Arts/Life

History
10:20 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Boardrooms And Beyond: Remembering Civil Rights 'Power Broker' Whitney Young

Whitney Young spent most of his in the civil rights movement, but he focused on changing business as much as changing law. As head of the National Urban League, he had the ear of some of the nation's most powerful leaders. Host Michel Martin speaks with Young's niece, filmmaker Bonnie Boswell, who chronicles her uncle's story in the documentary, "The Power Broker."

Monkey See
8:58 am
Thu February 14, 2013

A Die-Hard's Guide To 'Die Hard': 25 Years Of Sweat, Dirt And Blowing Stuff Up

Bruce Willis returns as iconoclastic cop John McClane in A Good Day To Die Hard.
Frank Masi, SMPSP Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 11:11 am

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The Two-Way
6:05 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Book News: LBJ And Lady Bird Johnson's Love Letters Go Public

Lady Bird Johnson and President Lyndon Johnson at an election rally in 1964.
Terry Fincher Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 8:02 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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From The NPR Bookshelves
5:03 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Sick Of Valentine's Day? 6 Book Stories To Soothe Your Soul

Nate iStockphoto.com

This Valentine's Day, if you're feeling lonely, heartbroken, or just a bit jaundiced, we've got some archive treasures for you — tempestuous relationships, cartoon heartbreak, and a few books that may make you feel less alone — plus a bonus playlist from our good friends at NPR Music.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Secrets, Lies And The Allure Of The Illicit

iStockphoto.com

By the time Wendy Plump learned from a friend that her husband had a longtime mistress and an 8-month-old son living just a mile away, their union was already pockmarked with the scars of adultery — both his and hers. She divulges all this and more in Vow, her at times jaw-droppingly frank but ultimately instructive post-mortem on their 18-year marriage.

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Books
5:03 am
Thu February 14, 2013

A Bouquet Of Romantic Reads For Valentine's Day

iStockphoto.com

I love Valentine's Day! There. I said it.

I know plenty of people out there think Valentine's Day is an overly commercial faux holiday, and to some extent I can see why. After all, it is a day when people (especially men?) can feel forced to celebrate romance. Call me an overly sentimental romantic if you want to, but I still adore the idea and practice of a day devoted to romance and love.

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All Tech Considered
1:06 am
Thu February 14, 2013

When It Comes To Fashion, Shouldn't There Be An App For That?

Fashion from designers like Oscar de la Renta were on display at Fashion Week in New York.
Kathy Willens AP

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 1:05 am

Thursday is the last day of New York Fashion Week, and some cutting-edge design will be presented in the tents at Lincoln Center — literally. Standing on the runway will be computer programmer types rather than models. This follows an event that kicked off Fashion Week — something called a "hackathon."

A hackathon, explains Liz Bacelar, is a "fast-paced competition in which graphic designers, software developers and people with ideas, they come together to build an app in 24 hours. "

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Opinion
12:59 am
Thu February 14, 2013

An Affair to Remember in Pre-Independence India

Sandip Roy and his great-aunt, Debika Ghosh, took this picture after she told him about her great romantic escapade.
Courtesy Sandip Roy

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 1:05 am

For Valentine's Day, Morning Edition commentator Sandip Roy shares a family love story from 70 years ago.

I always knew that my mother's aunt Debika was the most beautiful of all the great-aunts. I didn't know that when she was young, she jumped off a moving train for love.

She is now 90. Bent with age, she shuffles with a walker. But she's still radiant, her hair perfectly dyed.

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Movie Interviews
3:44 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Playing The Big Room: An Oscars Joke-Writer Reflects

Billy Crystal hosts the 84th Annual Academy Awards in 2012. Writing jokes for hosts is a tricky game, says longtime joke writer Dave Boone.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 1:45 pm

Hollywood's biggest night is in just a few weeks. People tend to focus on the glitz, the glamour and — of course — the gowns. But we thought we'd take a moment to focus on the gags.

Or rather what goes into writing both the jokes that fall flat and the jokes that soar. For a bit of Oscars Writing 101, NPR's All Things Considered turned to Dave Boone, who has written for the Academy Awards eight times.

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Opinion
12:16 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Uses For Latin (If You're Not The Pope)

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 1:07 pm

Annalisa Quinn writes about books for NPR.org.

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Author Interviews
11:51 am
Wed February 13, 2013

'Dead Sea Scrolls' Live On In Debate And Discovery

A part of the Isaiah Scroll, one of the Dead Sea Scrolls, is seen inside the vault of the Shrine of the Book building at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.
Lior Mizrahi Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 2:42 pm

The Dead Sea Scrolls are the ancient manuscripts dating back to the time of Jesus that were found between 1947 and 1956 in caves by the Dead Sea. Since they were first discovered, they have been a source of fascination and debate over what they can teach — and have taught — about Judeo-Christian history. In his new book, The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Biography, Yale professor John J. Collins tells the story of the scrolls, their discovery and the controversies surrounding the scholarship of them.

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Monkey See
10:59 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Rubio's Water Bottle And The Authenticity Craving

In this frame grab from video, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio takes a sip of water during his Republican response to President Obama's State of the Union address on Tuesday.
AP

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Books
8:03 am
Wed February 13, 2013

'Dry Bones'? Hardly — There's Still Life In Detroit

An image from "Detroit Disassembled," an exhibit on display at the National Building Museum. (Andrew Moore, The Aurora, Brush Park neighborhood, 2008)
Andrew Moore National Building Museum

"Girdles and red nail polish and intestinal cleansing and bar fights and sewer pipes and wiretaps and eternal life and decay all around. It was insanity. It was outrageous. It was a reporter's wet dream. Where the hell was I?

"I paid the bill and left.

"The sign outside said DETROIT CITY LIMITS."

The corrupt, crime-addled Detroit of Charlie LeDuff's new memoir, Detroit: An American Autopsy, isn't the same city that I left a month ago.

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The Two-Way
5:52 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Book News: Disgraced 'New Yorker' Author Talks Plagiarism — For A $20,000 Fee

Jonah Lehrer attends a panel discussion for the World Science Festival in 2008.
Thos Robinson Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 8:33 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Lost In Everett's Hall Of Metafictional Mirrors

A friend of mine, with more than half a lifetime in the business of writing and a following of devoted fans, some years ago nailed a sign on the wall above his writing desk.

TELL THE [Expletive] STORY!

How I wish Percival Everett looked up every now and then from his keyboard to see a sign like this.

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Kitchen Window
12:09 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Porridge: A Just-Right Meal To Fight Winter's Chill

Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 1:50 pm

Porridge doesn't get a lot of love and respect. It's the fairy tale stuff of Goldilocks, or the pauper gruel of Oliver Twist. But really, porridge can be a beautiful thing, especially during the cold slog of winter. It's a comforting way to start the morning, a nice warm hug of a breakfast. And, dare I say, it actually can be kind of exciting.

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Book Reviews
11:38 am
Tue February 12, 2013

A Soured Student-Teacher Friendship Threatens 'Everything'

Matjaz Boncina iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 12:55 pm

Over the past week or so, I've mentioned James Lasdun's new book, Give Me Everything You Have to a bunch of colleagues; they've all heard about it already and they're all dying to read it. What Amy Chua's Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother was to parenting a couple of years ago, Lasdun's Give Me Everything You Have may well be to teaching: a controversial personal reflection on the professor-student relationship — except Lasdun, unlike Chua, really has no advice to offer; no certitude, nor help for pain.

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Monkey See
9:08 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Ten Clues That The Zombie Outbreak Being Announced On Your Television Is Not A Hoax

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 12:25 pm

As reported on Tuesday's Morning Edition, KRTV in Great Falls, Mont., was apparently the victim of hackers who broke in and broadcast a warning of attacking zombies. The station now says that it was a hoax, fortunately.

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The Two-Way
6:23 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Book News: Anger Over 'Superman' Author Who Condemns Homosexuality

An image from the cover of the first issue of Superman.
DC Comics AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 8:06 am

  • Former POW John Borling talks with Renee Montagne

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue February 12, 2013

'Vampires' Isn't Sparkly — It's Magnificent

There's a popular misconception that literary fiction is supposed to be staid, boring, realistic to a fault. Like all stereotypes, it's deeply unfair, but it endures, perhaps because readers keep having traumatic flashbacks to novels, like Sister Carrie, that they were forced to read in high school.

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First Reads
5:03 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Exclusive First Read: 'With Or Without You' By Domenica Ruta

Spiegel & Grau

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 11:05 am

  • Listen to the Excerpt

Domenica Ruta's memoir, With or Without You, chronicles her youth in a working-class Massachusetts town, the daughter of a wildly flamboyant mother who drove a beat-up lime green hatchback, and held impromptu storm-watching parties on the porch.

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Poetry
1:38 am
Tue February 12, 2013

In A North Vietnamese Prison, Sharing Poems With 'Taps On The Walls'

Horst Faas Associated Press

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 7:12 am

The United States was fresh off signing the peace accords to end the long and bloody war in Vietnam when, on Feb. 12, 1973, more than 140 American prisoners of war were set free.

Among the men to start a long journey back home that day was John Borling.

An Air Force fighter pilot, Borling was shot down on his 97th mission over Vietnam on the night of June 1, 1966. He spent the next six years and eight months in a notorious North Vietnamese prison.

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Food
1:37 am
Tue February 12, 2013

An Italian-Inspired Valentine's Feast From 'Nigellissima'

If you can't find pennette, use the small bulging crescents that are chifferi, or regular elbow macaroni, instead.
Courtesy Random House

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 11:51 am

Before the roses and the romance, Valentine's Day commemorated the Roman Saint Valentine — Valentinus, in Latin. And in her new cookbook, Nigellissima: Easy Italian-Inspired Recipes, chef Nigella Lawson offers up simple recipes that celebrate the cuisine of the country Saint Valentine called home.

Lawson joins NPR's Renee Montagne to share some recipes for a romantic dinner for two, and describes the time she spent in Italy.

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Technology
2:11 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Video Game Violence: Why Do We Like It, And What's It Doing To Us?

A typical scene from Call of Duty: Black Ops 2, the latest in the series of wildly popular video games.
Activision

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 7:57 am

Violent video games have been a small part of the national conversation about gun violence in recent weeks. The big question: Does violence in games make people more violent in the real world?

The answer is unclear, but one thing is obvious: Violence sells games. The most popular video game franchise is Call of Duty, a war game where killing is the goal.

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Author Interviews
12:33 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

An 'Autopsy' Of Detroit Finds Resilience In A Struggling City

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and Detroit native Charlie LeDuff says that the city must forget the future and instead focus on the present. His new book is called Detroit: An American Autopsy.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 8:36 am

For some, Detroit may be a symbol of urban decay; but to Charlie LeDuff, it's home. LeDuff, a veteran print and TV journalist who spent 12 years at The New York Times, where he shared a Pulitzer Prize in 2001, returned home to the city after the birth of his daughter left him and his wife — also a Detroit native — wanting to be closer to family.

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Arts & Life
10:03 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Valentine's Advice: Love & Manners

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 9:32 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. It's almost Valentine's Day and we realize that, along with the avalanche of pink hearts and stuff, there's also an avalanche of questions at this time of year from whether it's OK to romance by text message to how do you decide who pays for dinner to how to figure out whether you're in love or just, you know, stuck in the friend zone.

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The Two-Way
5:06 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Book News: Pablo Neruda's Body Will Be Exhumed For Autopsy

Chilean poet and diplomat Pablo Neruda in Stockholm with his wife Matilda after he received the Nobel Prize for literature.
Keystone Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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New In Paperback
5:03 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Feb. 11-17: Romance, Clockwork, Secrets And Empire

Vintage Books

Fiction and nonfiction releases from Christine Sneed, Peter Carey, Nell Freudenberger and Tom Holland.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

You Must Read This
5:03 am
Mon February 11, 2013

On The 50th Anniversary Of Sylvia Plath's Death, A Look At Her Beginning

Sylvia Plath

Craig Morgan Teicher's latest collection of poetry is called To Keep Love Blurry.

Fifty years ago today, Sylvia Plath ended her life as a major poet and an artist of the highest order. But one could hardly have predicted, from her taut yet unfocused first book, The Colossus, her only book of poetry published in her lifetime, that she would, or even could, become the poet we know, revere — and maybe even fear — as Sylvia Plath.

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Music
1:35 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Hollywood's 'Hooray': Hardly A Happy Hymn

Doris Day's somber 1958 version of "Hooray for Hollywood," which was included on an album of the same name, better reflects the song's creatively complicated lyrics.
Sony Picture Archives

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 9:41 am

When the Oscars are handed out later this month, the ceremony will most likely be punctuated by music that has pretty much come to stand for movies and Movieland. Ironically, the composer grew up in Detroit, and the lyricist came from Savannah, Ga. — yet together they wrote the quintessential Tinseltown anthem.

"Hooray for Hollywood" was written for the Warner Brothers film Hollywood Hotel. It was a corny little "let's-go-to-Hollywood-and become-stars" movie from 1937, with some cute dialogue.

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