Arts/Life

Movies
2:10 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Hits And Misses From Cannes Film Festival

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 7:21 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The French Riviera is once again flooded with celebrities, photographers and fans. The annual Cannes Film Festival is underway, an event known for its international flavor and glamour and the festival's opening film this year "Grace of Monaco" has both of those in spades. It's about the life of Hollywood star Grace Kelly and her difficult transition from actress to princess.

(SOUNDBITE FROM FILM "GRACE OF MONACO")

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Monkey See
12:40 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

'Batman V Superman': A Legal Thriller (We Hope)

Henry Cavill played Superman in Man Of Steel and will return to go to court with Batman (we hope) next year.
Clay Enos Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 12:52 pm

We learned today that the upcoming sequel to Man Of Steel will be called Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice.

This is interesting for several reasons. First of all, "Dawn Of Justice" sounds like a dirty movie about sheriffs. Second of all, "Dawn Of Justice" sounds like it precedes the Morning Of Reckoning, the Afternoon Of Relief, the Dusk Of Regret, the Evening Of Resignation, and the Hot Muggy Midnight Of History Repeating Itself, all leading up to Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice: The Next Day.

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Book Reviews
12:25 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

'Chameleon' Has Cabaret, Spies And A Plot Fit For Lifetime

German troops march towards Paris' Arc de Triomphe in 1943.
Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 2:20 pm

Even the most restrained plot summary of Francine Prose's latest novel sounds like a teaser for a late night Lifetime TV movie. Here goes: In the Paris of the late 1920s, a butch lesbian race car driver named Lou Villars has her license revoked by the French government for daring to dress as a man in public. Lou goes on to become a performer in a risque review at the Chameleon Club, a smoky nightclub where threadbare artists and thrill-seeking aristocrats mingle in the half-light.

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The Salt
11:49 am
Wed May 21, 2014

On The Trail Of Durian, Southeast Asia's 'Crème Brûlée On A Tree'

The inside of the Graveolens, a variety of durian that grows in the southernmost parts of Thailand, is sticky and cheese-like.
Courtesy of Lindsay Gasik

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 5:13 pm

What if a single taste of one fruit — in this case, the durian — changed the course of your entire life?

That's what happened to Lindsay Gasik and Rob Culclasure, a young couple who visited an Asian grocery store in Eugene, Ore., in 2009 in search of the football-sized fruit with thick, spiky skin. They were curious to try it after hearing that the durian's pungent smell and custard-like flesh had the power to drive people delirious with craving.

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Pop Culture
10:12 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Does It 'Suck To Be A Fat Girl'?

A recent episode of FX show Louie raised some controversial questions about women, weight and body image. Did the episode miss the mark? Our panel of writers and bloggers weigh in.

The Two-Way
5:08 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Book News: Ray Bradbury's House Is Up For Sale

The Los Angeles house where writer Ray Bradbury and his wife lived is now for sale, at nearly $1.5 million. The Fahrenheit 451 author is seen here in 2007.
Charley Gallay Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 6:22 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Remembering Two Lives: Which Are The 'Real' Children?

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 10:52 am

There's a photograph of my mother's side of the family that I often think about. In it are my mother, her five siblings, and a host of children and cousins. Nestled into the center of the photograph is my grandmother, small and frail by then, but without whom none of the rest would be there.

That sense of marvelling at what multitudes could come from one person — within sight of that person — stayed with me throughout My Real Children.

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Movie Interviews
3:18 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Filmmaker Brings Light To Roma, Holocaust Victims Lost To History

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:16 pm

The Roma people — commonly called Gypsies — have long been relegated to the margins of European society. As outsiders, they were targeted during the Holocaust, but the number of victims remains little-known. Filmmaker Aaron Yeger tells their story in the documentary A People Uncounted, and he joins the program to explain more.

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Education
2:37 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Young Poet, Big Prize: A Conversation With The Sophie Kerr Winner

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:16 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This year's Pulitzer Prize for poetry carries with it a cash prize of $10,000. The National Book Award for poetry, same amount, $10,000. That's just a little context for the whopper of a prize that Alexander Stinton just won for his poetry. Stinton is a graduating senior at Washington College on the eastern shore of Maryland and the prize that he won last week is the Sophie Kerr Prize.

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Television
11:01 am
Tue May 20, 2014

'The Maya Rudolph Show' And What It'll Take To Bring Back Variety

The Maya Rudolph Show premiered Monday night with guest appearances from Sean Hayes, Fred Armisen and Andy Samberg.
Paul Drinkwater NBC

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 4:40 pm

On Monday night, NBC presented The Maya Rudolph Show, a one-hour prime-time variety special executive produced by Lorne Michaels and featuring many of their mutual Saturday Night Live cohorts, including Fred Armisen, Andy Samberg and Chris Parnell. It also co-starred Kristen Bell, Sean Hayes and singer Janelle Monae. The Maya Rudolph Show was an intentional effort to bring back the old-school TV variety show, but with a new-school slant that bathed most of the show in a distancing self-awareness.

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Author Interviews
11:01 am
Tue May 20, 2014

In Life And Fiction, Edward St. Aubyn Sheds The Weight Of His Past

Edward St. Aubyn's 2006 novel Mother's Milk was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize.
Timothy Allen Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 4:39 pm

The winner of the United Kingdom's only literary prize for comic fiction was awarded Monday to Edward St. Aubyn for his new book, a satire about Britain's most prestigious literary award. The novel is called Lost for Words and it was just published in the U.S.

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Monkey See
10:02 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Be Wary And Bury The Very Scary 'I Wanna Marry Harry'

This is Matt. He looks slightly more like Prince Harry than you do.
Chris Raphael Fox

Gather round, children, and I will tell you of a dark time. A cruel time.

It was a time when reality dating shows were even worse than they are now.

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The Two-Way
6:21 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Book News: Politician's Story Of Growing Up Poor Wins Ondaatje Prize

Alan Johnson's This Boy: A Memoir of a Childhood describes life with his mother and sister in public housing in London's North Kensington neighborhood.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:36 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue May 20, 2014

A 'Great Day At Sea' For A Brit Aboard An American Carrier

AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 12:34 pm

One of the most enviable aspects of Geoff Dyer's intellect is how nomadic it is. With dazzling authority and acuity, he has roamed over subjects as varied and dense as jazz (But Beautiful), photography (The Ongoing Moment), D.H. Lawrence (Out of Sheer Rage), and the perfect doughnut (the title essay of Otherwise Known as the Human Condition). Dyer himself is just as peripatetic, and his appetite for new experiences is the perfect reason to procrastinate on writing about them.

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The Salt
4:59 am
Tue May 20, 2014

'Third Plate' Reimagines Farm-To-Table Eating To Nourish The Land

A view of Dan Barber's Stone Barns Center field and barns in Pocantico Hills, N.Y.
Nicole Franzen Courtesy of Blue Hill Farm

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 3:56 pm

Perched on a farm along the Hudson River is Dan Barber's award-winning restaurant, Blue Hill at Stone Barns. The food that's harvested on the farm year-round is what is served to diners daily.

But this champion of the farm-to-table movement noticed that farming and consuming foods locally still wasn't all that sustainable.

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Arts/Life
2:53 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

NMSU Filmmaker's "The Odd Way Home" Released In U.S., Canada

  A New Mexico State University filmmaker has landed a distribution deal for his latest feature-length film. 

Breaking Glass Pictures is partnering with Sandia Media and Slant Productions to release Rajeev Nirmalakhandan’s feature film “The Odd Way Home” on DVD June 10. The film will have a theatrical release May 30 at the Arena Cinema theater in Hollywood. It will be available on iTunes and Dish Video on Demand June 3. 

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History
2:16 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

The Winding Stories Of A Quintessential American Spy

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 6:54 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. On April 18th, 1983, President Ronald Reagan addressed the nation about news that had broken earlier that morning in Lebanon.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED SPEECH)

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Book Reviews
2:16 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Book Review: 'Abide'

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 6:54 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Two days before his death in 2012, poet Jake Adam York handed in the manuscript for his last book. He was 40 and had already published three collections. Now, his fourth one is out posthumously. It's called "Abide." Poet Tess Taylor has our review.

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Television
12:40 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Louis C.K. On His 'Louie' Hiatus: 'I Wanted The Show To Feel New Again'

In Louie, Louis C.K. plays a comic who finds comedy in uncomfortable, touchy topics.
K.C. Bailey FX

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 12:59 pm

Louis C.K. is now commonly acknowledged as one of the greatest comics of his generation. His celebrated FX series, Louie, started its fourth season a couple weeks ago, after a 19-month hiatus.

Louis C.K. created, writes, directs and stars in the series as a standup comic named Louie, who, like Louis C.K., is the divorced father of two young girls and shares custody with their mother. Last year, Louis C.K. also had prominent roles in two films: Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine and David O. Russell's American Hustle.

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Television
10:43 am
Mon May 19, 2014

New Sitcom 'Unapologetically Embraces' Asian-American Family Life

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, I want to talk more about one of the shows that Eric just mentioned earlier a few minutes ago. It's a sitcom recently announced by ABC. It will be the first network family sitcom in two decades to feature an Asian-American cast. It's called "Fresh Off The Boat."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "FRESH OFF THE BOAT")

HUDSON YANG: (As Eddie) Me - my American dream is to fit in.

CONSTANCE WU: (As Jessica) Why do all your shirts have black men on them?

H. YANG: (As Eddie) It's Notorious B.I.G.

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Television
10:43 am
Mon May 19, 2014

TV Networks Double Down On Diversity This Fall

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. You may have to rethink your TV-watching schedule now that most of the major networks have unveiled their new fall offerings, as well as which shows made the cut and which ones will fade to black.

Later, we will hear from writer Jeff Yang. You've heard him here, on both our Parenting and Barbershop roundtables. He's going to tell us about ABC's new show "Fresh Off The Boat" because his son is the star of the new sitcom.

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The Salt
10:09 am
Mon May 19, 2014

'Fed Up' Portrays Obese Kids As Victims In A Sugar-Coated World

The true stars of the documentary film Fed Up are several children — including Maggie Valentine, 12 — who are trying to lose weight.
YouTube

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Just who's to blame for the childhood obesity epidemic? Over the years, the finger has been pointed at parents, video games, Happy Meals and the hamburgers in the school cafeteria.

A new documentary, Fed Up, alleges it all boils down to a simple substance most of us consume every day: sugar. The pushers of "the new tobacco," according to the film, are the food industry and our own government.

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Media
10:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

'New York Times' Upheaval: Is This A Barack Vs. Hillary Moment?

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to spend a good chunk of the rest of the day's program talking about issues in the media that all happen to bubble up at the same time. Later, we'll talk about why the new fall season just got more colorful. We'll hear about one show that puts an Asian-American family front and center in a network sitcom for the first time in 20 years.

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Gordon Willis, Cinematographer Who Gave Woody Allen Films Their Look, Dies

Cinematographer Gordon Willis poses with his honorary Oscar following a 2009 ceremony in Los Angeles.
Chris Pizzello AP

Gordon Willis, the cinematographer behind such classic 1970s films as Annie Hall, Klute, All the President's Men and the Godfather series, died on Sunday. He was 82.

"One cinematographer had established a kind of noir color look, rich in brown, amber and shadow, that was a vital force in the noir movies made in Hollywood in the 1970s," film historian David Thomson wrote of Willis in his New Biographical Dictionary of Film.

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The Two-Way
5:35 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Book News: Novel Mocking Literary Prizes Wins Literary Prize

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Author Interviews
1:22 am
Mon May 19, 2014

If You Want To Teach Kids History, Try Grossing Them Out First

In her new book Bugged, Sarah Albee explores history through the lens of insects — including how they spread disease, how they influence conflicts, and how they can be a tasty snack.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 5:46 am

How would a man in a suit of armor go to the bathroom? That inquiry into medieval sanitation is just one of many unlikely topics that have come up around Sarah Albee's dinner table. Albee, a children's book author, has been trying to get middle schoolers interested in history. Her strategy is to look at it through the lens of something that gets kids' attention, namely: things that are gross.

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My Big Break
3:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

A Big Break Realized Amid Fluorescent Lights and Slurpee Machines

Before his big break, Terry Boring worked as an assistant manager at a convenience store in Pittsburgh.
Jessica Ferringer Courtesy of Terry Boring

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:44 am

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

It all started with a dead-end job at a convenience store in Pittsburgh. Terry Boring says he had the worst job there: the assistant manager.

"You get none of the respect of the store manager and you get all of the terrible hours that they can't get anyone else to work," he says.

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Author Interviews
3:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Revolution, Fatherhood And 5 Years In The Middle East

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 6:54 am

In 2008, Nathan Deuel and his wife packed up their things and moved to Saudi Arabia. That country, famous for being largely closed to Westerners, was newly open to a handful of journalists. The couple moved to Riyadh. A year later, in 2009, their daughter was born.

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Movie Interviews
2:37 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

What's In A Roar? Crafting Godzilla's Iconic Sound

Godzilla's original 1954 roar was created by composer Akira Ifukube, who dragged a resin-coated leather glove along the loosened strings of a double bass.
Toho

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 9:47 am

Godzilla roared to No. 1 at the box office on opening weekend. The latest reboot of the sci-fi blockbuster brings a new take on the monster's iconic roar to the silver screen.

Ethan Van der Ryn and Erik Aadahl designed the sound for the new movie.

"I think that the Godzilla roar probably tops the King Kong roar in terms of iconic-ness," Van der Ryn says.

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Author Interviews
5:41 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Putting A Face Behind The 'Sting Of The Drone'

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 9:24 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Few people know the ins and outs of power politics in the nation's capital better than Richard A. Clarke. He served three presidents and as national coordinator for security and counterterrorism, he was instrumental in developing the nation's armed drone program.

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