NPR News

The Two-Way
12:23 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

It Has Been 100 Years Since The Passenger Pigeon Became Extinct

Martha (right), an extinct passenger pigeon, at the Smithsonian's Natural history Museum in Washington. The passenger pigeon was once the world's most plentiful bird. Sept. 1 is the centenary of the bird's extinction.
Susan Walsh AP

The Cincinnati Zoo held a commemorative event; the London Zoo stopped the clock outside its bird house at noon. The object of their memorials: Martha, the last passenger pigeon, who died exactly a century ago at the Cincinnati Zoo.

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Code Switch
11:55 am
Mon September 1, 2014

To Model Manhood, Immigrant Dads Draw From Two Worlds

Lindolfo Carballo, an immigrant from El Salvador, meets his son Raynel outside school. In El Salvador, he says, families often "teach their boys one thing and their girls differently." He's trying to set a different example for his children.
Sarah Tilotta for NPR

Lindolfo Carballo knows there's a stereotype about men like him. He grew up in San Miguel, El Salvador, he says, in a male-dominant culture.

"I'm coming from a so-called 'machista' country, right? I mean, in this country, we all think that Latin America, in general, is where machismo is promoted," Carballo says.

In many families in Latin America, he adds, "parents — fathers and even mothers — teach their kids that men are to be served by their sisters."

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The Salt
11:51 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Cutting Back On Carbs, Not Fat, May Lead To More Weight Loss

There's new evidence reaffirming that eating foods with fat — everything from avocados and salmon to dairy fat — doesn't make us fat.
eyecrave LLC iStock

We've reported a lot this year about how there's a major rethinking of fat happening in the U.S.

Turns out, eating foods with fat — everything from avocados and nuts to dairy fat — doesn't make us fat.

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The Two-Way
11:10 am
Mon September 1, 2014

U.K. Seeks To Expand Terrorism Laws To Target British Fighters

British Prime Minister David Cameron told the House of Commons on Monday that he wants to give police the power to seize the passports of Islamist fighters bound for Iraq and Syria.
PA Photos /Landov

Prime Minister David Cameron says he wants to give U.K. police the power to seize the passports of Islamist fighters bound for Iraq and Syria.

"We will introduce specific and targeted legislation ... providing the police with a temporary power to seize a passport at the border during which time they will be able to investigate the individual concerned," Cameron told British Parliament today.

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The Two-Way
10:17 am
Mon September 1, 2014

More Clashes In Pakistan As Pressure On Government Grows

Police use tear gas to disperse protesters in Islamabad, Pakistan, on Monday.
Anjum Naveed AP

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 10:42 am

  • Hear The Guardian's John Boone on Morning Edition

Anti-government protesters in Pakistan briefly forced state TV off the air amid continuing clashes with police and renewed calls for Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's resignation.

Today's violence marks an escalation of demonstrations that had been mostly peaceful until Saturday night when protesters tried to storm Sharif's residence in Islamabad. At least three people reportedly died and 500 were injured amid clashes with police. Sharif has refused to step down.

Here's more from The Associated Press:

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The Two-Way
9:08 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Showboat Casino Is Latest In Atlantic City To Close Its Doors

A security guard blocks entrance to the closing Showboat Casino Hotel on Sunday in Atlantic City, N.J.
Mel Evans AP

The iconic Showboat casino in Atlantic City closed Sunday, the latest casualty of competition from gambling in other states.

Denise Miller of New Jersey says she was an employee on the first day in 1987 when the Mardi Gras-themed Showboat opened. Although she no longer works there, Miller came down to watch the closed sign hung on the boardwalk entrance.

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The Two-Way
7:38 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Ahead Of New Talks, Russian Minister Calls For Ukraine Cease-Fire

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov called Monday for a cease-fire in Ukraine, but demanded that Ukrainian troops leave positions from which they can "harm the civilian population." His comments come ahead of talks in Minsk, Belarus, involving Ukraine, Russia, Russia-backed separatists and international monitors.
Jia Yuchen Xinhua /Landov

Russian and Ukrainian officials are meeting today in Minsk, the capital of Belarus, with Russia-backed separatists and international monitors to discuss a proposed cease-fire to stop the fighting in Ukraine.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said the meeting's goals should be a cease-fire, but he demanded that Ukrainian troops leave positions from which they can "harm the civilian population."

Karoun Demirjian, who is reporting for NPR from Moscow, tells our Newscast unit:

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Economy
7:21 am
Mon September 1, 2014

It Might Sound Stupid, But Maybe It Isn't The Economy This Time

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on Aug. 26. in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

As they always do on Labor Day, political candidates will begin their campaign sprint to Election Day.

And for years, they have been running on simple advice: "It's the economy, stupid." But this time around the track, they may discover that many Americans want to hear about other issues as well.

Wait. What?

The economy is not the No. 1 issue?

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The Two-Way
6:51 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Judge Blocks Enforcement Of Louisiana's Abortion Law

Louisiana's new abortion law requires doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges to a nearby hospital. But a lawsuit challenged the law on the basis that the requirement was medically unnecessary and would result in the closure of the state's abortion clinics. A federal judge on Sunday temporarily blocked the measure.

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Shots - Health News
5:03 am
Mon September 1, 2014

More Evidence That ADHD Drugs Don't Curb Ultimate Height

A recent study found a brief delay in peak growth spurt among boys who took ADHD stimulants for at least three years, but no significant effect on their ultimate height.
iStockphoto

More and more kids are being diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and many are medicated — often with stimulant drugs like Ritalin or Adderall.

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Goats and Soda
5:03 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Volunteer Docs In Peru Take A Shopping Trip To Look For Patients

During the rainy season, a canoe is a handy vehicle to have in the waterlogged Peruvian neighborhood of Belen.
Courtesy of Dave Ohlson

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 11:44 am

After a couple days operating on people in Iquitos, Peru, we realize we're going to need some more patients.

We started with about 50 candidates, with hernias, tumors or unidentified pains. But most were excluded for a variety of reasons. Some were too old or weak, and we feared complications with their hearts. Some never returned with the x-rays (relatively affordable at government clinics) we would need before operating. Yet others had conditions we were not equipped to operate on, like tumors of the ovaries or uterus.

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Around the Nation
5:01 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Archaeologists Find Brewery Remains At Virginia Campus

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 5:55 am

Archaeologists digging up the grounds of the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg found the remnants of a campus brewery from the 1700s. It's already known that salves sold the school hops.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Sports
4:59 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Japanese Baseball Games Goes 50 Innings

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 5:15 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
4:40 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Why Did Crowd Flee Shanghai Subway After Foreigner Fainted?

A still from the surveillance camera footage shows the fainting man (top left and bottom right) lying alone in a subway car, as the few remaining occupants hurry away.
YouTube

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 10:45 am

One Saturday night this summer, a foreigner fainted and fell to the floor of a Shanghai subway car.

The passengers around him scattered. Not a single person tried to help.

When the train arrived at the next station, hundreds rushed out, nearly trampling each other.

The incident was captured on closed-circuit cameras. Tens of millions in China have now seen the images, which have rekindled a long-running debate among Chinese about their national character as well as trust and fear in modern society.

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NPR Story
3:42 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Pie Crust Scandal Hits Kentucky State Fair

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 5:55 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
2:58 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Mugs Aren't Just For Liquids, Make A Microwave Meal In Them

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 5:55 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
2:58 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Democratic Candidates May Find Obama A Liability

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 5:55 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
2:22 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Librarians Are A Luxury Chicago Public Schools Can't Afford

There aren't mass layoffs of librarians; they're just doing different jobs.
Robyn Mackenzie iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 12:06 pm

Two years ago, the Chicago Public Schools budgeted for 454 librarians. Last year, the budget called for 313 librarians, and now that number is down to 254.

With educators facing tough financial choices, having a full-time librarian is becoming something of a luxury in Chicago's more than 600 public schools.

It's not that there's a shortage of librarians in Chicago, and it's not mass layoffs — it's that the librarians are being reassigned.

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Shots - Health News
1:17 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Our Use Of Little Words Can, Uh, Reveal Hidden Interests

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 5:55 am

One Friday night, 30 men and 30 women gathered at a hotel restaurant in Washington, D.C. Their goal was love, or maybe sex, or maybe some combination of the two. They were there for speed dating.

The women sat at separate numbered tables while the men moved down the line, and for two solid hours they did a rotation, making small talk with people they did not know, one after another, in three-minute increments.

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It's All Politics
1:15 am
Mon September 1, 2014

A Political Family, Funding And Running On Both Sides Of The Aisle

The Ricketts family poses on the Chicago Cubs field in 2010, a year after they bought the team. From left, Laura Ricketts, Joe Ricketts, Marlene Ricketts, Todd Ricketts, Tom Ricketts and Pete Ricketts.
Nam Y. Huh AP

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 5:55 am

Rich families sustain American politics. Some produce candidates; others supply money. And in rare instances, a family will do both.

Meet Nebraska billionaire Joe Ricketts, founder of Ending Spending, an independent political organization that's among the top 10 spenders this election cycle. Three of his four children are politically active, including one who's running for governor.

A Billionaire With Political Punch

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Shots - Health News
1:14 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Pretending To Be A Medical Patient Pays Off For This Teen

Third-year medical student Allie Tetreault, left, talks with Gabrielle Nuki, 16, at Maine Medical Center in Portland, Maine. Gabrielle helps med students practice patient care.
Patti Wight/MPBN

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 5:55 am

Some of us are lucky enough to stumble into a job that we love. That was the case for Gabrielle Nuki. The 16-year-old had never heard of standardized patients until her advisor at school told her she should check it out.

"I was kind of shocked, and I was kind of like, 'Oh, is there actually something like this in the world?' "

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All Tech Considered
5:49 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

New GoPro Camera Harness Captures Dog's-Eye View

The GoPro Fetch can fit dogs as small as 15 pounds and as large as 120 pounds.
GoPro

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 6:41 pm

There are few things more popular on YouTube than a good pet video.

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All Songs Considered
5:49 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

The Good Listener: Parents Just Don't Understand?

DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince said it themselves: There's no need to argue.
Jive Records YouTube

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 5:46 am

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and alongside the gigantic bottle of Marmite we probably shouldn't have ordered on a late-night whim is a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives — and, this week, thoughts on getting your parents into your favorite music.

Erik writes via Facebook: "How do you get your parents to respect the music of today?"

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Around the Nation
5:48 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

For Their Own Good? New Curfew Sends Baltimore Kids Home Early

This hangout spot in East Baltimore — like the rest of the city's outdoor spaces — now comes with a police-enforced nighttime age limit. Children under 14 must be indoors by 9 p.m. each night, all year long. Kids age 14-16 can stay out a little later, until 10 p.m. on school nights and 11 p.m. on other nights.
Courtesy of Brian O'Doherty

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 12:43 pm

Young people in Baltimore are adjusting to life under a tougher curfew law. For 20 years, the city has required kids to be inside at night during the summer — but now, children younger than 14 must be in by 9 p.m. every night of the year.

It's one of the strictest curfews in the country, and you can see its impact at the gym at Fort Worthington Elementary School in East Baltimore. On a recent Tuesday evening, the sun has set — and Ulysses Cofield, or Coach U, is trying to keep an eye on the time.

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Television
4:45 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

X Prize Competition Could Make 'Tricorder' A Reality

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 5:17 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Iraq
4:45 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

Islamic State Suffers Rare Defeat In Amerli

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Movies
4:21 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

Bostonians: Success Of Whitey Bulger Movie Hangs On The Accent

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 4:45 pm

Boston has become the set for a new film about mobster Whitey Bulger. Locals believe getting the Boston accent right will make or break the movie.

(This piece originally aired on Morning Edition on Wed., Aug. 27)

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Music Interviews
4:21 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

Ty Segall Rocks Out — Acoustic-Style, And With More Polish

Ty Segall's latest album is Manipulator.
Denee Petracek Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 4:45 pm

If there's a Mozart of garage rock, it's Ty Segall. He's put out at least a dozen albums of face-melting, critic-adored low-fi rock, in the style of bands like The Troggs or The Stooges — not to mention his work with other bands and in other styles.

But his newest album, Manipulator, is different: more produced and polished. Segall came to NPR West to talk about the album with NPR's Arun Rath — and play a few songs for us.

Hear the conversation at the audio link.

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Iraq
3:40 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

PTSD Goes Largely Untreated In Iraq's Kurdish Region

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 4:45 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

National Security
3:40 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

Guantanamo Defense Lawyer Resigns, Says U.S. Case Is 'Stacked'

Jason Wright, seen here during his 15-month deployment to Iraq, served in the military for nine years before resigning last week.
Courtesy of Jason Wright

Originally published on Sun August 31, 2014 4:45 pm

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the self-proclaimed mastermind behind the Sept. 11 attacks, is facing a military commission at Guantanamo Bay and potentially the death penalty. He was captured in 2003 but his case still hasn't gone to trial.

Last week, Maj. Jason Wright — one of the lawyers defending Mohammed — resigned from the Army. He has accused the U.S. government of "abhorrent leadership" on human rights and due process guarantees and says it is crafting a "show trial."

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