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One week before the school's football season starts, the University of Illinois has fired head coach Tim Beckman, saying a review had found "efforts to deter injury reporting and influence medical decisions that pressured players to avoid or postpone medical treatment and continue playing despite injuries."

Illini Director of Athletics Mike Thomas fired Beckman on Friday. A school statement says the decision was made "in the best interests of student-athletes."

Doctors without Borders / Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is seeking legal action against the producers of a new Bollywood film that it says portrays a worker for a "confusingly similar" aid organization who assists in tracking down and killing the head of a Pakistani extremist faction.

Wearing a green Dartmouth College jersey, the newest player on the school's football team readies for action during a preseason practice. The whistle blows, he makes his move and then is thrown to the ground by a teammate's crushing tackle. This happens again and again and again, but every time, the new player pops right back up, completely unhurt.

This player is an MVP — a "Mobile Virtual Player," that is.

In the 10 years since Hurricane Katrina, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has nearly completed one of the world's most remarkable hurricane protection systems to encircle New Orleans. Locals say their low-lying city finally has the storm defenses it should have had before Katrina, which killed hundreds and caused billions in property losses.

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A Close Look At The Volatility Index

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Companies have long had to disclose what their CEOs make, but soon, for the first time, large companies will have to disclose how salaries at the top compare to their median compensation level for employees worldwide. It's a rule the Securities and Exchange Commission adopted as required by the Dodd-Frank financial law.

After a huge drop in the past couple of weeks, Shanghai stocks rose Friday for the second day in a row.

For many, that's a relief. But China's economy has a long way to go. In fact, it's in the midst of wrenching transition from an economy based on investment and manufacturing to a higher-income one built on services and consumer spending.

The stakes are high — not just for China, but for the rest of the world.

Economic growth is slowing in China in a way it hasn't in a long time.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The strange story of Dallas District Attorney A Susan Hawk actually begins several years ago when the previously highly-regarded Dallas District Attorney Craig Watkins began to struggle managing his office. Watkins was the first black DA in Texas and he quickly made a national reputation by finding and releasing men who'd been wrongly convicted of rape in Dallas. Watkins, who started out as a defense attorney, used DNA evidence that had been preserved by the city to free more than a dozen men, most of them black, who'd been wrongly imprisoned for decades.

A 20-year member of Congress indicted on racketeering charges is challenging restrictions on his ability to meet with colleagues as "an undue and unnecessary burden...that is effectively impairing his ability" to do his job.

Last month, a federal grand jury in Philadelphia indicted Rep. Chaka Fattah, D-Penn., on conspiracy, bribery, and fraud counts for allegedly using political campaigns and nonprofit groups to cover personal expenses and evade campaign finance laws.

As the nation marks 10 years since Hurricane Katrina, Here & Now has a special New Orleans edition of the DJ Sessions. Host Jeremy Hobson sits down with Nick Spitzer, a New Orleans resident and host of “American Routes,” from Tulane University and WWNO in New Orleans, distributed by PRX. He talks about the music that has resonated in the city since the storm, and how the music scene has changed.

A ruling yesterday from the National Labor Relations Board gave contract workers and employees of franchises a lot more leverage to unionize.

The NLRB’s decision gives those employees the right to negotiate a union contract not only with a franchise owner, but also with the larger parent company. It has implications in the fast food industry, which is locked in a national debate about worker pay and benefits.

Michael Regan of Bloomberg News discusses this with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

Gyms and personal trainers across the country are watching new regulations coming from the Board of Physical Therapy in Washington, D.C. The board is preparing new guidelines that would make a registry of personal trainers and place further requirements on the industry.

Gyms fear Washington will be a testing ground for other states. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Phillip Godfrey, a medical exercise specialist in Washington, D.C. who opposes the regulations.

It has all the makings of an Indiana Jones sequel: In the final days of World War II as the Soviet army closed in on the Third Reich from the east, a train full of gold, gems and other Nazi loot was hidden in a secret underground tunnel near the present-day Polish city of Walbrzych. Seventy years later, a deathbed confession may provide the key clue to finding it.

As promised yesterday in our post about Oxford Dictionaries' new words, here are a few of the most linguistically nimble sentences submitted by NPR readers responding to a call-out to see how many of the words they could cram into one sentence.

From Facebook, Carrie Donovan:

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Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

"There are too many guns in America, and there's clearly too many guns in the wrong hands."

That's what Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe said to reporters in front of the WDBJ building in Roanoke, Va.

The governor, who promised to introduce gun-control legislation, was speaking two days after a gunman killed two journalists from that station during a live broadcast.

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

Former President George W. Bush, whose legacy was marred by the federal government's response to Hurricane Katrina, visited New Orleans today to mark the 10th anniversary of the tragedy.

Bush and his wife, Laura, arrived Friday morning at Warren Easton Charter High School, where they met with students as well as New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu and Kathleen Blanco, who was Louisiana's governor when Katrina hit in August 2005.

A three-judge panel for a U.S. appeals court has thrown out a lower-court decision that sought to stop the NSA from continuing to collect metadata on phone calls made by Americans.

The lower court ruling had found that the practice was unconstitutional.

Freezing Eggs May Reduce A Woman's Odds Of Success With IVF

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With egg freezing being touted as a way for women to potentially expand future childbearing options, the viability of those eggs when they're defrosted is still relatively unknown. The latest bit of guardedly good news is a short report in JAMA indicating that frozen eggs do indeed lead to live births after IVF nearly half the time — but that the odds of a live birth are almost 20 percent higher for IVF using fresh eggs.

The National Zoo in Washington, D.C., announced Friday that the surviving cub of giant panda Mei Xiang is a boy.

Genetic testing also showed that he was sired by China's panda, Tian Tian, the zoo tweeted.

Once thought to be ephemeral and fleeting, the keeping of keepsakes online may be the best way to hold on to — and to share — historic photographs and documents.

Usain Bolt has addressed Thursday's encounter with a mobile cameraman on a Segway.

If you missed it, a cameraman lost control and ran into the elite runner just after he won the 200-meter final during the 15th IAAF World Championships in Beijing.

This is going to be an unthinkably expensive election. Case in point: estimates of spending on the presidential race stretch as high as $10 billion.

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