NPR News

The Two-Way
6:48 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

House Approves Border Security Spending Bill, 223-189

In an attempt to weigh in on an immigration issue before Congress leaves Washington for a five-week break, the House has voted 223-189 to approve a $694 million emergency funding bill. The Republican-backed legislation is a response to the rising number of minors who have crossed the U.S. border unaccompanied and without going through the necessary legal steps.

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Goats and Soda
6:31 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Atlanta Doctors Gear Up To Treat Two Ebola Patients

Health workers prepare to bury a woman who died of the Ebola in Foya, Liberia, in July.
Ahmed Jallanzo EPA /LANDOV

A medical transport plane is en route to pick up two Americans sick with Ebola in Liberia, doctors in Atlanta said Friday.

This will be the first time doctors will treat somebody for Ebola outbreak in the U.S, they said.

Both people caught the virus while treating patients in the largest and deadliest Ebola in history. More than 700 people have died in West Africa from Ebola since March.

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The Two-Way
6:31 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Killing Of Four Latino Men Sparks Protests In Salinas, Calif.

After police in Salinas, Calif., shot and killed four Latino men since March, local authorities are rejecting demands for a federal investigation. Salinas Police Chief Kelly McMillin told NPR member station KQED that even though his department "has nothing to hide," a federal review would be premature since internal investigations of the shootings are still pending.

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The Salt
5:58 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Cheap Eats: Cookbook Shows How To Eat Well On A Food Stamp Budget

The Savory Summer Cobbler from the Cheap and Good cookbook features seasonal vegetables under a peppery biscuit crust.
Leanne Brown

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 8:06 pm

When Leanne Brown moved to New York from Canada to earn a master's in food studies at New York University, she couldn't help noticing that Americans on a tight budget were eating a lot of processed foods heavy in carbs.

"It really bothered me," she says. "The 47 million people on food stamps — and that's a big chunk of the population — don't have the same choices everyone else does."

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The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

GM Stays At The Top As U.S. Car Sales Surge In July

Sales of GM's cars slid by 3.8 percent from July 1013, but its light trucks and SUVs, like this Buick Enclave, more than made up for it, spiking 17.5 percent.
AP

Sales incentives helped U.S. auto sales rise in July, as major auto companies reported selling more than 120,000 more vehicles than the same month last year. GM retained its spot as the U.S. sales leader.

Sales of passenger cars rose by nearly 5 percent this July compared to last year, with sales of light trucks even higher, at 13.4 percent, according to data released Friday by research firm Autodata Corp.

GM sold 256,160 vehicles last month, beating Toyota's 215,802 and Ford's 211,467.

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Around the Nation
4:00 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

A Right Or A Privilege? Detroit Residents Split Over Water Shut-Offs

Demonstrators protest against the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department last month. Thousands of the city's customers are behind on their water payments.
Joshua Lott Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:02 pm

In Detroit, protests continue over the city's massive effort to shut off water to thousands of customers who aren't paying their bills. Activists call the move a violation of a basic human need, while city officials call it an economic reality.

Detroit's Water and Sewerage Department has been accruing a massive debt for decades — in part because officials say there was only a token attempt to collect past-due bills. By this year, about half of all water customers were behind on payments, owing a combined $90 million.

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The Two-Way
3:57 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Panel Says Plan To Cut Army Strength Goes Too Far

U.S. Army soldiers from 1st Platoon, G Troop, Task Force 1-35, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, move out on patrol in Iraq in 2008. A bipartisan panel says a Pentagon plan to cut Army strength go too far.
Sgt. Eric C. Hein AP

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 6:25 pm

A Pentagon plan to cut tens of thousands of soldiers from the U.S. Army's ranks in coming years goes too far given the growing global threats, including Russian aggression in Ukraine and unrest in Syria and Iraq, a bipartisan review panel says.

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The Two-Way
3:16 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

NYC Man's Chokehold Death Was A Homicide, Medical Examiner Says

The death of Eric Garner in police custody has sparked controversy in New York City — and it's now been ruled a homicide. On Thursday, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio (center) sat with Police Commissioner Bill Bratton (left) and the Rev. Al Sharpton during a discussion on police-community relations.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Eric Garner, the unarmed man who died two weeks ago after police placed him in a chokehold, was a victim of homicide, says New York City's Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. Garner's death was captured in a video that showed his confrontation with police on a Staten Island sidewalk.

The update on Garner's controversial death was announced Friday afternoon. Member station WNYC cites spokeswoman Julie Bolcer:

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Parallels
2:44 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

As Flow Of Migrants Into Mexico Grows, So Do Claims Of Abuse

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:00 pm

Like the United States, Mexico is dealing with a substantial increase of Central Americans migrants, including unaccompanied minors, crossing its borders. Earlier this month, Mexico's president announced plans to crack down on the illegal flow and strengthen security along the southern border with Guatemala.

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The Two-Way
2:39 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

WWI Diaries Of Poet Siegfried Sassoon Go Public For First Time

English poet and author Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967) wearing his army uniform. His experiences in the First World War resulted in his hatred of war, which he expressed in much of his work.
George C. Beresford Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 4:29 pm

Nearly two dozen diaries and notebooks of Siegfried Sassoon — among a handful of prominent soldier-poets whose artistic sensibilities were forged in the trenches of World War I — are being published online for the first time by the Cambridge University Library.

Sassoon, who served in the British Army, was a "gifted diarist [who] ... kept a journal for most of his life," the library says.

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Shots - Health News
2:24 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Breast-Feeding Is Still Difficult For Many Moms

Amber Medel weighs her 3-week-old baby, Elijah, as lactation consultant Carol Chamblin takes note. Medel had problems breast-feeding and Chamblin encouraged her to use a breast pump to get the milk flowing more easily.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 3:03 pm

When Elizabeth O'Connell was expecting her first child, she knew she wanted to breast-feed. And, she says, she sort of expected it to just happen, naturally.

That's not quite how it panned out. "I was experiencing very tremendous pain," she says.

At first she figured that was normal — but soon it became too much to handle. "I was devastated," she says. "The reality is nursing is a wonderful bonding experience, but when you're in pain, you aren't really thinking about that."

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Music Interviews
2:19 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Fresh Air Pays Tribute To James Brown, 'Godfather Of Funk'

Even though James Brown died in 2006 at age 73, he continues to be influential — a new biopic about him called Get On Up, premieres in theaters Friday.

In the '80s and '90s, Fresh Air recorded interviews with Brown's biographer and two musicians who played in his band. And in 2005, James Brown chatted with Terry Gross after the publication of his autobiography I Feel Good.

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Global Health
2:10 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

As Ebola Outbreak Worsens, West Africa Turns To Quarantines

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:00 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
2:01 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Fla. Judge Orders Lawmakers Back To Work On A New Congressional Map

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:00 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Economy
2:01 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

In July Jobs Numbers, Fodder For Cautious Optimism

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:00 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
2:01 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

In Gaza, A Glimmer Of Hope For Cease-Fire Is Snuffed Out Early

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
2:01 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

August Comes To The Hill, But House GOP Hasn't Started Recess Quite Yet

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Media
2:01 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

A Note Of Appreciation And Farewell For Margaret Low Smith

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 4:00 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
1:33 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

As Evangelical Clout Grows, Brazil May Face New Culture Wars

Evangelical Christians hold their hands out in prayer during the annual March for Jesus in downtown Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2013. Evangelicals play an increasingly large role in the nation's politics.
Victor R. Caivano AP

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:00 pm

Everaldo Dias Pereira — known to his flock as Pastor Everaldo — shakes the hands of potential voters at a shopping mall in a suburb of Sao Paulo in Brazil.

As he wishes them the peace of the Lord, a group of supporters shout out: "Enough of corruption, enough of people who don't know the word of God. We want Pastor Everaldo."

The pastor is running for president, and even though it is unlikely he will win — polls show he only has 3 percent of the vote — his socially conservative message resonates among many of the evangelical faithful.

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Shots - Health News
1:20 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

How U.S. Hospitals Keep Deadly Germs Like Ebola Virus Contained

A member of Doctors Without Borders dons protective gear in Conakry, Guinea. U.S. health care workers will use similar protective garb.
Cellou Binani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 1:59 pm

With plans underway to bring one or two Americans stricken with Ebola to the United States, people are wondering how that will happen without unleashing the deadly virus.

On Friday afternoon, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted a guide explaining how hospitals should manage Ebola patients. Hospital workers entering a patient's room should wear:

  • Gloves
  • Gown (fluid resistant or impermeable)
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Shots - Health News
10:17 am
Fri August 1, 2014

A Conservative Mayor Fights To Expand Medicaid In North Carolina

Residents fear that the economy of Belhaven, N.C., will collapse because its hospital closed. "How many people go retire somewhere where it doesn't even have a hospital?" asks the mayor.
Hyun Namkoong

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 1:28 pm

Last month, the only hospital in the sleepy town of Belhaven in eastern North Carolina closed its doors, prompting Belhaven Mayor Adam O'Neal to step out of party lines and call for an expansion of Medicaid in North Carolina. And then he took a lot more steps.

The Republican mayor and self-proclaimed conservative spent the last two weeks walking the 237 miles from eastern North Carolina to Washington, D.C., to raise awareness of the need to save his and other rural hospitals around the nation.

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The Two-Way
9:57 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Tropical Storm Bertha Takes Aim At The Caribbean

A satellite view of Tropical Storm Bertha.
National Hurricane Center

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 10:29 am

Tropical Storm Bertha is moving northwest, taking aim at Puerto Rico and expected to skirt the Dominican Republic's coast.

The National Hurricane Center has issued a tropical storm warning for Puerto Rico, St. Lucia, Dominica, Martinique, and the U.S. and British Virgin Islands, while the Dominican Republic has issued a tropical storm watch.

Luckily, forecasters with the Hurricane Center say upper level winds are not favorable for further strengthening, so maximum sustained winds should remain at about 50 mph.

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Goats and Soda
9:25 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Ebola Moving Faster Than Efforts To Control It, WHO Chief Says

Liberian men walk past an Ebola banner at the Monrovia City Hall in Liberia on Thursday.
Ahmed Jallanzo EPA /LANDOV

The head of the World Health Organization told leaders of the African countries affected by the Ebola outbreak that the deadly virus is "moving faster than our efforts to control it."

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The Protojournalist
9:21 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Slow Walkers May Be On Their Way To Dementia

Ralph Hoppe istockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 7:44 pm

Wait a minute. Weren't we told by Simon and Garfunkel: "Slow down, you move too fast. You've got to make the morning last"?

And by some other philosopher to "stop and smell the roses"?

Now we learn from new research that walking slow can be a bad thing — or at least reveal that you might be slouching toward Alzheimer's.

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The Two-Way
8:01 am
Fri August 1, 2014

During Transport, A Giraffe In South Africa Hits Head On Overpass, Dies

A pair of giraffes being transported in a crate Thursday near a low bridge on a freeway in Centurion, South Africa.
Thinus Botha Barcroft Media /Landov

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 10:14 am

As one South African journalist put it on Twitter, this tale is worthy of Aesop. It starts on a South African highway on Thursday. A truck is transporting two giraffes and as you might imagine, it creates a great buzz among drivers.

Pabi Moloi, a well-known TV and radio host, snaps a picture that portends trouble:

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All Tech Considered
7:48 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Simmering Online Debate Shows Emoji Is In The Eye Of The Beholder

What is this emoji?
NPR

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 4:22 pm

Images, GIFs and emojis — particularly the latter — have morphed into ways we express our feelings. They've quickly replaced words and sentences in our texts, tweets and emails.

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The Two-Way
7:24 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Cantor To Step Down This Month To Make Room For Successor

Rep. Eric Cantor of Virginia (left), pictured Tuesday, relinquished his House majority leader post on Thursday and said Friday that he would resign from Congress before the end of his term.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 4:02 pm

Fresh from relinquishing his House majority leader position in the wake of a stinging primary defeat, Rep. Eric Cantor now says he will give up his Virginia congressional seat months before his term expires, to make room for his replacement.

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The Two-Way
6:19 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Court In Uganda Throws Out Anti-Gay Law

Members of Uganda's gay community and gay rights activists react after the constitutional court overturned an anti-gay law.
Isaac Kasamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 10:03 am

A court in Uganda has thrown out a controversial law that mandated harsh punishments, including life in prison, for acts of homosexuality.

The Associated Press reports the decision was a technical one. The court ruled that there was no quorum when Parliament met to pass the law.

The news service adds that:

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Shots - Health News
6:03 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Caffeine Gives Athletes An Edge, But Don't Overdo It

Peter Kennaugh of SKY Procycling enjoys an espresso ahead of first stage of the Tour de France 2013, in Corsica.
Scott Mitchell teamsky.com via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 2:31 pm

After winning the Tour de France last Sunday, Vincenzo Nibali was tested for a bunch of performance-enhancing substances. But Nibali and his fellow competitors were welcome to have several cups of coffee (or cans of Red Bull), before their ride into Paris; caffeine is not on the World Anti-Doping Agency's banned list.

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Global Health
5:14 am
Fri August 1, 2014

CDC Chief On West African Ebola: 'We Know What To Do, But It's Not Easy'

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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