Arts/Life

Movies
7:54 pm
Sat March 28, 2015

The Chinese 'Paper Son' Who Inspired The Look Of Disney's 'Bambi'

The Walt Disney Studio's artists used Tyrus Wong's paintings as a guide for the forest backgrounds of Bambi. His work is featured in a new exhibit at the Museum of Chinese in America.
Peter Brenner Courtesy of the Museum of California Design

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 9:04 pm

The animals were getting lost in the forest — so the story goes.

A year after Walt Disney made history with the release of his studio's first feature-length animated film, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, his artists were struggling to find the right design for the woodland backgrounds of Bambi, the coming-of-age tale of a young deer.

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Author Interviews
3:24 pm
Sat March 28, 2015

'Night At The Fiestas' Spins Stories Of Faith And Family

Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 3:29 pm

When writer Kirstin Valdez Quade talks about her New Mexican roots, it's not just her own childhood, growing up in the region, that she means — it's a connection much deeper than that.

"My family has been in northern New Mexico for hundreds of years," she tells NPR's Arun Rath. "My family's presence can be traced back to 1695 and some of the earliest conquistadors. So there's a long family history in the region."

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Music
3:24 pm
Sat March 28, 2015

Using Computers To Connect With Classical Music

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 3:30 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:19 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Not My Job: 'Mad Men' Creator Matthew Weiner Gets Quizzed On Glad Men

Dan Steinberg AP

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:49 am

Does anybody remember the days when people on TV had to be nice, honest people you could root for? After seven seasons of the groundbreaking TV show Mad Men, neither do we.

The final season of the show is about to launch and so we've invited Mad Men creator Matt Weiner to play a game called "Glad Men" — three questions about people who try to cheer other people up. We'll quiz him on the lives of a success coach, a motivational speaker and a happiness guru.

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Music News
5:39 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Influential Guitarist John Renbourn, Co-Founder Of Pentagle, Dies

John Renbourn performs onstage at the Royal Festival Hall in London June 29, 2008. The influential guitarist died at his home in Scotland Thursday. He was 70.
Barney Britton Redferns

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 11:41 am

Guitarist and composer John Renbourn co-founded the group Pentangle and went on to become revered by guitarists around the world. Renbourn was found dead of an apparent heart attack at his home in Scotland on Thursday, after failing to show up for a concert. He was 70 years old.

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The Salt
5:39 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Making Cheese In The Land Of The Bible: Add Myrrh And A Leap Of Faith

A Palestinian Bedouin girl milks a sheep in her family's makeshift camp in the West Bank. Herders live close to their animals, their main source of income.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:56 am

In spring, West Bank almond trees bloom white. Dry brown hills turn temporarily green and are dotted with bright wildflowers. The ewes and nanny goats of Bedouin herders that wander the West Bank eat well this time of year.

It's cheese season.

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Author Interviews
5:39 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Hunting Mythical Monsters 'At The Water's Edge'

Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:56 am

Maddie Hyde is a Sara Gruen heroine. She's bold, she's warm, and she's been cast out of Philadelphia polite society — in this case the family of her husband Ellis, who is 4F in the middle of World War II. To avoid the glares and scowls, and to earn their own way in the world after being cut off from a family fortune, they cross the Atlantic during a high tide of submarine warfare to try to burnish their family name by hunting down an older kind of monster in a Scottish village.

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Book News & Features
4:03 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Pour A Bucket Of Blood On These New Adaptations Of 'Carrie'

In Carrie The Musical, now being revived at a California theater, Carrie gets a jarringly Disneyesque song before her fateful prom.
La Mirada Theatre

Stephen King's Carrie (his first published work) is now more than four decades old, but it's never fallen out of pop culture favor. It was a fresh, horrifying look at the nightmare that could be high school, with a memorably mousy teenage protagonist who unleashed her telekinetic powers on her town.

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The Seams
3:47 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Nigerian Artist Continues A Family Tradition With 'Sartorial Anarchy'

Robert Duncan poses with his wife, Karen, for New York photographer Iké Udé.
Iké Udé Courtesy of Robert and Karen Duncan

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 12:13 pm

On a recent night in Lincoln, Neb., aviation tycoon J. Robert Duncan hosted a party for the unveiling of two photographic portraits of him and his wife, Karen, whimsically attired in colorful dress from around the world. Their photographer is the Lagos, Nigeria-born, New York-based artist Iké Udé.

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Movie Reviews
2:37 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

Photography, Misery And Beauty In 'The Salt Of The Earth'

"I could hear the gold whispering in the souls of these men," says Brazilian photographer Sebastiao Salgado of a gold mine in Serra Pelada.
Sebastiao Salgado Amazonas Images/Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 6:07 pm

Having recently celebrated the accomplishments of musicians and dancers in his transcendent documentaries The Buena Vista Social Club and Pina, it perhaps makes sense that Wim Wenders would now turn his camera on a man who wields a camera.

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TED Radio Hour
6:52 am
Fri March 27, 2015

How Does Play Shape Our Development?

Dr. Stuart Brown says play is a "necessary part of being human."
Courtesy of TED

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 9:39 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Press Play

About Stuart Brown's Talk

Dr. Stuart Brown says humor, games, roughhousing and fantasy are more than just fun. He came to this conclusion after conducting some somber research into the stark childhoods of murderers.

About Stuart Brown

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TED Radio Hour
6:52 am
Fri March 27, 2015

Who's That Guy Riding The Subway In His Underwear?

The group Improv Everywhere brings moments of spontaneous fun into the everyday.
Courtesy of Charlie Todd

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 9:38 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Press Play

About Charlie Todd's TED Talk

Charlie Todd choreographs bizarre, hilarious and unexpected public scenes. He explains how his group, Improv Everywhere, creates these moments of urban whimsy to bring people together.

About Charlie Todd

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Monkey See
4:03 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Small Batch Edition: Talking 'X-Files' With Kumail Nanjiani

David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson (pictured above) are both returning to The X-Files.
Getty Images

Kumail Nanjiani is a standup comedian, the co-host of the comedy show The Meltdown With Jonah And Kumail for Comedy Central, an actor (including a regular gig on HBO's Silicon Valley), and a popular Twitter presence.

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Religion
4:01 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Church Of Scientology Calls New HBO Documentary 'Bigoted'

The HBO documentary Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief airs Sunday — over the vigorous objection of Scientology officials.
Courtesy of HBO

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 6:01 pm

The Church of Scientology is famous for its efforts to silence its critics, but it has not blocked an upcoming HBO film that turns a harsh light on the powerful organization and its leadership.

Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief, directed by Academy Award-winning documentarian Alex Gibney, will debut Sunday over the vigorous objection of Scientology officials.

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Television
1:29 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

'Justified' Creator Aims To Stay True To The Late Writer Elmore Leonard

Timothy Olyphant plays Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens on FX's Justified, which is based on a novella by Elmore Leonard. The show's creator, Graham Yost, says the only "tussle" the writers had with Leonard happened during the pilot, over which hat Raylan should wear.
Prashant Gupta FX

The FX series Justified, which is in its sixth and final season, is based on the novella Fire in the Hole by Elmore Leonard. Leonard was an executive producer of the series until his death in 2013. The show's creator and showrunner, Graham Yost, says he has made it his mission to stay as true as he can to Leonard's vision and storytelling style.

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The Salt
9:22 am
Thu March 26, 2015

How Snobbery Helped Take The Spice Out Of European Cooking

A 16th century woodcut shows the interior of a kitchen. In medieval Europe, cooks combined contrasting flavors and spices in much the same way that Indian cooking still does today.
Paul Lacroix Wikimedia

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 12:24 pm

My father usually starts off his curries by roasting a blend of cinnamon, cardamom, coriander, anise, cumin and bay leaves. Then he incorporates the onions, garlic and ginger — and then tomatoes and chilies and a touch of cream.

The North Indian cuisine I grew up eating is about melding together distinct, disparate flavors and building up layer upon layer of spice and seasoning. Much of European cuisine, by contrast, is about combining complementary flavors — think potatoes with leeks, or scallops with white wine.

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Code Switch
6:33 am
Thu March 26, 2015

Why It's So Hard For Us To Agree About Dong From 'Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt'

The gesture Kimmy's making doesn't mean the same thing to Dong.
Eric Liebowitz Netflix

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 10:01 am

The very first time we encounter Dong Nguyen, one of several hotly debated characters in Tina Fey's Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, he has just introduced himself to Kimmy in their GED class. And, as surely happens to Dong all the time, ever since he immigrated to New York from Vietnam, she's stifling a giggle over his name.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu March 26, 2015

'Lost Boys Symphony' Blurs The Lines Between Reality And Madness

Courtesy of Hachette Book Group

Not YA, not New Adult, not anything of the sort, despite the fact that it is primarily about teenagers, their love lives and the sticky, weird and thrilling moment of leaving home and growing up, just a little, for the very first time.

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Book Reviews
12:37 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Do You Believe In Ghosts? You Might After Reading This Book

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 4:13 pm

Who doesn't love a good ghost story? The unseen hand moving a cup or the shadow climbing a staircase promises an existence beyond our mundane realities. Hannah Nordhaus' new book, American Ghost, is an offbeat mishmosh of memoir, cultural history, genealogical detective story and paranormal investigation, but it opens in the classic manner of spooky tales — with a sighting.

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Book Reviews
5:13 am
Wed March 25, 2015

A Shimmy Into English Shakes The Dirt Off This Irish Classic

The Dirty Dust, by Máirtín Ó Cadhain.
Courtesy of Yale University Press

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 7:44 am

If, by some fluke of fate, you managed to dodge your Irish language requirement in high school, fail to visit rural western Ireland or even, heaven forbid, forget the great mass of Gaelic you surely had to have learned as a youngster, you'd be forgiven for not having heard of Máirtín Ó Cadhain. Sadder still, you're likely never to have read his best-known novel, The Dirty Dust. That is, I must admit: I hadn't.

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Book Reviews
3:22 pm
Tue March 24, 2015

'Crescent Moon' Counts Down To Political Mayhem

Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 10:40 am

The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is American-educated Pakistani writer Fatima Bhutto's first novel, but she already has three books to her credit: One volume of poetry, another a memoir (Songs of Blood and Sword, a title that seems apt, since she's the granddaughter of the executed Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, niece of the assassinated Benazir Bhutto and daughter of the murdered Murtaza Bhutto), and a compilation of survivors' accounts of the 2005 Pakistan earthquake.

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Monkey See
12:43 pm
Tue March 24, 2015

James Corden Nods To Talk Show Tradition With CBS's 'Late Late Show'

James Corden (left) talks to Mila Kunis and Tom Hanks on Monday's debut of The Late Late Show with James Corden.
Monty Brinton AP

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 1:44 pm

Looks like it took a 36-year-old comic actor from a small British town no one has heard of to bring back the oldest of old-school American TV talk show traditions.

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Television
12:42 pm
Tue March 24, 2015

'American Crime': A Series Packed With 'Emotional Honesty' About Race

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 12:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Television
12:42 pm
Tue March 24, 2015

James Corden Hits Late-Night TV With His Own Skill Set And Mindset

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 12:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Monkey See
10:43 am
Tue March 24, 2015

Here Comes 'The X-Files,' Back For More Mulder, More Scully, And More

Gillian Anderson and David Duchovny will reprise their roles as Dana Scully and Fox Mulder in The X-Files limited series.
Fox Broadcasting Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 10:58 am

Everything old really is new again. Even aliens.

Fox announced today that The X-Files, which ran on television from 1993 until 2002 and was accompanied by feature films in 1998 and 2008, will be back as a six-episode "event series," with production beginning this summer. Creator and Executive Producer Chris Carter will be in charge once again, and yes, Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson) will be, too.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue March 24, 2015

Ia, Ia, YA! 'Harrison Squared' Is A Tentacular Teen Adventure

Courtesy of Tor Books

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 12:34 pm

Daryl Gregory has written about monsters. He's written about demons and drugs and Philip K. Dick. He's wrecked the world a couple times over, bounced from fantasy to science fiction and back again with an impish ease. He's the kind of storyteller who's always chasing after the weird — occasionally catching it, often trailing close enough to smell the brimstone and tacos on its breath.

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The Salt
1:36 am
Tue March 24, 2015

Koreans Have An Insatiable Appetite For Watching Strangers Binge Eat

Rachel Ahn, who goes by "Aebong-ee," is among the top 100 most-watched mukbang stars in South Korea.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 8:55 am

Move over, cooking shows. In Korea, the big food fad is eating shows, or mukbang. Korean viewers are so glued to watching strangers binge eating that the live-streamers consuming calories in front of webcams are becoming minor celebrities in Korean culture.

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Author Interviews
4:46 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

'Cheated' Out Of An Education: Book Replays UNC's Student-Athlete Scandal

UNC basketball fans storm the court after a win over Duke in 2014.
Grant Halverson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 8:47 am

March Madness is college basketball's annual shining moment, and few schools have shone as bright or as long as the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. The Tar Heels have been in 18 Final Fours and won the national championship five times, most recently in 2009.

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Animals
3:44 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Former Orca Trainer For SeaWorld Condemns Its Practices

John Hargrove, a trainer who spent 14 years working with orcas, mostly at SeaWorld, eventually became disillusioned with the company's treatment of its killer whales.
Courtesy of Palgrave Macmillan Trade

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 7:12 pm

Last year 4 million people visited SeaWorld's theme parks, where the top shows feature orcas, also known as killer whales. For years, activists have charged that keeping orcas in captivity is harmful to the animals and risky for the trainers who work with them, a case that gained urgency in 2010 when Dawn Brancheau, a veteran orca trainer, was dragged into the water and killed by a whale at the SeaWorld Park in Orlando, Fla. When Brancheau died, there was some dispute as to whether the whale's intent was aggressive and whose fault the incident was.

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The Salt
2:27 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Even Neil DeGrasse Tyson Is Now Munching On Bugs

Neil deGrasse Tyson with a Cambodian cricket rumaki canape, wrapped in bacon. "I have come to surmise, in the culinary universe, that anytime someone feels compelled to wrap something in bacon, it probably doesn't taste very good," he said skeptically before taking a bite.
Carole Zimmer for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 3:03 pm

More than 1,000 guests in gowns and tuxedos crowded into a two-story hall on Saturday night at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

Standing among a pack of well-preserved African elephants, they sampled the delicacies offered by waiters wending their way through the throngs. They had come for the annual dinner of the Explorers Club — and the cocktail-hour fare certainly required an adventurous palate: All of it was made of insects.

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