NPR News

Goats and Soda
10:41 am
Fri August 22, 2014

If You're Too Sick To Fly, Airlines Might Not Offer A Refund

Kenyan health officials take the temperatures of passengers arriving at Nairobi's airport.
Simon Maina AFP/Getty Images

Airport health screeners in hazmat suits and armed with gun thermometers are becoming a familiar sight in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, where the Ebola epidemic continues to spiral out of control. Passengers boarding aircraft are checked for fever. If cleared, they receive a stamped leaflet declaring them fit for travel.

The precautions are similar to steps taken during previous outbreaks of contagious diseases, including Middle East respiratory syndrome and deadly bird flus.

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The Salt
10:34 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Nestle Nudges Its Suppliers To Improve Animal Welfare

Nestle, the world's biggest food company, manufactures and markets a wide range of food products including dairy, meat, poultry and eggs.
Susana Gonzalez Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 11:21 am

Chances are you haven't considered the tail of the cow that made the milk that goes into your Nestle Crunch bar or the cheese in your (Nestle-made) Lean Cuisine frozen dinner.

But as animal welfare groups report, many dairy cows have their tails partially amputated, or docked, to help keep their udders clean. Not only is docking painful, it also pretty much disables the cow's personal fly switch, making it more susceptible to fly attacks.

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The Two-Way
10:16 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Scientists Searching For Alien Air Pollution

In this artist's conception, the atmosphere of an Earthlike planet displays a brownish haze — the result of widespread pollution.
Christine Pulliam Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 11:28 am

Air pollution is clogging the skies of our planet. Now one scientist thinks Earth may be just one of many polluted worlds — and that searching for extraterrestrial smog may actually be a good way to search for alien intelligence.

"People refer to 'little green men,' but ETs that are detected by this method should not be labeled as green," says Avi Loeb, an astronomer at Harvard University.

The idea of finding alien polluters may be a bit of a long shot, but Loeb says it's possible.

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The Two-Way
10:11 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Coming Soon To A Pole Near You: A Bike That Locks Itself

On a bike made by Yerka, parts of the frame hinge open to form a locking bracket. Its designers say the bike can't be ridden if it's stolen.
Yerka

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 10:52 am

Cyclists may soon have a convenient way to discourage bike thieves, thanks to new designs that use parts of the bikes themselves as locks. Two projects — one based in Chile, another in Seattle — are promising to provide peace of mind without the fuss of carrying a separate lock.

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Eggs, Milk And Ink: Venezuela Wants All Supermarket Shoppers Fingerprinted

Government-subsidized goods at a state-run market in Caracas, Venezuela, in 2012. Smuggling of cheap groceries into neighboring Colombia is so rampant that the government plans to fingerprint shoppers.
Fernando Llano AP

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 9:46 am

Attention Venezuelan shoppers: Please proceed to the supermarket checkout for fingerprinting.

That could be a reality if a plan announced earlier this week by the country's president, Nicolas Maduro, goes into effect.

The purpose? Combating shortages caused by rampant smuggling of subsidized food in Venezuela across the border into neighboring Colombia. Maduro says the system would stop people from buying too much of a single item.

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Goats and Soda
8:12 am
Fri August 22, 2014

In Riots Sparked By An Ebola Quarantine, A Teen Is Shot And Dies

Shakie Kamara lies on the ground with a bullet wound in his leg and cries for help.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 10:56 am

A teenage boy should not die from gunshot wounds to his legs.

But that was the fate of 15-year-old Shakie Kamara.

This week, people in the neighborhood of West Point were angry that they'd been quarantined — a government step to prevent the spread of Ebola to other parts of Monrovia, the capital city of Liberia. On Wednesday, crowds of protesters tried to get past the checkpoints.

Soldiers opened fire. Kamara was wounded.

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The Two-Way
8:09 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Who Owns A Monkey's Selfie? No One Can, U.S. Says

This 2011 image taken by a crested black macaque in Indonesia has ignited a debate over who owns the photo. The camera's owner says the image belongs to him. In its new manual, the U.S. Copyright Office disagrees.
David J Slater Caters News Agency/Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 10:48 am

The question of who owns a striking image taken by a crested black macaque may be closer to being settled, as the U.S. Copyright Office says the photo can't be copyrighted — by the person who owns the camera or by any other entity — because it wasn't taken by a human.

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Shots - Health News
7:16 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Insurers Refuse To Cover Some Contraceptives, Despite Health Law

The NuvaRing contraceptive ring can be used monthly to prevent pregnancy.
Sandy Huffaker Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 9:15 am

How much leeway do employers and insurers have in deciding whether they'll cover contraceptives without charge and in determining which methods make the cut?

Not much, as it turns out, but that hasn't stopped some from trying.

People still write in regularly describing battles they're waging to get birth control coverage they're entitled to under the Affordable Care Act.

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The Two-Way
6:50 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Hamas Executes Suspected Informants After Deadly Israeli Strike

Palestinian mourners carry the body of three senior commanders of the Hamas military wing in the southern Gaza Strip on Thursday, after they were killed in an Israeli airstrike. Hamas executed more than a dozen people it says were spying for Israel.
Khalil Hamra AP

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 10:28 am

One day after an Israeli airstrike killed three of its senior military leaders, Hamas says it has executed more than a dozen people in the Gaza Strip, after concluding that they had been spying for Israel.

From Jerusalem, NPR's Jackie Northam reports:

"Hamas confirmed that there were two separate rounds of executions in Gaza for people suspected of collaborating with Israel.

"In one instance, 11 men were rounded up recently and investigated by the Hamas government. They were found guilty and all 11 were sentenced to death.

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The Two-Way
6:47 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Russian Convoy Crosses Ukraine Border Despite Kiev's Protests

A Russian border guard opens a gate into Ukraine for the first trucks from the Russian town of Donetsk, Rostov-on-Don region, on Friday. The convoy had been stalled near the border for more than a week.
Sergei Grits AP

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 11:10 am

Update at 12:55 p.m. ET

After being halted at the border for more than a week, a Russian aid convoy is rumbling into eastern Ukraine without permission, prompting Kiev to label the move a "direct invasion" of sovereign territory.

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The Two-Way
5:49 am
Fri August 22, 2014

U.S. Prisoner Swap For Bergdahl Broke The Law, GAO Says

When it carried out a tense prisoner exchange in May, the Pentagon misused nearly $1 million, the Government Accountability Office says. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was taken out of captivity in Afghanistan, as seen in this image from video obtained from the Voice Of Jihad Website.
AP

The Pentagon didn't give enough notice to Congress and misused nearly $1 million when it swapped Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for five senior Taliban members, the Government Accountability Office says. The nonpartisan agency's findings led Defense officials to say they had to act quickly to free Bergdahl, who had been held for five years.

GAO investigators looked into the incident at the request of several Republican senators, including Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and members of the Appropriations Committee.

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Around the Nation
4:32 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Shoplifter Claims To Be Stone Temple Pilots Ex-Lead Singer

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
4:07 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Charity Will Benefit If Mayweather Reads 'Harry Potter'

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 5:53 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Food
2:56 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Author And His Daughter Cook Around The World And You Can Too

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 9:19 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
2:56 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Outside Group Mirrors Successful Strategies Of Political Parties

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 10:18 am

This is a big political year in Iowa. A U.S. Senate seat is up for grabs, and the Republican Party has opened 11 field offices statewide. But there's also a new team working the state — the Virginia-based group Americans for Prosperity.

Along with other nonprofit groups affiliated with libertarian billionaires David and Charles Koch, AFP is campaigning against the Iowa Democrats' Senate candidate, Rep. Bruce Braley.

It looks a lot like what a political party would do.

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NPR Story
2:56 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Protests In Ferguson Cause Some Kids To Suffer Emotional Distress

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 5:53 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
2:56 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Pesticides Used On Florida's Mosquitoes May Harm Butterflies

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 5:53 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Monkey See
1:30 am
Fri August 22, 2014

TV's New Doctor Who Has An Old Connection To The Series

Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman star as The Doctor and Clara Oswald on the BBC science fiction drama Doctor Who.
Ray Burmiston/Ali BBC America

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 9:59 am

TV's longest-running science fiction program is about to get a new hero ... sort of.

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Race
3:41 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Who Are The Protesters Getting Arrested In Ferguson?

Police arrest a demonstrator protesting the killing of teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 6:04 am

There was nobody at the QuikTrip on Thursday — that's the gas station and convenience store that burned down on the first night of violent protests in Ferguson, Mo. It was once a focal point for protesters.

On Thursday, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon ordered his state's National Guard to start withdrawing, a sign of the calm that has finally descended on the city racked by protests ever since police shot and killed an unarmed 18-year-old African-American man named Michael Brown.

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Goats and Soda
3:32 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Contagious Kisses? We Answer Your Questions About Ebola Recovery

Dr. Kent Brantly (center) announces his recovery from Ebola, with his wife, Amber Brantly (left), during a press conference at Emory University Hospital Thursday in Atlanta. Brantly got sick at the end of July.
Jessica McGowan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 8:19 am

It was a public health first. Doctors discharged two Americans from a hospital in Atlanta after treating them for Ebola.

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Media
3:20 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

In Covering Foley's Killing, Media Outlets Face A Difficult Choice

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 4:24 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
2:44 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Islamic State 'Beyond Anything We've Seen,' Hagel Says

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel (left) and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey during a Pentagon briefing on Thursday. Hagel said Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria posed a threat "beyond anything we've seen."
Yuri Gripas Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 5:59 pm

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel describes a failed U.S. mission into northern Syria earlier this summer to rescue Americans believed held there — including a journalist who was executed earlier this week — as "flawless" despite not recovering the hostages.

"This was a flawless operation, but the hostages weren't there," Hagel told journalists at a Pentagon briefing with Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

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The Salt
2:30 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Can Quinoa Take Root On The 'Roof Of The World'?

Grown for thousands of years in South America, quinoa crossed the Atlantic for the first time in the 21st century, according to the United Nations.
iStockphoto.com

For thousands of years, quinoa barely budged from its home in the Andes. Other crops — corn, potatoes, rice, wheat and sorghum — traveled and colonized the world. But quinoa stayed home.

All of a sudden, quinoa is a trendy, jet-setting "superfood." And as we've reported, some American farmers are trying to cash in on its new-found popularity.

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Shots - Health News
2:27 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Vision Problems Increase The Risk Of Early Death In Older People

Seeing better can mean living longer because it helps people remain independent.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 5:32 pm

An eye exam may be the ticket to a longer life, researchers say, because good vision is essential for being able to shop, manage money and live independently. And maintaining independence in turn leads to a longer life.

Researchers have known for years that people who have vision problems as they get older are more likely to die sooner than those who still see well. But they weren't sure why that was so.

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Parallels
2:10 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

European Fighters Take On More Prominent Roles In The Islamic State

This image posted on a militant website shows ISIS fighters marching in Raqqa, Syria, where the extremist group trains recruits, including Westerners.
AP

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 7:18 pm

British authorities are trying to identify the masked man who executed American photojournalist James Foley in a video that has caused massive global reaction.

The man — who appears wearing all black, holding a knife, and wearing a gun holster — speaks in an accent that linguists say sounds like someone from East or South London. The video yields other clues to the man's identity, such as his height and the fact that he's left-handed.

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Law
2:10 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

McDonnell Takes The Stand, Founding Defense On Marital Dysfunction

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 4:24 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Economy
2:10 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

The Quandary At Jackson Hole: Is It Time To Step Back From Stimulus?

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 4:24 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

National Security
2:10 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Failed Foley Rescue Reveals Challenges Faced By U.S. Intelligence

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 4:24 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Health
2:10 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

American Ebola Patients Leave Atlanta Hospital Healthy

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 4:24 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
2:10 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

The Siege Deepens In Eastern Ukraine's Donetsk

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 4:24 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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