NPR News

The Two-Way
6:34 am
Tue July 28, 2015

NATO Says It Stands With Turkey In Fight Against ISIS

NATO country flags wave outside NATO headquarters in Brussels on Tuesday. For just the fifth time in its 66-year history, NATO ambassadors met in emergency session to gauge the threat the Islamic State extremist group poses to Turkey.
Geert Vanden Wijngaert AP

During a meeting with all 27 members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization on Tuesday, Turkey said it wanted to give the members a heads up that at some point it may need their help fighting against the so-called Islamic State.

Turkey called a rare Article 4 meeting of the allies after it began an air campaign against ISIS targets in Syria.

Read more
Shots - Health News
6:05 am
Tue July 28, 2015

Rehab Before Cancer Treatment Can Help Patients Bounce Back

Putting some work in ahead of cancer therapy can help speed up recovery afterward.
iStockphoto

Cancer patients who do rehabilitation before they begin treatment may recover more quickly from surgery, chemotherapy or radiation, some cancer specialists say. But insurance coverage for cancer prehabilitation, as it's called, can be spotty, especially if the aim is to prevent problems rather than treat existing ones.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:03 am
Tue July 28, 2015

Drawing A Line From The Chinese Stock Market To Your Wallet

A Chinese worker is seen at a construction site in Beijing. Economic changes in China and in other places have reduced demand and prices for commodities like the metal in the building's structure.
AP

A mega-economic story is playing out globally. It involves U.S. interest rates, the Chinese stock market and jobs in Minnesota, Arizona and North Dakota.

And your wallet, too.

No kidding – it's all related. To see how, let your mind wander back.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:12 am
Tue July 28, 2015

Postal Carrier Convicted Of Delivering Illegal Packages Of Pot

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 5:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
5:12 am
Tue July 28, 2015

Kentucky Distillery Uses Subwoofers To Age Brandy

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 5:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
5:02 am
Tue July 28, 2015

In Libya, Gadhafi's Son, Saif Al-Islam, Is Sentenced To Death In Absentia

Seif al-Islam is seen after his capture in 2011.
Ammar El-Darwish AP

A court in Tripoli has sentenced the son of Moammar Gadhafi to death in connection with killings during the 2011 uprising that ended Gadhafi's rule.

NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo that because the country is in such disarray, the sentence was handed down in absentia. She filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"A spokesman for Tripoli's self-declared government said Saif Al-Islam Gadhafi is one of nine former regime figures who were sentenced to death today. The rest, including Libya's former spy chief, are all in a prison in Tripoli.

Read more
Latin America
3:17 am
Tue July 28, 2015

Immigration Changes Create Refugee Crisis Along Dominican Republic-Haiti Border

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 5:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
3:13 am
Tue July 28, 2015

The Struggle To Breathe Life Back Into Empty Schools

Eliot Elementary in St. Louis, Mo., closed 10 years ago. The building remains empty.
Tim Lloyd/ St. Louis Public Radio

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 5:41 am

Virginia Savage lives in a part of north St. Louis, Mo., that's filled with vacant buildings, including Marshall Elementary. It has been closed for years now, and vines crawl into the building's smashed-out windows. The playground is littered with empty liquor bottles.

Savage went to school at Marshall as a young girl, and now she sees bigger problems beyond all those blemishes: "Drug dealers, drug users, eyesore. That's what I see."

In St. Louis, the student enrollment is one-fourth the size it was in the 1960s. That drop has led the district to close 30 or so schools.

Read more
The Salt
3:13 am
Tue July 28, 2015

Squeezed By Drought, California Farmers Switch To Less Thirsty Crops

Gary Broomell and his daughter, Debbie, pose behind a sign on their ranch in San Diego County. Their family has been growing citrus for generations, but lately, it's been hard staying in the black growing oranges, so they started a vineyard a few years ago.
Lesley McClurg Capital Public Radio

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 5:41 am

Water scarcity is driving California farmers to plant different crops. Growers are switching to more profitable, less-thirsty fruits, vegetables and nuts.

Nowhere is this truer than San Diego County, where water prices are some of the highest in the state.

Grapefruit trees shade the entrance to Triple B Ranches winery in northern San Diego County. The tasting room is a converted kitchen festooned with country knick knacks.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:13 am
Tue July 28, 2015

The Demise Of Old-Style Demolition Derby

Travis Moyer (center) drives the car that he built for the demolition derby in Kansas.
Frank Morris KCUR

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 5:41 am

Americans have been intentionally ramming cars into each other for sport for decades. And at this time of year, fans crowd into county fairs to see battered, souped-up cars bash each other to pieces.

This steel equivalent of blood sport draws a passionate following, and the drivers say it is deeply addicting.

"There's nothing better," says John Green, a demolition derby driver at a recent fair in Franklin County, Kan. "A lot of people say they would do it, but until you get in there and do it you never know the real feeling."

Read more
NPR Story
3:13 am
Tue July 28, 2015

Happy Birthday! Bugs Bunny Turns 75

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 5:12 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
3:00 am
Tue July 28, 2015

How Finns Make Sports Part Of Everyday Life

A Helsinki bomb shelter now serves as a shooting range for an archery club.
Rae Ellen Bichell for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 5:41 am

In Helsinki, sports facilities pop up all over the place, sometimes in some pretty odd nooks and crannies. One bomb shelter hosts an archery club, another an underground swimming pool and an ice hockey rink.

Though they hardly need it, there's a national plan in Finland to get people to sit less. It reminds them, in fact, that "Under the Constitution ... physical activity is a basic cultural right."

Read more
NPR Ed
2:57 am
Tue July 28, 2015

The 'Swim Whisperer' Teaches Kids To Be Water-Safe

Cooper is known as the Swim Whisperer. He's been teaching swimming full-time since 1995.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 6:48 am

If you looked at the children at the edge of Conrad Cooper's pool, you'd think you were watching an ad for something. Jell-O, maybe. Or a breakfast cereal kids like. They're that cute.

They're lined up on the steps in the shallow end, 10 little ones, ranging from age 2 to 5. The boys are in board trunks, many wearing rash-guard shirts like the weekend surfers they might become years from now. The girls wear bright one-piece suits and two-pieces that show their childish potbellies.

Read more
Business
1:33 am
Tue July 28, 2015

Tired Of The Big City? Consider Telecommuting From Montana

Greg Gianforte is distributing a brochure urging workers to "come home to Montana" and telework from there.
Marianne Wiest BetterMontanaJobs.com

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 6:59 am

Most local economic development schemes focus on creating jobs. Many offer incentives to startup companies, or try to lure existing companies to relocate.

But a campaign in Montana is turning that on its head. It's not trying to recruit companies but rather employees to come to the sparsely populated state and telecommute.

David Blackburn works for a financial services firm in Jersey City, N.J. He and his wife both have six-figure incomes, but real estate in the New York City area is so expensive that they have to live kind of far from their jobs.

Read more
Shots - Health News
5:53 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

California Health Insurance Exchange Keeps Rate Hikes Low — Again

At sign-up events like this one in Los Angeles in 2013, Covered California pledged "affordability" in health insurance as one of its main selling points.
Lucy Nicholson Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 6:04 pm

Monthly premiums for California's 1.3 million Covered California customers will rise a modest 4 percent, on average, officials with the agency said Monday. This increase is slightly less than last year's increase of 4.2 percent for consumers who bought policies on the state's health insurance marketplace.

Some consumers could even achieve a reduction in their premium, of an average of 4.5 percent, if they choose to shop around.

Read more
U.S.
4:06 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

With Religious Services, Immigrant Detainees Find 'Calmness'

Detainees at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Wash., gather for a Sikh prayer service.
Liz Jones KUOW

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 5:24 pm

When undocumented immigrants move through government-run detention centers in the U.S., it can take months before they find out if they'll be deported or allowed to stay in the country.

During this long wait, many become frustrated. And some turn to religion.

It's the job of the in-house chaplain to help connect detainees to religious services.

Keith Henderson, chaplain at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Wash., says, "I love it. I love the job," partly, he says, because he likes challenges.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:06 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

The 'Shock Of Confinement': The Grim Reality Of Suicide In Jail

A cell at New York's Rikers Island jail. About 1,000 people die in American jails every year, and about a third of those are suicides.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 4:49 am

The case of Sandra Bland has raised anger and suspicions nationwide since she was found dead in a jail cell in Hempstead, Texas, two weeks ago. Bland's family and supporters have rejected the medical examiner's finding of suicide, and the criminal district attorney for Waller County, Texas, says he's recruited two outside lawyers to assist in the investigation of her death. The local investigation has been reviewed by the FBI, and local prosecutors have pledged to bring the case to a grand jury next month.

Read more
It's All Politics
4:06 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

Could Joe Biden Get 'Ready For Biden'?

Vice President Joe Biden addresses a progressive youth summit in Washington, D.C., earlier this month.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 5:24 pm

Sitting vice presidents are usually seen as political heirs to the White House. But not this year.

With Hillary Clinton surging to the front of the Democratic field and the sudden rise of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden has largely been an afterthought.

Read more
Parallels
3:09 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

For Greece's Farmers, Growing Pressure To Be More Competitive

A worker picks clingstone peaches in Greece. Most of the country's farms are small and family owned. Production costs can be high, and Greek farmers have had trouble competing internationally.
Konstantinos Tsakalidis Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 5:41 am

Nick Lapatas spent 18 years living in Chicago. Then he returned home to Greece and bought a small farm. Today he and his son sell tomatoes in an open-air market in Athens. Despite the depressed economy and cheaper imports from Bulgaria and Albania, he's doing OK.

"I don't know how, but we are making some money," he says. "Now, what is going to happen a month from now, I don't know."

Read more
The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

Boston's 2024 Olympic Bid Is Over

Boston Mayor Martin Walsh speaks at a news conference last month. He and the USOC announced Monday that his city is no longer in the running to host the 2024 Olympics.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 6:19 am

It's official. The 2024 Olympic Games will not take place in Boston.

The Associated Press reports that the U.S. Olympic Committee "severed ties" with Boston on Monday. In a statement, Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh said, "I strongly believe that bringing the Olympic Games back to the United States would be good for our country and would have brought long-term benefits to Boston." He continued, "However, no benefit is so great that it is worth handing over the financial future of our City and our citizens were rightly hesitant to be supportive as a result."

Read more
The Salt
2:23 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

Cheap Eats: A Cookbook For Eating Well On A Food Stamp Budget

The Savory Summer Cobbler from the Cheap and Good cookbook features seasonal vegetables under a peppery biscuit crust.
Leanne Brown

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 6:29 am

Editor's note: A version of this story was first published Aug. 1, 2014.

When Leanne Brown moved to New York from Canada to earn a master's in food studies at New York University, she couldn't help noticing that Americans on a tight budget were eating a lot of processed foods heavy in carbs.

Read more
Goats and Soda
2:21 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

Fleeing To Haiti, They Put Their Faith In 'God And Government'

Children play among the tents of Parc Cardeau, one of the camps set up for in Haiti for migrants who've left the Dominican Republic after being stripped of their citizenship.
Peter Granitz for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 6:36 am

Marie Etyse left two of her children behind.

She's 29, a widow and has five kids. She's lived in a town in the Dominican Republic for the past nine years.

Like many Haitian migrants, she faced formal deportation after a law stripped them of their citizenship. Formal deportation could start as early as August 1. So many of these people have already fled to settlement camps in Haiti, which shares the island of Hispaniola with the DR.

Etyse had tried to get the required papers to stay in the country.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:41 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

Malaysia, Cuba Taken Off U.S. Human Trafficking Blacklist

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 3:13 am

The U.S. State Department has taken Malaysia and Cuba off its list of worst human trafficking offenders — which many human rights advocates and U.S. lawmakers say has more to do with politics than facts on the ground.

The department's latest annual Trafficking in Persons Report also upgraded Uzbekistan and Angola, while Belize, Belarus and South Sudan were among 18 nations downgraded this year. Russia, Iran, Eritrea and Algeria are some of the countries that have been on the blacklist for years.

Read more
NPR Story
12:47 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

In California Drought, Musicians Find Inspiration

Composer and professor Dr. Benjamin Boone created Waterless Music, a symphony about water and the lack of it in California. (Benjamin Boone)

Historical movements, wars and disasters around the globe have created signature sounds in music. Think freedom songs like “We Shall Overcome” or even Prince’s “Baltimore.” California is in its fourth year of drought and songs about a drying state are now emerging. From Here & Now’s contributing station Valley Public Radio, Ezra David Romero reports.

Read more
NPR Story
12:47 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

China Stocks See Biggest Drop Since 2007

An investor walks past a screen that shows share prices in a security firm in Hangzhou, east China's Zhejiang province on July 27, 2015. China's benchmark Shanghai stock index slumped 5.22 percent in afternoon trade on July 27, dragged lower by worries over the economy. AFP PHOTO CHINA OUT (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Stocks in China slid dramatically today and yesterday, with the Shanghai Composite Index ending down 8.5 percent. The drops come after huge gains in the markets earlier this summer, and amid fears that the government is going to stop taking certain actions to prop up the market. Jill Schlesinger of CBS News joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.

Read more
NPR Story
12:27 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

Is Raising The Minimum Wage To $15 A Good Idea?

McDonald's employees wait to take orders during a one-day hiring event at a McDonald's restaurant on April 19, 2011 in San Francisco, California. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 12:47 pm

The New York Wage Board today is expected to endorse a recommendation of a $15 per hour minimum wage for fast food workers. The state’s Labor Commissioner would then make a final decision. Seattle and Los Angeles have also moved towards raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour.

The minimum wage issue also promises to be part of the 2016 presidential campaign. On Sunday in Louisiana, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders called for the federal minimum wage to more than double.

Read more
NPR Story
12:27 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

Lifting The Boy Scouts' Ban On Gay Leaders

Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts prepare to lead marchers while waving flags at the 41st annual Pride Parade Sunday, June 28, 2015, in Seattle. (Elaine Thompson/AP)

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 6:46 am

The Boy Scouts of America is expected to announce today that it’s ending its ban on gay adult leaders. Church-sponsored troops, though, will still be allowed to “continue to choose adult leaders whose beliefs are consistent with their own,” according to a statement from the Scouts top executives.

Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd talks with Zach Wahls, an Eagle Scout and executive director of Scouts for Equality, about the significance of the change.

Read more
NPR Story
12:27 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

U.S. Wind Power On Course To Grow Big

The Wyoming Wind Energy Center, located in Uinta County, Wyoming has 80 1.8-megawatt Vestas turbines that are capable of generating enough electricity to power more than 43,000 homes. (warzauwynn/Flickr)

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 12:47 pm

The Department of Energy says wind power is poised to become one of the country’s largest sources of energy, generating 35 percent by 2050, up from 5 percent today.

And it’s not just the windiest states that will generate wind energy. Thanks to improvements in technology, every state now has the capacity to produce wind power.

Read more
NPR Story
12:26 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

Psychiatrist: Walking Stimulates The Brain 'In Many, Many Ways'

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 12:47 pm

According to psychiatry professor and author John Ratey, something as simple as a walk can improve both physical and mental well being. Ratey is co-author of the book “Go Wild: Free Your Mind from the Afflictions of Civilization.” Last year, he and Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson went for a walk near the Charles River in Boston. Today we revisit that conversation.

Read more

Pages