Arts/Life

The Salt
4:05 pm
Fri November 28, 2014

From Humble Salt To Fancy Freezing: How To Up Your Cocktail Game

Smoke and mirrors: Dave Arnold plays around with liquid nitrogen in a cocktail glass during his interview with NPR's Ari Shapiro.
Claire Eggers NPR

Originally published on Fri November 28, 2014 4:58 pm

Dave Arnold can work some serious magic with a cocktail shaker. But he's no alchemist — Arnold, who runs the Manhattan bar Booker and Dax, takes a very scientific approach to his craft.

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Art & Design
3:26 pm
Fri November 28, 2014

'New Yorker' Cover Shows A Divided St. Louis

Originally published on Fri November 28, 2014 4:22 pm

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Bob Staake, illustrator of the controversial cover of The New Yorker, which depicts the St. Louis skyline divided in half.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This Week's Must Read
3:15 pm
Fri November 28, 2014

After The Ferguson Decision, A Poem That Gives Name To The Hurt

Originally published on Fri November 28, 2014 4:22 pm

Since George Zimmerman was found not guilty of killing Trayvon Martin, I've been repeating these words by the poet Audre Lorde like a prayer. She writes:

For those of us
who were imprinted with fear
like a faint line in the center of our foreheads
learning to be afraid with our mother's milk
for by this weapon
this illusion of some safety to be found
the heavy-footed hoped to silence us
For all of us
this instant and this triumph
We were never meant to survive.

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Television
3:15 pm
Fri November 28, 2014

Diversity On 'The Walking Dead' Wasn't Always Handled Well

Chad Coleman, left and Sonequa Martin-Green star as Tyreese and Sasha on AMC's The Walking Dead.
Frank Ockenfels AMC

Originally published on Fri November 28, 2014 4:22 pm

Language advisory: Quotes from The Walking Dead in this story contain language some find offensive.


For The Walking Dead, it was less like a conversation between two characters and more like a mini manifesto.

The moment came during an episode called "Four Walls and Roof," as Bob Stookey spoke to hero Rick Grimes about a central theme this season: keeping your humanity in midst of a zombie apocalypse.

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Monkey See
8:21 am
Fri November 28, 2014

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Kid Stuff And Leftover Outtakes

NPR

It's a holiday weekend for many of us, but we've still got a fresh episode — and a sparkly new panelist in the fourth chair: Guy Raz, host of NPR's TED Radio Hour. When we asked Guy about coming on the show, we learned that pop-culture-wise, he — like our own Stephen Thompson — spends a lot of time sharing stuff with his kids. So this seemed like a good week to get around to Disney's current hit, Big Hero 6. But not just that! We also cover new shows on Amazon, old films Stephen will harass you into seeing, and lots more.

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Art & Design
2:00 am
Fri November 28, 2014

Gold-Plated Gowns And 8-inch Pumps: The Stuff That Made Starlets Shimmer

Mae West is said to have worn these super platform shoes both on screen and off.
Brian Sanderson Courtesy of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Originally published on Fri November 28, 2014 5:16 am

Dripping in diamonds and shimmering in silks, the movie stars of the 1930s and '40s dazzled on the silver screen. Now, some of their costumes and jewels are on view at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. There, a film clip runs on a wall behind gorgeously gowned mannequins lit by sconces and chandeliers. The clip is from 1932's No Man of Her Own, starring Clark Gable and Carole Lombard. Nearby, co-curator Michelle Finamore points to the actual gown Lombard wore. It's long, made of slinky silk crepe and covered in teeny gold-colored glass beads.

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Remembrances
2:23 pm
Thu November 27, 2014

'Queen Of Crime' PD James Was A Master Of Her Craft

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 5:12 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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Movie Interviews
2:23 pm
Thu November 27, 2014

Beware The 'Babadook,' The Monster Of Your Own Making

In an independent, Australian film, a single mother (Essie Davis) and her troubled young son (Noah Wiseman) are terrorized by a mysterious character from a children's book called Mister Babdook.
Matt Nettheim Causeway Films

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 5:12 pm

The monsters of repression are what terrorize a single mom and her little boy in The Babadook. The small, independent, Australian, feminist horror movie was one of the buzziest films coming out of the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. As of this writing, The Babadook enjoys an impressive 97 percent positive score on Rotten Tomatoes.

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Movies
2:23 pm
Thu November 27, 2014

The Holiday Films Are Coming, From 'Moses' To 'Annie'

Rameses (Joel Edgerton) and his wife Nefertari (Golshifteh Farahani) try to save their stricken child, a victim of one of the plagues, in Exodus: Gods And Kings.
Kerry Brown Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 5:57 pm

Every year, Hollywood tries to go out with a bang — the question this year is, which bang will be biggest? For sheer moviemaking grandeur, you'd think it would be hard to top the subduing of the dragon Smaug in The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies. But Peter Jackson's only got Gandalf and armies. In Exodus: Gods And Kings, Ridley Scott's got Moses, 400,000 slaves, and an effects budget Pharaoh would envy, not to mention the parting of the Red Sea.

Shall we call that a draw?

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Remembrances
10:12 am
Thu November 27, 2014

For P.D. James, A Good Mystery Celebrated Human Intelligence

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
7:00 am
Thu November 27, 2014

British Mystery Novelist P.D. James Dies At 94

Author P.D. James, whose publisher says died at age 94.
Ulla Montan AP

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 9:32 am

British mystery and crime novelist P.D. James, whose best-known works featured poet and Scotland Yard detective Adam Dalgliesh as a protagonist, has died at age 94, her publisher says.

Phyllis Dorothy James, a baroness and award-winning writer of such books as Shroud for a Nightingale, The Black Tower and The Murder Room, was born in Oxford began writing in her late 30s and published her first novel, Cover Her Face, in 1962.

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Monkey See
3:22 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Christmas Bells Are Ringing, And Cable Holiday Movies Are Unrelenting

Candace Cameron Bure and David O'Donnell star in Hallmark's Christmas Under Wraps, which airs Saturday on The Hallmark Channel.
Fred Hayes Crown Media

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 5:36 pm

On today's All Things Considered, my great dream came true: Audie Cornish and I sat down for a chat about Hallmark/Lifetime/UP movies of the holiday season. Do people really watch them? What are they about? Can they save Christmas? You may have read my story a couple of weeks back about being busted watching these movies, so you know that I mean it when I say I watch them and I don't judge.

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The Salt
9:19 am
Wed November 26, 2014

For Native Alaskans, Holiday Menu Looks To The Wild

Akutaq or agutak — also known as Eskimo ice cream — is a favorite dessert in western Alaska. It's made with berries and frothed with fat, like Crisco.
Al Grillo AP

When Americans sit down to their Thanksgiving meal, most tables will feature traditional fare: turkey, mashed potatoes, cranberries. But should you be looking for a different kind of holiday meal, head for rural Alaska.

That's where Nellie Gamechuck lives, in a village squeezed between tundra and a bend in the river in the southwest part of the state. Ask her what's for dinner on Thanksgiving, and she opens up the deep freeze. "Walrus meat, moose meat," she says. Digging down through the layers, she reaches the dessert level: salmonberries.

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The Two-Way
8:14 am
Wed November 26, 2014

Book News: Despite The Tumult, Ferguson Library Keeps Its Doors Open

Youths walk past a mural calling for peace in Ferguson, Mo., on a building up the street from the city's police department a day before the grand jury decision was announced.
David Goldman AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

A grand jury decision announced Monday not to indict police officer Darren Wilson in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown was preceded by a wave of shuttered doors in Ferguson, Mo. Expecting an eruption of protests over the decision, the city's public schools and many public services quickly declared they would be closed on Tuesday.

The Ferguson Public Library, however, remained open.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed November 26, 2014

North-Of-The-Border Horror In 'Go Down Together'

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 12:41 pm

"There is a town in north Ontario / With dream comfort memory to spare," sings Neil Young on the 1970 CSNY track "Helpless." "Helpless" also happens to be the title of the tenth and final story in Gemma Files' new collection, We Will All Go Down Together. The similarity isn't a coincidence; Files quotes Young's lyrics directly in another story, "Strange Weight." And the whole volume revolves around a fictional town in northern Ontario called Dourvale — a village which, like the town in Young's song, has dreams and memories to spare.

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The Salt
2:16 am
Wed November 26, 2014

Gluten-Free? Vegan? Thanksgiving Recipes For Alternative Diets

Baked Squash Kibbeh: Middle-Eastern kibbeh is a finely ground combination of beef or lamb, bulgur and onions either formed into balls and deep-fried or pressed into a pan and baked. For a vegetarian version of this flavorful dish, why not pair butternut squash with the warm spices?
Steve Klise Courtesy of America's Test Kitchen

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 10:05 am

It's like the start of a bad joke: a vegan, a gluten-free and a paleo walk into a bar — except it's your house, and they're gathered around your Thanksgiving table.

More and more Americans are passing on gluten — some for medical reasons, most by choice. Others are adopting diets that exclude meat, or insisting on the kinds of unprocessed foods that early man would have hunted and gathered.

All of this is a challenge to the traditional Thanksgiving feast.

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The Salt
4:32 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

For More Local Turkeys To Hit Holiday Tables, You Need An Abattoir

The turkeys at Kate Stillman's farm don't have to be loaded on a trailer and driven hundreds of miles this year. They now meet their ends on the same farm where they lived their lives.
Chris Arnold NPR

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 9:22 am

It's a busy time of year for turkey farmers around the country. And these days, with the growth of the local food movement, small family farms are struggling to keep up with all the orders for birds. So, we went to find out what one New England farmer is doing to get her gobblers from the field to the table. Enter the "abattoir."

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Author Interviews
3:08 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Box Of Love Letters Reveals Grandfather Didn't Escape WWII With 'Everyone'

cover crop
Riverhead

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 4:31 pm

Karl Wildman was the hero of his family — he escaped Vienna at the start of World War II and became a successful doctor in the United States. When Karl died, his granddaughter Sarah Wildman found a hidden trove of love letters from a woman Karl left behind in Vienna.

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Pop Culture
2:32 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Lions, Pianos And Boomboxes, Oh My: Movie Artifacts Hit The Auction Block

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 4:31 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Lions, pianos and boomboxes, oh my. Last night was a Hollywood night at Bonhams Auction House in New York City. As NPR's Jasmine Garsd reports, artifacts from some of the most iconic films sold for millions.

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Parallels
1:46 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

The American Origins Of The Not-So-Traditional Celtic Knot Tattoo

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 4:31 pm

What is the most cliched tattoo you can think of? Chinese characters? A tribal armband?

How about a Celtic knot? Those interlocking lines that look like ropes or basket weaving.

Last week I was in Ireland and decided to investigate the roots of this trend.

I spoke with Kevin McNamara at the Dublin Ink tattoo parlor.

"It would be a weird week in the shop if I didn't do at least, like 40," he told me. "That's not a literal number, but yeah, it's nuts."

Without Celtic knots and shamrocks, McNamara said, he would never have learned how to tattoo.

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Author Interviews
12:42 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

In 'Redeployment,' Former Marine Explores The Challenges Of Coming Home

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Movie Reviews
12:42 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Benedict Cumberbatch Lifts Above Biopic Formula In 'Imitation Game'

Keira Knightley, Matthew Beard, Matthew Goode, Benedict Cumberbatch, and Allen Leech in The Imitation Game.
Jack English The Weinstein Company

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 5:25 pm

Major studios once churned out scores of great-person biographical pictures. But now you rarely see them except during awards season. They're prime Oscar bait. The new Stephen Hawking biopic, The Theory Of Everything, is a perfect specimen. It's a letdown, finally, but Eddie Redmayne is amazingly tough. He captures the fury inside Hawking's twisted frame.

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Arts/Life
11:15 am
Tue November 25, 2014

Sierra County Announces Holiday Events

SIERRA COUNTY, NM—Hillsboro, New Mexico in Sierra County along with other “ghost towns” and cities there are bringing the spirit of the holidays to Southern New Mexico with several celebrations including “Christmas in the Foothills,” “Old Fashioned Christmas” and a “Luminaria Beachwalk,” to name a few, beginning on Dec. 6, 2014.

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The Salt
10:13 am
Tue November 25, 2014

Take A Bite Out Of Ringo: Giant Cookies Honor Pop Culture Icons

Brittanie Reed and her mother, Wendy Fitt, the two pastry chefs behind Snickety Snacks, took their inspiration for these sugar cookies from a series of Beatles finger puppets by the artist Hanasaurusrex.
Abram Landes/Courtesy of Snickety Snacks

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 12:05 pm

Chocolate chip. Oatmeal raisin. Snickerdoodle.

When it comes to cookies, these are the classics. They aren't the prettiest confections in the bakery case, but you don't feel guilty about gobbling them until only crumbs remain.

You will probably hesitate, however, about nibbling on an edge of one of the artfully decorated sugar cookies from Snickety Snacks.

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The Two-Way
8:09 am
Tue November 25, 2014

Book News: Gabriel Garcia Marquez's Collection Gets A Texas Welcome

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, seen here in 1982, speaks to reporters following the announcement of his Nobel win. Among the materials in his archive are the many drafts he prepared for his Nobel acceptance speech.
Hasse Persson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 9:41 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Just months after Gabriel Garcia Marquez's passing, the works of the late Colombian writer have found their resting place. The University of Texas, Austin has announced that the Harry Ransom Center, the school's humanities research library, has acquired the Nobel winner's archive.

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Book News & Features
3:46 pm
Mon November 24, 2014

Long-Lost Letter That Inspired 'On The Road' Style Has Been Found

A stream of consciousness letter Neal Cassady wrote to Jack Kerouac helped inspire the style of On The Road. The original manuscript of the first draft of Jack Kerouac's best-seller is shown above.
Darron Cummings AP

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 8:15 am

When Jack Kerouac's On the Road was first published in 1957 no one had ever seen anything quite like it. As it turns out, that stream of consciousness style that Kerouac made famous owes a huge debt to a letter written by his friend Neal Cassady. Among Kerouac scholars and fans it became known as the "Joan Anderson letter." It was missing for 65 years, but it has been found and will be auctioned next month.

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Book Reviews
2:37 pm
Mon November 24, 2014

Book Review: 'Lunch Poems' Reissue

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 8:15 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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The Salt
1:20 pm
Mon November 24, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Thanksgiving Hot Durkey

Happy Thanksgiving!
NPR

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 4:15 pm

Olson is a marketing company that promises its clients it will "revolutionize engagement" with its customers. In the case of client Oscar Meyer, this meant sending us eight packs of hot dogs, a loaf of bread, toothpicks, twine and instructions on how to make "the Hot Durkey," in the hope that it would go "viral," which is not the usual meaning of the word "viral" when applied to hot dogs.

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Books
12:52 pm
Mon November 24, 2014

Decades Later, Laurie Colwin's Books 'Will Not Let You Down'

Colwin was known for making her own baby food for her daughter, Rosa, pictured here in 1985.
Courtesy of Open Road Media

Many years ago, Laurie Colwin began an essay she wrote about the magic of roast chicken like this: "There is nothing like roast chicken. It is helpful and agreeable, the perfect dish no matter what the circumstances. Elegant or homey, a dish for a dinner party or a family supper, it will not let you down." Substitute the phrase "Laurie Colwin's writing" for the words "roast chicken," take some poetic allowances with the word "dish," and you'll have an approximate description of Colwin's own elusive magic.

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Author Interviews
12:52 pm
Mon November 24, 2014

The Rise And Fall Of Comedian Bob Hope

Bob Hope performs for servicemen at Munda Airstrip, New Georgia, Solomon Islands, in 1944.
U.S. Army AP

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 4:55 pm

For his first book, Comedy at the Edge, about standup comedy in the 1970s, Richard Zoglin interviewed comedians like Steve Martin and Jerry Seinfeld about who influenced their careers. He says he was surprised that none of them mentioned Bob Hope.

"It was very strange," Zoglin tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "It made me realize how off the radar he was."

The comedians instead mentioned people like Lenny Bruce, Groucho Marx and Jack Benny. Zoglin says he thought that it was "unjust" and that Hope wasn't getting the credit he deserved.

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