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Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

No information is private online — the phrase is hardly news to anybody who actively uses the Web for work, play and in between. Here's a CNN headline dating back to 2013 that minces no words: "Online privacy is dead."

That particular CNN article focused on the revelations about the scope of Web data available to the federal government. The ensuing pushback still ripples out as privacy advocates and many tech companies try to rein in government access to what Americans say and do online.

Who is a Jew? It's an age-old question that in Israel been determined by government-selected rabbis in the decades since the country was established in 1948.

But now a group of Orthodox rabbis is challenging the state's control on determining who is and isn't Jewish — a status that affects many important aspects of life in Israel.

The parents of 7-year-old Lihi Goldstein weren't thinking about their daughter's future wedding when they adopted her as a toddler. Israelis Amit and Regina Goldstein picked the blue-eyed girl from a crowd of children at an orphanage in Ukraine.

As the debate over gun ownership and gun control is renewed following the shooting deaths of nine people, including the gunman, at an Oregon community college earlier this month, there's a voice of an evangelical leader whose views might be different than some would expect.

For generations, John Harris's family has arranged lavish funerals for Cockney East Enders. But London is changing, and Harris has been quick to adapt.

He watches the latest procession go by: Two regal white horses with plumes of feathers fastened to their foreheads, trot through an East End borough, drawing a gleaming white Victorian carriage. Inside is a coffin bedecked with flowers. Eight black, custom-made Jaguar limos follow. The conductors wear three-piece suits with coattails, top hats and carry canes.

Want to follow what the presidential candidates are saying on Facebook, but not quite ready to turn over your news feed to pleas for money, stilted memes and behind-the-scenes pics from Iowa and New Hampshire?

Interested in hearing more from, say, Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton, but a little hesitant to declare to your Facebook friends that you "like" them?

There's a hack for that!

When you think of a nuclear meltdown, a lifeless wasteland likely comes to mind — a barren environment of strewn ashes and desolation. Yet nearly 30 years after the disaster at the nuclear reactor in Chernobyl, in the former Soviet Union, a very different reality has long since taken root.

In and around Chernobyl, wildlife now teems in a landscape long abandoned by humans. The area has been largely vacant of human life since 31 people died in the catastrophe and cleanup.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

After a few days of dry conditions, rain is once again in the forecast for South Carolina.

Torrential rains — in some parts, 20 inches in two days — have caused historic flooding in the state, which is still recovering. Parts of I-95, for example, are still closed. reports that the good news is that the new storms aren't forecast to drop torrential rains:

86 Killed In Turkey Twin Blasts At Peace Rally

6 hours ago

Eighty-six people were killed and another 186 were injured when two bombs exploded during a peace rally in central Ankara, Turkey, the country's Interior Minister, Selami Altinok, said during a press conference on Saturday.

One video from the scene showed demonstrators dancing and chanting when a blast goes off behind them. Pictures from the aftermath show scores of bodies strewn on city streets — many of them covered with the banners used in the protest.

The BBC's Mark Lowen tells our Newscast unit:

How They Spent Their Global Summer Vacation

6 hours ago

How did you spend your summer vacation?

If you're studying global affairs, international policy, intercultural studies or public health in the developing world, summer vacation often means fieldwork far from campus dorms (and familiar comforts).

We asked three graduate students in international studies programs to tell us how they spent their global summer vacations.

Who: Tatenda Yemeke, a native of Zimbabwe, working toward a master's degree in the Duke University Global Health program

If you've never tasted a pawpaw, now is the moment.

For just a few weeks every year in September and October, this native, mango-like fruit falls from trees, everywhere from Virginia to Kansas and many points westward. (We discovered them several years back along the banks of the Potomac River when we ran into some kayakers who were snacking on them.)

Since the diplomatic thaw with Cuba was first announced last December, the Obama administration has moved aggressively to ease restrictions on travel and trade. Looser rules were announced in January, and restrictions were eased further in September. But the Commerce and Treasury Departments can only go so far, unless Congress votes to lift the legal embargo.

The safety of the Metro in Washington will now be the responsibility of federal authorities.

Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx said in a letter late Friday that the metro safety will be placed under Federal Transit Administration due to recent accidents, like an incident in January when the metro tunnel filled with smoke, killing one person.

Here we go: some international soccer news that doesn't involve FIFA President Sepp Blatter.

Over the summer, the Texas Forensic Science Commission, which sets standards for physical evidence in state courts, came to an unsettling conclusion: There was something wrong with how state labs were analyzing DNA evidence.

It seemed the labs were using an outdated protocol for calculating the probability of DNA matches in "mixtures"; that is, crime scene samples that contain genetic material from several people. It may have affected thousands of cases going back to 1999.

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We're going to turn now to Thanassis Cambanis. He has just returned from Syria. He was reporting for Foreign Policy magazine, and we reached him in Beirut. And Thanassis Cambanis, welcome to the program.

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And we're going to hear now from one of the other leaders of Tunisia's National Dialogue Quartet. Her name is Wided Bouchamaoui. She's president of the Tunisian employers union, and she joins us from Tunis.

A Scottish nurse who recovered from Ebola in January has been medevaced from Glasgow to London in a Royal Air Force C-130 Hercules transport plane specially equipped for infection control.

Doctors say Pauline Cafferkey is suffering "an unusual late complication" from her previous Ebola infection. They note that "Pauline previously had the Ebola virus and this is therefore not a new infection."

Chaos ensued in the halls of Congress Thursday when Rep. Kevin McCarthy unexpectedly took himself out of the running to replace John Boehner as speaker of the House.

The reason for the pandemonium and, yes, even tears: No one knows where this goes from here.

Here are the four likely ways it gets resolved:

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After a career working on Mideast policy in several administrations and many years trying to mediate a Middle East peace, Dennis Ross has written a book about U.S.-Israeli relations, and he joins us now. Welcome to the program.

Mexico says that it will allow a team of international experts to revisit the case of 43 students who went missing last year.

NPR's Carrie Kahn reports that the United Nations' top human rights official recommended the move after a visit to the country.

Carrie filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, the U.N.'s High Commissioner on Human Rights, recommended the experts re-examine the site where the government says the bodies of the students were burned.

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For the first time in more than a decade, there’s a new treatment for patients diagnosed with one of the most common and deadly forms of brain cancer, known as glioblastoma or GBM. More than 12,000 Americans are diagnosed annually and until now, the median life expectancy after diagnosis was about 15 months.

Unlike traditional treatments, which include chemotherapy and radiation, this new treatment is non-invasive, doesn’t involve drugs and has few side effects. In fact, it looks a lot like an old-fashioned bathing cap hooked up to a backpack.

It sounds like a storyline out of Hollywood. A group of convicted inmates from the Eastern New York Correctional Facility, all of them participants in Bard College’s Prison Initiative, challenge Harvard University’s national championship-winning debate team. The inmates, who research without the Internet (because it’s not allowed), and wait weeks for the books they need to be cleared by security, win.

On Thursday, Volkswagen’s U.S. executive Michael Horn apologized before a congressional committee for the deception over software that evades emissions tests. The automaker is mired in an emissions cheating scandal that affects half a million cars in the U.S. and 11 million around the world.

There’s also news today that federal and California regulators are investigating a second computer program in Volkswagen diesel cars that also impacts emissions controls. Mike Regan of Bloomberg News joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. On Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you three items.

From Sam Sanders, a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk:

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