Arts/Life

Monkey See
4:03 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Small Batch Edition: Talking 'X-Files' With Kumail Nanjiani

David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson (pictured above) are both returning to The X-Files.
Getty Images

Kumail Nanjiani is a standup comedian, the co-host of the comedy show The Meltdown With Jonah And Kumail for Comedy Central, an actor (including a regular gig on HBO's Silicon Valley), and a popular Twitter presence.

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Religion
4:01 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Church Of Scientology Calls New HBO Documentary 'Bigoted'

The HBO documentary Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief airs Sunday — over the vigorous objection of Scientology officials.
Courtesy of HBO

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 6:01 pm

The Church of Scientology is famous for its efforts to silence its critics, but it has not blocked an upcoming HBO film that turns a harsh light on the powerful organization and its leadership.

Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief, directed by Academy Award-winning documentarian Alex Gibney, will debut Sunday over the vigorous objection of Scientology officials.

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Television
1:29 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

'Justified' Creator Aims To Stay True To The Late Writer Elmore Leonard

Timothy Olyphant plays Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens on FX's Justified, which is based on a novella by Elmore Leonard. The show's creator, Graham Yost, says the only "tussle" the writers had with Leonard happened during the pilot, over which hat Raylan should wear.
Prashant Gupta FX

The FX series Justified, which is in its sixth and final season, is based on the novella Fire in the Hole by Elmore Leonard. Leonard was an executive producer of the series until his death in 2013. The show's creator and showrunner, Graham Yost, says he has made it his mission to stay as true as he can to Leonard's vision and storytelling style.

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The Salt
9:22 am
Thu March 26, 2015

How Snobbery Helped Take The Spice Out Of European Cooking

A 16th century woodcut shows the interior of a kitchen. In medieval Europe, cooks combined contrasting flavors and spices in much the same way that Indian cooking still does today.
Paul Lacroix Wikimedia

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 12:24 pm

My father usually starts off his curries by roasting a blend of cinnamon, cardamom, coriander, anise, cumin and bay leaves. Then he incorporates the onions, garlic and ginger — and then tomatoes and chilies and a touch of cream.

The North Indian cuisine I grew up eating is about melding together distinct, disparate flavors and building up layer upon layer of spice and seasoning. Much of European cuisine, by contrast, is about combining complementary flavors — think potatoes with leeks, or scallops with white wine.

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Code Switch
6:33 am
Thu March 26, 2015

Why It's So Hard For Us To Agree About Dong From 'Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt'

The gesture Kimmy's making doesn't mean the same thing to Dong.
Eric Liebowitz Netflix

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 10:01 am

The very first time we encounter Dong Nguyen, one of several hotly debated characters in Tina Fey's Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, he has just introduced himself to Kimmy in their GED class. And, as surely happens to Dong all the time, ever since he immigrated to New York from Vietnam, she's stifling a giggle over his name.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu March 26, 2015

'Lost Boys Symphony' Blurs The Lines Between Reality And Madness

Courtesy of Hachette Book Group

Not YA, not New Adult, not anything of the sort, despite the fact that it is primarily about teenagers, their love lives and the sticky, weird and thrilling moment of leaving home and growing up, just a little, for the very first time.

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Book Reviews
12:37 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Do You Believe In Ghosts? You Might After Reading This Book

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 4:13 pm

Who doesn't love a good ghost story? The unseen hand moving a cup or the shadow climbing a staircase promises an existence beyond our mundane realities. Hannah Nordhaus' new book, American Ghost, is an offbeat mishmosh of memoir, cultural history, genealogical detective story and paranormal investigation, but it opens in the classic manner of spooky tales — with a sighting.

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Book Reviews
5:13 am
Wed March 25, 2015

A Shimmy Into English Shakes The Dirt Off This Irish Classic

The Dirty Dust, by Máirtín Ó Cadhain.
Courtesy of Yale University Press

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 7:44 am

If, by some fluke of fate, you managed to dodge your Irish language requirement in high school, fail to visit rural western Ireland or even, heaven forbid, forget the great mass of Gaelic you surely had to have learned as a youngster, you'd be forgiven for not having heard of Máirtín Ó Cadhain. Sadder still, you're likely never to have read his best-known novel, The Dirty Dust. That is, I must admit: I hadn't.

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Book Reviews
3:22 pm
Tue March 24, 2015

'Crescent Moon' Counts Down To Political Mayhem

Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 10:40 am

The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is American-educated Pakistani writer Fatima Bhutto's first novel, but she already has three books to her credit: One volume of poetry, another a memoir (Songs of Blood and Sword, a title that seems apt, since she's the granddaughter of the executed Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, niece of the assassinated Benazir Bhutto and daughter of the murdered Murtaza Bhutto), and a compilation of survivors' accounts of the 2005 Pakistan earthquake.

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Monkey See
12:43 pm
Tue March 24, 2015

James Corden Nods To Talk Show Tradition With CBS's 'Late Late Show'

James Corden (left) talks to Mila Kunis and Tom Hanks on Monday's debut of The Late Late Show with James Corden.
Monty Brinton AP

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 1:44 pm

Looks like it took a 36-year-old comic actor from a small British town no one has heard of to bring back the oldest of old-school American TV talk show traditions.

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Television
12:42 pm
Tue March 24, 2015

'American Crime': A Series Packed With 'Emotional Honesty' About Race

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 12:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Television
12:42 pm
Tue March 24, 2015

James Corden Hits Late-Night TV With His Own Skill Set And Mindset

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 12:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Monkey See
10:43 am
Tue March 24, 2015

Here Comes 'The X-Files,' Back For More Mulder, More Scully, And More

Gillian Anderson and David Duchovny will reprise their roles as Dana Scully and Fox Mulder in The X-Files limited series.
Fox Broadcasting Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 10:58 am

Everything old really is new again. Even aliens.

Fox announced today that The X-Files, which ran on television from 1993 until 2002 and was accompanied by feature films in 1998 and 2008, will be back as a six-episode "event series," with production beginning this summer. Creator and Executive Producer Chris Carter will be in charge once again, and yes, Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson) will be, too.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue March 24, 2015

Ia, Ia, YA! 'Harrison Squared' Is A Tentacular Teen Adventure

Courtesy of Tor Books

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 12:34 pm

Daryl Gregory has written about monsters. He's written about demons and drugs and Philip K. Dick. He's wrecked the world a couple times over, bounced from fantasy to science fiction and back again with an impish ease. He's the kind of storyteller who's always chasing after the weird — occasionally catching it, often trailing close enough to smell the brimstone and tacos on its breath.

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The Salt
1:36 am
Tue March 24, 2015

Koreans Have An Insatiable Appetite For Watching Strangers Binge Eat

Rachel Ahn, who goes by "Aebong-ee," is among the top 100 most-watched mukbang stars in South Korea.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 8:55 am

Move over, cooking shows. In Korea, the big food fad is eating shows, or mukbang. Korean viewers are so glued to watching strangers binge eating that the live-streamers consuming calories in front of webcams are becoming minor celebrities in Korean culture.

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Author Interviews
4:46 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

'Cheated' Out Of An Education: Book Replays UNC's Student-Athlete Scandal

UNC basketball fans storm the court after a win over Duke in 2014.
Grant Halverson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 8:47 am

March Madness is college basketball's annual shining moment, and few schools have shone as bright or as long as the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. The Tar Heels have been in 18 Final Fours and won the national championship five times, most recently in 2009.

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Animals
3:44 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Former Orca Trainer For SeaWorld Condemns Its Practices

John Hargrove, a trainer who spent 14 years working with orcas, mostly at SeaWorld, eventually became disillusioned with the company's treatment of its killer whales.
Courtesy of Palgrave Macmillan Trade

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 6:38 am

Last year 4 million people visited SeaWorld's theme parks, where the top shows feature orcas, also known as killer whales. For years, activists have charged that keeping orcas in captivity is harmful to the animals and risky for the trainers who work with them, a case that gained urgency in 2010 when Dawn Brancheau, a veteran orca trainer, was dragged into the water and killed by a whale at the SeaWorld Park in Orlando, Fla. When Brancheau died, there was some dispute as to whether the whale's intent was aggressive and whose fault the incident was.

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The Salt
2:27 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Even Neil DeGrasse Tyson Is Now Munching On Bugs

Neil deGrasse Tyson with a Cambodian cricket rumaki canape, wrapped in bacon. "I have come to surmise, in the culinary universe, that anytime someone feels compelled to wrap something in bacon, it probably doesn't taste very good," he said skeptically before taking a bite.
Carole Zimmer for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 3:03 pm

More than 1,000 guests in gowns and tuxedos crowded into a two-story hall on Saturday night at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

Standing among a pack of well-preserved African elephants, they sampled the delicacies offered by waiters wending their way through the throngs. They had come for the annual dinner of the Explorers Club — and the cocktail-hour fare certainly required an adventurous palate: All of it was made of insects.

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The Salt
1:06 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Sandwich Monday: Burger King's YUMBO

A look within.
NPR

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 1:57 pm

Nobody is more excited about Burger King's new Chicken Fries — fried chicken strips shaped and served like french fries — than Burger King. The workers at the Chicago store we visited were all dressed in large, sacklike yellow Chicken Fries T-shirts, and a chicken mascot cavorted on the electronic menu, next to a picture of the item.

"Two orders of Chicken Fries!" I said, infected, salmonella-like, with their joy.

"We don't have any Chicken Fries," said the server.

I pointed mutely at the dancing chicken above her head.

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The Salt
12:19 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Liberte, Egalite, Gastronomie? France Rallies To Defend Its Food's Honor

A sampling of the multicourse menu served at the Gout de France dinner at the French embassy in Washington, D.C.: (clockwise from top left): seasonal vegetables with winter truffle Bayonne ham crisps; slowly cooked monkfish with fennel pollen flavors in "Armoricaine" sauce; Ariane apple and Guanaja chocolate onctueux; Saint-Nectaire cheese and grilled bread with nuts and raisins.
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 12:18 pm

What do the French do when their economy and identity are under assault? Throw a dinner party, of course – a global one.

From Madagascar to Washington, D.C., more than 1,000 French chefs on five continents hosted multi-course gastronomic dinners last Thursday in celebration – and defense – of France's culinary prowess.

At one dinner, at the Chateau of Versailles west of Paris, around 600 guests (including NPR), dined in the lamp-lit Battles' Gallery, flanked by oil paintings of French military victories through the ages.

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Author Interviews
3:23 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

'13 Men,' No Clear Answers: Digging Into An Indian Gang Rape Case

In 13 Men journalist Sonia Faleiro chronicles the real-life case of "Baby" — a 20-year-old woman from the tribal village of Subalpur in West Bengal, India. Baby falls in love with a Muslim outsider and, she tells police, is gang-raped as punishment. Villagers maintain that Baby's story was fabricated.
Picasa Sonia Faleiro

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 11:26 am

Last year, a 20-year-old woman left the Indian capital city of New Delhi and returned to the rural village where she grew up so she could take care of her sick mother.

The woman's name isn't public, but Sonia Faleiro — a journalist who's been investigating her case — calls her "Baby." She says Baby was known as a high-profile figure in her modest village.

"She became a somebody," Faleiro tells NPR's Kelly McEvers. "A landowner. An employed young woman. She had money to spend. And she refused to accept that she needed to be like everyone else."

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Arts/Life
11:43 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Film Review: Cinderella

  Jack Fields reviews the new film, "Cinderella."

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Arts & Life
7:19 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Decades Before YouTube, Video Pioneers Captured Turbulent Era

From left, Videofreex David Cort, Bart Friedman and Parry Teasdale filmed kids' programs and daily goings-on in 1973 at their Maple Tree Farm in Lanesville, N.Y.
John Dominis Courtesy of Videofreex

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 10:02 am

Back in the pre-digital era — when telephones were used for talking, not photographing and filming, and before YouTube came along to broadcast everyone's videos — capturing and disseminating moving images was expensive, time consuming and decidedly non-portable.

But that changed in 1967, when Sony introduced the world's first portable video tape recorder. Before long, enthusiasts formed "media collectives" that captured the social and cultural upheaval of the era. Fueled by a mix of the tunes, the tokes and the times, video became part of the revolution it was documenting.

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Sunday Puzzle
6:03 am
Sun March 22, 2015

What's Last Comes First

NPR

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 7:19 am

On-air challenge: You'll be given some words. For each one, name another word that can follow the first to complete a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase. The last and first letters, respectively, of the first word must be the first and second letters, respectively, of the second. For example, given "tennis," you would say "stadium" or "stroke."

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Author Interviews
6:02 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Author: Kids Need Abundant Connection With Nature

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 7:19 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Scott Sampson has a big fancy title. He's the vice president of research and collections at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. But to a whole lot of American kids, he's this guy...

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Theater
6:01 am
Sun March 22, 2015

William Electric Black Tackles Gun Violence In 5 Ambitious Plays

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 7:19 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Salt
4:18 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Foraging In The Office Fridge: Petty Theft Or Public Service?

Snarky notes may not do much to ward off office fridge thieves. "I came across one guy who will intentionally steal people's food when they leave snarky notes," says Dan Pashman, host of the Sporkful.
Photo Illustration by Ryan Kellman/NPR

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 8:14 am

There is perhaps no greater opportunity to introduce tension into the workplace than within the walls of the office refrigerator. It's a social experiment without a set list of rules to guide behavior, and no authority to enforce what's appropriate.

Is a dollop of ketchup too much? What if someone's sandwich has been in there for days?

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Author Interviews
4:01 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

Thanks To Chance (And Craigslist), A Writer Becomes A Carpenter

131Pixfoto iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 1:22 pm

Nina MacLaughlin always knew she wanted to be a writer. She studied English and classics in college, and after graduation, she landed a great job with Boston's weekly alternative newspaper, the Boston Phoenix.

But after a few years of editing the newspaper's website, the drudgery began to hit her. It involved so much clicking, she says, and so many empty hours scrolling through the Internet. It didn't feel like how she wanted to spend her life.

And then came the low point: web producing a "listicle" of the world's "100 Unsexiest Men."

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My Big Break
3:33 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

'I'm Perd Hapley, And I Just Realized I'm Played By An Actual Newscaster'

Jay Jackson, as Perd Hapley, interviews Amy Poehler's character Leslie Knope during the sixth season of Parks and Recreation.
Colleen Hayes NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 5:41 pm

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:17 am
Sat March 21, 2015

Not My Job: Richard Price (AKA Harry Brandt) Gets Quizzed On Pseudonyms

Lorraine Adams Courtesy of Henry Holt & Co.

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 6:43 am

Novelist Richard Price has spent his career writing about cops, but he didn't really get to know one until relatively late in life. "I had never met a cop before I was, like, 35," Price tells NPR's Peter Sagal. "I had no reason to. And I just got addicted to what you can see ... from the back of a police car."

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