NPR News

Shots - Health News
10:02 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Getting Hospice Care Shouldn't Have To Mean Giving Up

Patients who get the comforts of palliative care as well as disease treatment live longer, studies show, than those who only get treatment for the disease.
Annette Birkenfeld iStockphoto

It's a painful dilemma for seriously ill Medicare patients: In order to receive the extra support, counseling and care provided by the program's hospice benefit they have to agree to stop receiving curative treatment for their disease.

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All Tech Considered
9:54 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Solving The Scourge That Is Slow Hotel Wi-Fi

SpeedSpot is a free app that lets you test the speed of Wi-Fi networks in hotels and share the test results instantly.
Courtesy of SpeedSpot

You know how it feels. You're a moderately frequent business traveler and trying to get some work done from your hotel. But you're slowed — and sometimes stalled — by an intermittent Internet connection. Your hotel Wi-Fi has the download speeds of an early 1990s dial-up connection.

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The Two-Way
8:59 am
Tue July 29, 2014

NCAA Reaches $75 Million Settlement In Head-Injury Lawsuit

Penn State running back Evan Royster eludes a tackle by Eastern Illinois' Adrian Arrington during a 2009 NCAA college football game in State College, Pa. Arrington was one of the athletes who sued the NCAA over concussions.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 9:40 am

The NCAA has reached a settlement with former athletes that provides $75 million for medical monitoring and research into head injuries. The settlement also calls for a change in the way schools handle head trauma.

As USA Today explains, the NCAA currently requires that member schools only have a concussion management plan. The settlement would require schools to make changes to their policies and "institute return-to-play guidelines."

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Goats and Soda
7:55 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Time To 'Girl Up:' Teens Fight For The Right To School, Soccer

Watch out Congress: Girl Up activists came to the nation's capital in June to lobby for issues affecting girls in the developing world. From left, Alexandrea Leone (Ewing, N.J.), Grace Peters (Flemington, N.J.), Aklesiya Dejene (Chicago, Ill.), Isabella Gonzalez and Erika Hiple (Stockton, N.J.)
Ryan Kellman NPR

They are seven girls in their teens and early 20s, awake at the ungodly (for them) hour of 8:30 a.m. With sleepy smiles, the young women slip into a windowless conference room in a Washington, D.C. hotel to talk to a reporter, who's curious to find out: What's it like to be a global girl activist?

And they're the experts. They're supporters of the U.N. Foundation group called Girl Up, which has the manifesto of "uniting girls to change the world."

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The Two-Way
6:48 am
Tue July 29, 2014

White House Says Delayed Action On Climate Change Could Cost Billions

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 9:04 am

In a report issued Tuesday, the White House warned that the cost of inaction when it comes to climate change outweighs the cost of implementing more-stringent regulations on greenhouse gas emissions.

Here's how Time boils down the White House's argument:

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Shots - Health News
5:47 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Athletes Should Fear The Heat More Than The Heart Attack

Some marathons are warning runners when conditions increase the risk of heat stroke.
iStockphoto

When a runner's heart stops during a marathon, it gets a lot of press – even though it's actually a pretty rare event. A more common killer among runners, and a condition that needs more prevention efforts, is heat stroke, according to a study by Israeli researchers.

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The Two-Way
5:45 am
Tue July 29, 2014

China Puts Former Top Communist Party Official Under Investigation

Zhou Yongkang, who at the time was Chinese Communist Party Politburo Standing Committee member in charge of security, attends a plenary session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China in 2012.
Ng Han Guan AP

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 8:49 am

The central committee of China's Communist Party placed a former top-ranking official under investigation on Tuesday.

China's state-run news agency Xinhua says Zhou Yongkang is accused of "serious disciplinary violation."

Reporting from Beijing, NPR's Anthony Kuhn tells our Newscast unit that while there is no specificity to those charges from the party, this usually implies that criminal corruption charges will follow.

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Health
5:35 am
Tue July 29, 2014

A Compromise Deal On Overhauling The VA, But Will It Pass?

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
5:20 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Israel's Prime Minister Says Gaza War Could Be 'Prolonged'

In the morgue of Gaza's Shifa hospital, Palestinian relatives mourn following an explosion that reportedly killed at least 10 people Monday, nine of them said to be children.
Adel Hana AP

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 8:43 am

Despite calls from the United Nations for a cease-fire, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned his country to prepare for a "prolonged" war.

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Middle East
5:20 am
Tue July 29, 2014

For Two Years, He Smuggled Photos Of Torture Victims Out Of Syria

This is one of the some 55,000 images the former Syrian military police photographer known as Caesar smuggled out of the country between 2011 and 2013. The regime used numbers — written on white cards and sometimes directly on the skin — to identify the dead, which branch of the Syrian government had held them and when they died.
Courtesy Syrian Emergency Task Force

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 10:06 am

Warning: This report contains descriptions and an image that could disturb some readers.

The savage and protracted conflict in Syria has left more than 170,000 dead. Now, there are allegations of torture and killing of political prisoners opposed to the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

Those allegations appear to be supported by evidence: tens of thousands of photographs.

The man who says he took the pictures worked as a military police photographer for the Assad regime and defected last year.

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U.S.
5:00 am
Tue July 29, 2014

N.H. Promises To Let D.C. Residents Buy Booze There

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
4:11 am
Tue July 29, 2014

For Iraqis In Crisis, Dividing The Country Seems A Poor Solution

A volunteer at a Christian church in Qosh, Iraq, loads aid onto a handcart Monday for delivery to displaced Shiites who are sheltering there.
Alice Fordham NPR

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 5:35 am

The muscular farmer sits in the basement kindergarten of the church, perched on a tiny chair intended for a child. He and his family are spending the holiday here, after being forced to flee from extremists.

"Our village is more than 300 years old," Ahmed Ali says of Shreikhan, near Mosul, "and we never had any such problems."

For most Muslims around the world, Eid is a time for gifts, feasts and visiting relatives. But for him and others in a militant-controlled swath of northwest Iraq, it's a strange and unhappy holiday.

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Latin America
3:35 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Venezuelans Celebrate Chavez With A Focus On His Handwriting

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

History
2:56 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Ghost Cats And Musket Balls: Stories Told By Capitol Interns

Interns who host tours on Capitol Hill, stopping at sites like the small Senate rotunda, don't always have their facts straight.
The Architect of the Capitol

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 5:00 am

Every summer thousands of interns flood the offices of Capitol Hill. One of their primary duties is to give constituents tours of the famous buildings. They parade visitors from the rotunda to statuary hall, offering stories and anecdotes.

But while these intern tours provide a great deal of information, they are sometimes a little short on actual history.

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NPR Story
2:56 am
Tue July 29, 2014

On NASA's Birthday, Mars Rover Sets A Mileage Record

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 5:35 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
2:56 am
Tue July 29, 2014

What Ray Rice's 2-Game Suspension For Assault Says About The NFL

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 8:50 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
2:56 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Ruling Against D.C.'s Gun Law Sends Local Officials Scrambling

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 5:00 am

Copyright 2014 WAMU-FM. To see more, visit http://wamu.org.

Middle East
2:56 am
Tue July 29, 2014

U.S. Aid To Rebels In Syria: Too Little Too Late?

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 5:35 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
2:55 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Crews Are Containing Western Wildfires, But More Bad Weather's Ahead

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 5:35 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
9:00 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

U.S. Accuses Russia Of Violating Nuclear Treaty

The Obama administration says Russia has violated a 1987 nuclear pact by testing a ground-launched cruise missile.

An administration official called the matter "very serious" and says the U.S. is "prepared to discuss this in a senior-level bilateral dialogue immediately." The New York Times reports that President Obama notified Russian President Vladimir Putin of the finding in a letter Monday.

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Sports
6:55 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

LA Judge Rules Sale Of Clippers Can Move Ahead

A Los Angeles judge has issued a preliminary ruling against embattled LA Clippers owner Donald Sterling. The judge decided that Sterling's wife, Shelly, was within her rights to agree to an earlier $2 billion sale of the team. Dan Woike has been reporting on the story for the Los Angeles Register. He speaks with Audie Cornish about the ruling.

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The Two-Way
4:41 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Judge Rules Against Sterling, Allows LA Clippers Sale To Proceed

Shelly Sterling sits with her husband, Donald, during a 2010 Los Angeles Clippers game against the Detroit Pistons.
Mark Terrill AP

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 6:45 pm

A probate judge has ruled that Donald Sterling cannot block the sale of the Los Angeles Clippers.

Shelly Sterling, his estranged wife, had arranged in May to sell the NBA franchise to former Microsoft executive Steve Ballmer for a record $2 billion.

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The Salt
4:16 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Korean Steak Sandwich

This photo also featured in BuzzFeed's "21 Unbelievable Beverage Can Photobombs."
NPR

Ever since we landed in San Francisco and refused to leave, we've heard people talking about the Korean steak sandwich at Rhea's Deli and Market. People say things like "It's amazing" and "Get away from me, I'm trying to eat" and "Did you just lick a drop of sauce off of my shirt? I'm calling the police."

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Remembrances
3:31 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Margot Adler, A Venerable And Beloved NPR Voice, Passes At 68

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 1:50 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Netanyahu: Israel Is Prepared For 'Long Operation' In Gaza

Palestinian relatives cry when mourners carry out the body of Baraa Mogdadm, 6, one of nine people killed in an explosion at a park in the northern Gaza Strip on Monday.
Adel Hana AP

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 6:40 pm

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday dismissed international calls for an immediate cease-fire in the country's conflict with Hamas in Gaza.

"We need to be prepared for a long operation until our mission is accomplished," Netanyahu said in televised remarks.

He defined that mission the same way Israeli officials have since launching a ground offensive in Gaza: taking out the tunnels Hamas uses to infiltrate Israel.

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All Tech Considered
3:05 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

It's Boom Times For Pop-Up Shops As Mobile Shopping Clicks

Customers can get a tactile experience trying on glasses at Warby Parker's shop in New York City.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 6:51 am

Fast-rising mobile technology is making buying stuff with a tap of an app easier than ever, and shifting the way we shop. What were once permanent, brick-and-mortar stores, where shoppers look at items in a physical space, are now often pop-ups first — shops that last for a limited time only.

Pop-up shops are temporary retail spaces that spring up in unused premises. Leases can last as short as a single day, when brands use the spaces for a promotional event instead of testing out a market.

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Goats and Soda
2:40 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Taliban In Pakistan Derail World Polio Eradication

A health worker gives a child the polio vaccine in Bannu, Pakistan, June 25. More than a quarter-million children in Taliban-controlled areas are likely to miss their immunizations.
A. Majeed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 8:40 am

Last January Salma Jaffar was shot while she was going door to door in Karachi, giving children drops of the polio vaccine.

"Even when they took out the pistol, I couldn't understand why he was taking out the gun," Jaffar says of the two men who pulled up on a motorcycle and started shooting at the vaccination team.

"But when he opened fire, that is when I thought it was the end of the life," she says. "My first thought was that I won't be able to see my children again."

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NPR Ed
2:31 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Teacher Tenure Lawsuits Spread From California To New York

Campbell Brown of the Partnership for Educational Justice, with plaintiffs in their New York teacher tenure lawsuit.
Gwynne Hogan WNYC

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 5:40 pm

Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.?

That question is at the center of the heated debate about teacher tenure. In New York today, a group of parents and advocates, led by former CNN and NBC anchor Campbell Brown, filed a suit challenging state laws that govern when teachers can be given tenure and how they can be fired once they have it.

As WNYC reported, Brown announced the suit on the steps of City Hall:

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Law
2:27 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

In Colo., An Effort To Ease Court Confusion Over Same-Sex Marriage

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 5:40 pm

The Colorado attorney general has asked the state's Supreme Court to stop same-sex marriages. As Colorado Public Radio's Megan Verlee reports, he's trying to have the matter both ways — dropping his opposition to lawsuits against the state's gay marriage ban, while still pushing the courts to continue enforcing it.

Politics
2:25 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

After 5 Weeks Of Haggling, Congress Inks Bipartisan VA Bill

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 5:40 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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