Arts/Life

U.S.
10:36 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Meet The 2014 Winners Of The MacArthur 'Genius Grants'

U.S. cartoonist Alison Bechdel works Sept. 2 in her studio at the castle of Civitella Ranieri, central Italy.
Riccardo De Luca MacArthur Foundation

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 10:46 pm

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Author Interviews
2:42 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

100 Years Ago, 'New Republic' Helped Define Modern Liberalism

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 3:33 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Author Interviews
12:27 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

13 Days Of High Emotion That Led To The Egypt-Israel Peace

As President Jimmy Carter looks on, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat (left) shakes hands with former Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin at Camp David on Sept. 6, 1978.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:13 pm

When President Jimmy Carter decided to bring Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin to Camp David in 1978 to broker peace talks, his hope that the two men would like each other was "completely naïve and mistaken," says journalist Lawrence Wright.

The first couple of days turned into a screaming match.

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Monkey See
11:45 am
Tue September 16, 2014

'Mindy' And 'New Girl' Navigate Their Worlds Of Crazy Love

Danny (Chris Messina) and Mindy (Mindy Kaling) find themselves in a new position in the premiere of The Mindy Project.
Isabella Vosmikova Fox

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 1:48 pm

[This post contains information about where main characters stand relative to each other at the opening of the new seasons of The Mindy Project and New Girl. Be advised.]

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The Two-Way
6:39 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Book News: Rankine, Glück On National Book Awards Longlist For Poetry

The poetry shortlist for the National Book Awards will be announced Oct. 15.
NationalBook.org

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue September 16, 2014

The Monstrous And The Beautiful Dance In 'White Van'

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 11:24 am

In the opening chapter of Wolf in White Van, the debut novel from singer-songwriter John Darnielle, protagonist Sean Phillips descends into a memory, and imagines other paths within it. "There are several possibilities," he tells us of a hallway in his family's home, with its many doors and secrets. "They open onto their own clusters of new ones, and there's an end somewhere, I'm sure, but I'll never see it."

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Parallels
2:43 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Iraq's Artists Defy Extremists With Bows, Brushes And A Low Profile

The Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra performs in Baghdad. The concert was promoted by word of mouth to avoid being targeted by bombs.
Graham Smith NPR

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 5:00 pm

It's a hot night in Baghdad, and the national theater is packed with people who are here to see the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra.

They're fanning themselves with programs that show conductor Karim Wasfi, a striking man with thick eyebrows and a pointed beard, playing the cello. Tonight, he'll be conducting for the first time in more than a year.

Iraq has been in the headlines lately, with extremists taking over parts of the country, American airstrikes, the militias and the politics.

But the country was once a sophisticated center for learning and the arts.

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The Salt
2:22 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

'Language Of Food' Reveals Mysteries Of Menu Words And Ketchup

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 3:58 pm

The words we use for everyday foods contain clues to their origins and hint at their ancient travels across the globe as they merge, fuse and sometimes take on different forms altogether. Stanford University linguist Dan Jurafsky unpacked some of the history with All Things Considered's Robert Siegel and in his book, The Language of Food.

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Arts/Life
1:40 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

El Paso Museum Of Art Announces Renoir To Remington Exhibit Opening September 21

The El Paso Museum of Art announces

Renoir to Remington:

Impressionism to the American West

September 21, 2014 – February 1, 2015

Woody and Gayle Hunt Family Gallery

Organized by the El Paso Museum of Art

in partnership with Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma, Washington.

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The Salt
1:18 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Sandwich Monday: Lay's Cappuccino Potato Chips

It's spelled "potato ccips."
NPR

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 3:42 pm

Lay's Potato Chips is having some sort of promotion in which they release a bunch of new flavors and we vote on which one is best, based on flavor, crunch, and foreign policy experience. One of the finalists is Cappuccino. This proves unequivocally that democracy itself is flawed.

Miles: What a rip-off! Three-fourths of the bag is foam.

Kelsie: Can I get mine substituted with soy?

Ian: The cappuccino-potato chip combination is the culinary equivalent of a mullet.

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Television
11:16 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Australian Comic Finds Humor In Humiliation For His Sitcom 'Please Like Me'

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 12:19 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Monkey See
10:07 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Kids, Pants, Booze, Music: Trouble In River City And Always

Robert Preston and Shirley Jones in the film version of The Music Man.
AP

Perhaps the most static conversation in American culture is the one about its constant decline. Today's music, today's actors, today's movies, today's media, today's food, today's habits, today's language — it's all going to hell, all of it, and it's taking us with it, no matter when today is.

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The Two-Way
5:31 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Book News: Agent Denies That Oscar Pistorius Is Writing A Memoir

Oscar Pistorius was convicted of culpable homicide for the shooting death of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp. Sentencing is set to begin Oct. 13.
Siphiwe Sibeko AP

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 7:46 am

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Author Interviews
3:10 pm
Sun September 14, 2014

A 'Lasciviously LA' Lunch With Crime Novelist James Ellroy

James Ellroy lives in Los Angeles, which serves as the setting for much of his work.
Jenniffer Carroll Knopf

Originally published on Sun September 14, 2014 4:29 pm

Writer James Ellroy has spent decades capturing a gritty, noirish Los Angeles in sprawling crime novels like The Black Dahlia and L.A. Confidential.

Ellroy could be a character in one of his own books. He's a thoroughly uncensored guy, a bit of a Luddite, and unafraid to talk on any subject at all: his mother's horrific murder when Ellroy was just 10, which was never solved; his decades-long struggle with alcoholism; his religious beliefs. And, of course, his LA crime fiction.

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Business
5:50 am
Sun September 14, 2014

'Your Call Is Important ... ' Which Is Why You Hear Music

Originally published on Sun September 14, 2014 9:56 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

You're listening to WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. It can be maddening. You call your doctor, your cable provider, your utility company, and you get sent to hold.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: There are 12 callers ahead of you. (Music playing).

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Research News
5:50 am
Sun September 14, 2014

Millennial Generation Likes Old-Fashioned Technology: Books

Originally published on Sun September 14, 2014 9:56 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Movie Interviews
5:50 am
Sun September 14, 2014

From Casting To Cutting The N-Word, The Making Of 'Gone With The Wind'

Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh) and Rhett Butler (Clark Gable) made their film debut in 1939's Gone with the Wind.
AP

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 9:00 am

Scarlett O'Hara and Rhett Butler are one of the most enduring couples in American cinema, and this year marks the 75th anniversary of their film debut in Gone with the Wind, a tale of war, love gone wrong and tragic endings. Adjusted for inflation, the epic melodrama has grossed more money than any other American film.

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Goats and Soda
5:50 am
Sun September 14, 2014

In The Quest To Make A Difference, 'A Path Appears'

In Malawi, Biti Rose Nasoni used a CARE microsavings program to start a business selling doughnuts.
Nicholas D. Kristof Random House

Originally published on Sun September 14, 2014 11:22 am

Everyone wants to "make a difference" but with an overwhelming array of charitable causes and organizations, the question is: how? Journalists Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn set out to find the answer in their new book, A Path Appears.

They profile a nurse in West Virginia who helps a teenage mother through the tough early days of parenting. And they tell the story of a woman in Africa who gets a small loan and starts a business that supports her family.

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Book Reviews
3:29 am
Sun September 14, 2014

A Fresh Take On Dystopia In 'Chimpanzee'

Originally published on Sun September 14, 2014 5:41 pm

The recent wave of dystopian novels — okay, let's call it a glut — has focused attention on all kinds of Earth-threatening ills, from climate change to genetically modified food. The plight of student-loan debtors and struggling academics, however, hasn't usually topped that list. Which is partly what makes Darin Bradley's latest novel, Chimpanzee, so fascinating, flaws and all.

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Author Interviews
3:10 pm
Sat September 13, 2014

In Margaret Atwood's Latest, The Past Is Powerfully Present

Canadian Margaret Atwood is the author of more than a dozen novels including The Handmaid's Tale, The Blind Assassin and Oryx and Crake, as well as works of poetry and nonfiction.
Jean Malek Random House

Originally published on Sun September 14, 2014 8:48 am

Author Margaret Atwood is prolific, beloved and extraordinarily accomplished. In addition to best-selling novels like The Handmaid's Tale and The Blind Assassin, she's penned poems, short stories, children's books, essays and works that defy classification.

But her fans will have to wait a long, long time for one particular piece of writing. She's working on a book that nobody will read for a hundred years — part of an art project that's going to require some special archival paper, as she explains to NPR's Arun Rath.

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Author Interviews
2:55 pm
Sat September 13, 2014

A Cheerful Mortician Tackles The Lighter Side Of Death

On her YouTube channel, mortician Caitlin Doughty humorously answers serious questions about death, decomposition, burial practices and more.
YouTube

Caitlin Doughty remembers her first encounter with death.

"That thud — that noise of the girl's body hitting laminate — would play over and over again in my mind, dull thud after dull thud," she writes in her new book, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory. She was 8, in a shopping mall in her home state, sunny Hawaii. The girl fell from a balcony. "Today, the thuds might be called a symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder, but back then the noises were just the drumbeat of my childhood."

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Author Interviews
8:41 am
Sat September 13, 2014

Wendy Davis Tells Of Her Own Difficult Abortions In 'Forgetting'

Texas Democratic gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis has a new memoir, Forgetting to Be Afraid.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 11:21 am

Wendy Davis, the Democratic candidate for the governor of Texas, came to the attention of most Americans outside Texas when, as state senator, she filibustered a highly restrictive abortion bill for 11 straight hours.

Now Davis is making headlines for her newly released memoir, Forgetting to Be Afraid. In the book, Davis revealed for the first time that she had two abortions herself. She also details her gritty and sometimes unhappy life growing up, first in Rhode Island and then Texas, Oklahoma and California.

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Book Reviews
8:03 am
Sat September 13, 2014

The 'Witch With No Name' Rides Into The Sunset, In Style

promo image

It's a bright cool day in September and the books now number 13. Kim Harrison has concluded her long-running Hollows series, the 10-year-anniversary of which I marked back in April, and I am bereft. In The Witch With No Name, Rachel Morgan, Ivy Tamwood and Jenks the pixy have their last string of adventures together in a modern-day Cincinnati riddled with elves, witches, vampires living and undead, werewolves, fairies and demons, in a rollercoaster ride of interlocking shenanigans that left me a little breathless.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:25 am
Sat September 13, 2014

Not My Job: Comedian Richard Lewis Gets Quizzed On Confidence

Jason Kempin Getty Images for AFI

Originally published on Sat September 13, 2014 10:24 am

Comedian Richard Lewis has made a successful career out of being a nervous, complaining, chronic worrier. He's just released a retrospective DVD set called Bundle of Nerves.

We've invited Lewis to play a game called "The secret, my young friend, is confidence." Three questions about how to be a badass, taken from the WikiHow article, How to Become a Badass.

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Music Interviews
5:40 am
Sat September 13, 2014

Paul Thorn Got Music At Southern Churches, White And Black

Originally published on Sat September 13, 2014 10:47 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

Here's something you don't read in the bio of every blues rocker who comes down the pike - Paul Thorn was once a nationally ranked middleweight boxer who fought world champion Roberto Duran, (Spanish spoken), Hands of Stone.

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Movie Interviews
5:40 am
Sat September 13, 2014

Medic Returns From Afghanistan To Broken Family In 'Bliss'

Originally published on Sun September 14, 2014 6:23 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
5:40 am
Sat September 13, 2014

Franklin Expedition Find May Reveal 'The Horror Of The Darkness'

Originally published on Sat September 13, 2014 10:47 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
5:40 am
Sat September 13, 2014

Peter Thiel In 'Zero To One': How To Develop The Developed World

Originally published on Sat September 13, 2014 10:47 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

You might remember this scene from the movie "The Social Network."

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "THE SOCIAL NETWORK")

WALLACE LANGHAM: (As Peter Thiel) You must be Mark.

JESSE EISENBERG: (As Mark Zuckerberg) Hi.

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Code Switch
3:40 am
Sat September 13, 2014

Why Michael Che's New Role Could Change More Than 'SNL'

Daily Show correspondent Michael Che will become the first black co-anchor of Saturday Night Live's Weekend Update.
Paul Marotta Courtesy of Michael Che

Originally published on Sat September 13, 2014 11:27 am

It seems some TV networks have gotten the message on late-night diversity and others have not.

Friday's news — that Saturday Night Live hired comic Michael Che to join Colin Jost behind the anchor desk on its popular "Weekend Update" segment — shows NBC's venerated late night comedy franchise may, finally, stand among those in the first group.

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Book Reviews
3:36 am
Sat September 13, 2014

'The Dog': Dubious Dealings In Dubai

iStockphoto.com

One measure of a fine writer is the ability to master new tricks. Joseph O'Neill's new novel, The Dog, is a different animal (so to speak) from Netherland, his remarkable PEN/Faulkner Award-winner about a Dutch financial analyst adrift in New York in the aftermath of 9/11. Though both involve romantic estrangement in a globalized but alienating world, The Dog focuses more narrowly — and sometimes claustrophobically — on one man's hopeless, deluded efforts to live blamelessly in a distressingly mean-spirited, soulless society.

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