NPR News

The Two-Way
6:39 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

NFL Lays Out New Penalty For Domestic Violence: 6-Game Suspension

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, shown here in January, has sent an open letter to NFL team owners explaining the league's new policies for preventing and punishing domestic violence and sexual assault.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has announced new guidelines for how the league will handle incidents of domestic violence and sexual assault. The change in policy, explained an open letter to team owners, come a month after the NFL was criticized for how it handled player Ray Rice's arrest on domestic violence charges.

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Iraq
4:42 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Obama Says U.S. Will Aid Iraqis Who Are Marooned On Mount Sinjar

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
3:59 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

'We Don't Have A Strategy Yet' On Islamic State, Obama Says

President Obama said Thursday at the White House that the U.S. doesn't yet have a strategy on how to deal with the Islamic State militant group.
Michael Reynolds EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:02 pm

President Obama says the U.S. doesn't "have a strategy yet" on how to deal with Islamic State militants who now control vast swaths of territory across Iraq and Syria, but he added that the militant group was continuing to lose arms and equipment because of targeted U.S. strikes against its members in Iraq.

"I don't want to put the cart before the horse," Obama said at a White House news conference Thursday. "We don't have a strategy yet."

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Around the Nation
3:48 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Zero-Tolerance Policing Is Not Racism, Say St. Louis-Area Cops

Police arrest a woman in Ferguson, Mo., protesting the shooting death of Michael Brown. Most officers in Ferguson and nearby Jennings are white, but the neighborhoods they police are predominantly African-American.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:28 pm

The protests that followed the shooting death this month of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., have rekindled long-standing complaints about racist policing, especially in the St Louis area.

Many male African-American residents there say police scrutinize them unfairly. "Every time you see a cop, it's like, 'OK, am I going to get messed with?' " says Anthony Ross. "You feel that every single time you get behind your car. Every time."

Now, police officers in and around St. Louis are becoming more vocal about defending themselves against the charges of bias.

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Monkey See
3:03 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

New Amazon Series Pilots Fall Short Of A TV Revolution

Jay Chandrasekhar, left, and Sarah Chalke are a married couple in the new Amazon Studios pilot Really.
Quantrell Colbert Amazon Studios

When it comes to original TV series, it's tough to understand exactly where Amazon is going.

At first, their strategy seemed simple: They went where big-ticket competitors like Netflix and HBO didn't, greenlighting comedies like Garry Trudeau's political satire Alpha House and the Silicon Valley series Betas, along with a raft of kids' shows.

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The Salt
3:03 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

When Zero Doesn't Mean Zero: Trans Fats Linger In Food

About 84 percent of food products that contain trans fats still carry a "zero gram" label, which may mislead consumers, researchers say.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 3:12 pm

Last we heard, the once ubiquitous trans fats had mostly disappeared from packaged cookies, muffins and french fries.

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Code Switch
2:58 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Michel Martin Goes #BeyondFerguson

A demonstrator raises his arms before police officers move in to arrest him on Aug. 19 in Ferguson, Mo.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

We are in Ferguson, Mo., at Wellspring Church to hear from the community in the aftermath of the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown. Together with St. Louis Public Radio, we are also hosting a Twitter chat using #BeyondFerguson. This is an opportunity to share your reactions, ideas and frustrations, as well as talk about ways to move forward. (Scroll down to see participants.)

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Goats and Soda
2:54 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Tom Frieden's Ebola Assessment: The Risk Is Increasing

Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the CDC, talks with staff from Doctors Without Borders during a visit to the nonprofit group's newest Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

The Ebola outbreak has crippled local health systems. It's flooded wards with patients, killed doctors, scared away medical staff and forced some hospitals to shut down entirely.

That's the grim assessment of Dr. Tom Frieden, head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who's visiting West Africa this week for a firsthand look at the situation. Frieden spoke to Goats and Soda by cell phone as he was traveling by car from the hard-hit eastern Sierra Leone city of Kenema back to the capital, Freetown.

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Shots - Health News
2:52 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Texas Law Could Lead To Closure Of Clinics That Offer Abortions

The Hilltop Women's Reproductive Clinic in El Paso, Texas, is expected to close if a state law is upheld by a federal judge.
Juan Carlos Llorca AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 4:31 pm

A federal judge in Austin, Texas, will issue a decision in the next few days about whether clinics that perform abortions in the state must become outpatient surgery centers.

The Texas law is part of a national trend in which state legislatures seek to regulate doctors and their offices instead of women seeking abortions.

The laws are collectively known as TRAP laws, for "Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers."

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Media
2:45 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Foley's Mother: We Didn't Want Him To Go Back To Syria

Journalist James Foley in 2011. He was killed by Islamic State militants in Syria earlier this month.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 4:11 pm

The mother of slain journalist James Foley says in an interview with NPR's All Things Considered that the family did not want him to return to Syria after a brief trip back to the United States in 2011.

"We really did not want him to go back," Diane Foley tells host Melissa Block. "I must be honest about that," she says of her son, who was killed by Islamic State militants in Syria earlier this month.

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Around the Nation
2:45 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Shooting Range Accident Draws Focus On Children Handling Guns

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 4:08 pm

A tragedy at an Arizona shooting range this week has set off a debate about children using high-powered weapons, as well as America's gun culture. Shooting range owners are defending their industry as safe, criticizing this particular operator for allowing a small girl to use an Uzi.

Education
2:45 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Want To Widen Your Worldview? A Random Roomie Helps

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 4:08 pm

Melissa Block talks to Jesse Singal of New York Magazine, about his article titled "In Praise of the Rando Freshman Roommate." Research shows that when students are paired with roommates from different backgrounds, they tend to develop more tolerant attitudes.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S.
2:45 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

With Drones In Flight Over Syria, Questions Of Airstrikes Rise With Them

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 4:08 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
2:45 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Momentum Gathers For The West's Response To Russia

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
2:45 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Rebels Storm Key Border Crossing Between Syria And Israel

The Syrian civil war has flared up in the south of the country, near the Israeli border. A group of Islamist fighters have now captured a border crossing between Syria and Israel on the Golan Heights, which has long been monitored by United Nations peacekeeping forces.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Science
2:45 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Night Of The Cemetery Bats

Big brown bats like this one are relatively common in urban areas, sometimes roosting in buildings. Contrary to popular belief, bats rarely carry rabies and are not rodents. They belong to the order Chiroptera, which means "hand-wing."
Courtesy of Robert Marquis

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 4:08 pm

I've visited St. Louis' Bellefontaine cemetery before, but never at night.

It's really dark. The looming trees are black against the sky, where a half-moon is just barely visible behind some clouds.

I can see eerie lights and strange, shadowy figures moving among the gravestones.

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Shots - Health News
2:16 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Scentless: Losing Your Sense Of Smell May Make Life Riskier

If you can't smell this, you could be in big trouble.
Henrik Sorensen Getty Images

Losing your sense of smell may not sound like a big deal, but it can increase your risk of injury, researchers say. Without the sniffer serving as early warning system, it can be hard to know if the pan is burning on the stove or the chicken has gone bad.

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Goats and Soda
2:02 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

They Are The Body Collectors: A Perilous Job In The Time Of Ebola

A team of body collectors carry the corpse of a woman suspected of dying of Ebola in Monrovia, Liberia's capital.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:28 pm

"When I wake up in the morning, I will pray to God to give me strength and focus," says 21-year-old Sorie Fofana.

His job is collecting the bodies of those who die from Ebola in Monrovia, Liberia's capital city of roughly 1 million people. Before, Fofana was an artist, making designs for T-shirts. The new job pays better — $1,000 a month. But every morning, the lanky, laid-back Fofana has to steel himself to go out and do the job.

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Goats and Soda
1:55 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Homer Simpson's Visit To Bangalore Makes Us Go 'D'Oh!'

Homer thinks he is a god in the episode of The Simpsons set in Bangalore.
via metatube

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 2:59 pm

Some of us here at Goats and Soda were pretty excited when the cable channel FXX said it was going to run every Simpsons episode ever, 24/7 for 12 days. We are a global blog, and The Simpsons is a global show, airing in at least nine other countries.

What really caught our eye was an episode scheduled to air tomorrow at 4 a.m. ET, in which the Simpsons visit Bangalore, India.

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Shots - Health News
1:28 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Will Be Put To Human Test

Scanning electron micrograph shows Ebola virus (red) on the surface of a kidney cell from an African green monkey.
NIAID

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 2:13 pm

An Ebola vaccine being developed by the National Institutes of Health and drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline is going to get a try in healthy people starting next week.

The number of Ebola cases and deaths continues to climb in Western Africa, underscoring the need for a vaccine to protect people from infection. There's no such vaccine now.

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The Two-Way
1:18 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Scientists Study How We Evolved To Stand On Our Own Two Fins

Researchers raised two groups of walking, air-breathing Polypterus senegalus — one on land and one on the water. They discovered that each group was able to adapt to be best suited to its environment.
A. Morin, E.M. Standen, T.Y. Du, H. Larsson McGill University

Scientists examining an unusual African fish that can walk and breathe air think they've learned a thing or two about how our distant ancestors made the leap from the oceans to terra firma some 400 million years ago.

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NPR Ed
12:59 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Kids And Screen Time: What Does The Research Say?

LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 1:46 pm

Kids are spending more time than ever in front of screens, and it may be inhibiting their ability to recognize emotions, according to new research out of the University of California, Los Angeles.

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The Two-Way
12:23 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Fatal Shooting At Firing Range Sparks Debate About Safety

A man closes off an entrance to the Last Stop shooting range in White Hills, Ariz., on Wednesday. Instructor Charles Vacca was killed at the range Monday by a 9-year-old girl he was teaching to use an Uzi submachine gun.
John Locher AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 3:19 pm

A 9-year-old girl in Arizona on Monday accidentally killed her firing-range instructor when she lost control of an Uzi submachine gun.

The news has ignited a debate in the country about access to guns and the wisdom of state law and parents who allow children to shoot them. It also brought up a host of questions. We've answered three of the main ones below:

Is it common for kids to shoot guns at ranges?

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Goats and Soda
12:08 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Ebola Is Rapidly Mutating As It Spreads Across West Africa

A technician tests fluid samples from Ebola-infected patients at a field lab, run by Doctors Without Borders, in Kailahun, Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 6:30 pm

For the first time, scientists have been able to follow the spread of an Ebola outbreak almost in real time, by sequencing the virus' genome from people in Sierra Leone.

The findings, published Thursday in the journal Science, offer new insights into how the outbreak started in West Africa and how fast the virus is mutating.

A international team of researchers sequenced 99 Ebola genomes, with extremely high accuracy, from 78 people diagnosed with Ebola in Sierra Leone in June.

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The Two-Way
10:03 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Murder Charges Dismissed Against Former Top Thai Leaders

Suthep Thaugsuban, a former deputy prime minister who ordered a bloody crackdown on protesters in 2010 and later encouraged a coup against the elected government, arrives at court on Thursday. In recent weeks, Suthep has become a Buddhist monk.
Narong Sangnak EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 10:52 am

A court in Thailand has dismissed murder charges against a former prime minister and his deputy who led anti-government protests that triggered a coup toppling the elected government in May.

Thailand's Criminal Court ruled Thursday that it did not have jurisdiction in the case against former Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva and former Deputy Prime Minister Suthep Thaugsuban.

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The Two-Way
9:57 am
Thu August 28, 2014

'Geography Can Be Tough': Canada Trolls Russia For Ukraine Action

NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 1:54 pm

Russian troops are entering Ukraine — this much is known — but whether they are mounting a "full-scale invasion," as one Ukrainian official told CNN, or are mistakenly crossing over, as Moscow itself claims, is uncertain.

Enter Canada.

Our northern neighbor's delegation to NATO had this useful tweet to remind everyone how, in its words, "Geography can be tough."

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Goats and Soda
9:21 am
Thu August 28, 2014

In Haiti, An 'American Idol'-Style Contest About Child Slavery

Hedson Lamour, 28, prays with his color-coordinated band before performing. He entered the contest because his mom was a child slave.
Frederic Dupoux for NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 11:33 am

Haiti's got talent.

Tamarre Joseph paces the stage, her sleek, short blue dress hugging her pencil-thin frame. She works the hometown crowd, rapping "Nap rive peyi san restavek."

The thousands in the packed stadium jump and sing along. An entire section of men take off their shirts and wave them overhead.

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Shots - Health News
9:03 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Hey, You've Got Mites Living On Your Face. And I Do, Too

Want to find your personal posse of Demodex mites? Gently scrape the pores on the sides of your nose.
Juergen Peter Bosse iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 11:20 am

When Megan Thoemmes first found a tiny critter living in the pores of her nose, she was disgusted.

"The first time I found one on my face I didn't sleep for four nights," says Thoemmes, a graduate student at North Carolina State University.

But she's made peace with her Demodex mites, not only accepting that the microscopic arthropods are hers for life, but conducting a study that finds that everybody else has them, too.

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The Two-Way
8:59 am
Thu August 28, 2014

China Warns U.S. Over Surveillance Flights

This handout photo provided by the Office of the Defense Secretary (OSD), taken Aug. 19, 2014, shows a Chinese fighter jet that the White House said Friday conducted a "dangerous intercept" of a U.S. Navy surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft.
Uncredited AP

Beijing has rejected U.S. claims that one of its fighter jets acted recklessly in intercepting a U.S. Navy maritime patrol plane in the South China Sea last week, warning Washington to curtail or discontinue "close surveillance" flights near Chinese territory.

"According to different situations we will adopt different measures to make sure we safeguard our air and sea security of the country," Defense Ministry spokesman Yang Yujun said at a news briefing.

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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Sister Of Boston Bombing Suspects Arrested Over Bomb Threat

Ailiana Tsarnaeva, sister of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, departs district court in Boston's South Boston neighborhood in October.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 12:43 pm

The sister of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects was arrested on Tuesday and accused of making a bomb threat against her boyfriend's ex-girlfriend.

The Boston Herald reports:

"Ailina Tsarnaeva, 24, of North Bergen, N.J., turned herself in to officers in Manhattan around 2:30 p.m. yesterday and was charged with aggravated harassment, according to police.

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