NPR News

All Tech Considered
7:28 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Some Google Street View Cars Now Track Pollution Levels

A Google Street View car equipped with Aclima mobile sensors that can track air pollution in real time.
Carlo Acenas Aclima

For years, Google has had eyes in neighborhoods across the world: Google Street View cars armed with cameras, lasers, and GPS devices to filter "360-degree panoramic views" and "locations on all seven continents" to Google Maps.

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The Two-Way
6:18 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Debris In The Indian Ocean May Have Come From Vanished Airliner

A piece of a wing, apparently from a Boeing 777, has been found on Reunion, an island the Indian Ocean. It's not clear yet whether the debris from the Malaysia Airlines jet that disappeared from radar during a flight last year.
YANNICK PITOU AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 10:36 pm

Authorities on the French island of Réunion in the Indian Ocean have found debris that may be from a missing Malaysia Airlines jet.

A source familiar with the investigation tells NPR's Geoff Brumfiel that the debris appears to have come from a large passenger aircraft, but it remains unclear whether it's from Malaysia Airlines flight 370, which vanished from radar on March 8, 2014.

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The Two-Way
5:40 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Michel Platini Is Running For President Of Scandal-Plagued FIFA

Michel Platini of Fance announced his campaign for FIFA president and is considered a strong candidate.
Shaun Botterill Getty

A new candidate has tossed his name in the hat for FIFA President.

France's Michel Platini is currently the president of the European soccer's governing body, UEFA, and a FIFA vice president. He wrote that he wanted "to give FIFA back the dignity and the position it deserves," in a UEFA press release.

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The Two-Way
3:52 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Birkin Bag Is Fine, But Namesake Actress Wants 'Birkin Croco' Rebranded

The Birkin Croco is made of dyed crocodile skin.
Sam Yeh AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 3:56 pm

A lot of people who want a Birkin bag — a handbag popular among celebrities that can cost more than $100,000 — will get on multiple-year waiting lists to get one. But its namesake wants nothing to do with one version of it.

Specifically, Jane Birkin no longer wants to be affiliated with the popular crocodile-skin version. Her request comes after PETA published a graphic video on how crocodiles are allegedly treated before being killed.

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Your Money
3:31 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

From The Silents To Millennials, Debt Burdens Span The Generations

Alyson Hurt and Paige Pfleger NPR

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 5:56 pm

For most of us, debt is a big part of life. According to a new study by Pew Charitable Trusts, 80 percent of Americans have some form of debt — from student loans to credit card balances.

There are many among the so-called silent generation, those born before World War II, who are still paying off mortgages and credit cards.

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The Salt
3:15 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

The Golden Age Of Cocktails: When Americans Learned To Love Mixed Drinks

An illustration from The Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain, published 1897. Between the 1860s and 1920, when Prohibition went into effect, American bartending came into its own.
via Flickr

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 5:56 pm

Summertime is the perfect time to indulge in a refreshing cocktail on a balmy night. But before you reach for that minty mojito or sweet sangria, consider stepping out of your modern-day comfort zone and going back to the drinks of 100 years ago.

"Some of the best cocktails that we think about today — the martini, the daiquiri, the Manhattan — those all came out between the 1860s and Prohibition," says Derek Brown, an award-winning mixologist who has studied the history of alcohol in America.

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The Salt
3:12 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Europe's Taste For Caviar Is Putting Pressure On A Great Lakes Fish

Lake herring roe at the Dockside Fish Market in Grand Marais, Minn. Some workers at the market call it "Lake Superior Gold."
Derek Montgomery for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 5:56 pm

Lake Superior is the largest freshwater lake in the world, by surface area, and it has something the other Great Lakes do not: stable populations of mostly native fish species.

But scientists say a key fish in Superior's food web is now in trouble because of mild winters and an appetite for caviar in Europe.

There wasn't much demand for lake herring 10 years ago. It used to be fed to mink and used as fertilizer, according to Craig Hoopman, a commercial fisherman in Wisconsin who fishes around Lake Superior's Apostle Islands.

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Code Switch
3:12 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Once Outlaws, Young Lords Find A Museum Home For Radical Roots

Johanna Fernández, co-curator of a new exhibition about the Young Lords, points to pages of the group's newspaper on display at the Bronx Museum of the Arts.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 5:56 pm

They were under watch by the FBI and the New York Police Department. And by the early 1970s, the Young Lords emerged as one of the country's most prominent radical groups led by Latino activists.

Inspired by the Black Panthers, a band of young Puerto Ricans wanted to form a Latino counterpart to the black nationalist group. In fact, one of the founding Young Lords in New York City almost started a group called the "Brown Tigers."

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Environment
3:12 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

California's Drought Spurs Unexpected Effect: Eco-Friendly Development

A town in California's Central Valley plans to transform farmland into an eco-friendly residential community. An artist's rendering shows plans for Kings River Village in Reedley, Calif.
Courtesy of the City of Reedley

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 5:56 pm

The drought in California has gone on so long, and is so severe, that it's beginning to change the way people are designing residential communities — in unexpected ways, and unexpected places.

Planning is under way, for instance, for one of the first eco-friendly communities in California's predominantly agricultural Central Valley.

The site is in the town of Reedley, 30 miles southeast of Fresno.

There were a number of factors that distinguished Reedley, says Curt Johansen, the San Francisco developer who's spearheading the project.

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NPR Story
3:12 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Obama Administration Officials Take The 'Malign' Line On Iran

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 5:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
2:53 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

One Point Of View On How Lions Can Earn Money For Africa

Tourists on safari watch three young lions in Kenya's Masai Mara National Reserve.
Beverly Joubert National Geographic/Getty Images

A beloved lion in Zimbabwe — Cecil was his name — was wounded with a crossbow, then later shot dead. The animal had reportedly been lured from Hwange National Park, a protected area.

The dentist who killed the lion said he believes it was a legal hunt, for which he reportedly paid $50,000.

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Music Reviews
2:14 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Ashley Monroe's 'Blade' Blends Country Sentiment And Delicate Phrasings

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Shots - Health News
2:05 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Doctors Devise A Better Way To Diagnose Shaken Baby Syndrome

Frustration with a crying baby can lead some parents and caregivers to shake a baby.
iStockphoto

To tell if a baby has been injured or killed by being shaken, the courts use three hallmark symptoms: Bleeding and swelling in the brain and retinal bleeding in the eyes. Along with other evidence, those standards are used to convict caregivers of abusive head trauma, both intentional and unintentional, that can result in blindness, seizures, severe brain damage or death.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Supply Storehouses Keep Wildland Firefighters Supplied, Fed

Assistant manager Nicole Hallisey, right, and BLM fire spokesperson Jessica Gardetto in the Great Basin fire support cache at the edge of Boise's airport. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)

When wildfires break out and hundreds of responding firefighters need to be equipped and fed, their bosses order from a special warehouse.

There are 16 regional wildfire supply storehouses operated by the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and partner states.

Tom Banse of Here & Now contributor Northwest News Network got a tour of what you might call the Amazon.com for wildfire fighting in Boise, Idaho.

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Animals
12:05 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

A Hollywood Animal Trainer's Secrets For Getting Dogs To Act On Cue

White God is about a dog who is separated from his owner (Zsófia Psotta) when her father forces her to give him up. Teresa Ann Miller worked as a trainer for the Hungarian film.
Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 1:04 pm

Animal trainer Teresa Ann Miller is used to working with furry performers, but she says the Hungarian film White God was especially challenging. "This wasn't necessarily a film with an animal in it," Miller tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "It was a dog leading the film and telling the story."

Directed by Kornél Mundruczó, White God tells the story of a mixed-breed dog, Hagen, who is abandoned alongside a highway and who then bands together with other discarded dogs to get revenge against the people who have mistreated them.

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NPR Story
11:52 am
Wed July 29, 2015

Garden-Inspired Cooking With Kathy Gunst

Kathy Gunst picks peas from her garden in Maine. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst gets much of the fresh produce she enjoys in the summer from her garden in southern Maine.

As she told host Jeremy Hobson, keeping a garden “is hours and hours” of work that she and her husband put in year-round. But “for me to come out in the morning and pick raspberries off my vine and pull together a lettuce for my lunch and know exactly what was in the soil, that it’s completely organic, that no one has sprayed it – the food just tastes so good.”

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NPR Story
11:52 am
Wed July 29, 2015

Microsoft Quietly Launches Windows 10

Visitors try out Windows 10, the latest operating system from US software giant Microsoft, during a launch event in Seoul on July 29, 2015. ( Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)

Microsoft is launching Windows 10 today without the usual midnight sales parties and marketing campaigns.

The company is hoping that users are happier with Windows 10, after Windows 8 was widely criticized when it was released in 2012. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson takes a look at what Windows 10 means for Microsoft with CNN’s Maggie Lake.

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The Two-Way
11:27 am
Wed July 29, 2015

'Booker Dozen' Stirs In A Hefty Batch Of American Authors

Mr_Vector iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 2:04 pm

When the Man Booker Prize announced in 2013 it would expand eligibility to include writers across the English-speaking world, the doomsayers came out in spades. The literary award, the U.K.'s most prestigious, had long been open only to British writers and those from Ireland, Zimbabwe and the Commonwealth.

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The Two-Way
11:25 am
Wed July 29, 2015

University Of Cincinnati Police Officer Charged In Killing Of Unarmed Black Man

Mourners Shanicca Soloman cries in the embrace of friend Terrell Whitney outside funeral services for Samuel DuBose at the Church of the Living God in the Avondale neighborhood of Cincinnati on Tuesday.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 3:17 pm

Announcing the indictment of a white University of Cincinnati police officer who shot and killed an unarmed black man during a traffic stop, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters called the officer's actions "asinine" and "totally unwarranted."

"This doesn't happen in the United States," he said. "It might happen in Afghanistan or somewhere else, but people here don't get shot during a traffic stop."

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Code Switch
11:07 am
Wed July 29, 2015

On Wyatt Cenac, 'Key & Peele,' And Being The Only One In The Room

Onstage at the 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards held at Nokia Theatre L.A.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Last week, the Internet exploded after an episode of the WTF! Podcast with Marc Maron went online. The guest was the comedian Wyatt Cenac, who talked about being a writer and correspondent on The Daily Show for several years. He recalled getting into a heated argument with Jon Stewart, the show's host, over Stewart's impression of Herman Cain, which Cenac had found troubling:

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The Two-Way
10:20 am
Wed July 29, 2015

U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah Sr., Of Philadelphia, Indicted On Corruption Charges

Rep. Chaka Fattah Sr., D-Pa., speaks in Philadelphia on May 7.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 1:25 pm

Updated at 3:25 p.m. ET

U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah Sr., the Democrat who represents a district that includes parts of Philadelphia, was indicted on Wednesday over allegations of political corruption.

According to the indictment, the government alleges that Fattah was involved in a wide-ranging conspiracy that included bribery, the illegal use of campaign contributions and theft of charitable funds.

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The Salt
9:49 am
Wed July 29, 2015

To Shed Pounds, Going Vegetarian Or Vegan May Help

Most people go vegetarian out of some combination of ethical, environmental or health concerns.

But to drop pounds? That could soon become another reason to go meatless. A meta-analysis published in early July shows that people who followed a vegetarian diet overall lost more weight than people on an average American diet.

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Code Switch
9:41 am
Wed July 29, 2015

'Key & Peele' Is Ending. Here Are A Few Of Its Code Switch-iest Moments

Ian White Comedy Central

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 11:34 am

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The Two-Way
9:22 am
Wed July 29, 2015

Migrant Dies In Calais As Thousands Try To Use Channel Tunnel

Migrants cross a road near the Eurotunnel on Wednesday in Coquelles, near Calais, France. A Sudanese man, between 25 and 30 years old, was killed by a truck as up to 1,500 migrants tried to force their way into the tunnel, officials say.
Yoan Valat EPA/LANDOV

France is boosting security around its entry to the tunnel that runs beneath the English Channel, after thousands of migrants tried to make a desperate rush to Britain. One migrant died; at least 3,500 have tried to make the trip this week.

Since the start of 2015, French officials have intercepted more than 37,000 migrants who were hoping to jump on trains or trucks heading to Britain via the tunnel that's called the Eurotunnel in France and the Channel Tunnel, or Chunnel, in Britain.

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NPR History Dept.
9:17 am
Wed July 29, 2015

The Future Of American History

Eddie Brady Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 9:39 am

College history majors used to study The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. Today perhaps they should also be studying the decline and fall of history majors.

Since 2010, the number of history majors at Ohio State University has dropped by more than 30 percent, according to a May 9 Columbus Dispatch story. Meanwhile, the number of students majoring in history at the University of Cincinnati has fallen by 33 percent since 2010.

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Shots - Health News
8:58 am
Wed July 29, 2015

Progress For Bill To Bolster Medicare Patients' Hospital Rights

Hospitals can call people who stay overnight outpatients, a classification that can have surprising financial consequences.
iStockphoto

The Senate unanimously approved legislation Monday night requiring hospitals across the nation to tell Medicare patients when they receive observation care but haven't been admitted to the hospital as inpatients.

The distinction is easy for patients to miss — until they get hit with big medical bills after a short stay.

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The Two-Way
6:03 am
Wed July 29, 2015

Afghan Government Says Mullah Omar 'Died In April 2013'

Undated photo reportedly showing Taliban leader Mullah Omar.
AP

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 11:48 am

(This post was last updated at 12:47 p.m. ET.)

The Afghan government says the Taliban's spiritual leader, Mullah Omar, "died in April 2013 in Pakistan."

In a statement issued by the office of the president, the government said their report was based on "credible information."

The announcement comes just two days before the Taliban and the Afghan government hold a second round of peace talks in Pakistan.

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Around the Nation
5:59 am
Wed July 29, 2015

Las Vegas Mob Museum To Open FIFA Exhibit

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
4:56 am
Wed July 29, 2015

It's Summer But There Is Still Snow In Buffalo, N.Y.

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 5:59 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
4:47 am
Wed July 29, 2015

Texas Authorities Release More Jailhouse Video Relating To Sandra Bland Case

In this undated frame from video provided by the Waller County Sheriff's Office, Sandra Bland stands before a desk at Waller County Jail in Hempstead, Texas.
AP

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 9:00 am

Officials in Waller County, Texas, have released more jailhouse video that they say dispels some of the conspiracy theories surrounding the case of Sandra Bland, who was found hanged in her cell two weeks ago.

Her death was ruled a suicide by a medical examiner but her family says she was not suicidal.

NPR's Martin Kaste filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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