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One-hundred percent of votes are now in in New Hampshire and a couple things are now official:

1. Record for total turnout: Combing all voters — Democrats and Republicans — it was a record for a New Hampshire primary. In all, 538,094 people cast ballots. That beats the 2008 record of 527,349.

2. The Republican record was shattered: The final tally for GOP ballots cast was 284,120 votes. That beats out the 2012 Republican primary tally of 248,475.

Attention Harry Potter fans.

This is not a drill.

A new Harry Potter book will be published this summer.

The book, called Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Parts I & II picks up the story of Harry, Ron and Hermione where the epilogue left off, according to author J.K. Rowling's website Pottermore.

As you no doubt vividly remember, the series' final book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, closes on a scene that takes place 19 years after the Battle of Hogwarts and Voldemort's downfall.

There's really only one thing you absolutely need to hold a big-wave surf competition, and it's big waves.

In Flint, Mich., government officials allowed water from the Flint River to corrode the city's pipes, leaching lead and other toxins into the tap water. The damaged pipes continue to contaminate the water, and it could take months — or years — to repair and rebuild the water system.

It could take even longer to rebuild something more abstract: trust, between citizens and their government.

Roxanne Adair, a vendor at the local farmers market, says this goes deeper than just the water.

A few years ago, mysterious green bottles started washing up on the New England coast.

Each one contained a message from Ken Baker, a crane operator who lives in the Scituate, Mass. So far, Baker has thrown 223 of these bottles into the Atlantic Ocean.

The journey of Baker's bottles starts in his basement. They originally started in 2012 when his wife bought some bottles of San Pellegrino water.

"I used to clean 'em and wash 'em, and put 'em on my fence posts outside. I think my neighbors thought I was a raging alcoholic for a while," he says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The U.S. Department of Justice is suing the city of Ferguson, Mo., for unjust policing that violates the civil and constitutional rights of citizens, Attorney General Loretta Lynch announced Wednesday.

The lawsuit came one day after the Ferguson City Council voted to change a proposed consent decree to reform the police and courts. The council said the package, which had been negotiated between the DOJ and city officials, cost too much.

The National Book Foundation announced Wednesday that it will soon have a new leader at the helm. Lisa Lucas, the 36-year-old publisher of Guernica magazine, is set to become only the third executive director in the history of the foundation, which oversees the annual National Book Awards.

For years, Thai police have been trying to track down a master passport forger known only as "The Doctor."

All they had was a rough description: "a bald Iranian in his 40s," Thailand's The Nation reported.

The publication says '"The Doctor' had kept himself away from the public eye and contacted customers only via 4-5 agents," so his face and name remained a mystery.

In 1996, when Dominque Dawes became the first black woman to win an individual gymnastics medal at the Atlanta Summer Olympics, critics said her look wasn't quite right.

Aedes aegypti is the dog of the mosquito world. It acts as if it's man's best friend.

"It's been with us for a long time, probably for at least 5,000 years when we started keeping water next to our homes [ideal for laying eggs] and it's adapted to people," says Marten Edwards, an entomologist at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pa. "It loves us. It loves our cities. It loves our blood. It functions very well with us."

There's just one problem. This mosquito makes us sick.

Former Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca, who has been embroiled in a scandal involving reports of prisoner abuse and an alleged conspiracy to cover it up, has pleaded guilty to making false statements, the Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

The single count against him relates to statements made regarding a federal investigation into corruption and violence at LA County jails. Baca has confessed to lying multiple times when he said he did not know about the actions of those within his department. He was still serving as sheriff at the time.

Humans have long turned to the dog for its nose, especially in its ability to hunt, track missing people, and search for drugs.

But there is a new challenge: Bomb-detecting dogs have to now learn to find the increasingly common Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) that can be assembled from ingredients that are not dangerous by itself.

"So we're now asking dogs not just to find a needle in a haystack – now the problem is more like saying to the dog 'we need you to find any sharp object in the haystack,' " says Clive Wynne, a professor at Arizona State University.

In 1530, at Hampton Court Palace, King Henry VIII and his advisers penned a letter to Rome. In it, for the first time, Henry threatened to break with the Vatican and split off from the Catholic Church.

Four years later, in the 1534 Act of Supremacy, Henry carried through on that threat — and the Church of England was born.

Talking to some Hong Kong residents, you might think their territory was under siege. Their press is censoring itself. Its judiciary is required to be "patriotic." Even their mother tongue, Cantonese, is under assault, some believe, from Mandarin speakers to the north.

Now add academic freedom to that list, as pro-democracy and pro-Beijing camps have rushed to take sides in an ongoing battle over leadership of the territory's oldest institution of higher learning, the University of Hong Kong.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

The Justice Department says it is considering taking legal actions against the city of Ferguson, Missouri, after Ferguson city councilors unanimously voted last night to amend and potentially gut a negotiated agreement to reform the city’s police department and municipal court.

The agreement came after the 2014 killing of unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brown by a white police officer.

It’s been a year since the murder of three Muslim-American students in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Since then, their families have been working to reshape the narrative around Muslims in America. Jorge Valencia from the Here & Now contributor network WUNC reports.

Next up: Nevada. Democrats hold their caucuses – the first in the West – on Saturday Feb. 20. Republicans will vote in a caucus of their own Feb. 23, a few days after South Carolina.

Nevada is a large state with a diverse population, which will present new challenges to candidates in both parties. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Joe Schoenmann from KNPR about the new challenges facing the candidates.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has suspended his campaign for president.

"And while running for president I tried to reinforce what I have always believed — that speaking your mind matters, that experience matters, that competence matters and that it will always matter in leading our nation," said Christie in a post on Facebook.

The decision comes after a sixth-place finish in New Hampshire, where Christie had banked so much of his political capital.

This post was updated at 4:50 p.m. ET to reflect revised delegate counts

Bernie Sanders delivered the second-biggest rout in New Hampshire Democratic primary history last night, besting Hillary Clinton by 22 percentage points.

Carly Fiorina is exiting the Republican presidential race after a seventh-place showing in last night's New Hampshire primary.

"While I suspend my candidacy today, I will continue to travel this country and fight for those Americans who refuse to settle for the way things are and a status quo that no longer works for them," said Fiorina in a statement.

There's been a male tilt to biomedical research for a long time.

The National Institutes of Health is trying to change that and is looking to bring gender balance all the way down to the earliest stages of research. As a condition of NIH funding, researchers will now have to include female and male animals in their biomedical studies.

As late as the 1990s, researchers worried that testing drugs in women who could be pregnant or become pregnant might lead to birth defects, so experimental drugs were mainly tested in men. Research in animals followed the same pattern.

It was a big night for presidential candidates Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders, who walked away the winners in the New Hampshire primary.

Sanders led Hillary Clinton by more than 20 points in what many considered a must-win for the Vermont senator. On the Republican side, Ohio Governor John Kasich came in second, followed by Iowa’s winner Ted Cruz and former Florida Governor Jeb Bush.

The Granite State made clear choices in last night’s presidential primary, as both winners ended up with 20-point victories.

Republican Donald Trump took 35 percent of all the GOP votes cast and Democrat Bernie Sanders nabbed 60 percent of his party’s votes. Both candidates bill themselves as anti-establishment candidates for their respective parties.

While some contenders are considering how long to stay in the race, others are looking ahead to South Carolina and Nevada.

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Bernie Sanders are celebrating victories in the New Hampshire primary.

Here & Now’s political strategists Angela Rye and Paris Dennard join hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson to analyze the results, including what they mean for the second-place finishers, Hillary Clinton and John Kasich.

Clinton pulled in 38 percent, compared to Sanders’ 60 percent, and Kasich won 16 percent, compared to Trump’s 35 percent.

Remember the story scooting around the Internet earlier this week about a man in India who was reportedly killed by a meteorite? If you need a refresher, we wrote a post about it, creatively titled, "Did A Meteorite Kill A Bus Driver In India?"

Well, it turns out the answer is probably not.

From the restorative justice practices in Rwanda to the supermax prisons in Brazil, author and educator Baz Dreisinger offers a glimpse of prison systems abroad through the prism of the mass incarceration system in the U.S.

Dreisinger visited prisons in nine countries and found that while some modeled their prisons on America’s “doing time for the crime” punishment system, others aimed to find healing and reconciliation for both victims and offenders.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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