Fronteras: A Changing America

NPR Story
2:23 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

Could The Next Pope Come From Latin America?

Joey Palacios/Texas Public Radio Fronteras Desk

SAN ANTONIO, Texas — As Catholics wonder who will be the next Pope, many are also speculating that he might make history and come from Latin America.

After nearly eight years of leading the Holy See, Pope Benedict XVI will step down at the end of the month.

The Papal vacancy is leaving many questioning if his replacement will be non-European.

San Antonio Archbishop Gustavo Garcia-Siller, who was appointed by Benedict, says talk of a Pope from outside of Europe has been discussed since the death of Pope John Paul II.

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NPR Story
10:59 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Tucson Wants Mexico's Business

Photo by Fred Hood/Metropolitan Tucson Convention & Visitors Bureau Fronteras Desk

TUCSON, Ariz. — Border cities are increasingly eager to boost trade, commerce and contact. San Diego’s new mayor is opening up the first city office in Tijuana and now Tucson, 60 miles north of the line, is opening its own trade liaison office, working with businesses in Nogales and Hermosillo. Tucson city officials are pushing for a bigger piece of the booming trade pie and for more wealthy shoppers.

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NPR Story
3:07 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

A Little Emotion

PHOENIX — Okay, if you haven't seen the 1987 movie "Broadcast News" and don't want me to spoil it, stop here. Producer Holly Hunter falls in love with reporter William Hurt. During an especially emotional interview in one of Hurt's pieces, the camera cuts away to show him shedding a tear.

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NPR Story
12:25 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Border Patrol Says Its Drones Not Being Used In Dorner Manhunt

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency has said that widespread reports it is using drones to aid the manhunt for an ex-Los Angeles police officer accused of a killing spree are untrue.

“Reports that the U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s unmanned aircraft systems are being used are incorrect,” San Diego Sector spokesman Ralph DeSio said in a brief interview. “CPB’s [aircraft] are not flying in support of this search.”

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NPR Story
12:17 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

McCain Addresses Secure Border Question

On Sunday, Arizona Senator John McCain shared more insight around the security objectives that he believes need to be passed before shifting the immigration conversation to citizenship.

McCain is one of the eight Senators who are laying the foundation on immigration reform. However, they have made it clear this conversation begins with security.

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NPR Story
10:15 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Filner's Tijuana Office Still Not Open

KPBS Fronteras Desk

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 11:02 am

Throughout his campaign, San Diego Mayor Bob Filner championed his plan to improve relations with Mexico. He touted his experience working on border issues while in Congress and the relationships he’s built with Mexican leaders.

At campaign rallies, people would chant "Bob, si puede!" And the momentum culminated at his State of the City address, when Filner announced when his Tijuana office would open.

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NPR Story
7:30 am
Mon February 11, 2013

In Border Security Quest, A Call For More Drones

Wikimedia Commons Fronteras Desk

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 2:26 pm

The bipartisan group of U.S. senators working on a bill to overhaul the nation’s immigration system released a generally broad set of principles a few weeks back. Among the plan’s few specifics was a promise to increase the number of unmanned aerial vehicles — commonly known as drones — patrolling the border.

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NPR Story
7:21 am
Sat February 9, 2013

A Town's Children Embrace An Old Tradition

Over the winter holidays I traveled once again to the southern Mexican state of Veracruz. Since summer, I’ve been learning a traditional style of string music known as Son Jarocho.

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NPR Story
7:21 am
Sat February 9, 2013

Best Of The Border (2/4-2/8)

The week's top stories from Fronteras Desk.

Sending immigrants to the back of an endless line

Both the Senate and the President’s proposals for immigration reform agree the pathway to citizenship begins at the “back of the line” — behind everyone who’s legally waiting. But, it turns out, there isn’t one line. There are many lines. And for some families, the wait is so long it’s going back in time.

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NPR Story
10:56 pm
Thu February 7, 2013

Copper Dependence Inspires Art

Murphy Bannerman Fronteras Desk

PHOENIX — Plans for huge new copper mines on public land in Arizona have created tensions between mining companies, conservationists, Native American tribes and even rock climbers.

Meanwhile, the global thirst for electronics is expected to make demand for copper increase, but the earth’s supply of the element is finite.

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NPR Story
4:41 pm
Thu February 7, 2013

Border Cities El Paso, San Diego Have Lowest Crime Rate

For the third straight year, Congressional Quarterly reported the border city El Paso had the lowest crime rating with population greater than 500,000 in America. Another border city, San Diego came in second.

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NPR Story
3:04 pm
Thu February 7, 2013

Sports Fans Hold On To Native American Mascots

Smithsonian Fronteras Desk

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Sports writers, scholars, representatives from Indian nations and the NCAA got together in Washington, D.C., on Thursday to talk about Native American stereotypes in sports, and recent efforts to retire and revive the mascot names.

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NPR Story
11:34 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Former Miss Navajo Rides Rough Road To Grammys

Jetsonorama Fronteras Desk

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Navajo singer Radmilla Cody has been nominated for her first Grammy.

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NPR Story
7:02 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Sending Immigrants To The Back Of An Endless Line

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 11:54 am

SAN DIEGO — Both the Senate and the President’s proposals for immigration reform agree the pathway begins in the “back of the line” — behind everyone who’s legally waiting. But, it turns out, there isn’t one line. There are many lines. And for some families, the wait is so long it’s like going back in time.

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NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Five Takeaways From Border Patrol's 2012 Year In Review

On Friday, the U.S. Border Patrol released official statistics from the 2012 fiscal year.

Here are five interesting takeaways (all links PDF):

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NPR Story
12:11 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Napolitano Cites El Paso As Example Of Improved Border Safety

EL PASO, Texas — Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano concluded her two-day tour of the border Tuesday in El Paso, touting that city as an example of improved safety along the border.

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NPR Story
11:06 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Teaching The Future Radiophiles

Fronteras Desk

EL PASO, Texas — I choose my interns like I sometimes choose my stories -- I revel in a challenge. This school semester my student is a shy 21-year-old who speaks English as a second language. She's a soft-spoken, timid creature -- and yet she wants to be a journalist.

When I pushed her to do her first practice interview at my neighborhood coffee shop, she went pale.

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NPR Story
7:06 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Teaching The Future Radiophiles

Fronteras Desk

EL PASO, Texas — I choose my interns like I sometimes choose my stories -- I revel in a challenge. This school semester my student is a shy 21-year-old who speaks English as a second language. She's a soft-spoken, timid creature -- and yet she wants to be a journalist.

When I pushed her to do her first practice interview at my neighborhood coffee shop, she went pale.

Read more
NPR Story
4:06 pm
Tue February 5, 2013

Navajo Nation Seeks Help to Fix Pipes

Indian Health Service Fronteras Desk

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — The Navajo Nation in northern Arizona has sought help from state and federal agencies to repair broken water lines. About 10,000 people are experiencing severe water shortages.

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NPR Story
4:06 pm
Tue February 5, 2013

US, Mexico End Tomato Trade War

The U.S. Commerce Department ended a tense negotiation with Mexico over the price of its tomatoes imported to the United States this past weekend. Imports will continue, but be prepared to pay more for them.

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NPR Story
11:49 am
Tue February 5, 2013

House Immigration Reform Hearings Kick Off In D.C.

Fronteras Desk

SAN ANTONIO, Texas — The first hearing on fixing the immigration system will be held by the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday. They will hear testimony concerning enforcement against illegal immigration. San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro is being called as a witness and will deliver a message of urgency.

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NPR Story
10:49 am
Tue February 5, 2013

A Quarter-Century Later, 1986 Amnesty Still Informs the Immigration Debate

Fronteras Desk

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 12:15 pm

SAN DIEGO — The last time Congress passed a major immigration bill, one of its goals was to stop the flow of undocumented migrants across the border. But in the years after the bill passed, illegal immigration surged. Today, the bill's legacy has become critical in informing the immigration debate.

In 1984, Congress had just killed an immigration bill that would have legalized up to six million unauthorized immigrants living in the U.S. President Ronald Reagan was one of its most prominent backers.

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NPR Story
7:04 am
Sat February 2, 2013

Best Of The Border: Broken Border (1/28-2/1)

The week's top stories from Fronteras Desk.

Broken Border

Our immigration system is broken.

An estimated 11 million people live in the United States without proper documentation. Visas available to bring in high skilled, or less-skilled, workers are hard to come by. Visa backlogs have separated families for upward of 20 years.

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NPR Story
7:04 am
Fri February 1, 2013

Medicine Woman's Wise Words

Fronteras Desk

Originally published on Sat February 2, 2013 3:44 pm

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Back in November I had the great opportunity to hike into Havasu Canyon to meet Dianna Baby Sue White Dove Uqualla. She is a Havasupai medicine woman. I traveled with a group from Arizona Highways magazine.

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NPR Story
12:01 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Juarez Police Commander Likely Shot As Retaliation

Originally published on Sat February 2, 2013 4:03 pm

CIUDAD JUÁREZ, Mexico — A Juárez police commander is in a local hospital today recovering from a gunshot wound.

Rafael Ochoa Leyva is the police commander who heads the auto theft unit in the Mexican border city of Juárez.

Wednesday morning he was driving to work when two vehicles opened fire on his police truck. He was wounded but managed to escape and get to a hospital where he is currently being treated.

A police spokesman says Ochoa Leyva has reduced car thefts in Juárez by 70 percent and arrested more than 200 suspects in the last two years.

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Fronteras-A Changing America
3:11 pm
Mon December 24, 2012

Gang Life In Two Cities

Fronteras 229: Gang Life in Two Cities.  Guest: Dr. Robert J. Durán of New Mexico State University.

Fronteras-A Changing America
3:09 pm
Mon December 24, 2012

Border Trade Boom

Border Trade Boom:  Guests: Jerry Pacheco & Ed Camden

Fronteras-A Changing America
3:29 pm
Wed October 31, 2012

Fronteras 226-Mexodus Journalism Project

Fronteras-A Changing America
3:25 pm
Wed October 31, 2012

Fronteras 224-Immigration Roundtable

Fronteras-A Changing America
5:41 pm
Thu October 4, 2012

Dr. Pat Hynes, New Mexico Space Grant Consortium

Fred Martino interviews Dr. Pat Hynes, New Mexico Space Grant Consortium.  They discuss Spaceport America and the International Symposium for Commercial Spaceflight.  More information is available at www.ispcs.com

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