Arts/Life

The Salt
3:11 am
Tue July 7, 2015

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey prepares a pop-up Nigerian dinner in the kitchen of Toki Underground, a ramen restaurant in Washington, D.C., in December 2014.
Eliza Barclay NPR

Most aspiring chefs long for the white hat, the gleaming kitchen, the fancy menu.

But Nigeria-born Tunde Wey stumbled into a different version of the (American) chef's dream. He wanted to see the country, and share the food of his West African childhood with friends and strangers along the way.

So a few months ago, he packed up his knives and his spices at his home in Detroit, and started crisscrossing the U.S. by Greyhound bus.

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U.S.
7:19 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

Bill Cosby Admitted To Acquiring Drugs To Give To A Woman For Sex

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
4:20 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

Cosby Admitted Giving Woman Quaaludes

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 5:55 pm

Updated at 7:10 p.m. ET

Comedian Bill Cosby testified in 2005 that he obtained the sedative Quaalude with the intent of giving the drug to women with whom he wanted to have sex, and he acknowledged giving it to at least one woman.

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Theater
2:30 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

The Mornin' Ain't So Beautiful For This Dark 'Oklahoma!' Production

Damon Daunno (Curly) and Amber Gray (Laurey) star in director Daniel Fish's experimental retelling of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Oklahoma!
Cory Weaver Courtesy of Bard College

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 7:02 pm

Oklahoma! was the first musical that the celebrated team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II wrote together. On the surface, it tells the story of a young woman (Laurey) deciding whether to go to a party with a dangerous, lonely farmhand (Jud) or a nice, young cowboy (Curly).

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Author Interviews
12:01 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

The New Science Behind Our 'Unfair' Criminal Justice System

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 2:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Book Reviews
11:23 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Dead-Cinch Thrillers: 4 Books To Get Your Heart Pounding

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 4:37 pm

I've just spent much of the past two weeks on my couch, reading suspense fiction. The result of all that heavy lifting is this list of recommendations — four thrillers, very different in style and MO, but all deadly accurate in their aim to entertain.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Television
1:44 am
Mon July 6, 2015

After Sketchy Science, Shark Week Promises To Turn Over A New Fin

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 8:54 am

It has been called the "Super Bowl of the ocean."

Shark Week is a ratings bonanza for the Discovery Channel with more than 40 million people tuning in last year. Shark Week kicked off this weekend with the most hours of programming ever in its 28-year history But many scientists think the huge audiences — and the hype — have come at the expense of real science.

A generation of shark scientists cut their teeth on Shark Week.

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Author Interviews
4:08 pm
Sun July 5, 2015

From Early Failures To New 'Trainwreck,' Judd Apatow Gets Serious

Director, writer and producer Judd Apatow has both a new memoir and a new movie right now. Trainwreck, which he directed, is in theaters starting July 17 and Sick in the Head was published in June.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 5, 2015 8:11 pm

It's a bit of an understatement to call Judd Apatow busy.

His new book, Sick in the Head, a 500-page collection of Apatow's conversations with some of the greatest minds in comedy, is on the New York Times best-seller list. Meanwhile, his film collaboration with the white-hot Amy Schumer, Trainwreck — his fifth movie as a director — is set for release within two weeks.

Oh, and he just wrapped up shooting another movie that's due out next year.

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Author Interviews
3:22 pm
Sun July 5, 2015

From Blueprints To Betrayal: The Daring, And Downfall, Of A Cold War Spy

Courtesy of Doubleday

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 4:19 pm

It was the middle of the Cold War and the CIA was having a difficult time getting information on what the Soviet Union was up to next.

The agency needed a spy — a Russian spy — who was willing to go the full way and betray his country.

It found one in Adolf Tolkachev, a Soviet aviation expert.

David Hoffman tells Tolkachev's story in his new book, The Billion Dollar Spy.

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Sunday Puzzle
6:03 am
Sun July 5, 2015

What's A Pirate's Least-Favorite Puzzle? One That Hates Arrrrs

NPR

Originally published on Sun July 5, 2015 6:34 am

On-air challenge: In each pair of clues, the answer to the first clue is a word that contains the consecutive letters A-R. Drop the A-R, and the remaining letters in order will form a word that answers the second clue.

Example: Sweet brown topping on ice cream / Animal with humps = C(AR)AMEL

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Movie Interviews
5:57 am
Sun July 5, 2015

Alan Rickman Returns To Directing With 'A Little Chaos'

Originally published on Sun July 5, 2015 6:34 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

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The Salt
5:57 am
Sun July 5, 2015

What To Do With Weird Farmers Market Vegetables

Kohlrabi, peeled and sliced, is refreshing, but lightly poached is good too, says chef April Bloomfield.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 8:10 am

Walking through the farmers market this time of year is a wondrous thing: juicy tomatoes, rows of jewel-toned eggplants, fragrant basil and sweet yellow corn. But then, you see bunches of greens that look like weeds, stuff with names like kohlrabi and purslane, and suddenly, you feel intimidated. Other people know what to do with these greens, why don't I?

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The Salt
5:57 am
Sun July 5, 2015

Do Try This At Home: 3 Korean Banchan (Side Dishes) In One Pot

Dan Gray is a restaurateur and food blogger in Seoul, South Korea.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Sun July 5, 2015 10:05 am

This summer, NPR is getting crafty in the kitchen. As part of Weekend Edition's Do Try This At Home series, top chefs are sharing their cleverest hacks and tips — taking expensive, exhausting or intimidating recipes and tweaking them to work in any home kitchen.

This week: We go to Seoul, South Korea, to make banchan — those endless small plates of pickles and veggies that traditionally accompany rice or soup.

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Book News & Features
5:03 am
Sun July 5, 2015

Baldwin And Bridges: Two Artists, Two Debuts, One Fire

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 8:17 am

Every so often, an artist comes along who simply resonates. They show up and fill a particular void in our cultural consciousness, whether in prose, song or film. They tap into something that feels especially new, and at times transcendent.

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Author Interviews
3:10 am
Sun July 5, 2015

In 'Playing Scared' Pianist Grows Less Frightened Of Stage Fright

Courtesy of Bloomsbury USA

Originally published on Sun July 5, 2015 10:08 am

Everyone has had the dream in one form or another. You are about to take a big test when you realize you don't know anything about the subject. You are on stage but you haven't memorized the lines. You have to make a speech but you haven't written it.

It's your basic performance anxiety nightmare.

But if you are a musician, performance anxiety, better known as stage fright, can ruin your career — maybe before it even gets started.

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Author Interviews
3:04 pm
Sat July 4, 2015

If Robots 'Speak,' Will We Listen? Novel Imagines A Future Changed By AI

Courtesy of Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins

Originally published on Sat July 4, 2015 4:42 pm

Louisa Hall was a nervous speaker when she was little. At school, kids teased her and said she talked like a robot.

"I think I was just so nervous that I kind of couldn't put any real animation in my voice," she tells NPR's Arun Rath. "But ever since then I've kind of looked at robots or looked at machines and wondered whether they were just having trouble acting human."

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Author Interviews
7:40 am
Sat July 4, 2015

An Outsider In Buenos Aires Goes Incognito, For Love Of Tango

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 1:52 pm

In the dirty, crowded, and impoverished immigrant barrios of Buenos Aires of 1913, a 17-year-old girl arrives with little more than some clothes and her grandfather's violin.

Her name is Leda, and she's the character at the heart of Carolina De Robertis' third novel, The Gods of Tango.

Leda, an Italian girl, was sent for by her cousin-husband, but widowed before her ship even lands in South America. She soon finds comfort and excitement in a new kind of music that's filling the city's courtyards, bars and brothels: the tango.

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Recipes
5:54 am
Sat July 4, 2015

A Little Chiltomate Raises The Underappreciated Turkey Thigh

Originally published on Sat July 4, 2015 9:04 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

If you've got any beer left over after your Fourth of July barbecue and picnic, we've got a delicious recipe for you - beer-braised turkey thighs. NPR's Noah Adams tracked down the recipe in Dayton, Ohio.

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Author Interviews
5:54 am
Sat July 4, 2015

Decades Of Politics And Partnership In Jimmy Carter's 'Full Life'

Originally published on Sat July 4, 2015 9:59 am

In just over 18 months, Barack Obama will join the ranks of ex-presidents. He'll be 55 when he leaves office, among the youngest to become a former president, alongside Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter.

President Carter remains a model of what an active, productive life can look like after leaving the White House. He looks back on that life in his new memoir, A Full Life: Reflections at Ninety, beginning with growing up with black friends in the Jim Crow South.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Sat July 4, 2015

'Shadowshaper' Paints A Vibrant Picture

Courtesy of Arthur A. Levine Books

Originally published on Sat July 4, 2015 8:55 am

Shadowshaper had me crying at 3 percent of the e-book. Not because it was sad, but because I am one giant button when it comes to stories about family, heritage, language, art, and the magic mixed up in them, and this book knew just where to push.

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Movies
3:25 pm
Fri July 3, 2015

On Its 40th Anniversary, Remembering The Terror Of 'Jaws'

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 4:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Rachel Martin, and I have a confession to make. It's the Fourth of July weekend, and there was a really big movie made in 1975, 40 years ago, pegged to this weekend - "Jaws."

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "JAWS")

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Movie Reviews
2:19 pm
Fri July 3, 2015

Investigating The Drug Trade In 'Cartel Land'

Jose Manuel Mireles Valverde, spokesman for the Autodefensas, a militia organized against the Knights Templar mob.
The Orchard

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 3:37 pm

Observing the consequences of the Mexican drug trade on both sides of the U.S. border, Cartel Land toggles between Arizona and the state of Michoacan, about 1,000 miles to the south. Only the latter of the twinned storylines really pays off, but that one is riveting.

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Monkey See
6:03 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Pop Culture Happy Hour No. 250: 'Magic Mike XXL' And 'Catastrophe'

Joe Manganiello in Magic Mike XXL.
Claudette Barius Warner Brothers

Just a little less than five years ago, Linda Holmes and I decided to book a studio after-hours and record what we'd call "an audio experiment" — a roundtable discussion of pop culture with the two of us and our pals Trey Graham and Glen Weldon, produced by the essential Mike Katzif. By the time the first recording was complete, we'd decided to come back every week, even though our budget was zero and we'd never asked our bosses for permission.

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The Salt
5:03 am
Fri July 3, 2015

New Nation, New Cuisine: The First Cookbook To Tackle 'American Food'

A recent version of Indian Slapjacks, a recipe featured in American Cookery, the first cookbook of American food.
Premshree Pillai Flickr

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 10:45 am

In 1776, the American colonies declared independence from Britain.

But it wasn't until 1796 that someone dared to tackle a question that would plague every generation of Americans to come: "What is American food?"

American Cookery, the very first American cookbook, was written by Amelia Simmons (more on this mysterious woman later). In it, she promised local food and a kind of socioculinary equality. The title page stated that the recipes were "adapted to this country and all grades of life."

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Goats and Soda
5:03 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Peruvian Sisters Can Turn A Gourd Into An $800 Objet D'Art

Standing in their backyard in Cochas Grande, Peru, Katya and Blanca Cantos, hold the fruit of their labor. The gourd at left shows scenes from a potato harvest. The just-started gourd at right will tell the story of an ancestor's epic trek.
Josh Cogan Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archive, Smithsonian Institution

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 8:23 pm

Their gourds tell a story — and earn them a living. That gourd in the photo — the one on the left? It is covered with miniature pictures of a potato harvest in Peru. There's even a wee burro hauling the day's crop.

That gourd will sell for around $800.

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Beyond A Voice And A Sad Story, 'Amy' Listens To A Life

Amy Winehouse
A24

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 4:54 pm

Booze, drugs, Svengalis galore, rampant co-dependence: The bare bones of a crash-and-burn rocker bio-pic poke through Asif Kapadia's richly absorbing documentary about the short, sharp life of Amy Winehouse. Here and there Amy flirts with prurience, but prurience is hard to avoid with a young woman who, willy-nilly, lived her private life in public. And if ever there was an artist whose life and work fed one another for better and worse, it was Winehouse.

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Television
2:45 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Sonia Manzano, Who Played Maria On 'Sesame Street,' To Retire

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 4:35 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

She has taught generations of children important lessons and read them a whole lot of books.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "SESAME STREET")

SONIA MANZANO: (As Maria) "Goldilocks And The Three Bears" - an oldie, but a goodie.

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Book Reviews
2:30 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Book Review: 'The Uses Of The Body,' Deborah Landau

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 4:35 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Instead of ignoring the strange things a woman's body does through motherhood and aging, Deborah Landau's new collection revels in them. It's called "The Uses Of The Body." Tess Taylor has our review.

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Book Reviews
9:03 am
Thu July 2, 2015

Get A 'Grip' On This Goofy Noir Sci-Fi Tale

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 12:36 pm

Remember how it felt when, as a kid, you opened up a fresh-from-the-library book to discover the illustrations weren't in color? It wasn't a good feeling. Most of us still have a foot planted firmly in childhood when it comes to the ol' rainbow. It means that sticking to black and white — whether it's to save money on your independent film or to approximate high-end austerity in an Ikea-furnished apartment — usually entails a sensory sacrifice.

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Movie Reviews
3:28 pm
Wed July 1, 2015

'Magic Mike XXL' And 'Terminator Genisys' Bring The Testosterone

Originally published on Wed July 1, 2015 4:22 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Dinosaurs have been rampaging through movie theaters for weeks. And now, just in time for Independence Day, they are joined by robots and male strippers. Critic Bob Mondello says let the block busting go on.

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