Business

Business
4:43 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with upping the oil output.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The group of seven most industrialized nations are urging oil producing countries to ramp up production. In a statement yesterday, the so-called G-7 nations warned of the risks, quote, "posed by elevated oil prices." Demand for gasoline usually starts to wane at the end of the summer but right now gasoline prices are hitting new highs. Oil prices are surging because of tensions with Iran and the ongoing concern about Hurricane Isaac.

Business
4:43 am
Wed August 29, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is a home run for Major League Baseball.

ESPN agreed yesterday to pay the baseball association $5.6 billion over the next eight years for broadcast and digital rights to games. That is a record, we're told, for baseball broadcasting rights. It is also about double what ESPN currently pays to broadcast Major League Baseball games, although the sports network will be getting a lot more for its money this time around - more international rights, radio rights, rights to more games.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:43 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Calif. Leaders Agree To Overhaul Pension System

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

California's governor, Jerry Brown, has announced a set of long-awaited reforms to his state's underfunded public pension system. The Democratic governor says the package will save the state about $30 billion in the future. More details of the cost savings are expected later today.

Brown is hoping the reforms will pave the way for another of his policy goals, as NPR's Richard Gonzales reports.

Read more
Business
4:43 am
Wed August 29, 2012

White House Unveils New Fuel-Efficiency Standards

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

President Obama's administration has adopted new fuel efficiency standards for cars and light trucks. They're expected to nearly double fuel efficiency and slash greenhouse gas emissions.

NPR's Elizabeth Shogren reports the new requirements are a rare example of industry agreeing to tough environmental regulations.

ELIZABETH SHOGREN, BYLINE: The new standards were the result of many months of negotiation between the Obama administration, the state of California, the auto industry and environmental groups.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:48 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Computer Troubles Freeze United Airlines' System, Bringing A Cascade Of Delays

Two United Airlines planes sit at a terminal at San Francisco International Airport Friday. The airport briefly refused to accept any domestic arrivals Tuesday, after a computer crash disrupted United's system.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 1:51 pm

Many travelers using United Airlines faced delays Tuesday, but they weren't connected to Hurricane Isaac. Instead, the airline's computer network crashed, leaving large parts of its system paralyzed Tuesday afternoon.

First noted around 2:15 p.m. EDT, the problems persisted until about 6:30 p.m. EDT, when the airline tweeted that it is "in the process of resuming operations and rebooking customers."

Read more
Business
2:27 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Bain Capital Tax Documents Draw Mixed Reaction

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 6:52 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Mitt Romney stands by his decision not to release more than two years of his tax returns. Democrats keep hammering away, suggesting the Republican presidential candidate has something to hide. Well, last week, the website Gawker released over 900 pages of financial documents related to Bain Capital. That's the private equity firm Romney co-founded.

Read more
Business
3:53 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:32 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with an eye on oil prices.

Isaac is not expected to grow beyond a Category 1 hurricane and that is easing some concerns it could damage oil and gas refineries along the Gulf Coast. Still, several have shut down operations and will probably be offline for a couple days. Depending on Isaac's severity, analysts say gas prices could go up by about 10 cents or so in the coming weeks. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Business
3:53 am
Tue August 28, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:32 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. Microsoft had to know there would be critics when it released its new logo late last week. And today's last word in business is: mixed reviews.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Microsoft used the old logo for 25 years. The tech world has certainly changed a lot since then. PCs, not iPads, where the big thing then and Microsoft dominated the software for them. Now, Microsoft says it's time to change its look.

Read more
Business
3:53 am
Tue August 28, 2012

App Answers: Who's Paying For That Political Ad?

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:32 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now that Isaac has passed by Tampa, the Republican National Convention gets underway today, but voters living in swing sates have already heard plenty of messages from both political parties - unprecedented waves of ads.

NPR's Steve Henn reports there is an app - an application that can help you figure out who's behind them.

STEVE HENN, BYLINE: If this is what your TV sounds like...

(SOUNDBITE OF AD)

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

ANNOUNCER #1: Two wars. Tax cuts for millionaires. Death.

Read more
The Salt
1:28 am
Tue August 28, 2012

In India, 100-Year-Old Lunch Delivery Service Goes Modern

Dabba wallahs carry lunchboxes to offices in Indian cities. But the old tradition is changing with modern times.
Aijaz Rahi AP

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:37 am

Every day in Mumbai, some 5,000 deliverymen called dabba wallahs hand deliver 200,000 hot meals to doorsteps across the city. It's an intricate network that requires precise timing and numerous handoffs from courier to courier. The century-old service is a staple for the city's office workers. (See how it works in this video.) But as the city has changed, so too has the service.

Read more
Africa
1:12 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Somaliland: A Pocket Of Stability In A Chaotic Region

Bundles of Somaliland's own currency bills are laid out by a money-changer on a street in Hargeisa, capital of the unrecognized breakaway republic of Somaliland in northwestern Somalia. Investors are beginning to move into the untapped market in Somaliland, a stable island in a turbulent region.
Kyodo/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:32 am

Somalia is synonymous with failed states, pirates and Islamist militants. But in the nation's northwest lies a peaceful, stable territory with an elected government known as Somaliland. The enclave broke away from the fractious Horn of Africa nation in 1991 and has been going it alone ever since.

To the disappointment of its residents, Somaliland has not been recognized as an independent nation, but its stability is attracting investors that other parts of Somalia can only dream of.

Read more
Technology
2:46 pm
Mon August 27, 2012

Tech Week Ahead: Fallout After Apple-Samsung Suit

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 4:23 pm

Audie Cornish looks ahead to the week's tech news with Steve Henn. They cover fallout from the Apple's victory over Samsung in a mobile patents case.

The Salt
11:06 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Portland Company Aims To Tame Food Truck Trash

Portland-based GO Box, a service that provides and cleans reusable take-out boxes for local food trucks, hopes to keep some of the city's food waste from going in the dumpster.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:39 am

With nearly 700 food carts licensed last year, Portland, Ore., is arguable a leader in the mobile food revolution. Lucky residents can choose between Iraqi-Jewish sabich, yeasted Belgian liege waffles, or Indonesian rendang, all served out of a friendly window on the sidewalk. But all of these mobile meals come with a downside — namely, trash.

Read more
Economy
9:48 am
Mon August 27, 2012

How Has The Economy Changed Since 2008 Elections?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, the NFL is in the middle of another lockout, but it's not the players. We'll get more from Sports Illustrated's Pablo Torre in just a few minutes.

Read more
Business
8:04 am
Mon August 27, 2012

As Conventions Begin, Where Is The U.S. Economy?

Sales of new homes, like this one in Palo Alto, Calif., rose 3.6 percent in July.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 12:52 pm

In late August of 2008, just as delegates were coming together for their political-party conventions, the U.S. economy was falling apart. Home sales were shutting down, employers were slashing payrolls, and financial institutions were lurching toward chaos.

Subsequent weeks saw political leaders and regulators fighting through one gut-wrenching day after another, trying to avert a complete collapse of global markets. On Sept. 24, Republican presidential candidate John McCain temporarily suspended his campaign to help Congress develop financial bailout plans.

Read more
Business
2:56 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Illegal Dowloads Follow Teen Into Adulthood, Court

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 11:23 am

A federal court in Massachusetts has upheld a $675,000 penalty against a Boston University graduate student for downloading 31 pirated songs online as a teenager. The recording industry says Joel Tenebaum was downloading and distributing thousand of songs and wouldn't stop even after warnings from his father, his college and a cease and desist letter from Sony.

Business
2:56 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Samsung Shares Drop After Patent Verdict

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 4:35 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Samsung's slip.

This is the first trading day since Apple's win in a huge American patent battle with competitor Samsung. This weekend, the South Korean company was ordered to pay more than $1 billion in damages after a California jury found it copied features of Apple's iPhone and iPad.

Read more
Business
2:56 am
Mon August 27, 2012

New Hampshire, A Low-Cost Massachusetts?

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 8:56 am

New Hampshire's economy is comparatively strong these days, but that strength varies depending on where you are in the small state. The closer you get to its border with Massachusetts, the more robust the economic activity. The state has been aggressive about marketing the so-called "New Hampshire Advantage."

It's All Politics
5:32 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Romney's Auto Bailout Stance Complicates Campaign In Battleground Ohio

Cars at the General Motors Assembly plant in Lordstown, Ohio, in 2009.
Mark Stahl AP

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 2:00 pm

The auto industry is big business in Ohio. Billions of dollars' worth of cars and auto parts are made in the state each year. Thousands of unionized auto workers live in Ohio, as do the business owners and employees who make it one of the top auto parts suppliers in the nation.

So, the auto bailout is a hot issue — and a complicated one.

For Republicans in Ohio, the bailout is a tough issue — perhaps because of Mitt Romney's initial stance, or perhaps because of the consensus that the bailout worked.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:24 am
Sun August 26, 2012

Snakes, And The Snake Wranglers Who Love Them

Matt and Paula Wilson (in background) clear rattlesnakes from a field in Pennsylvania. They work as snake wranglers, clearing areas for natural gas company employees.
Scott Detrow WITF

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 10:32 am

Jobs on natural gas drilling sites can have funny-sounding names: There are roustabouts, mud men, doodlebuggers and snake wranglers. That last one — snake wrangler — is exactly what it sounds like.

Everyone hates snakes, right?

Even Indiana Jones hates snakes.

But — not everybody.

Read more
The Salt
7:13 am
Sat August 25, 2012

On A Quest To Roll Out The Bourbon Barrel And Fill It With Hot Sauce

Used bourbon barrels like these at the Goose Island Brewery in Chicago are finding new life by bringing distinctive flavor to beer, cocktails and hot sauce.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:39 am

Washington, D.C. blogger Sam Hiersteiner is a hot sauce fan turned maker. He's already harvested two pounds of chiles — serranos, jalapenos, and habaneros — from his 30-plant pepper garden this month, and he's ready to mash them into hot sauce as soon as more ripen. Last year, he mashed fifty pounds total.While he loved the results, he thought it would be even better with a whisper of the flavor imparted by a barrel used for aging bourbon.

Read more
Business
4:28 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Apple Win Over Samsung Sends Message To Industry

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 8:16 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Apple has won a decisive victory in a closely watched patent lawsuit. A federal jury in California yesterday ordered Samsung to pay Apple slightly more than $1 billion. The jury found that the world's largest maker of smartphones had essentially stolen iPhone and iPad technology. As NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports, the impact of the ruling is likely to be felt throughout the tech industry.

Read more
All Tech Considered
4:00 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Apple's Patent Win Could Alter Landscape Of Smartphone Industry

Banners advertising Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S III and Apple's iPhone 4S are displayed at a store in Seoul, South Korea.
Ahn Young-joon AP

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 2:35 pm

The dust has yet to settle on Apple's patent lawsuit victory Friday over electronics rival Samsung. Samsung has said it will ask the court to overturn the verdict, which would award Apple more than $1 billion in damages. But if that's unsuccessful, Samsung will likely appeal.

Read more
Sports
3:55 pm
Fri August 24, 2012

Can Livestrong Survive Armstrong's Fall?

The ubiquitous Livestrong wristband was introduced in 2004 and quickly became a cultural icon.
Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

Lance Armstrong may soon be stripped of his seven Tour de France titles, but many supporters are sticking by him — if not as the celebrity cyclist, then as the relentless advocate for cancer survivors.

That's encouraging news for his Livestrong foundation, which must deal with the delicate matter of a scandal-tainted figurehead.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
12:30 pm
Fri August 24, 2012

Failure Of Lilly Drug Is Latest Alzheimer's Setback

A PET scan of the brain of a person with Alzheimer's disease.
U.S. National Institute on Aging Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 1:19 pm

An experimental drug that aimed to slow the development of plaques and help clear them from the brains of Alzheimer's patients failed in two late-stage studies conducted by Eli Lilly & Co., the company said today.

Read more
The Salt
9:08 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Arty Students, Not Party Students, Are Champs Of Late-Night Food Delivery

Art students rule the campus late-night delivery field. Maybe they're studying the packages.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:55 am

Millions of college students are heading back to campus soon, and as any parent footing the bill knows, they're hungry for more than just knowledge — they want food, and lots of it, at all hours.

Read more
Business
4:21 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 2:59 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a big patent ruling.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: This is a case of Apple against Samsung - and if that sounds familiar, it's because there's more than one patent case here.

While a jury in California deliberates a huge multibillion dollar patent infringement case, which we've been discussing this week, a ruling on a similar case with the same players has been issued today in South Korea.

Read more
Business
4:21 am
Fri August 24, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 9:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: duh. That's right, D-U-H.

That's a Colombian beer, and it's at the center of a brewing legal battle between two businessmen and 20th Century Fox. The golden ale was originally called Duff Beer, and it looks just like the beer served up at Moe's Tavern on "The Simpsons." But 20th Century Fox complained that the two brothers who founded the company were infringing on a trademark here - Duff, it's from "The Simpsons." So the brothers said they changed the name to DuH.

Read more
Politics
3:59 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Democrats, GOP Need Donors For Party Conventions

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 9:56 am

The Democratic and Republican parties are preparing for their respective nominating conventions in Tampa, Florida, and Charlotte, North Carolina. That means each side will depend, as usual, on donors to help pay for the events.

Planet Money
1:45 am
Fri August 24, 2012

In The Kitchen With The Inventor Of Steak-Umm

Eugene Gagliardi
Joshua Marston

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 8:08 am

One night in the late 1960s, Eugene Gagliardi was lying awake in bed trying to figure out how to save his company. He was thinking about the Philly cheesesteak.

Gagliardi ran a family business that sold hamburgers and other meat to restaurant chains in the Philadelphia area. But within the span of a few months, the company had lost several of its biggest customers.

Read more

Pages