NPR News

Author Interviews
6:11 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Reviving A Grand Tradition Of 'Black Prophetic Fire'

Professor and author Cornel West in 2008.
Richard Alan Hannon Getty Images

In a new book, Cornel West tries to look unblinkingly at the power of what he calls black prophetic fire: Six African American leaders — Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, Jr., Ella Baker, Malcom X and Ida B. Wells, whom he believes have enlivened America, even as their messages have often blunted, ignored, or, almost worse, deodorized, as he puts it. West tells NPR's Scott Simon that there are leaders — and then there are prophets. "A leader is somebody who has to jump in the middle of the fray and be prudential, we hope, rather than opportunistic," he says.

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Fine Art
6:11 am
Sat November 1, 2014

'Ciao, Carpaccio!' Painter's Reputation No Longer Sliced Thin

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

News
6:11 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Jury Finds Tradition Is No Excuse For Brutal Hazing

Pam Champion (second from right) and Robert Champion Sr. (right), parents of Robert Champion Jr., listen as the guilty verdict against Dante Martin is read in an Orlando courtroom on Friday.
Red Huber AP

A jury has rejected a defense argument that beatings of Florida A&M University band members were a band tradition. The panel found a former member of marching band guilty of felony hazing and manslaughter in one such beating.

Dante Martin is now looking at a possible sentence of up to 22 years in prison for his role in the death of Robert Champion. Sentencing is scheduled for Jan. 9.

Called "The Example" by band colleagues, Champion was an accomplished clarinetist, drum major and leader of the "Marching 100."

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The Two-Way
6:11 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Boko Haram Says Kidnapped Girls Are Now 'Married'

People call for the Nigerian government to rescue girls taken from a secondary school in Chibok region, during a protest earlier this month. Boko Haram, the group that took the girls, says they have been "married off."
Olamikan Gbemiga AP

Originally published on Sat November 1, 2014 6:32 am

Nigerian extremist group Boko Haram says the more than 200 girls it kidnapped from a school in April are now married. The group made the claim as its leader denied stories that it has reached a cease fire deal.

"We have married them off. They are in their marital homes," Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau said of the girls, in a video that was obtained by Agence France-Presse.

From Lagos, NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports:

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Around the Nation
6:11 am
Sat November 1, 2014

At This Museum, Falling Back An Hour Takes The Whole Weekend

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Space
6:11 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Rocket Explosion Raises Questions About Private Space Ventures

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Africa
6:11 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Press Freedom Dwindles In Egypt

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
6:11 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Ray Rice Hearing, LaBron James Playing This Week In Sports

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
6:11 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Despite A Royals Loss, There's Still Joy In Kansas City

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Africa
6:11 am
Sat November 1, 2014

'Ebola Is Real': Group Works Beyond Government In Sierra Leone

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Code Switch
5:03 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Hollaback! Video Calls Out Catcallers, But Cuts Out White Men

Ten hours of walking in NYC as a woman.
Hollaback!

There's a video that's been circulating online since Tuesday, and it frames itself like this: a woman walks around New York City for 10 hours, with a camera secretly recording as she gets street-called 100 times by men.

The woman who does the walking is Shoshana Roberts. Most of the men who street-harass, call out and follow her are black and Latino. Noticeably absent from the video? White men.

It's something a lot of people noted.

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The Salt
4:12 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Election Night Eating: A Tasting Menu For What's At Stake

Join NPR on Tuesday night for a virtual election party. Host your own party and invite your friends.
NPR

This Tuesday, NPR is hosting a virtual election viewing party, and we want you to join us.

NPR's politics team has put together a nifty little app designed to let listeners at home follow the results of races around the country along with our hosts on their TVs, Google Chromecast, iPads or laptops. You'll tap into the same real-time results that our hosts and reporters see.

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Goats and Soda
3:43 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Ebola Design Challenge Says Yes To The Wedding Dress Designer

Man, that PPE is hot. And not in a good way. One challenge for the designers was to come up a way to give health workers more time in personal protective equipment without overheating.
Will Kirk Jhpiego/CBID

For the past 25 years, Jill Andrews has been making extravagant dresses for brides and whimsical costumes for actors. But this past weekend, the 47-year-old wedding gown designer from Baltimore used her sewing skills to create a different kind of garment: an anti-Ebola protection suit.

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All Tech Considered
3:29 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Tech Week: Tim Cook's Reveal, Net Neutrality And Big Data Dishes

Although Apple CEO Tim Cook's sexual orientation wasn't public, it has been something of an open secret in business and technology circles.
Michael Graae Getty Images

Tim Cook is known for revealing new Apple products but the company's CEO made news this week by publicly acknowledging that he's gay. As NPR's Laura Sydell reported, Cook's decision may have a larger impact overseas than in the U.S.

And for other tech news highlights this week:

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Your Money
3:21 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Five Reasons Why Your Financial Outlook Just Got Better

Look at your paycheck.

Chances are good you won't see much more there than you did in the summer of 2008 — just before the financial crisis hit. Average private-sector earnings are $24.53 an hour now, unchanged from 2008, after adjusting for inflation.

So most likely, you haven't felt yourself moving up for years.

Now, that may be changing.

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The Two-Way
6:57 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

U.S. Marine In Mexican Jail Is Now Free, Mexican Judge Orders

Jill Tahmooressi stands outside the Mexican Consulate in Miami, in May to protest the arrest of her son in Mexico. He was released by a federal judge in Mexico today.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 7:10 pm

A U.S. Marine held in a Mexican jail since March was ordered free by a Mexican judge on Friday.

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The Two-Way
4:58 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

On Eve Of Promotion, NYPD's Top Uniformed Official Resigns

On the eve of a promotion that would have made him the second in command of the New York Police Department, Chief Philip Banks III handed in his resignation.

On Twitter, Banks said:

The New York Times reports that the resignation comes as a surprise especially because of the timing. The paper adds:

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This Week's Must Read
4:34 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

A 19th Century Novel Explains Quantitative Easing

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:56 pm

Anthony Trollope was one of England's, and maybe the world's, greatest 19th century novelists. I say that even though I'm not especially a fan. Trollope's prose is determinedly, insistently flat and neutral. Reading him you sometimes get the impression that if he came upon a particularly brilliant phrase or image, he would take it out, on the basis that it distracted from the story.

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Parallels
4:21 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

With Mexican Students Missing, A Festive Holiday Turns Somber

Three large crosses lean against the burned out facade of Iguala's City Hall. Masked protesters angry about the disappearance of 43 students — attacked on orders of Iguala's mayor, according to Mexican federal authorities — burned the building last week.
Carrie Kahn NPR

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 6:30 pm

Mexican families are celebrating the Day of the Dead this weekend, a festive holiday, where relatives remember deceased loved ones with grand, floral memorials in their homes as well as at cemeteries.

But in the southern state of Guerrero, the mood is decidedly different. Authorities there are still searching for 43 students abducted last month by police working for drug traffickers and crooked politicians in the town of Iguala.

In front of Iguala's City Hall, Maria de Jesus Rodriguez, 68, slowly sweeps the patio.

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Shots - Health News
4:10 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

Payments Start For N.C. Eugenics Victims, But Many Won't Qualify

Debra Blackmon (left) was sterilized by court order in 1972, at age 14. With help from her niece, Latoya Adams (right), she's fighting to be included in the state's compensation program.
Eric Mennel WUNC

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:41 pm

Debra Blackmon was about to turn 14 in January 1972, when two social workers came to her home.

Court and medical documents offer some details about what happened that day. Blackmon was "severely retarded," they note, and had "psychic problems" that made her difficult to manage during menstruation.

Her parents were counseled during the visit, and it was deemed in Blackmon's best interest that she be sterilized.

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Music Interviews
4:08 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

'Anything That Connects': A Conversation With Taylor Swift

Taylor Swift's new album is titled 1989.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:41 pm

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Goats and Soda
3:51 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power Sees Signs Of Hope In West Africa

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power had her temperature taken as she arrived in Freetown, Sierra Leone.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:41 pm

Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, just returned from a four-day trip to all three of West Africa's Ebola-stricken countries. Speaking with Melissa Block of All Things Considered, she said she saw promising signs of recovery but had also gained a sense of just how much work must still be done.

In Liberia, Power was struck by the gratitude expressed to the United States for "rescuing these countries in their hour of greatest need."

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Goats and Soda
3:51 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

How Liberia Is Starting To Beat Ebola, With Fingers Crossed

Children play in the West Point neighborhood of Monrovia last week. West Point has been hit hard by Ebola. So local leaders formed their own Ebola task force, which goes door to door looking for cases.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:41 pm

If you want the inside scoop about what's happening with the Ebola outbreak, then just hang out at the Mamba Point Hotel in Monrovia.

It's packed with scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, international reporters and a bunch of guys and gals in camouflage from the U.S. Army.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

Former Band Member Found Guilty In FAMU Hazing Case

Dante Martin waits for jury selection on Monday, as he stood trial in Orange County, Fla.
George Skene AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 4:48 pm

A Florida jury found former Florida A&M University marching band member Dante Martin guilty of manslaughter for his role in the fatal hazing of drum major Robert Champion.

As NPR's Greg Allen reported from Orlando earlier this week, prosecutors said Martin was the ringleader of what they called a dark hazing tradition in which Champion was beaten to death. Martin's lawyer argued that the tradition of walking through a bus while getting beaten started way before Martin was in the band.

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Shots - Health News
1:46 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

A Field Of Medicine That Wants To Know Where You Live

A map of toxic waste sites can be combined with maps of waterways and cities to reveal potential health risks.
Bill Davenhall Esri

In 1854, an English doctor named John Snow pinpointed an outbreak of cholera in London to a single contaminated water pump.

A pioneer of modern epidemiology, Snow used information about where the sick people lived to deduce that they were drinking tainted water from that source.

And while using clues about peoples' locations is an important tool in public health, it's now set to make individual health care even more personal.

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Goats and Soda
1:31 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

Why Is North Korea Freaked Out About The Threat Of Ebola?

North Korean medical workers wore protective suits at Pyongyang's Sunan International Airport this week.
Wong Maye-E AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:25 pm

North Korea has a number of serious public health woes: malnutrition, tuberculosis and cardiovascular disease, just to name a few. Ebola isn't one of them. The disease hasn't hit anywhere in Asia, much less this isolated and rarely visited Northeast Asian nation.

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NPR Story
12:37 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

I Am A Teenage Witch

Youth Radio’s Akemi Weaver is a self-described "teen witch." (Screenshot from Youth Radio)

With Halloween upon us, images of witches abound. But for some, witching is a year-round thing. Youth Radio’s Akemi Weaver sent us this story to explain why.

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NPR Story
12:37 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

Ghost Stories From Around The World

The popobawa is a shape-shifting demon that stalks the Tanzanian island of Pemba. (Phoebe Boswell/NPR)

Are you afraid of ghosts, vampires and witches? What about Hanako-san, a little girl who waits to drag her victims to hell in the third stall of the third-floor bathroom of schools in Japan? There’s also La Llorona, a woman who drowned her children then herself and roams around, wailing in anguish.

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NPR Story
12:37 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

Defense Department Invests In Brain Implants For Depression, PTSD

Liss Murphy, who had surgery to implant Deep Brain Stimulation for depression in 2006 and got much better, on Cape Cod in summer, 2014, with husband Scott, son Owen and sheepdog Ned. (Courtesy)

More than 100,000 people have electrical stimulation devices implanted in their brains to treat Parkinson’s disease. The implants block the abnormal nerve signals that cause Parkinson’s symptoms like tremor and stiffness.

Now the Department of Defense is putting up $70 million to develop a new generation of brain implants to target depression and PTSD. These devices would detect and correct abnormal brain activity in real time.

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Music
12:32 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

'Merry Widow' Operetta: Stage Versus Screen

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 2:21 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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