected on his creeping memory lapses and the weight he'd gained, Gifford got interested in the timeless quest to turn back the aging clock — or at least slow it down.

His latest book, Spring Chicken, explores everything from some wacky pseudo-cures for aging to fascinating research that point to causes of aging at the cellular level.

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Television
12:39 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

'Battle Creek' Has The Flavor Of A TV Throwback From An Earlier Age

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 2:28 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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The Two-Way
9:27 am
Thu February 26, 2015

ISIS Video Shows Extremists Smashing Priceless Artifacts

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 1:16 pm

The self-styled Islamic State has released a video showing an orgy of destruction of ancient statues in the Iraqi city of Mosul, with footage at a museum and at least one archaeological site nearby.

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Ask Me Another
8:54 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Welcome To Night Vale: Tales From the Cryptids

Welcome to Night Vale.
Courtesy of Welcome To Night Vale

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 10:02 am

Hooded figures drift in the dog park, which one is never supposed to enter. A desert pier goes nowhere. Stay away from wheat, and wheat by-products. Welcome to Night Vale.

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Ask Me Another
8:53 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Bring Your 'Eh' Game

What sound does a frog make when it plays this popular lawn game in Canada? Croak-eh? All the answers in this game are words that become other words when pronounced with a Canadian accent.

Heard in All Hail The Might Quiz Show

Ask Me Another
8:53 am
Thu February 26, 2015

That's Not What This Is About

Remember when Maya Angelou and Pablo Neruda formed that club from beyond the grave in Dead Poets Society? No? Well, maybe we got the plot wrong. In this game, contestants must guess the names of films from inaccurate plot descriptions based on their titles.

Heard in All Hail The Might Quiz Show

Ask Me Another
8:53 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Just Because

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 10:02 am

What famous spy likes his martinis shaken, not stirred? Every answer for this final round is the name of a person or fictional character with the initials JB.

Heard in All Hail The Might Quiz Show

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ask Me Another
8:53 am
Thu February 26, 2015

N-E-R-D Alert

Be on the lookout for 'banner drops,' 'dinner dates' and other words, names and phrases that have the letters N-E-R-D in order.

Heard in All Hail The Might Quiz Show

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ask Me Another
8:53 am
Thu February 26, 2015

The World Makes Money Go Round

What Swiss currency buys you exactly one hot dog? A Frank! Play this game for more international currency puns.

Heard in All Hail The Might Quiz Show

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ask Me Another
8:53 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Chore Song

This game makes chores sound almost fun. Can you guess the household chore being described in this rewrite to the classic Elton John hit, "Your Song"? Guest musician Julian Velard is on the keys.

Heard in All Hail The Might Quiz Show

Book Reviews
8:16 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Please Fill In This Form In Triplicate Before You Read 'Utopia Of Rules'

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 1:52 pm

You probably don't need me to enumerate the pains of navigating bureaucracies. Lines and forms and hold times are the stuff of daily routine — and it's just as routine to complain about them.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu February 26, 2015

It's All Charm and Wolves In 'The Turnip Princess'

Long ago in far Bavaria, Franz Xaver von Schönwerth went hunting for fairy tales. However, the collection disappeared, and his work was thought lost forever. Then in 2009, cultural curator Erika Eichenseer discovered five hundred of them in what one assumes must have been the deepest, darkest, most perilous basement of a municipal archive, and all those stories came to life again.

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The Salt
4:43 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

A Detroit Opera Celebrates Frida Kahlo's Life And Cooking

Frida Kahlo's passion for food was evident in her many still lifes of fruit, like this painting entitled "The Bride Frightened at Seeing Life Opened." She was also known for her raucous dinner parties in Mexico City.
Wikiart

The life of Frida Kahlo seems tailor-made for an opera: pain, love, art, travel and revolution. So the Michigan Opera Theater's decision to mount a production of the opera Frida, opening Mar. 7 in Detroit — where the iconic painter lived with her husband, Diego Rivera, for nearly a year, and where she survived a miscarriage that marked a turning point in her art — isn't so surprising.

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Movies
2:27 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

The Good, The Bad And The Hot: Movies To Warm Winter's Bite

Sidney Poitier smolders — and swelters — in In the Heat of the Night.
Mirisch/United Artists

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 6:46 pm

Plenty of movies sound as if they'll warm you up — Heat, The Towering Inferno, Hot Fuzz, Blazing Saddles, The Long Hot Summer, Paris When It Sizzles, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, In the Heat of the Night — the list goes on and on.

But just as you can't judge a book by its cover, it's tough to take a film's temperature from its title. Yes, In the Heat of the Night does swelter, both from being set in Mississippi and from having Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger spend most of its length hot under the collar. But most of the rest of those films won't warm you up much.

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The Two-Way
1:10 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Acclaimed Documentary Filmmaker Bruce Sinofsky Dies At 58

Co-director Bruce Sinofsky attends the Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory press day at HBO Studios on Jan. 6, 2012, in New York City.
Michael Loccisano Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 3:14 pm

Peabody and Emmy Award winning filmmaker Bruce Sinofsky has died at age 58.

Sinofsky and his longtime co-director, Joe Berlinger, made such acclaimed documentaries as Some Kind of Monster, about the heavy metal band Metallica and Brother's Keeper, about four brothers in rural upstate New York. They are perhaps best known for Paradise Lost, a trilogy of films about three teenagers convicted of killing three little boys in West Memphis, Ark.

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Monkey See
9:54 am
Wed February 25, 2015

Not Just Eating Bugs For Money! A Story Of 'Survivor' And Strategy

The "Blue Collar" tribe assembles on the premiere of Survivor, season ... 30.
Monty Brinton CBS

The most famous scene in the first season of Survivor, back in the summer of 2000, involved the castaways, who were very hungry indeed, catching and cooking a rat, then tentatively picking meat off the bones. There was also a challenge that involved eating grubs as quickly as possible. This pretty much sealed the fate of the show's reputation early on among people who didn't watch it: it was essentially one big show called Eating Bugs For Money, and its pleasures were purely exploitative, so low of brow that nothing was visible except the bottom of the barrel.

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The Salt
9:10 am
Wed February 25, 2015

Produce Pride: Showing The Love With Vegetable Tattoos

Siblings Jessica and Oliver Schaap of Holland, Mich., test out the temporary vegetable tattoos known as Tater Tats.
Courtesy of Jenna Weiler

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 1:24 pm

If you really love vegetables and want to tell the world, there are many ways to do so. You can join a community supported agriculture group, or CSA. You can plant a garden in your front yard. And you can broadcast your passion with t-shirt or sticker slogan like "Eat More Kale" or "Powered By Plants."

Now, there's also the option of adorning your body with vegetable body art.

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Book Reviews
8:03 am
Wed February 25, 2015

'Darker Shade' Paints A Fantasy World Rich In Depth And Color

One of the most compelling things about V.E. Schwab's second adult novel, A Darker Shade Of Magic, is how long it takes to develop a plot. Once the main arc finally slips fully out of the shadows, it turns out to be fairly standard for a fantasy novel: Evil scheming magicians, cursed and forbidden item, dark magic ready to consume everything it touches.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed February 25, 2015

The 1970s, Warts (And More Warts) In 'Inner City Romance'

Courtesy of Fantagraphics

Leave it to good ol' Hunter S. Thompson to be one of the first people to put his finger on the swan-songy feeling that would dominate the 1970s. As usual, his language defied the malaise he described: "We are all wired into a survival trip now," he wrote in 1971's Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. "A generation of permanent cripples, failed seekers, who never understood the essential old-mystic fallacy of the Acid Culture: the desperate assumption that somebody — or at least some force — is tending that Light at the end of the tunnel."

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Monkey See
9:03 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

'Parks And Recreation' Sets Off Into The Future

Amy Poehler as Leslie Knope.
Colleen Hayes NBC

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 7:49 am

After seven seasons, NBC's gently acerbic, lovingly rendered Parks and Recreation ended its run Tuesday night with an extension of the final season's voyage to 2017. In further flashes to a few years or even decades later, we learned about April and Andy's kids, Garry's future as a beloved eternal mayor with an ageless wife, Tom's many hustles to come, Donna's educational foundation, the park Ron will run, Leslie's brilliant career and the true partnership of equals that is her marriage to Ben.

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Television
2:16 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Amid Declining Ratings, Cable Networks Speed Up Reruns To Make Room For Ads

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
12:27 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

After His Brother's Suicide, Writer Seeks Comfort In 'All The Wrong Places'

Philip Connors' first book Fire Season was about how he spent a few months every year for eight years as a fire lookout, living in a cabin and scanning the horizon with binoculars atop a 45-foot tower in a remote region of New Mexico.
Mark Ehling Courtesy of W.W. Norton & Co.

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 6:35 pm

When writer Philip Connors was in his 20s, he received a call from his mother that later haunted him: "You know, I spoke to your brother and he's been having trouble with his girlfriend — he sounded really down ... you should really call him."

"And when I hung up the phone, I thought to myself: 'Yeah, yeah, kid brother and his silly troubles with women, I'll get around to calling him. I'll call him in a few days, or maybe next week,' " Connors tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies.

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Television
12:27 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Fair Warning: Watch One 'Foyle's War' Episode, And You'll Want To Watch Them All

Michael Kitchen stars as Foyle, a widowed police superintendent in the coastal city of Hastings in England. His sidekick is his driver, Samantha Stewart, a vicar's daughter played by Honeysuckle Weeks.
Acorn TV/ITV

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 12:41 pm

The satisfying thing about TV crime shows is that they offer a sense of closure. The unsatisfying thing is how much of life they must leave out to do it. Like, history. Whether you're talking CSI or Sherlock, crime shows tend to take place in a weirdly hermetic universe where the characters may change — like in True Detective — yet the historical moment in which they live remains largely irrelevant background.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue February 24, 2015

'Lucky Alan' Thumbs Its Nose At Convention

A handful of purist holdouts aside, most readers these days realize that "genre fiction" and "literary fiction" aren't mutually exclusive. That's not to say that every paperback on the supermarket shelf is high art, but the list of respected literary genre writers — Poe, Verne, Chandler, Le Guin, to name just a few — is a long one, and it's growing every year.

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Fine Art
1:47 am
Tue February 24, 2015

Daughters Back An Artful End To The Rivera-Rockefeller Rivalry Story

Diego Rivera, seen here in 1933, works on a panel of his mural in the lobby of Rockefeller Center.
AP

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:48 am

It's been called one of the great rivalries of the art world — a clash between egos, riches and ideologies. In the spring of 1932, capitalist (and prolific collector of Mexican art) Nelson Rockefeller hired Mexican painter and staunch socialist Diego Rivera to paint a mural for the lobby of the newly erected Rockefeller Center in New York City. Sketches were drawn and approved, but when reporters leaked that Rivera had added an image of Russian revolutionary Vladimir Lenin, a battle began.

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Author Interviews
1:43 am
Tue February 24, 2015

Family Secrets — And Mango Chutney — In 'Don't Let Him Know'

Courtesy of Bloomsbury USA

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 12:56 pm

If you're a longtime Morning Edition listener, you've probably heard commentator Sandip Roy. For years he told stories about his life as an Indian immigrant in California, about trying to celebrate Indian holidays far from home, or the embarrassment of not doing yoga. Then he reported for us on Indian-Americans who were moving back to India — and a few months later, he did it himself.

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Author Interviews
4:40 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

'After Birth' Author On 'Mommy Wars': 'It Doesn't Have To Be This Way'

After Birth by Elisa Albert
Emily Jan NPR

Writer Elisa Albert believes that the so-called "Mommy Wars" have gone on long enough — they are both a distraction and a cop-out, she says. "It's a way of avoiding the actual issues, which is: Women don't have enough support for any of the choices that we make," Albert tells NPR's Kelly McEvers. "We are pitted against each other and ultimately, then, are pitted against ourselves. And everybody is unhappy, and everybody feels judged. It doesn't have to be this way."

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Author Interviews
1:09 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Prisoners Of War And Ojibwe Reservation Make Unlikely Neighbors In 'Prudence'

David Treuer is the author of three previous novels and two books of nonfiction, including Rez Life. He also teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Southern California
Jean Luc Bertinin Courtesy of Riverhead Books

David Treuer's latest novel Prudence follows a young man who returns home to visit his family on an Ojibwe reservation before he joins the war as a bombardier. It's the 1940s and a prison camp for Germans captured during World War II has been set up across the river.

Treuer bases the camp on a real-life one that existed near the village of Bena, Minn., on the Leech Lake Reservation where he grew up. The camp was on the shores of Lake Winnibigoshish — the German prisoners used to cut down trees to make roads.

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