NPR News

The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Is There Such A Thing As A 'Good Psychopath'?

kuzmafoto.com istockphoto.com

Oxymoronic, isn't it, the idea of a "good psychopath"?

But in their just published book, The Good Psychopath's Guide To Success, Andy McNab and Kevin Dutton argue that relying on some psychopathic traits can lead to a more successful life.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:59 am
Thu August 21, 2014

U.S. Won't Rule Out Attack In Syria To Hit Islamic State

American aircraft have carried out more strikes against the Islamic State, after the extremist group beheaded U.S. journalist James Foley. The attacks come despite threats to kill other hostages; a White House official says the U.S. could also targets areas in Syria, if warranted.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:53 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Bank Of America Reaches Record Settlement Over Mortgage Meltdown

The Countrywide Banking and Home Loans office in Glendale, Calif., in an April 2007 photo.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Bank of America Corp. has agreed to pay nearly $17 billion in a settlement with federal regulators over allegations that it misled investors into buying risky, mortgage-backed securities in the run-up to the 2008 financial meltdown.

The Department of Justice, which announced the $16.65 billion deal today, describes it as "the largest civil settlement with a single entity in history."

Read more
Extras: TED Radio Hour
8:46 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Playlist: Family Reunion

These stories will get you ready for your own family reunion this summer.
iStock

We made playlists of TED Radio Hour stories that will keep you curious about big ideas throughout the summer.

It's time for a TED Radio Hour family reunion. This playlist will remind you of the special connections a family shares — through both the good and hard times.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
8:45 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Hamas Senior Leaders Killed In Predawn Israeli Airstrike

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Code Switch
8:34 am
Thu August 21, 2014

An Officer Shot A Black Teen, And St. Louis Rioted — In 1962

News outlets in 1962 paired this image of injured police officers with a story about the aftermath of a riot in a St. Louis suburb.
Proquest Historical Newspapers Archive

Amid the flurry of coverage about Michael Brown's death and the reaction in Ferguson, Mo., journalists have been unpacking St. Louis' long, tense history of racial unrest. In some of these stories, the parallels between the events of years past and those of the past few weeks are striking.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:26 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Afghanistan Expels 'Times' Reporter Over Article About Potential Coup

One of the most heralded "success stories" of post-Taliban Afghanistan has been the growth of its independent media. Afghan and international news organizations in Afghanistan have largely enjoyed press freedoms rivaling those of many Western nations.

But today's expulsion of New York Times correspondent Matthew Rosenberg calls into question how much progress Afghanistan has made in terms of rule of law and press freedoms.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:11 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Night Of Calm In Ferguson Follows Days Of Unrest

A demonstrator protests the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., on Wednesday night. It was a night of relative calm after days of unrest.
Larry W. Smith EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 8:02 am

Following violent protests, Ferguson experienced a night of relative calm after a grand jury began investigating whether criminal charges should be brought against the white police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black teen and a visit to the St. Louis suburb by Attorney General Eric Holder.

NPR's Elise Hu, reporting from Ferguson, tweeted this morning:

As St. Louis Public Radio's Chris McDaniel writes:

Read more
The Two-Way
6:15 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Hamas Says Airstrike Killed 3 Senior Commanders

Palestinian emergency personnel dig through the rubble of a building destroyed by an Israeli military strike in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on Thursday. Hamas announced that three of its senior military commanders were killed in a predawn Israeli airstrike.
Said Khatib AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 7:01 am

An Israeli attack on a house has killed three military commanders in Gaza, Hamas says, including one of the group's most senior leaders. Thursday's strike follows an Israeli attack on the top Hamas military leader earlier this week.

From Gaza, NPR's Philip Reeves reports:

"The attack happened overnight and targeted a residential house in Rafah close to Gaza's border with Egypt.

Read more
NPR Ed
5:16 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Notebooks And Pencils And Pens, Cha-Ching!

On the left, supplies on the back-to-school list for third-graders in Arlington, Texas; on the right, the items fifth-graders need in Palmer, Alaska.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 7:12 am

Millions of families are heading to Target or Wal-Mart this month to make sure their kids have what they need for the first day of school. And, as many parents know, those glue sticks and gym clothes can really add up.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:06 am
Thu August 21, 2014

George Bush Challenges Bill Clinton To Ice Bucket Challenge

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 5:37 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
5:05 am
Thu August 21, 2014

'I Am Thrilled To Be Alive': American Ebola Patients Released From Hospital

Less than a month after being airlifted from Liberia, Dr. Kent Brantly will be released from the hospital where he's been treated for Ebola.
Joni Byker Courtesy of Samaritan's Purse

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 9:29 am

The two U.S. patients who were treated for Ebola have been discharged from Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, where they had been in an isolation ward since returning from Liberia early this month. They are the first patients treated for Ebola on American soil.

Dr. Kent Brantly and missionary Nancy Writebol have been released after "a rigorous course of treatment and thorough testing," Emory's Dr. Bruce Ribner said. He added that he is confident that their release from care "poses no public health threat."

Read more
Europe
4:55 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Oslo Police Arrest Intoxicated Segway Driver

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 5:37 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
3:07 am
Thu August 21, 2014

News Out Of Eastern Ukraine Battle Zone Is Hard To Confirm

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 4:37 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:07 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Other Hostages Are In Danger, White House Official Says.

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 4:48 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
3:07 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Female Pitcher Mo'Ne Davis Is A Hit At Little League World Series

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 4:36 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
1:42 am
Thu August 21, 2014

How Much Bigger Is The Ebola Outbreak Than Official Reports Show?

Workers with the aid group Doctors Without Borders prepare a new Ebola treatment center near Monrovia, Liberia, on Sunday. The facility has 120 beds, making it the largest Ebola isolation clinic in history.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 6:00 am

The latest numbers on the Ebola outbreak are grim: 2,473 people infected and 1,350 deaths.

That's the World Health Organization's official tally of confirmed, probable and suspect cases across Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. But the WHO has previously warned that its official figures may "vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak."

So how bad is it really?

Read more
Around the Nation
1:41 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Holder Seeks To Soothe Nerves During Visit To Ferguson

Attorney General Eric Holder participates in a closed-door meeting Wednesday with students at St. Louis Community College, Florissant Valley.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 5:47 am

The nation's top law enforcement officer traveled to Ferguson, Mo., on Wednesday to wrap his arms around a community in pain.

Attorney General Eric Holder hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown, the unarmed 18-year-old killed by a police officer earlier this month.

From the moment he walked into a soul food restaurant in Ferguson, the attorney general found friends and began getting reports on the community's mood after days of protests and sporadic violence.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:30 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

Macy's To Pay $650,000 In Settlement Over Alleged Racial Profiling

Customers at Macy's flagship store in New York City say they were discriminated against. Macy's agreed to a settlement.
Eric Thayer Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:51 pm

Macy's has agreed to a settle over complaints of racial profiling in its flagship New York City store. The department store will pay $650,000, according to a statement from the New York attorney general's office.

This deal follows a similar deal earlier this month with Barneys in New York.

Read more
National Security
6:30 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

U.S. Reveals Failed Special Forces Mission To Rescue Hostages

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 7:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
The Two-Way
5:10 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

U.S. Forces Tried To Rescue Foley, Other Hostages In Syria

President Obama leaves after making a statement Wednesday about the killing of journalist James Foley in Syria. The president said the U.S. would continue to confront Islamic State extremists despite the brutal murder.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 8:42 pm

The White House and Department of Defense released statements Wednesday night regarding an attempt earlier this summer to free hostages held by the Islamic State in Syria, including journalist James Foley, whose execution was announced Tuesday by the militants.

According to Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby, the U.S. had hoped to reclaim multiple hostages on the mission:

Read more
The Salt
3:58 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

No. 1 Most Expensive Coffee Comes From Elephant's No. 2

Elephants, unlike humans or civets, are herbivores. The fermentation happening in their gut as they break down cellulose helps remove the bitterness in the coffee beans.
Michael Sullivan NPR

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:30 pm

I s#&% you not: The world's most expensive coffee is now being produced in Thailand's Golden Triangle, a region better known for another high-priced, if illegal, export: opium.

Read more
Men In America
3:58 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

From A Father And Son, What It Means To Be A Military Man

Mark Pierce enlisted in the military in 1970, served in Vietnam and retired in 2010. Years later, his two sons also joined the armed forces.
Courtesy of Mark Pierce

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:35 pm

Military service once defined the lives of many men in the United States, particularly before the end of the draft in 1973. But today, many younger adults have no direct family ties to the military at all.

For the men in Mark and Jeremy Pierce's family, however, military service is a tradition dating back to the Civil War.

Read more
Law
3:58 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

Supreme Court Steps In To Put Hold On Va. Same-Sex Marriage Licences

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:30 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
3:22 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

SeaWorld Won't Appeal Ban On Trainers Performing With Orcas

Killer whales perform in Shamu Stadium at the SeaWorld Orlando theme park in Florida. SeaWorld says it will not appeal a citation that prohibits trainers from performing with the whales.
Phelan M. Ebenhack AP

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 5:23 am

SeaWorld has decided not to appeal a court ruling that prohibits its trainers from performing with killer whales, the Orlando Sentinel reports, citing a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The legal battle has lasted for years, beginning with the death of trainer Dawn Brancheau by an orca named Tilikum in 2010.

Read more
Health
3:20 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

The Momentum Of The Ice Bucket Challenge — And What It Means For ALS

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:30 pm

A recent fundraising challenge has gone viral on social media, calling attention to research into Lou Gehrig's disease. Audie Cornish talks with Forbes contributor Dan Diamond about the state of that research and where it goes from here after the fundraising success.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:04 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

Many Seek Justice In Ferguson, Mo., But Will Have To Wait Awhile

A memorial sits at the site of Michael Brown's death in Ferguson, Mo. Any investigation into his shooting by a police officer is likely to take months.
Larry W. Smith EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:30 pm

Both the county case and the federal investigation into the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown are expected to take time, as are basic answers about the circumstances that led to the black teenager's death Aug. 9.

About two dozen people showed up Wednesday in front of the St. Louis County Courthouse to demonstrate against County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch, who is preparing to present evidence in the case to a grand jury.

Read more
Remembrances
2:25 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

Remembering James Foley, A Journalist Who Made His Life In War Zones

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:30 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Parallels
2:17 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

In Syria, The U.S. Weighs A Range Of Unpalatable Options

Forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar Assad walk along a street in Mleiha, near the Damascus airport, during a tour organized by the Syrian government on Aug. 15.
Omar Sanadiki Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:35 pm

President Obama said Wednesday that the Islamic State is a cancer that threatens all governments in the Middle East. But that raises the question of what the U.S. could or should do.

Two former U.S. ambassadors to Syria, Robert Ford and Ryan Crocker, have advocated different approaches to a conflict where there are many different options. But none is appealing and there's no guarantee, or even a likelihood that U.S. action would ultimately determine the outcome.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:13 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

EPA Wades Into Water Fight With Farmers

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:30 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more

Pages