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Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke, who is charged with murder in the shooting death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, has posted bond and been released from jail. Van Dyke was captured on dashcam video shooting the black teen 16 times. A Cook County judge set bail at $1.5 million and Van Dyke posted the required $150,000.

Providence is considered by many to be the finest restaurant in Los Angeles, a gourmet seafood eatery run by chef Michael Cimarusti. He's won several James Beard awards and two highly coveted Michelin stars. He is also a fisherman who is piloting a program to support local, small-scale fishermen.

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Chris Christie was giving thanks this weekend for one of the biggest prizes in Granite State politics: the endorsement of the New Hampshire Union Leader.

It's a notable get for the New Jersey governor, who has struggled to catch fire both nationally and in the early states. Christie had a good performance in this month's GOP debate despite dropping down to the undercard faceoff. He has gotten some momentum after that performance and has been playing up his national security experience in the aftermath of this month's deadly terrorist attacks in Paris.

Turkish authorities rounded up some 1,300 migrants on Monday whom they said were planning to sail to Greece. The crackdown came a day after Turkey reached an agreement with the leaders from the European Union to stem the flow of migrants.

Authorities have arrested a man in connection with the online threat that prompted the University of Chicago to cancel Monday classes at its main campus.

You hit the mall on #BlackFriday. You patronize local businesses on #SmallBizSaturday. You surf the web for deals on #CyberMonday. And if you're feeling a little guilty for how much cash you've dropped — along comes #GivingTuesday.

The International Monetary Fund says it will add the Chinese renminbi to its basket of reserve currencies, a significant milestone in China's long campaign to be recognized as a global economic power.

The decision means that the renminbi, also known as the yuan, will join the U.S. dollar, the Japanese yen, the Euro and the British pound as one of the currencies that the IMF uses to denominate its loans.

The jurors who will be chosen to hear the first case against a police officer charged in the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore will be anonymous, at least for now.

A judge has ruled that their identities can be shielded from the public. That practice is controversial, but not unheard of in high-profile cases.

As diplomats argue in Paris over a new global agreement to fight climate change, their work is driven by scientists' dire predictions of how unchecked warming will transform our planet decades and centuries from now.

But how can researchers be so sure of what will happen that far off?

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The United States and 19 other countries on Monday promised to work toward doubling their spending over five years to support "clean energy" research.

At the same time, 28 private investors, including Microsoft's Bill Gates, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Amazon's Jeff Bezos, pledged their own money to help build private businesses based on that public research.

Minnesota prosecutors have charged four men in connection with last week's shooting that injured five people at a protest over the killing of a black man by Minneapolis police.

Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman said during a news conference that the accused shooter, Allen Lawrence Scarsella, 23, was charged with five counts of second-degree assault with a dangerous weapon and one count of second-degree riot.

The number of people using bicycles to get to and from work has more than doubled since 2009. Take Washington D.C.’s Shaw neighborhood. Recent census data show one out of every 10 work trips originating in Shaw is on a bicycle, leading to calls for better bike lanes there.

Have you ever opened your closet and wondered why you bought that hideous sweater? Well, it turns out that maybe you weren’t responsible. Instead, the culprit may be science.

In a new article in The Atlantic, Eleanor Smith delves into the science behind many purchases, looking at 13 different scientific studies that add up to big bucks for retailers, particularly during the holiday season.

How The Holiday Shopping Season Is Changing

10 hours ago

Cyber Monday may be giving way to Cyber Week, and Black Friday is losing its importance, as more retailers offer deals through the month of November and more shopping is being done online. Jill Schlesinger of CBS News speaks with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about the shift in the holiday shopping season.

A court in Jerusalem has convicted two Israeli teenagers in the 2014 kidnapping and killing of a 16-year-old Palestinian boy, a crime that heightened tensions in the run-up to the Gaza war that summer.

The two teenagers, who were not named because they are juveniles, are expected to be sentenced in January.

As NPR's Emily Harris reports, a ruling on the accused ringleader, 31-year-old Yosef Haim Ben-David, has been delayed. She tells our Newscast unit:

As the United Nations summit on climate change got underway in Paris, protesters have gotten much attention.

A High Court judge in Belfast has ruled that Northern Ireland's abortion restrictions are incompatible with human rights.

Currently, abortion is permitted only when the life of the mother is under threat or her long-term health would be compromised by carrying the fetus to term. Monday's decision will put pressure on lawmakers to allow for the procedure in some other instances.

Judge Mark Horner said that banning the procedure in the case of rape, incest, and when the fetus has fatal abnormalities violates the European Convention on Human Rights.

The Obama administration has announced some changes to the visa waiver program, which allows travelers from some 38 countries including France, Belgium and other European countries, to come to the U.S. without a visa.

The White House announced several steps, including attempting better tracking of past travel, fines for airlines that don't verify passport data, assisting other countries on the screening of refugees and with border security.

Cecile Richards is walking a fine line: She paints the shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic as one of many attacks linked to "hateful rhetoric."

She doesn't specifically say that rhetoric motivated the attack Friday in Colorado Springs.

The president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America spoke with NPR on Monday morning about the attack that left three people dead: a mother of two children, an Iraq war veteran, a police officer.

Sophie Sartain had long worked in documentary filmmaking as a writer and editor. For her first film as a director, she turned the camera on her own family.

About seven months after Baltimore was rocked by a night of riots, the first police officer implicated in Freddie Gray's death is being put on trial.

As NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports, the case is being closely watched in the city, and residents believe that a lot is at stake.

Saying his country will not apologize for downing a Russian warplane, Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu struck a defiant note after meeting with his NATO allies.

The Associated Press reports that Davutoglu said his country was simply defending its airspace last week when two of its F-16s fired at a Russian Sukhoi SU-24.

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A generation ago, a high school diploma could open doors, especially to well-paying manufacturing jobs. But today, with technology radically reshaping the U.S. economy, many of those doors have closed. The high school diploma is as important as ever — but as a stepping stone to a higher degree, no longer as a destination.

Sixty years ago Tuesday, Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give her seat to a white passenger on a bus in Montgomery, Ala. A police officer made the arrest that set off the modern civil rights movement. Today police recruits in Alabama's capital city are being schooled in that history in a course designed to eliminate bias in policing.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit