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Many people were shocked Friday when the Nobel Prize Committee awarded this year's Peace Prize to a pro-democracy group that helped Tunisia restore the dream of democracy that was born in the Arab Spring of 2011.

Tunisia's National Dialogue Quartet beat out Pope Francis and Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel — and 270 other candidates — to take the prize, which the Nobel Committee said had guaranteed "fundamental rights for the entire population, irrespective of gender, political conviction or religious belief."

Bill Cosby is expected give a videotaped deposition Friday in a lawsuit brought by a woman named Judy Huth, who says Cosby sexually assaulted her at the Playboy Mansion in 1974, when she was 15.

Lawyers for the 78-year-old entertainer went before a Los Angeles Superior Court judge on Wednesday asking for the case to be dismissed.

NPR's Mandalit del Barco filed this report:

The Missionaries of Charity founded by Mother Teresa says it has shut down its adoption services in India over religious objections to the country's new adoption rules. The Catholic sisters known for their blue and white habits and vow of free service to the poor say they have asked the government to de-register 13 orphanages.

Color images of Pluto released by NASA this year show the dwarf planet has a reddish brown surface. But an even newer photo shows that despite those colors, Pluto's atmosphere has a blue haze.

The discovery results from the New Horizons probe's fly-by of Pluto, which also captured data showing that the planet contains "numerous small, exposed regions of water ice," NASA says.

But first things first: Why would a planet that's been known to be reddish — even pink — have a blue sky?

Donald Trump found love Thursday night. He's been trying to get the word out that he loves Latinos and "Latinos love Trump," after widespread criticism of his stance on immigration.

At a campaign event Thursday in Las Vegas, Trump pulled onstage an immigrant from Colombia who was holding a copy of the People magazine as he was talking about it.

The woman jumped up onstage screaming with come-on-down-you-just-won-a-car excitement, "Mr. Trump!"

California Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law the most sweeping and stringent digital privacy law in the country on Thursday.

The American Civil Liberties Union called it a "landmark victory for digital privacy."

In essence, the law requires a warrant before any business turns over any of its clients' metadata or digital communications to the government.

Could A Mushroom Save The Honeybee?

5 hours ago

Honeybees need a healthy diet of pollen, nectar and water. But at a bee laboratory in eastern Washington state, Steve Sheppard fills their feeding tubes with murky brown liquid from the forest.

His bees are getting a healthy dose of mushroom juice.

Updated at 1:27 p.m. ET.

The United States has shelved a program that was intended to train moderate Syrian rebel fighters.

As we've reported, the $500 million program, which sought to train 5,400 fighters, has failed. At last count, the U.S. said it had been able to train only about 60 fighters.

About 2 a.m. on Oct. 3, Afghanistan time, medical staff and patients at the Medecins Sans Frontieres hospital in Kunduz heard the sounds of bombing, louder and closer than they'd heard before. By the time it was over, at least 12 medical workers and seven patients were dead and the hospital was in flames.

When a family member of mine was dying of cancer, her husband's boss told him to take all the time he needed to care for her. She was granted her wish of being at home when she left this earth, surrounded by those she loved most.

But a wide base of support is needed in order for a patient's wish to die at home to be made real — including, in some cases, whether someone can take time off work to be with their loved one in their final days, a study finds.

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Officials at Northern Arizona University say a suspect is in custody following a shooting at the campus of the Flagstaff school in the early hours of Friday morning. One person was killed; three other victims are in the hospital.

"The first call of shots fired came in at 1:20 a.m.," the school says via Facebook. It adds that the campus is not on lockdown.

All of the victims are students; some were shot multiple times, police say.

Update at 9:30 a.m. ET: Fraternity Says Its Members Were Involved

On Campus, Older Faculty Keep On Keepin' On

8 hours ago

Ken Nickerson could have retired from his job as a professor of biological sciences at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln 10 years ago, when he turned 62.

He could have retired five years ago, when the university offered faculty a year's salary to step down as part of a buyout to encourage more of them to leave.

He could have retired last year, when, in yet another buyout offer, administrators dangled the equivalent of 90 percent of one full year's salary in front of faculty who would finally agree to go.

But Nickerson stayed.

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National Dialogue Quartet, a group that helped preserve Tunisia's dreams of democracy in 2013, has won this year's Nobel Peace Prize, with the Nobel Prize Committee citing its "decisive contribution to the building of a pluralistic democracy in Tunisia."

"We are here to give hope to young people in Tunisia, that if we believe in our country, we can succeed," said Ouided Bouchamaoui, president of The Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts, a group that's part of the Quartet.

There was chaos on Capitol Hill on Thursday after front-runner Rep. Kevin McCarthy withdrew his name from the House speakership election. The closed-door House Republican meeting that was supposed to emerge with a speaker nominee spilled out into the hallway outside of the House Ways and Means Room in the Longworth Office Building. That's where reporters rushed lawmakers to find out exactly what had happened and where the conference might go from here.

Here's a peek into that hallway, in 60 seconds:

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2015 Nobel Peace Prize Announced

11 hours ago
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And in Oslo this morning came this announcement of one of the world's most prestigious awards.


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Wendy Sherman, the lead U.S. negotiator on the Iran nuclear talks, was the third-ranking official at the State Department until she left her position just last week.

One of the most meaningful gifts she received during her job at the State Department was a small thing, she said.

"It was a plastic Rubik's Cube that was given to me by my team that was emblematic of the Rubik's Cube we were trying to settle in the Iran nuclear negotiation," she tells NPR's Steve Inskeep.

After the mass shooting in Roseburg, Ore., last week, the national media gave a lot of attention to the fact that the local sheriff, John Hanlin, is an ardent supporter of gun rights. He'd written a letter to Vice President Joe Biden shortly after the Dec. 14, 2012, massacre of schoolchildren at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., saying gun control was not the answer. In the letter, Hanlin pledged not to enforce gun regulations he believed to be unconstitutional.

What wasn't widely reported was how common views like Hanlin's have become in law enforcement.

On Friday, in a federal courtroom in Tucson, Ariz., an agent of the U.S. Border Patrol for the first time will be arraigned on charges of murder for shooting and killing a Mexican national across the international border.

On Oct. 10, 2012, Agent Lonnie Ray Swartz, standing behind the border fence in Nogales, Ariz., shot 16-year-old Jose Antonio Elena Rodriguez, who was walking along a sidewalk in Nogales, Sonora. The agent claims he acted in self-defense against rock-throwers on the other side.

North Charleston, S.C., has reached a settlement with the family of an unarmed black man shot in the back and killed by a white police officer in April

An iconic luxury ocean liner, originally designed and built in 1952 to be the fastest ship on the seas and a symbol of America's postwar strength and pride, may soon be reduced to scraps of metal.

It probably won't surprise you that there's a growing polarization among Americans over how to deal with several immigration policy proposals.

Whether it's Donald Trump's idea for a massive border fence or the proposal to change the Constitution so that babies of unauthorized residents aren't automatically made citizens, Republicans and Democrats are hardening their views, according to a new national survey issued by the Washington, D.C.-based Pew Research Center.

The nail in the coffin of House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy's hopes of being the next speaker was opposition from the House Freedom Caucus. The rogue conservative group of about 30 members instead wants it to be Florida Rep. Daniel Webster.

But Webster might not even be coming back to the House in 2017, thanks to a redrawing of his congressional district that might make it unwinnable for the GOP.

How many emotions does a human experience? Dozens? Hundreds? Thousands? Maybe it depends on the language you speak?

"Man, in New Orleans we really are fortunate — we got some of the best things in the world," Chef Paul Prudhomme once said. "And one of those things is the muffuletta sandwich."

And one of the best things about New Orleans was Prudhomme himself.

He was known for introducing blackened redfish to the rest of us, for his cooking demos and for his line of magic spices. Needless to say, Prudhomme changed the way the world saw Louisiana cooking.

He has died at the age of 75.

Amazon is firing yet another shot at a competitor. This time it's a mega-artisanal shot, at Etsy — the popular craft site. The e-commerce giant on Thursday launched Handmade, a new marketplace for, well, handmade goods. This could be wonderful news for the artisan movement, or terrible news for Etsy, its staunchest supporter to date.

Valerie Nethery got a message out of the blue, from Amazon. "They emailed me directly. I'm not sure how they found me."

Something unusual is happening in America's wilderness — some animals and plants are moving away from their native habitats. The reason is a warming climate. It's getting too hot where they live.

Species that can't migrate may perish, so some biologists say we need to move them. But they admit that's a roll of the dice that violates a basic rule of conservation: If you want to keep the natural world "natural," you don't want to move plants and animals around willy-nilly.