NPR News

NPR History Dept.
9:25 am
Wed May 6, 2015

4 Hot-Button Kids' Books From The '50s

NPR

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 9:31 am

The 1950s was a hinge decade for noteworthy and nation-changing civil rights events all across the United States, including Brown vs. Board of Education in Kansas, the bus boycott in Alabama and the National Guard-protected integration of Central High School in Arkansas.

Meanwhile, there was also a revolution brewing in book stores and public libraries.

By design or by happenstance, a handful of children's picture books were focal points of the American movement toward integration in the Fifties.

Read more
It's All Politics
9:15 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Clinton Charms DREAMers On Immigration

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton spoke Tuesday with DREAMers including Juan Salazar (second from right) and Astrid Silva (left). "I will fight to stop partisan attacks on the executive actions that would put DREAMers — including many with us today — at risk of deportation," Clinton said.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 9:26 am

When it comes to energizing Latino voters, a group of young people who can't even vote plays an outsized role.

They are known as DREAMers — undocumented immigrants, brought to the country by their parents when they were kids. Now they're a political force.

Read more
Monkey See
9:01 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Amy Schumer Puts Her Own Looks On Trial

Front: Chris Gethard, Nick Di Paolo, Vincent Kartheiser. Back: Henry Zebrowski, Paul Giamatti.
Comedy Central

On the fantastic advice podcast Judge John Hodgman, one of the things Hodgman always says in getting litigants to relay their stories is that "specificity is the soul of narrative." Specificity is also the soul of parody, as we saw Tuesday night on Inside Amy Schumer, when Schumer and her crew devoted the entire episode to a detailed parody of the film 12 Angry Men

Read more
The Two-Way
8:46 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Baltimore Mayor Asks Feds To Investigate Police Department

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has asked the Justice Department to open up a civil rights investigation into the city's police department.

"Such an investigation is essential if we are to build on the foundation of reform," she said during a news conference.

Over the past couple of weeks, Baltimore has seen near-daily protests over the death of Freddie Gray, who suffered a fatal spine injury in police custody. Those protests boiled over into a night of riots.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:24 am
Wed May 6, 2015

U.S. Approves Ferry Service From Florida To Cuba

A taxi driver steers his classic American car along the Malecon at sunrise in Havana, Cuba.
Desmond Boylan AP

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 8:59 am

The United States issued licenses for ferry service between the United States and Cuba for the first time in five decades.

The South Florida Sun-Sentinel reports the Treasury Department issued at least four licenses to companies that want to establish ferry service to Cuba from Key West, Miami, Fort Lauderdale and perhaps even Tampa.

The paper reports:

Read more
The Two-Way
7:05 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Afghan Judge Sentences 4 Men To Death Over Mob Killing Of Woman

An Afghan judge sentenced four men to death over the mob killing of a woman who was falsely accused of burning a Koran.

As NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Kabul, the brutal death of Farkhunda was captured on video and prompted outcry over violence against women in the country.

Soraya says that eight other men were given lengthy prison sentences, but 18 others were found innocent and released.

Soraya spoke to a university student who carried Farkhunda's coffin. She said that the sentences make her believe that Afghanistan is making some progress.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:37 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Despite Being Stabbed, Pizza Deliverer Follows Through On Order

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
6:37 am
Wed May 6, 2015

World War II Vet Fights Robber Off With His Cane

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
5:07 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Germanwings Co-Pilot May Have Rehearsed Crash On Earlier Flight, Report Finds

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 9:07 am

The Germanwings co-pilot who crashed a passenger jet into the French Alps may have practiced the crash during an earlier flight.

According to a preliminary report issued by French investigators, Andreas Lubitz set the altitude dial to 100 feet several times during an outbound flight from Duesseldorf, Germany, to Barcelona on March 24.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:40 am
Wed May 6, 2015

California Regulators Adopt Unprecedented Water Restrictions

Mountain tops in Sierra Nevada, normally covered in snow this time of year, are seen nearly barren, near the Sequoia National Park during an aerial survey of the snowpack done by the California Department of Water Resources.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Saying state officials and residents simply haven't done enough to curb water use, California regulators unanimously approved unprecedented water restrictions on Tuesday.

The AP reports:

Read more
The Two-Way
4:04 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Chicago Set To Create Reparation Fund For Victims Of Police Torture

Stanley Wrice pauses in December 2013 as he speaks to the media with his lawyer, Heidi Linn Lambros (left), and his daughter, Gail Lewis, while leaving Pontiac Correctional Center in Pontiac, Ill. Wrice was released after serving more than 30 years. He claimed for decades that Chicago police detectives under the command of then-Lt. Jon Burge beat and coerced him into confessing to rape.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 7:15 am

The city of Chicago will take a big step today toward closing what Mayor Rahm Emanuel has called one of the darkest chapters in city history, as the city council is expected to approve a $5.5 million dollar reparations fund for victims of police torture.

The fund will compensate victims tortured by notorious former Chicago Police Lt. Jon Burge, and the detectives under his command, between the early 1970s and the early 1990s.

Read more
It's All Politics
3:03 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Huckabee Hopes Evangelical Voters Are Tying Yellow Ribbons For Him

When Mike Huckabee was governor of Arkansas, he tied a yellow ribbon around a bust of President Clinton at the Governor's Mansion. He said he would remove the ribbon when the federal government allows ARKids First to continue enrolling Medicaid-eligible applicants into the program.
Chris Johnson AP

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 6:37 am

When Mike Huckabee ran for president eight years ago, he was a new face on the national scene, a fresh upstart former governor of Arkansas and a one-time Baptist preacher, who quickly became a favorite among evangelical voters.

He had an ease on the campaign trail, an openness with the media, and a quirkiness that made him seem like a breath of fresh air.

Read more
The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:03 am
Wed May 6, 2015

6 Words: 'My Name Is Jamaal ... I'm White'

Jamaal Allan is a teacher in Des Moines, Iowa. His name has taken him on a lifelong odyssey of racial encounters.
Courtesy of Jamaal Allan

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 7:29 am

NPR continues a series of conversations from The Race Card Project, in which thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words.

People make a lot of assumptions based on a name alone.

Jamaal Allan, a high school teacher in Des Moines, Iowa, should know. To the surprise of many who have only seen his name, Allan is white. And that's taken him on a lifelong odyssey of racial encounters.

Read more
NPR Ed
3:03 am
Wed May 6, 2015

What Happens In Vegas Includes Crowded, Struggling Schools

Students eat lunch at Robert Forbuss Elementary School in Las Vegas. The school, designed for 780 students, enrolls 1,230.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 7:54 am

Las Vegas is back, baby. After getting slammed by the Great Recession, the city today is seeing rising home sales, solid job growth and a record number of visitors in 2014.stru

Read more
NPR Story
3:03 am
Wed May 6, 2015

How NASA's Space Race Helped To Integrate The South

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 6:37 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Wed May 6, 2015

In Kabul, Judge Sentences 4 To Death In Mob Killing Of Woman

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 4:37 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
4:57 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Pacquiao Sued For Failing To Disclose Injury Before 'Fight Of The Century'

Manny Pacquiao answers questions May 2 during a news conference following his welterweight title fight against Floyd Mayweather Jr. in Las Vegas. Pacquiao could face disciplinary action from Nevada boxing officials for failing to disclose a shoulder injury before the fight.
John Locher AP

Boxer Manny Pacquiao is being sued for his failure to disclose a shoulder injury during his "Fight of the Century" Saturday against Floyd Mayweather Jr.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:05 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Justice Dept. Criticizes Punishments For Agents Linked To Student's Detention

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 4:54 pm

Federal agents who forgot that a detained San Diego college student was in a jail cell and left him without food or water for more than four days were reprimanded and suspended for up to seven days, a punishment the Justice Department says is inadequate.

The case involves Daniel Chong's detention in 2012 by agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Read more
The Salt
3:57 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Tea Tuesdays: Butter Up That Tea, Tibetan-Style

A monk pours butter tea at the Tashilhunpo Monastery in Tibet.
Antoine Taveneaux via Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 4:38 pm

Butter (arguably) makes everything better – even tea. For Chime Dhorje, who works at Café Himalaya in New York City, the butter in the cup of tea before him ideally comes from a yak.

Yak butter tea is often referred to as the national drink of Dhorje's homeland, Tibet. Tibetans drink it all day long — up to 60 cups a day, it's said — though they're not the only ones who enjoy it: It's consumed in countries throughout the Himalayas.

Read more
It's All Politics
3:42 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Clinton 'War Room' Pushback And The 'Invent Your Own' Media Campaign

The Clinton campaign is embracing several new technologies and platforms to get its message out more directly to voters, a tactic her potential rivals are sure to employ, too.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 7:33 pm

The Hillary Clinton campaign went into overdrive Tuesday trying to minimize the damage from a new book that delves into Clinton foundation fundraising — and it's not using the typical channels to do so.

Read more
Religion
3:11 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Texas Shooting Sheds Light On Murkiness Between Free, Hate Speech

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 5:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
National Security
3:11 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Self-Declared Islamic State Claims Responsibility For Texas Shooting

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 5:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more
Economy
3:11 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

In Puerto Rico's Debt Crisis, There Are No Easy Solutions

Protesters gather April 30 outside Puerto Rico's Capitol building in San Juan to oppose Gov. Alejandro Garcia Padilla's budget proposal. The plan would raise taxes to help cover the state's massive debt.
Ricardo Arduengo AP

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 9:11 am

The island of Puerto Rico is many things: a tropical paradise, a U.S. territory and an economic mess. After years of deficits, state-owned institutions in Puerto Rico owe investors some $73 billion. That's four times the debt that forced Detroit into bankruptcy two years ago. The bill is now due.

Read more
U.S.
3:11 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

From Oakland To Baltimore, Lessons Learned From Cities Of Unrest

Public memorials, like the one at the scene where Freddie Gray was arrested, have become sites to commemorate other deaths of unarmed black men in similar police encounters across the country.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 6:12 am

The images from Baltimore of demonstrations, police in riot gear, looting and outbreaks of violence are familiar to some other cities after encounters with police ended in death for unarmed individuals — primarily black men.

Officials say what comes from those tragic encounters can be important lessons about policing and moving forward.

Read more
It's All Politics
2:17 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Obama Laces Up To Tout Asian Trade Deal At Nike

President Obama walks away from Marine One in his Nikes on Sunday. He heads to Nike Headquarters later this week.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 5:32 pm

President Obama says he wants consumers around the world buying more products stamped, "Made in the U.S.A."

That's one reason he's pushing a controversial Asian trade deal known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Obama has chosen a curious setting to make his pitch for the trade agreement this week. He'll be speaking Friday at the Beaverton, Ore., headquarters of the Nike Corporation.

Read more
Goats and Soda
2:17 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Virtual Volunteers Use Twitter And Facebook To Make Maps Of Nepal

Kathmandu Living Labs' earthquake site collects data about conditions and needs. Each blue dot represents the number of reports of help wanted — medical, food, water or shelter — near Kathmandu.
Kathmandu Living Labs

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 3:15 pm

The village of Melamchighyang needs 100 blankets.

The remote area of Hyolmo has many injuries, and only two nonprofit groups are providing "limited aid."

Two girls from Germany are missing in Langlang Valley.

People are stranded in Kyanjin Gompa.

Read more
Parallels
1:55 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

It's No Joke: Venezuela Cracks Down On Comedians

Venezuelan comedian Laureano Marquez performs a stand-up routine at a theater in Caracas last year. Marquez says the government is now cracking down on comedians who make jokes about the government and the country's economic problems.
Christian Veron Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 5:32 pm

Read more
The Two-Way
1:19 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

New French Rules Would Expand Surveillance Of Terrorism Suspects

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 2:01 pm

French lawmakers in the lower house of Parliament have voted overwhelmingly to approve a bill legalizing broad surveillance of terrorism suspects. The legislation, which must still be approved by the country's Senate, has been criticized as highly intrusive.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley tells our Newscast unit:

Read more
Parallels
1:13 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

London's Dominance Becomes A British Election Issue

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 5:32 pm

Nearly every country in the world has its major hub city, often the capital, with smaller cities feeding into it. The United Kingdom takes this structure to a whole new level. London is one of the richest cities in the world, and its population is the size of the next six British cities combined.

A global hub, London completely dominates the political, cultural and economic life of the U.K. to an extent rarely seen elsewhere. The U.K. has struggled with this imbalance for decades. This Thursday's election is highlighting the divide.

Read more
NPR Story
12:16 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

The End Of An Era: Looking Back On Letterman's Legacy

US President Barack Obama tapes an appearance on the "Late Show with David Letterman" in New York on May 4, 2015. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 1:23 pm

When David Letterman makes his last wisecrack as host of the “Late Show” on May 20th, he’ll be concluding an accomplished 33-year career that included more than 6,000 late-night broadcasts and almost 20,000 guest appearances.

His shows received 16 Emmy Awards awards and a staggering 112 Emmy Award nominations.

NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans talks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the host’s legacy and final weeks.

Read more

Pages