Arts/Life

Arts & Life
10:00 am
Fri April 6, 2012

Texan Poet Says, Spend Some Time Among The Clouds

As part of Tell Me More's series for National Poetry Month, host Michel Martin shares a poetic tweet from storyteller and poet Anne McCrady of Henderson, Texas. Listeners are invited to tweet original poems of 140 characters or less to #TMMPoetry.

Movie Interviews
9:59 am
Fri April 6, 2012

Whit Stillman: An Indie Auteur Returns, Wink Intact

Whit Stillman, the whimsical director of Metropolitan, Barcelona and The Last Days of Disco, returns after 13 years with Damsels in Distress -- which he calls "a comedy of ideas, even if they're lame ones."
Gareth Cattermole Getty Images

A little short of two decades ago, I served with Whit Stillman on the Dramatic Competition jury at the Sundance Film Festival, alongside actor Samuel Jackson and directors Atom Egoyan and Darnell Martin. During voting meetings, we were a fractious bunch, but otherwise we all got along great. Never had jury duty been so much fun — when I wasn't fretting about whether Stillman had seen my surly review of his 1990 first feature, Metropolitan.

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The Salt
9:34 am
Fri April 6, 2012

Lust, Lies And Empire: The Fishy Tale Behind Eating Fish On Friday

Did the pope really make a secret pact to sell more fish? No, but the real story of eating fish on Fridays is much more fantastical.
Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 1:07 pm

It sounds like the plot of a Dan Brown thriller: A powerful medieval pope makes a secret pact to prop up the fishing industry that ultimately alters global economics. The result: Millions of Catholics around the world end up eating fish on Fridays as part of a religious observance.

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Movie Reviews
9:14 am
Fri April 6, 2012

A Sublime, Impressionistic 'Deep Blue Sea'

Rachel Weisz plays the adulterous Lady Hester Collyer in The Deep Blue Sea, turning in a performance as luminous as a Pre-Raphaelite portrait.
Music Box Films

Terence Davies' films aim for and often achieve a state of music, the camerawork in harmony with the soundtrack, the images connected by emotion rather than narrative.

Adapting Terence Rattigan's 1952 play The Deep Blue Sea, he throws out the drama's tidy structure and much of the dialogue, and shows the events through the eyes of the adulterous Lady Hester Collyer, played by Rachel Weisz.

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Monkey See
9:02 am
Fri April 6, 2012

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Sex Comedies And Marshmallow Peeps

On this week's podcast, we decided to ruminate about teen sex comedies — in part because of spring break season, and perhaps in part because we're all surrounded by discussions of American Reunion. We chat about the ebb and flow of teen comedy in general, the ways in which Superbad was and was not influential, and the relationship between teen comedies, sex comedies, and teen sex comedies. This also leads us down a strange path about what kinds of vaguely dirty movies we did and did not have access to as kids.

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Movie Reviews
3:30 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

'Comic-Con': A Frothy Love Letter To Nerd Culture

Costume designer Holly Conrad (center) poses with some of her own creations inspired by the popular video game Mass Effect.
Wrekin Hill

The inaugural San Diego Comic Book Convention, now more commonly known by the shorthand Comic-Con, drew around 300 comic enthusiasts for a weekend at a downtown hotel. More than 40 years later, the event now hosts upward of 120,000 attendees at the San Diego Convention Center, all gathered for a pop-cultural smorgasbord in which comic books are but a small, increasingly marginalized part.

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Monkey See
3:10 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

This 'American' Life: Pie, Hormones And The Endless Hunt For Happiness

From left, Kevin (Thomas Ian Nicholas), Jim (Jason Biggs), Stifler (Seann William Scott), Oz (Chris Klein) and Finch (Eddie Kaye Thomas) are back, together again for their 13-year high school reunion.
Hopper Stone Universal Pictures

It was really too bad about the audio.

Our press screening of American Reunion here in Washington was saddled with a muted soundtrack, which is unfortunate for any movie, let alone one that revolves around '90s music, loud parties and a school dance. The audience laughed louder at "I love this song!" than at any of Eugene Levy's improv.

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Movie Reviews
3:00 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

'Surviving Progress': Taking Overdevelopment To Task

The documentary Surviving Progress illustrates its arguments on the sustainability of human behavior in the context of environmental degradation with striking images of life in cities like Sao Paulo.
First Run Features

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 11:37 am

Not every human advance is a snare, according to Ronald Wright, author of A Short History of Progress. But some new techniques can lead to something the Canadian author calls a "progress trap" — a development that's ultimately more harmful than helpful.

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Movie Reviews
3:00 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

'We Have A Pope': Whoops, Maybe We Don't

Reluctant Papa: Michel Piccoli (center) plays Melville, a cardinal surprisingly elected pope by his peers. At a critical moment before he must address his new flock, Melville insists he can't take the job.
Philippe Antonello IFC Film

"God sees abilities in me I don't have," laments the protagonist of Italian writer-director Nanni Moretti's new movie. Such self-doubt is hardly novel, but Melville (Michel Piccoli) has a special stake in God's opinion of him — he's just been elected pope.

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Movie Reviews
3:00 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

'Keyhole': Looking Through (And Into) The Past

Isabella Rossellini plays Hyacinth, the late (but still remarkably vital) wife of Ulysses in Guy Maddin's multilayered drama Keyhole.
Monterey Media

"This kind of weather stirs me up," growls Ulysses, as he looks with caged-tiger menace out of rain-streaked windows at the strobing, manic lightning outside.

"Man's weather," he adds.

As embodied in the chiseled good looks of actor Jason Patric, Ulysses himself is a picture of old Hollywood masculinity, so tough and unwavering that surely only the most primal forces of nature could match him.

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Monkey See
1:45 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

Kerry Washington On Bringing Washington 'Scandal' To TV

Kerry Washington plays Olivia Pope on ABC's new drama, Scandal.
Danny Feld ABC

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 3:58 pm

Kerry Washington knows that her new drama, Scandal, will inevitably be compared to another drama about D.C.: The West Wing. Scandal tells Audie Cornish on today's All Things Considered that it even has Josh Malina, a West Wing cast member, for a little of what she calls "secret D.C. credibility."

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Author Interviews
1:41 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

Self-Improver A.J. Jacobs Takes On Getting 'Healthy'

Simon & Schuster

When A.J. Jacobs got sick on a tropical vacation, his wife looked at him in his hospital bed and said, "I don't want to be a widow at 45."

Jacobs was 41, bedridden with tropical pneumonia, and living with what he calls a "python-that-swallowed-a-goat body." He wasn't notably unhealthy, but he'd begun to feel some of the vulnerabilities of age, so he vowed to make himself healthier so that he could be around — and vital — for his wife and three sons.

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Television
1:00 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

Mary J. Blige Burger King Commercial Draws Ire

There's growing controversy over a Burger King ad featuring singer Mary J Blige. Blige apologized for the ad on Thursday, saying she didn't approve the final version.

Author Interviews
12:33 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

The Secret Hunt For The Mastermind Of Sept. 11

Little, Brown and Company

After the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, there was one man the American public wanted captured: Osama bin Laden. There was also a secret hunt going on for someone else, the real mastermind of the attacks.

That man was Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, and he's the focus of Josh Meyer and Terry McDermott's new book, The Hunt for KSM: Inside the Pursuit and Takedown of the Real 9/11 Mastermind, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed."

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Book Reviews
10:02 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Lionel Shriver's Not-So-'New Republic'

istockphoto.com

Lionel Shriver's new novel, called The New Republic, is actually an old manuscript with a star-crossed history. As Shriver explains in a prefatory note, this satire on (among other things) terrorism was finished in 1998, but, back then, publishers weren't interested. That was five years before Shriver's break-through novel, We Need to Talk About Kevin. Then, Sept. 11 happened: sincerity was in; irony was out. Publishers wouldn't touch this story that offered an ironic take on violent extremism.

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Arts & Life
10:00 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Australian Filmmaker Offers A Somber Poetic Tweet

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 6:49 am

As part of Tell Me More's series for National Poetry Month, host Michel Martin shares a poetic tweet from Jim Lounsbury of Sydney, Australia. He is a writer and filmmaker who listens to NPR on his iPhone. Listeners are invited to tweet original poems of 140 characters and less to #TMMPoetry.

Remembrances
10:00 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Artist, Social Justice Activist Dies At 96

Host Michel Martin remembers American artist Elizabeth Catlett, who died this week at the age of 96. Catlett is known for integrating social justice activism in sculptures and prints. That activism caught the eye of the U.S. government at the height of McCarthyism. For years, she was banned from entering the U.S. from her adopted home of Mexico.

Economy
9:24 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Debt Struggles As Old As America Itself

An 18th century political cartoon entitled "A New Way to Pay the National Debt."
Library of Congress

As of today, the national debt held by the public is more than $10 trillion. That's more than $30,000 for every man, woman and child living in the United States.

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Book Reviews
5:30 am
Thu April 5, 2012

'Abstract City': Whimsical Eye Candy For Urbanites

Christoph Niemann

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:55 am

Imagine a Lego as tuna sushi, or a leaf as a pair of acid-washed jeans, or bathroom tiles made to resemble Warhol's Brillo box. These are only a few of the funny, unexpected, cleverly conceived and realized sights that make up Christoph Niemann's Abstract City, a book culled from the renowned illustrator's popular visual blog for The New York Times.

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Television
1:30 am
Thu April 5, 2012

With 'Scandal,' ABC Targets Black Female Viewers

In Scandal, Kerry Washington stars as Olivia Pope, a crisis manager based on real-life fixer Judy Smith.
ABC

On Thursday night, ABC's Scandal will step out as a rarity on TV: a show developed by one of the most powerful black women in TV, Grey's Anatomy creator Shonda Rimes, depicting a powerful black woman in Washington, D.C.: Olivia Pope, a top-flight crisis manager.

She's a "fixer" so impressive, she can negotiate down payments with the Ukrainian mob in a burst of rapid-fire dialogue. She is played by Kerry Washington, whom you might recognize from wife and girlfriend roles in films like The Fantastic Four and Ray.

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Theater
1:27 am
Thu April 5, 2012

A Fruitful Collaboration Still Yielding Broadway Hits

A crowd-pleasing revival of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice's rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar has transferred from Canada's Stratford Festival to Broadway.
Joan Marcus

Since they made their debut in 1971, it's been rare for Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice to not have a show on Broadway. But now they're ramping it up, with the opening of Evita following fast on the heels of Jesus Christ Superstar.

"It's actually just a coincidence as far as I can tell, because the two shows came from totally different sources," Rice says. "And by sheer chance, they've arrived within two or three weeks of each other on Broadway, which is fun!"

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Movies
1:26 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Many Colors Of Prejudice Are Revealed In 'Dark Girls'

Student Pamela Moore is one of the women interviewed in Dark Girls, a documentary on color discrimination by actor-director Bill Duke and co-director D. Channsin Berry.
Dark Girls, LLC

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 5:56 am

Bill Duke knew he was going to get flak from a lot of people before he ever turned the cameras on to film Dark Girls, a new documentary about the painful encounters dark-skinned black women experience in a society where lighter is usually considered better.

It's a subject that has, more often than not, been considered taboo to discuss outside the black community. So Duke knew making a general-distribution movie about color prejudice within the black community was definitely going to rub some black folks the wrong way.

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Monkey See
1:45 pm
Wed April 4, 2012

Fred Savage: A Child Star Makes Good, With Less Than Wholesome Comedies

The face you may remember: Fred Savage cuddles up with a puppy on The Wonder Years, in a photo from December 1989.
ABC Photo Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 4:05 pm

Former Child Star Fatigue. Many of us have suffered it, given the drug problems, the meltdowns, the awful nude photos.

But then there's Fred Savage, who starred in the ABC show The Wonder Years from 1988 through 1993. Now he's a successful, slightly offbeat 35-five-year-old television producer and director. He works on wicked, slightly warped comedies including Party Down, It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia and as of today, Best Friends Forever. His first network sitcom premieres tonight on NBC.

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New In Paperback
11:51 am
Wed April 4, 2012

New In Paperback April 2-8

I'm Over All That cover detail

Fiction and nonfiction releases from Julie Otsuka, Kyung-sook Shin, E.L. James, Shirley MacLaine, Shania Twain and Wendy McClure.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arts & Life
10:00 am
Wed April 4, 2012

A Texan Photographer Offers A Taste Of Spring

As part of Tell Me More's series celebrating National Poetry Month, host Michel Martin shares a poetic tweet from freelance photographer and administrative assistant Renea Hanna of Bandera, Texas. Listeners are invited to tweet original poems of 140 characters and less to #TMMPoetry.

Monkey See
8:41 am
Wed April 4, 2012

Ten Fun Things To Do After You Are Immortalized In A Wax Museum

New wax figures of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge are worked on at Madame Tussauds in London, England. They're being revealed today.
Stuart Wilson Getty Images

Of all the things that make me say, "I really don't understand why this is still a thing," wax museums are right up there.

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Book Reviews
5:00 am
Wed April 4, 2012

'The Beginner's Goodbye': A Grief Observed

istockphoto.com

Anne Tyler is the patron saint of misfits. In novel after novel, this wry, warmhearted writer introduces us to awkward, shy, often eccentric or mismatched people, mostly residents of Baltimore. Embarking on an Anne Tyler novel is like heading off on vacation to a favorite destination: You're filled with anticipation of pleasure, even though you know the place is likely to have changed since your last visit.

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Kitchen Window
4:06 am
Wed April 4, 2012

Carrots: Beyond The Relish Tray

Dave Scantland for NPR

My first distinct memory of eating carrots is from when I was about 7. Mom and Dad had gone out for the evening, leaving me and my sister in the care of our older brother, whose duty it was to serve us the dinner Mom had prepared. Dinner included her usual chopped salad with shredded lettuce and diced carrots, tomatoes, onions and celery. When serving the salad, my sly brother asked me if I liked carrots. I said yes, and in typical big-brother fashion, he proceeded to pick out every single tiny orange cube and add it to my plate.

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Movies
1:01 am
Wed April 4, 2012

'Shanghai': A Rom-Com Look At Americans In China

In Shanghai Calling, Chinese-American attorney Sam Chao (Daniel Henney) relocates from New York to Shanghai at the behest of his law firm. He develops a relationship with Amanda (Eliza Coupe), an expert on relocation and local customs and culture.
Americatown, LLC

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 12:47 pm

A growing number of American professionals have moved to China in the last decade to ride the economic boom. While much of the news coming out of the country is serious stuff — political repression, trade disputes, tainted food — for American expatriates, day-to-day life in China can be chaotic, exciting and often funny.

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Poetry
12:00 pm
Tue April 3, 2012

Storify: Muses And Metaphor

Poetry and social media join forces in April, as Tell Me More celebrates National Poetry Month with the Muses and Metaphor series. We've asked you to tweet your poems to the hashtag #tmmpoetry. Holly Bass, a Washington, D.C.-based poet and performer, will help us curate our favorites — you can find some of our most recent selections below.

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