Business

Law
4:16 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Networks Tell Supreme Court Aereo Steals Their Content

Broadcasters say the TV streaming company is violating copyright laws. The ruling will influence the future of television, and also affect technologies such as cloud computing.

Education
3:54 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Income Inequality Is A Major Barrier To Attending College

Morning Edition co-host David Greene talks to Suzanne Mettler of Cornell University, author of the new book, Degrees of Inequality: How the Politics of Higher Education Sabotaged the American Dream.

All Tech Considered
2:33 am
Wed April 23, 2014

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

A Google data center in Oklahoma is shown. Google recently slashed prices for its cloud services; Amazon responded by cutting its cloud prices.
Connie Zhou AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 3:23 am

This week, our tech reporting team is exploring cloud computing — the big business of providing computing power and data storage that companies need, but which happens out of sight, as if it's "in the cloud."

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The Salt
2:20 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Fast-Food CEOs Earn Supersize Salaries; Workers Earn Small Potatoes

According to a new report, YUM! (owner of KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut) compensated its CEO $22 million in 2013.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 4:05 pm

At a time when fast-food workers make an average of about $9 an hour, what are the chief executives bringing home?

According to a new report, YUM! (owner of KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut) compensated its CEO $22 million in 2013.

Chipotle's CEO took home $13.8 million in total compensation. And McDonald's CEO compensation totaled $7.7 million. (Compensation includes salary, bonus and the value of exercised options.)

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All Tech Considered
2:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Online Sales Taxes Shift Consumer Behavior, Study Shows

Monica Chavez packs up a box at an Amazon.com fulfillment center Dec. 2, in Phoenix.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 4:38 pm

Technically, consumers are supposed to pay taxes on things they buy online. In fact, few do.

Congress is considering a bill called the Marketplace Fairness Act that would force many online sellers to collect sales taxes for the first time.

In the meantime, some states have already enacted so-called Amazon taxes, forcing the giant online retailer to collect sales taxes the same way traditional brick-and-mortar stores do.

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Business
12:47 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Monday BusinessWatch

  Every Monday at 7:51am on Morning Edition, Fred Martino covers the week's top local business stories with Las Cruces Sun News Business Editor Brook Stockberger.  Subscribe to our podcast on the right side of this page so you never miss a segment.

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Shots - Health News
9:03 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Change Your Income, Change Your Health Insurance Plan

iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 9:11 am

People who qualified for subsidies under the Affordable Care Act aren't necessarily locked into the plan they chose. And that can be good news for people whose income fluctuates during the year. Here's our response to the latest reader questions on coverage through the health exchanges.

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Business
6:13 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Netflix To Raise New Customers' Subscription Rates

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:34 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the rising cost of Netflix.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: The online video provider will raise the price of its subscriptions by one or two dollars over the next few months. This only affects new subscribers for now. Current subscribers won't see a rate hike for at least a year.

CEO Reed Hastings says the higher fees will increase the number of TV shows and movies Netflix offers and improve video streaming. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Law
5:16 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Supreme Court Case Could Change How You Watch TV

An economic model is being challenged in the Supreme Court on Tuesday in a battle between broadcast television networks and the startup Aereo Inc. The issues focus on copyright law, but the outcome could alter broadcasting in the U.S.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 7:42 am

Bruce Springsteen may have been ahead of his times with his song "57 Channels (And Nothin' On)," released in 1992. These days there are hundreds of channels, and whether you like it or not, you get most of them in your basic cable package. On Tuesday, that economic model is being challenged in the Supreme Court in a high-stakes legal battle between the broadcast television networks and a tiny startup, or at least tiny by broadcast standards.

The issues focus on copyright law, but the outcome could alter the face of broadcasting in the United States.

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Law
3:01 am
Tue April 22, 2014

High Court To Consider Political Lies, Future Of Broadcasting

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Two important cases will be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court today. One of them involves a high-stakes, high-tech battle that has raised the possibility of major TV networks no longer broadcasting over the air. The other case involves the future of lying in political campaigns. Here's NPR's legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg.

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Asia
2:58 am
Tue April 22, 2014

8-Day Asia Trip Critical To Obama's Regional Strategy

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:34 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

The schedule of President Obama's trip to East Asia offers a reminder that there are at least two East Asias. There's the giant of the region, China, the focus of so much attention.

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Business
2:56 am
Tue April 22, 2014

For Short Trips, Intercity Buses Horn In On Airline Customers

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. It's hard to imagine a bus getting you some were faster than a plane. But for travelers planning relatively short trips, a new study shows bus companies are gaining on the airlines.

NPR's David Schaper reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF STREET TRAFFIC, HONKING HORNS)

DAVID SCHAPER, BYLINE: Here on a downtown Chicago sidewalk, a few dozen people are standing in the Midwestern spring air, waiting for a Megabus to take them out of town.

JOE SCHWIETERMAN: A whole new demographics are taking the bus.

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NPR Story
2:56 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Fur Flies Over First Cat Cafe

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: Meow.

(LAUGHTER)

INSKEEP: Actually, it's cat cafe. There's been a bit of a cat fight over which city would host the nation's first cat cafe, meaning a place where patrons can cozy up with a latte and also a feline in need of a good home and hopefully adopt that cat.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
1:29 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Powerful Narcotic Painkiller Up For FDA Approval

Morphine and oxycodone (the active ingredient in Oxycontin) are strong narcotic pain relievers on their own. Moxduo, a drug now up for FDA approval, would combine morphine and oxycodone in a single capsule.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:34 am

The Food and Drug Administration is trying to decide whether to approve a powerful new prescription painkiller that's designed to relieve severe pain quickly, and with fewer side effects than other opioids.

While some pain experts say the medicine could provide a valuable alternative for some patients in intense pain, the drug (called Moxduo) is also prompting concern that it could exacerbate the epidemic of abuse of prescription painkillers and overdoses.

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The Salt
1:26 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Fields And Farm Jobs Dry Up With California's Worsening Drought

Recent rains kept Suzanne and Mike Collins' orange grove alive, but the rainy season is ending. If they don't get federal irrigation water by this summer, their trees will start dying.
Kirk Siegler/NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:34 am

On a recent afternoon on the main drag of Orange Grove, Calif., about a dozen farm workers gather on the sidewalk in front of a mini-mart.

One man sits on a milk crate sipping a beer. A few others scratch some lotto tickets. Salvador Perez paces back and forth with his hands stuffed in the pockets of his jeans.

If there is no water, there's no work, he says in Spanish.

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All Tech Considered
4:03 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Searching The Planet To Find Power For The Cloud

MidAmerican Energy's wind farm in Adair, Iowa. Facebook is working with MidAmerican to build a similar wind farm near Wellsburg, Iowa, where it will help power Facebook's planned data center.
Courtesy of MidAmerican Energy

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:02 am

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Business
3:16 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

To Keep Business Growing, Vendors Rebrand Pot's Stoner Image

Alison Ledden, marketing director for The Farm, a recreational marijuana store in Boulder, Colo., says some customers come in thinking they're at a specialty grocer, not a marijuana store.
Luke Runyon KUNC

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:26 pm

From the outside, Jan Cole's recreational marijuana store in Boulder, Colo., just feels welcoming. Big glass windows let in natural light, and the walls are painted in soothing earth tones. Cole used her background in spa management to build a "warm and inviting" pot shop that puts customers at ease.

In fact, the store's name, The Farm, is so inconspicuous, "we have a lot of people who come in think that we might be an organic food grocer or something," she says.

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Around the Nation
2:16 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Some In Irwindale Still Not Happy About Smelly Neighbor, Sriracha

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:26 pm

The skirmish continues between Sriracha and Irwindale, Calif. Irwindale's city council declared that owner David Tran must curb his hot sauce factory's smelly fumes or they'll do it themselves. Tran is considering relocating, and he has already received several offers.

Law
2:16 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Anti-Poaching Agreements May Implicate Several Tech Titans

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. A court case in Silicon Valley has brought some juicy emails to light. The correspondence involved some of the valley's biggest stars including the late Apple founder and CEO, Steve Jobs. Apple, Google, Intel and Adobe are accused in a class action suit of suppressing the wages of their developers and engineers.

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Digital Life
10:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Security Threats Hit Deeper Than Heartbleed Bug

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. You might have been hearing about the Heart Bleed bug over the past couple weeks. And if you haven't, you might want to check it out. It's important. That is the security flaw the researchers say could have compromised up to half a million websites. So maybe you changed your passwords for your online accounts by now.

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Around the Nation
10:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

No Longer Marching Out To Work, More Mothers Stay Home

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we want to take a closer look at women who work full-time as stay-at-home moms. We have new numbers from the Pew Research Center that show the proportion of home stay-at-home moms in the U.S. has gone up since 1999. That number had been declining since the 1960s.

But between 1999 and 2012, the percentage of moms who stayed at home rose from 23 percent to 29 percent. Joining us to talk about this is D'Vera Cohn. She's a senior writer at the Pew Research Center and an author of the new report. D'Vera, welcome.

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Education
10:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

A 'Tennessee Promise' To Educate The State's College Students

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. This spring, along with NPR's Morning Edition, we're helping you navigate the higher education money maze with our "Paying for College" series.

We've heard about how college got so expensive and how families and students are taking on massive loans to pay for it. But today, we want to talk more about an effort to make college not just affordable, but free.

(SOUNDBITE OF STATE OF THE STATE ADDRESS)

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Economy
10:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

President Obama Will Skip China, But Asia Trip Sends A Message

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. President Obama heads overseas this week to Asia. He hopes to strengthen U.S. economic ties with that region.

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Business
5:53 am
Mon April 21, 2014

GM To Boost Car Production In China

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts on the road in China.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The Beijing Auto Show is underway and among the big announcements is this: General Motors says it will boost its production in China. GM said yesterday it will be able to produce five million cars per year by the end of 2015. It sold just over three million vehicles in China last year.

Business
5:08 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Honda Introduces Asimo To North America

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Asimo is Honda's latest humanoid robot. This one, the third version, is more life-like than previous models.

Business
3:20 am
Mon April 21, 2014

U.S. Supreme Court To Hear Arguments In Argentina Debt Case

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Argentina and its teetering economy will be affected by case being heard today by the U.S. Supreme Court. The case goes back more than a decade and could have wide implications, not just for Argentina's economy, but also to relations with the U.S.

NPR's Laura Sydell reports.

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NPR Story
3:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Powdered Alcohol Approved By The Feds

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Palchohol is powdered alcohol — just mix with water to create an instant cocktail. The creators of Palcohol pitched their idea as a solution to the soaring price of alcohol.

All Tech Considered
1:44 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Who Should Pay To Keep The Internet's Locks Secure?

A lock icon signifies an encrypted Internet connection. But thanks to a recently discovered (and now fixed) bug, it's been bleeding out information for a few years.
Mal Langsdon Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 11:01 am

The encryption code unlocked by the Heartbleed bug last week provided vital security for some of the most widely used websites on the Internet. Fortune 1000 companies rely on the open source code for their core business. But it turns out no one is paying for it.

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Your Money
1:42 am
Mon April 21, 2014

How Do Companies Boost 401(k) Enrollment? Make It Automatic

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 12:15 pm

More Americans are saving for retirement through their employers' 401(k) programs. That's because in recent years they've been given a strong nudge — more companies are automatically enrolling workers in retirement savings programs.

Some firms are also automatically increasing the amount employees contribute. That's just as important, experts say.

And all of this makes a big difference: Without it, millions of Americans don't save at all.

Making Time For Retirement Planning

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Shots - Health News
1:40 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Scribes Are Back, Helping Doctors Tackle Electronic Medical Records

Medical scribe Connie Gayton keeps the electronic records, allowing orthopedic surgeon Devesh Ramnath to focus on his patients.
Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 7:43 am

Like many other doctors across the country, Dr. Devesh Ramnath, a Dallas orthopedic surgeon, recently made the switch from paper to electronic medical records. This meant he no longer had to just take notes when he was examining a patient — he also had to put those notes into the computer as a permanent record.

"I was really focused on just trying to get the information in, and not really focusing on the patient anymore," Ramnath says.

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