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The U.S. Coast Guard is continuing efforts to clean up an oil spill along a stretch of the Mississippi River near Columbus, Ky. after two tow boats — one carrying about 1 million gallons of a potentially toxic petroleum product — collided earlier this week.

Supporters of Kim Davis, the county clerk in Kentucky who was jailed after refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, are planning a demonstration to voice their opposition to her incarceration.

"The Kim Davis Jailhouse Prayer Rally" is set to begin at 11 a.m. today at the Carter County Detention Center. An announcement for the rally, published by Christian News Wire, contends that Davis "is obeying the laws of Kentucky while refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex [couples]."

At first it seems lively outside on the weekend in Baghdad — the lights are bright in open-air cafes, music streams from beribboned cars in a wedding party and at Ali Hussein's juice stand, decorated with plastic bananas, they're squeezing oranges on old brass presses.

But even as Hussein offers me a sharp, fresh juice, he's downcast. When I ask about the subject on everyone's mind here — the migrant flood into Europe — he laughs. "We were just talking about this!" he says. Several of his friends just passed by to say farewell.

More than four years after the 7,400 residents of the Japanese town of Naraha were evacuated after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant melted down in the wake of a devastating tsunami, the government is allowing people to return.

Following several years of decontamination, Naraha is the first town in the area to allow residents to return. It was evacuated in March 2011 after the Fukushima plant was smashed by the magnitude-9.0 earthquake and tsunami near Sendai, setting off the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl.

Congress Faces A Crazy-Busy September

2 hours ago
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The so-called Islamic State continues to wreak a human toll in the Middle East. And in addition to that suffering, the militant organization continues its assault on Syria's cultural heritage.

This week, militants blew up three tombs in the ancient city of Palmyra, and reduced the Greco-Roman Temple of Bel to rubble.

At the same time, ISIS also profits by selling small antiquities on the black market.

German police say that about 450 migrants from Hungary have arrived at a train station in Munich after German Chancellor Angela Merkel said her country would not limit the number of asylum seekers allowed in.

An estimated 4,000 people arrived in Austria, many en route to Germany, after the Hungarian government blocked them from leaving the country by train earlier this week.

Why Are So Many People Running For President?

3 hours ago

Running for president is expensive and exhausting — but this year, some 22 people seem to think it's a good idea. There are five major candidates for the Democratic nomination and a whopping 17 on the Republican side.

But why? As it turns out, there are many reasons.

They Think They Have A Real Chance

Murders On The Rise In Major U.S. Cities

4 hours ago
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In a dense, wooded lot, 17-year-old Justis Jackson lies on a mound of dirt. He doesn't seem to mind the sticky heat or buzzing mosquitoes. Jackson's attention is fixed on a buried object at the bottom of a neatly dug hole.

"Sounds like metal," he says, knocking. "But what type of metal and how old it is, I don't know. I hope it's old."

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Funeral services were held Friday for slain Harris County Deputy Darren Goforth. He was shot to death a week ago as he pumped gas into his police car. Police called it "an unprovoked execution-style killing."

Updated at 5:30 a.m. ET

More than 1,000 weary Syrian refugees were greeted with food and applause at the Austrian border after arriving by busloads from a long, chaotic journey through Hungary.

Some of the refugees had walked westward for hours on Friday after officials refused to let them board a train at a Budapest rail station. They had covered up to 30 miles on foot — about one third of the way to the border — before the Hungarian government supplied buses to carry them. Authorities in Germany and Austria agreed to accept them.

Seeing no other options to help get her brother Abdullah's family out of Syria and to safety, Teema Kurdi sent him money to get them onto a smuggler's boat that would take them to Greece.

"We actually would say we encouraged them to go, because his brother made it, and there was no other hope," he told NPR's Rachel Martin in an emotional interview. "We don't see the war ending in Syria; life in Turkey is hopeless."

Hours before it was scheduled to screen at the Telluride Film Festival, the Aretha Franklin documentary Amazing Grace has been pulled, after a federal court granted the singer an injunction. The film centers on footage shot by late director Sydney Pollack at a 1972 Franklin concert.

It was a sad day in Houston, as the family, friends and colleagues of Harris County Sheriff's Deputy Darren Goforth attended his funeral Friday. In an apparent attempt to ease their grief, a couple who were at the gas station where Goforth was killed came forward Friday to tell the family that after he was attacked, they had sat with the deputy to wait for help.

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Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The British prime minister today eased his position on admitting Syrian refugees to the United Kingdom. David Cameron spoke of Britain's moral responsibility.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

By now, you've probably seen the photo of Aylan Kurdi, the 3-year-old refugee from Syria who died with his 5-year-old brother and mother after their small rubber boat capsized on its way to Greece. You might remember his Velcro shoes. His red shirt. His lifeless body lying face down in the sand.

It's that time of year when some gardeners and tomato-coveting shoppers face a vexing question: What on earth am I going to do with all these tomatoes I grew (or bought)?

A select few up to their elbows in tomatoes may have an additional quandary: How am I going to prepare different kinds of tomatoes to honor their unique qualities?

Editor's Note: This report contains a racial slur.

A new play reveals some little-known history about the land that became New York City's Central Park: People used to live there.

Beginning in 1825, about 300 people — mainly free African-Americans — lived in a village that spanned a portion of the park's 843 acres in Manhattan, between 82nd and 89th streets, east of Central Park West. It was called Seneca Village.

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Music Review: 'Poison Season,' Destroyer

19 hours ago
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Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The musician we're going to hear about goes by the name Destroyer. You might expect heavy metal. Well, not exactly.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MIDNIGHT MEET THE RAIN")

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Note: The photo in this story may be distressing to some viewers.

Social media, and one photo in particular, have played a central role in galvanizing public attention around Europe’s migrant crisis.

The head of the United Nations’ refugee agency has called the crisis a “defining moment” for the EU and said member countries must mobilize and accept up to 200,000 refugees. Ireland has agreed to take 1,800 refugees, and British Prime Minister David Cameron agreed to accept thousands more.

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