NPR News

Parallels
3:20 am
Mon August 3, 2015

Allegations Of Corruption Dog Mexico's First Lady Angélica Rivera

Thomas Samson AP

Eight months ago, Mexico's first lady, known for her fondness of designer clothes and European vacations, made a public promise to sell a multi-million-dollar mansion bought under controversial circumstances. She's purchasing the home, at below market rates, from a contractor with lucrative connections to her husband.

The scandal has been one of the biggest to rock the president's administration. And months later many questions remain regarding the questionable purchase — and the first lady hasn't sold her house.

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It's All Politics
3:11 am
Mon August 3, 2015

Baltimore Launched Martin O'Malley, Then Weighed Him Down

Newly-elected mayor Martin O'Malley, left, waves to supporters during morning in November 1999 in Baltimore.
Gail Burton AP

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

As Martin O'Malley neared the launch of his presidential campaign, the former Baltimore mayor and Maryland governor said he wouldn't think of announcing his bid "anyplace else," even as the city exploded with riots after the death of Freddie Gray, a young black man who was fatally injured while in police custody.

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Shots - Health News
3:11 am
Mon August 3, 2015

How A Scientist's Slick Discovery Helped Save Preemies' Lives

Researcher John Clements in the early 1980s, after he figured out that lungs need surfacants to breathe.
David Powers/Courtesy of UCSF

In 1953, Dr. John Clements realized something fundamental about the way the lung functions — an insight that would ultimately save the lives of millions of premature babies.

The story begins in 1950, when the U.S. Army sent Clements, a newly graduated physician, to the medical division of what was then called the Army Chemical Center in Edgewood, Md. Clements was interested in doing research in biochemistry. His commanding officer was of a different mind.

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NPR Story
3:11 am
Mon August 3, 2015

After 9 Days, Special Olympics World Games Come To A Close

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:11 am
Mon August 3, 2015

Al Jazeera Journalist Mohamed Fahmy Waits To Hear If He Faces More Prison Time

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S.
1:52 am
Mon August 3, 2015

Ghosts Of Katrina Still Haunt New Orleans' Shattered Lower Ninth Ward

Children walk down one of the many empty streets next to the vacant lots where houses once stood.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 3:11 am

The flooded streets and destroyed homes of the New Orleans neighborhood known as the Lower Ninth Ward were among the most powerful and iconic images from Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath 10 years ago.

Now, much of New Orleans is back — more than half of the city's neighborhoods have recovered some 90 percent of their pre-storm population.

That's not the case for the Lower Ninth.

Today, there's a feeling of desolation on nearly every block of the predominantly African-American neighborhood.

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Remembrances
3:26 pm
Sun August 2, 2015

Remembering 'Rowdy' Roddy Piper, The Wrestler So Tough, He Wore A Kilt

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 4:37 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Now let's take moment to remember one of the icons of pro wrestling.

(SOUNDBITE OF WRESTLING MATCH ANNOUNCEMENT)

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Law
3:23 pm
Sun August 2, 2015

Acquitted Of Extreme Corruption, Former Officers Now Sue For Defamation

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 4:49 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Food
3:20 pm
Sun August 2, 2015

Confronting A Shortage Of Eggs, Bakers Get Creative With Replacements

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 4:37 pm

Eggs are becoming more expensive and scarce recently because so many chickens have died from avian flu. So bakers, in particular, are looking for cheaper ingredients that can work just as well. (This story previously aired on All Things Considered on July 22, 2015.)

Politics
3:09 pm
Sun August 2, 2015

As First Presidential Debate Looms, A Look At The Landscape Of The Race

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 7:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
2:03 pm
Sun August 2, 2015

Review Of Leaked Test Results Shows Doping Is Widespread In Track And Field

The track at Olympic Stadium during the London 2012 Olympic Games.
Popperfoto Popperfoto/Getty Images

According to a review of the results of 12,000 blood tests, the world of track and field has a doping problem that is as big as the one cycling had at the height of Lance Armstrong's popularity.

That's according to the Sunday Times and Germany's public broadcaster ARD/WDR, which obtained a leak of documents with the bloodwork of 5,000 athletes.

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The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Sun August 2, 2015

A Hitchhiking Robot's Journey West Ends Early ... In Philadelphia

HitchBOT, a hitchhiking robot, sits with German tourists Sarah Strempel and Eric Vogel in the back seat of a vehicle as they and their companions prepare to leave Marblehead, Mass., after picking-up hitchBot for its first ride on July 17, 2015.
Stephan Savoia AP

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 1:48 pm

After a bunch of really nice humans helped a hitchhiking robot traverse the length of Canada and most of Germany, the robot was going to try to make it from Massachusetts all the way to California.

HitchBOT is the brainchild of two Canadian social scientists. As Frauke Zeller and David Harris Smith explained it in a piece for the Harvard Business review, it was an experiment meant to spark a discussion "about trust, notions of safety, and about our attitude towards technology."

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Animals
12:15 pm
Sun August 2, 2015

For Many Adopted Dogs, The Journey Home Takes A Thousand Miles

Dinaz Campbell, 10, holds Sherry, her newly adopted dog, at an adoption clinic in Rockville, Md.
Marisa Penaloza NPR

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 4:07 pm

On a muggy Sunday morning in Rockville, Md., the parking lot of the local pet store is organized chaos at its finest. Several hundred people pack the lot looking for a dog to adopt, and they have 50 to choose from. But they'll have to sort through a whole bunch of barking and tail-wagging to do it.

The scene looks like a mix between a fair and speed dating. Volunteers run the check-in table, coordinators walk potential adoptive families through the logistics and people move from dog to dog trying to find a perfect match to take home.

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Parallels
12:15 pm
Sun August 2, 2015

In Seoul, Where Everything Moves Fast, There's Also Longing For The Past

Traditional architecture and modern skyscrapers overlap in central Seoul.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 6:28 am

Anytime I need to update a bunch of apps on my smartphone, I'm going to fly to South Korea to do it.

I'm only partly joking.

The Internet speeds are so fast here, they make me feel like the U.S. is living in the past.

And it's not just the Internet. The subways here are clean, and on time, with air conditioning and Wi-Fi.

Since I arrived in Seoul, I've lost track of the number of Americans who've told me, "Incheon in my favorite airport in the world."

Now, the journalistic cliché would be to say, "This didn't happen overnight!"

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Interviews
12:14 pm
Sun August 2, 2015

After Katrina, One Sister Moves On; For Another, 'Tomorrow Never Came'

Huge shafts of light strike the littered playing field of the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans on Sept. 2, 2005 four days after Hurricane Katrina. The Superdome was a squalid shelter to tens of thousands of residents for days after the storm, including the Halley sisters and their mother.
Bill Haber AP

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 7:37 am

Ten years ago this month, the monster storm Hurricane Katrina thundered through New Orleans and coastal Mississippi and Alabama. Many who survived the storm and its aftermath are still feeling its terrible impact.

This week on For the Record: Hurricane Katrina's mark on one family, 10 years later.

In 2005, sisters Regina and Talitha Halley, had just moved out of the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans, into a new house on Spain Street. Regina, now 33, took care of her sister full time while their mom worked as a professional caregiver.

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The Two-Way
9:22 am
Sun August 2, 2015

Mexican Photojournalist Found Dead In Country's Capital

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 5:05 pm

A Mexican photojournalist, who worked for, among others, the investigative outfit Proceso, has been found dead along with four other people at an apartment in the country's capital.

According to Article 19, a group that advocates for press freedom, Rubén Espinosa is the 88th journalist killed in Mexico.

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The Two-Way
7:47 am
Sun August 2, 2015

President Obama To Unveil Tough Proposal Targeting Greenhouse Gases

A close carbon-fired power plant outside Helper, Utah.
George Frey Landov

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 8:18 am

Calling it the "biggest, most important step we've ever taken to combat climate change," President Obama said his administration would unveil the final version of a proposal aimed at curbing the amount of carbon pollution put out by power plants.

NPR's Scott Horsley reports that the new regulations are actually tougher than the ones unveiled by the Environmental Protection Agency in a draft proposal in June of 2014.

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Parallels
6:59 am
Sun August 2, 2015

25 Years In Iraq, With No End In Sight

U.S. Marines arrive at Saudi Arabia's Dhahran Air Base on Aug. 21, 1990. The U.S. began a buildup in the region just days after Iraq invaded Kuwait on Aug. 2 of that year. The U.S. military has been active in Iraq virtually nonstop for the past quarter-century.
Gerard Fouet AFP/Getty Images

It started so well. When Saddam Hussein's Iraq invaded Kuwait on Aug. 2, 1990, the United States swiftly cobbled together a broad coalition, unleashed a stunning new generation of air power and waged a lightning ground offensive that lasted all of four days. Iraqi troops were so desperate to quit that some surrendered to Western journalists armed only with notebooks.

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The Two-Way
6:52 am
Sun August 2, 2015

More Plane Debris Washes Up On Réunion Island

Debris from an airplane that was found on the Indian Ocean island of Reunion has been determined to belong to a Boeing 777. It is still unclear whether it belongs to MH370.
Raymond Wae Tion Maxppp /Landov

More debris has washed on shore of the French Island of La Réunion in the Indian Ocean.

From Paris, reporter Jake Cigainero tells our Newscast unit that French authorities believe the debris could be linked to the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.

Jake filed this report:

"Taking a Sunday morning stroll on the beach in La Réunion, walkers stumbled upon mangled metallic debris with what appears to be a type of door handle.

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Politics
6:28 am
Sun August 2, 2015

Obama To Detail Tougher Plan To Fight Climate Change

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 8:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The Obama administration is preparing to release a new climate rule that calls for deeper cuts in carbon pollution from the nation's power plants. President Obama previewed the plan in a Facebook video posted overnight.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

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Religion
6:15 am
Sun August 2, 2015

Mormons Face A Painful Loss If The Church Severs Boy Scout Ties

Boy Scouts work on canoes at camp Maple Dell outside Payson, Utah. The Mormon Church is considering pulling out of its 102 year old relationship with the Boy Scouts after the Boy Scouts changed it's policy on allowing gay leaders in the organization.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 10:44 am

The vote by the Boy Scouts of America to lift its ban on openly gay troop leaders last week was a blow to some religious conservative organizations that have long been connected to scouting, especially the Mormon Church, which has deep roots in the Boy Scouts.

The church, also known as the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, has used the Boy Scouts as its official program for young men for more than 100 years, according to Quin Monson, a political science professor at Brigham Young University.

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Health
5:31 am
Sun August 2, 2015

Less-Addictive Opioids Could Boost Drug Firms' Image

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 6:28 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
5:30 am
Sun August 2, 2015

Could Biden Catch Clinton In A White House Bid?

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 6:28 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sports
5:27 am
Sun August 2, 2015

NFL's First Female Coach Raises The Perennial 'Distraction' Question

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 6:28 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Middle East
5:27 am
Sun August 2, 2015

Nusra Front Attacks U.S.-Backed Syrian Fighters

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 6:28 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
5:03 am
Sun August 2, 2015

Rivers Run Through This Exhibit Of Colombian Art

Fibers from the fique plant, dyed with natural pigments by artist Susana Mejia, are part of the Waterweavers exhibit. In the photo above, the fibers hang to dry in the Amazon jungle.
Jorge Montoya

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 7:58 pm

You walk into an air-conditioned building in Washington, D.C., and suddenly you're surrounded by rivers.

You can hear them, from the bubbling chuckle of a current to an unforgiving roar.

You can see them, foamy currents rushing past on video screens.

And when you take a break and sit down on a chair — carved out of reclaimed rainforest wood — you look up to see cascades of linen and plastic that seem to pour from the ceiling like flowing water.

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The Two-Way
7:47 pm
Sat August 1, 2015

Texas Attorney General Indicted On Felony Charges, 'New York Times' Reports

A grand jury has indicted Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton on three counts of securities fraud, according to multiple media reports.

Paxton is accused of misleading investors in a technology company — by encouraging investments without revealing he was making a commission on them — and, on a lesser charge, of failing to register as a solicitor while he was referring clients to an investment firm, the New York Times reports.

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NPR Story
4:39 pm
Sat August 1, 2015

An Immigrant's Experience, Recast As Noir, In 'Dragonfish'

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 2:04 pm

Oakland cop Robert can't seem to forget Suzy: She left him two years ago and ended up marrying a man named Sonny, a gambler and a smuggler; a man who escaped from Vietnam, like Suzy.

Robert's always wondered what happened to his ex-wife — and now she's disappeared, and Sonny's forcing him to look for her. Sonny shadows Robert on a journey that takes them through the gambling underworld of Las Vegas, and through the haunted enclaves of Suzy's past.

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It's All Politics
4:38 pm
Sat August 1, 2015

SuperPAC Fundraising Already Dwarfs 2012 Levels

The super PAC supporting Jeb Bush has posted some truly astonishing fundraising numbers...and the election is still more than a year away.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 3:26 pm

Independent-expenditure-only committees, also known as superPACs, released their latest funding numbers on Friday, and already it's clear that the committees' roles in 2016 will be gargantuan.

The numbers already are far higher than those of the three election cycles since the Supreme Court's 2010 Citizens United ruling, which paved the way for the outside spending surge.

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Law
4:18 pm
Sat August 1, 2015

A Lawyer's Advice For Black Men At Traffic Stops: 'Comply Now, Contest Later'

Demonstrators hold up a placard of a man with his hands up during the "Justice For All" march in Washington, DC last December. Numerous protests have brought attention to police violence against people of color. One lawyer, while emphasizing that police are responsible for behaving professionally, also wants to give black men advice on how to survive encounters with police.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 4:55 pm

It's been nearly a year since a police officer shot and killed Michael Brown, an unarmed African-American 18-year-old, in Ferguson, Mo. Since then, more deadly police encounters across the country have prompted anger, activism and reform.

Many of those incidents began with traffic stops — routine events that quickly turned deadly. And attorney Eric Broyles says that the risks for citizens are not distributed evenly.

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