NPR News

Goats and Soda
11:03 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Plane Of Good Samaritans: Why Fly To (And From) West Africa

Yes, visitors are still coming — and they want to help fight the virus.
John Moore Getty Images

Flying into the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic is actually anti-climactic.

We landed on Friday night. And by Saturday morning, we realized that people around Monrovia, Liberia, are generally going about their business as usual — they're just washing their hands a lot more and trying not to touch each other.

The city of a million people is now reporting about 30 Ebola cases each day. On the surface, you really wouldn't know there was an epidemic of the world's scariest disease going on, except that every now and then an Ebola ambulance zooms past with its sirens on.

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The Two-Way
10:40 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Nepal Ends Rescue Efforts After Deadly Avalanches In Himalayas

Nepal has ended rescue operations for people who may have been trapped or died in blizzards and avalanches last week throughout the foothills of Nepal's Himalayan mountain range. Locals and international tourists are among at least 39 people known to have died. Rescuers say those killed include four Canadians, two Poles, an Israeli, an Indian and a Nepali.

The Associated Press reports that officials believe no more people are stranded:

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The Two-Way
10:37 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Indiana Officials Say Man Has Led Them To Multiple Bodies

This Motel 6 in Hammond, Ind. seen Monday is where police found one of seven women's bodies over the weekend.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 11:06 am

Updated at 1:05 p.m. ET

Police in Hammond, Ind., believe they may be on to a serial killer after a man who confessed to killing one woman subsequently led authorities to the bodies of six others, The Associated Press reports.

Gary Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson tells the AP that the suspect, 43, directed investigators to sites where bodies were found Saturday and Sunday.

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The Two-Way
9:25 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Sweden's Sub Hunt Evokes Cold War Memories

Swedish corvette HMS Stockholm patrols Jungfrufjarden in the Stockholm archipelago, Sweden, on Monday. Swedish authorities say they've detected "foreign underwater activity" thought to be a possible Russian submarine.
Anders Wiklund EPA/Landov

The hunt for a possible Russian submarine operating clandestinely in Swedish waters might sound familiar to those of us who lived through the Cold War: that's because it bears striking similarities to a 1981 incident that made international headlines and proved a major embarrassment for Soviet authorities.

Here's what happened over the weekend, according to The Wall Street Journal:

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The Salt
8:53 am
Mon October 20, 2014

In The Big Easy, Food Vendors Create A Little Honduras

Taqueria La Delicia is a lonchera, or food truck, that parks near a Lowe's Home Improvement store in New Orleans. The owner is Honduran, and so are many of the day laborers who eat there.
Laine Kaplan-Levenson NPR

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:46 am

Thanks to a quirk of history — and a love of bananas — New Orleans has had a Honduran population for more than a century. But that population exploded after Hurricane Katrina, when the jobs needed to rebuild the city drew waves of Honduran immigrants. Many of them stayed, and nearly a decade later, they've established a thriving — if somewhat underground — culinary community.

Signs of that community abound, if you know where to look.

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The Two-Way
7:21 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Hong Kong Leader Blames 'External Forces' For Joining Protests

Pro-democracy protesters gather during a rally of the ongoing Occupy Central movement in the Admiralty District of Hong Kong on Monday. The territory's leader has accused foreign elements of helping stoke unrest.
Jeon Heon-kyun EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 8:46 am

Hong Kong's leader is blaming "external forces" for helping stoke student-led pro-democracy protests that have brought parts of the Chinese territory to a halt in recent weeks.

Leung Chun-ying's statement in a televised interview on Sunday marked the first time he blamed foreign involvement for the unrest, something that Beijing has said repeatedly during the three weeks of demonstrations, according to The Associated Press.

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The Two-Way
6:14 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Latest Developments In The Ebola Story

Dutch Foreign Minister Bert Koenders (center) speaks with Luxembourg Foreign Minister Jean Asselborn (second from left) and British Foreign Minister Philip Hammond (right) during a round table meeting of EU foreign ministers in Luxembourg on Monday. The ministers hope to raise 1 billion euros to fight Ebola.
Virginia Mayo AP

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:24 am

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

It's Monday, and Ebola still dominates the headlines. Here's a roundup of some of the latest developments:

Duncan's Family Completes 21-Day Quarantine:

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The Two-Way
5:03 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Turkey Says It's Helping Iraqi Kurds Join Fight For Kobani

Turkish Kurds watch the Syrian town of Kobani from a hill near the Mursitpinar border crossing on Monday.
Kai Pfaffensbach Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 6:30 am

Turkey says it is assisting Iraqi Kurdish fighters in crossing into Syria to aid their brethren in the embattled city of Kobani, where Kurds have fought a fierce defense action for weeks against besieging Islamic State militants.

"We are assisting peshmerga forces [Iraqi Kurds] to cross into Kobani," Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu told reporters in Ankara. He added: "We have no wish at all to see Kobani fall."

Cavusoglu offered no details.

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All Tech Considered
4:23 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Will Apple's Mobile Wallet Replace Your Leather Wallet?

Apple Pay is demonstrated at Apple headquarters in Cupertino, Calif.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 8:08 am

On Monday, Apple is rolling out a new way to pay: a digital wallet called Apple Pay. Millions of people with the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus will be able to tap — rather than swipe — at the register.

The move could be a major change in how we shop. Or it could end up as a blip on the map that fades away, as other "mobile wallets" have in the past.

Here are some questions you might be asking:

I have a leather wallet in my back pocket. Am I going to have it a year from now, given this mobile-wallet revolution?

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Asia
3:07 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Beijing Marathoners Powered Through Thick Smog

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
2:23 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Turf Shifts In Culture Wars As Support For Gay Marriage Rises

People hold signs, including some reading "America is ready for marriage," at a same-sex marriage victory celebration on Oct. 6 in Salt Lake City, Utah. America may be ready, but Republicans aren't: Rising popular support for same-sex marriage is posing a problem for the GOP.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 10:24 am

When social norms change, sometimes they change so fast it's hard to keep up.

Only 10 years ago, ballot initiatives opposing gay marriage were helping Republicans win elections. But two weeks ago, when the Supreme Court effectively cleared the way for legal same-sex marriage, the response from Republican leaders was deafening silence.

They were so quiet, some wondered whether the culture wars had finally ended with a Republican defeat.

Gary Bauer, a longtime social conservative activist, thinks that's nonsense.

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Shots - Health News
2:23 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Halting Schizophrenia Before It Starts

Meghan, 23, began experiencing hallucinations at 19. "Driving home, cars' headlights turned into eyes. The grills on the cars turned into mouths and none of them looked happy. It would scare the crap out of me," Meghan says.
Marvi Lacar for NPR

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 7:55 am

The important thing is that Meghan knew something was wrong.

When I met her, she was 23, a smart, wry young woman living with her mother and stepdad in Simi Valley, about an hour north of Los Angeles.

Meghan had just started a training program to become a respiratory therapist. Concerned about future job prospects, she asked NPR not to use her full name.

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Religion
2:23 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Catholic Synod Highlights Divisions, Sets Stage For Future Battles

Pope Francis attends a session of the two-week synod at the Vatican that wrapped up over the weekend. The usually predictable event produced a robust debate among the bishops on how the Catholic Church should deal with gays as well as Catholics who are divorced or remarried.
Gregorio Borgia AP

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 10:19 am

Over the last few decades, assemblies of Roman Catholic bishops meeting in Rome, known as synods, have been predictable events that have always upheld the viewpoints of the reigning pope.

But with the widely popular Pope Francis, nothing is predictable.

A two-week-long synod on family issues that wound up this weekend was tumultuous and the results showed a church deeply divided over how to deal with gays and with divorced and remarried Catholics.

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The Two-Way
12:38 am
Mon October 20, 2014

U.S. Airdrops Weapons, Ammo, Medical Supplies To Kurds In Kobani

Kurdish fighters move into position in Kobani, Syria on the border with Turkey Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014.
Levend Ali AP

The U.S. military confirmed Sunday an airdropped delivery of small arms, ammunition and medical supplies to Kurdish forces in the Syrian town of Kobani on the border with Turkey. The 27 bundles of supplies were provided by Kurdish authorities in Iraq.

In a statement, U.S. Central Command said the airdrops, executed by three C-130 cargo planes, were intended to help Kurdish fighters defend the city against the group calling itself the Islamic State.

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The Record
6:55 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

The Right Way To Complain About The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame

Future Hall Of Famers?: Green Day's Tre Cool (left), Billie Joe Armstrong (center) and Mike Dirnt) in New York City in 1994.
Ken Schles Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 12:39 pm

As a music geek, I often find myself in conversations, either online or over cocktails, about the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Indeed, I've been nerding out about the Hall since last Thursday, when the institution announced its shortlist for induction into the Hall Class of 2015. And when I find myself in polite but argumentative company debating the Rock Hall, I have an approach I use.

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The Two-Way
6:54 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

A Pumpkin Festival Turns To Mayhem In Keene, N.H.

Local police, firefighters and ambulances in New Hampshire responded to riots during the annual Pumpkin Festival near Keene State College on Saturday.
Seth Meyer AP

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 1:17 pm

An annual pumpkin festival in Keene, N.H., devolved into mayhem as people threw beer bottles, lit fires, overturned at least one car and clashed with police late Saturday into Sunday morning.

The local Boston CBS station reports that police arrested at least a dozen people and about 30 were injured, forcing police to disperse the crowd with pellets and pepper spray.

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U.S.
6:31 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

Residents Uneasy About Immigrant Shift Into Suburbs

Anti-immigration activist Judy Lairmore protests busing of migrant people from Central America on July 15, in Oracle, Ariz. Many immigrants have been moving into the suburbs in recent decades. And that's creating new tensions with the people who live there.
Sandy Huffaker Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:38 am

Unprecedented numbers of immigrant children crossed the southern U.S. border illegally this past summer. Now, the department of Health and Human Services says 43,000 of them have been placed in the homes of family members and sponsors to await court dates.

Cities are often the first stop for immigrants who come to the U.S. illegally. But many have been moving into the suburbs in recent decades. And that's creating new tensions with the people who live there.

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Around the Nation
5:09 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

Why Did The Mountain Lion Cross The Freeway? To Breed

The proposed overpass would allow mountain lions to cross this section of freeway. One mountain lion was hit near here after apparently failing to make it over this wall.
Arun Rath NPR

In Los Angeles' Griffith Park, there is a mountain lion known as the "Hollywood Lion."

The big cat — known as P22 to ecologists — somehow made it across two very busy freeways to get there. Mountain lions like solitude, but if P22 wants to find a mate and have some cubs, he'll have to risk his life again in Los Angeles traffic.

P22's dilemma is one faced by an entire population of mountain lions along the 101 Freeway, less than 30 miles away from Griffith Park. The freeway slices right across the wilderness in this stretch of the Santa Monica Mountains.

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Code Switch
3:24 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

The Boston Herald's Missed 'Cartoongate' Lessons

The Boston Herald published this cartoon earlier this month.
The Boston Herald

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 8:38 am

The worst fate of all may be to make a terrible mistake and then learn the wrong lessons from the experience.

That's the thought I had reading a heartfelt column about the Boston Herald's unfortunate decision to publish a cartoon featuring a White House gate-crasher asking the nation's first black president if he had "tried the new watermelon flavored toothpaste."

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The Two-Way
12:06 pm
Sun October 19, 2014

Pentagon Preps Ebola Medical Response Team

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 12:47 pm

The Pentagon is training a 30-person medical response team designed to be deployed nationally in case anyone else in the country is diagnosed with Ebola.

Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Admiral John Kirby said the team was formed based on a request from the Department of Health and Human Services.

"The team will consist of 20 critical care nurses, five doctors trained in infectious disease, and five trainers in infectious disease protocols," Kirby said.

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The Two-Way
10:18 am
Sun October 19, 2014

One Of 7 Northern White Rhinos Left In The World Dies In Kenya

Suni back in 2009, when the rhino arrived at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya.
Riccardo Gangale AP

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 12:57 pm

Northern white rhinos are one step closer to extinction, after one of only two breeding males known to exist was found dead at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya.

In a statement, the conservancy said Suni, 34, had not been poached, but they had not yet determined why the rhino died. It continued:

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Around the Nation
9:44 am
Sun October 19, 2014

As Their Wells Run Dry, California Residents Blame Thirsty Farms

Many rural California residents rely on private wells for tap water — wells that are starting to dry up.
Jeremy Raff KQED

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:43 am

Imagine flushing the toilet and watching sand come up. That's what happened to Pam Vieira, who lives south of Modesto, Calif. Her water well has slowed to a trickle, and you can see the sand in the tank of her toilet.

"Sometimes we have brown water," Vieira says. "Sometimes we have no water."

Vieira is one of as many as 2 million rural California residents who rely on private domestic wells for drinking water.

Some of those people are among the hardest hit by the state's severe drought, as wells across the state's Central Valley farm belt start to go dry.

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Parallels
9:19 am
Sun October 19, 2014

An Urban Village Pops Up To Comfort Hong Kong Protesters

Student demonstrators don't want to fall behind on their studies, so volunteers built them an outdoor study hall. Some of the desks are built into the concrete highway divider.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:43 am

Hong Kong's main pro-democracy protest camp turned three-weeks-old over the weekend. What began as a road block has grown into urban village with several hundred tents that attracts more than a thousand people at night.

The camp is a combo street fair, outdoor art gallery with political sculptures, propaganda posters as well as speeches, movie screenings and even a free library.

The vibe here is like an American college campus in the 1960s, except it's on an island on the edge of the South China Sea and surrounded by skyscrapers.

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The Two-Way
8:57 am
Sun October 19, 2014

Health Care Worker On Cruise Ship Tests Negative For Ebola

The cruise ship Carnival Magic passes near Cozumel , Mexico, on Friday.
Angel Castellanos AP

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 10:40 pm

A health care worker who had self-quarantined herself aboard a Carnival Cruise Lines ship has tested negative for Ebola and was allowed to disembark with the rest of the passengers in Galveston, Texas, on Sunday.

In a statement, the Galveston County Health Authority said it had determined "there is no evidence of a public health threat to cruise passengers or to Galveston county."

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The Two-Way
6:06 am
Sun October 19, 2014

Texas Hospital: 'We Are Deeply Sorry' For Missing Ebola Diagnosis

The exterior of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 1:15 pm

In a full-page letter published in Sunday's Dallas Morning News, Barclay Berdan, the CEO of the company that owns Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, said the hospital was "deeply sorry" for missing the ebola diagnosis of Thomas Eric Duncan.

If you remember, Duncan came into the hospital on Sept. 28 with a fever and other symptoms consistent with Ebola. He told a nurse he had traveled to Africa, but the doctor somehow missed that vital piece of information.

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Politics
5:47 am
Sun October 19, 2014

Will Ebola Impact Midterm Elections?

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:43 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. And this...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: I'm going to tell you something, mister, and I want you to remember it.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: Now you listen to me.

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Around the Nation
5:47 am
Sun October 19, 2014

California Farmers: We Are Getting 'Much Less Water'

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:43 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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National Security
5:47 am
Sun October 19, 2014

DOD: Climate Change Is A Volatile Factor In International Security

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:43 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Iraq
5:47 am
Sun October 19, 2014

ISIS Threat Is 'Extremely Worrying' Says Counter-Insurgency Expert

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:44 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
3:33 am
Sun October 19, 2014

The Kissimmee: A River Recurved

The restoration's goal is to put as much of the Kissimmee as possible back to the way it was. This photo shows the river after restoration.
Courtesy the South Florida Water Management District

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 9:43 am

It sounds almost superhuman to try straighten a river and then recarve the curves.

That's what federal and state officials did to the Kissimmee River in central Florida. They straightened the river in the 1960s into a canal to drain swampland and make way for the state's explosive growth. It worked — and it created an ecological disaster. So officials decided to restore the river's slow-flowing, meandering path.

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