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New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie plans to suspend his campaign for president, a source close to the Christie campaign tells member station WNYC.

The decision comes after a sixth-place finish in New Hampshire, where Christie had banked so much of his political capital.

"I love New Hampshire," the governor tweeted Tuesday. "I am comfortable to have my fate in your hands."

Bernie Sanders delivered the second-biggest rout in New Hampshire Democratic primary history last night, besting Hillary Clinton by 22 percentage points.

That's important, because it hands him a crushing victory, lots of momentum and money to help him staff up for a potentially long fight against Clinton. And with that huge win, one might think that Sanders would end up with the majority of delegates.

Carly Fiorina is exiting the Republican presidential race after a seventh-place showing in last night's New Hampshire primary.

"While I suspend my candidacy today, I will continue to travel this country and fight for those Americans who refuse to settle for the way things are and a status quo that no longer works for them," said Fiorina in a statement.

There's been a male tilt to biomedical research for a long time.

The National Institutes of Health is trying to change that and is looking to bring gender balance all the way down to the earliest stages of research. As a condition of NIH funding, researchers will now have to include female and male animals in their biomedical studies.

As late as the 1990s, researchers worried that testing drugs in women who could be pregnant or become pregnant might lead to birth defects, so experimental drugs were mainly tested in men. Research in animals followed the same pattern.

It was a big night for presidential candidates Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders, who walked away the winners in the New Hampshire primary.

Sanders led Hillary Clinton by more than 20 points in what many considered a must-win for the Vermont senator. On the Republican side, Ohio Governor John Kasich came in second, followed by Iowa’s winner Ted Cruz and former Florida Governor Jeb Bush.

The Granite State made clear choices in last night’s presidential primary, as both winners ended up with 20-point victories.

Republican Donald Trump took 35 percent of all the GOP votes cast and Democrat Bernie Sanders nabbed 60 percent of his party’s votes. Both candidates bill themselves as anti-establishment candidates for their respective parties.

While some contenders are considering how long to stay in the race, others are looking ahead to South Carolina and Nevada.

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Bernie Sanders are celebrating victories in the New Hampshire primary.

Here & Now’s political strategists Angela Rye and Paris Dennard join hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson to analyze the results, including what they mean for the second-place finishers, Hillary Clinton and John Kasich.

Clinton pulled in 38 percent, compared to Sanders’ 60 percent, and Kasich won 16 percent, compared to Trump’s 35 percent.

Remember the story scooting around the Internet earlier this week about a man in India who was reportedly killed by a meteorite? If you need a refresher, we wrote a post about it, creatively titled, "Did A Meteorite Kill A Bus Driver In India?"

Well, it turns out the answer is probably not.

From the restorative justice practices in Rwanda to the supermax prisons in Brazil, author and educator Baz Dreisinger offers a glimpse of prison systems abroad through the prism of the mass incarceration system in the U.S.

Dreisinger visited prisons in nine countries and found that while some modeled their prisons on America’s “doing time for the crime” punishment system, others aimed to find healing and reconciliation for both victims and offenders.

It took Sen. Ted Cruz to finally persuade me to answer a riddle that's bothered me for years. Suppose somebody yanked away the law that currently props up the nation's ethanol industry, as Cruz has proposed. What would actually happen?

It was a rumor that had many Twitter old-timers up in arms: Twitter is changing its signature structure of real-time posts in reverse chronological order.

It's true. The company now says it's got a new algorithm to predict which tweets you might not want to miss. Those selected tweets, minutes or hours old, will display at the top when you log in after an absence. The rest of the tweets below will remain in real-time and reverse chronology.

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French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius has announced that he will leave his post in the government.

Fabius, 69, was instrumental in forging the Iran nuclear deal and presided over climate negotiations in Paris last December that saw nearly 200 countries adopt a landmark agreement.

In a letter to president Obama, a former federal judge is asking that a sentence he handed down in 2004 be commuted.

"In looking back on the case, it was one of the most troubling that I ever faced in my five years on the federal bench," Paul G. Cassell wrote on Tuesday.

The next Tesla car is expected to be revealed and made available for pre-order next month. And while the auto world is still waiting to see specs and drawings, one thing is already known: the price.

As promised, Elon Musk tells Bloomberg, the Model 3 will cost $35,000 — before any incentives.

The morning after his New Hampshire primary victory, Bernie Sanders made a highly publicized visit to Harlem to dine with Al Sharpton, one of America's most prominent civil rights activists and media personalities.

The two dined at Sylvia's, the same New York City restaurant where Sharpton huddled with Barack Obama during his 2008 presidential campaign.

Wednesday's meeting was a not-so-subtle recognition of Sanders' pivot to South Carolina and Sanders' effort to broaden his appeal to the state's decisive African-American voters.

John Kasich And The Long Road To Super Tuesday

4 hours ago

One of the many curiosities of the 2016 presidential field is how hard it has been for a popular, swing state governor with a long track record of accomplishments to gain traction in this race.

But John Kasich's second-place showing in New Hampshire's primary has suddenly jolted his second-tier candidacy. With the race pivoting to South Carolina, the Ohio governor is getting a second look from Republicans still seeking an alternative to front-runner Donald Trump.

In a closely watched visit to Capitol Hill, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen listed risk factors in the global economic scene, such as concerns over China's currency and market volatility. It's the first time Yellen has testified since the Fed nudged interest rates higher in December.

Wisdom, a Laysan albatross that researchers first tagged in 1956, has hatched what could be her 40th chick, leading the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to call her "an iconic symbol of inspiration and hope."

Born at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge (which is part of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument), the new (adorable) chick has been named Kūkini — the Hawaiian word for messenger.

A Russian opposition leader says he was sitting in a Moscow restaurant when about 10 men burst in, threatened to kill him and then attacked him — with a cake.

Mikhail Kasyanov is co-leader of the opposition Republican Party of Russia-People's Freedom Party (Parnas), which is planning to put forward candidates to run in Russia's parliamentary elections later this year.

NPR's Corey Flintoff tells our Newscast unit that the Kremlin is downplaying the assault. Here's more:

Even with expected wins by Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump, there's plenty to talk about the morning after New Hampshire's primary, whether it's Republican John Kasich's surprising No. 2 finish or the "Bernie Sandwich."

A rundown of what's being said Wednesday:

Bernie Sanders becomes first Jewish, non-Christian candidate to win U.S. primary -- The Week

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Tuesday night's New Hampshire primary offered little surprise in terms of who actually won: Donald Trump triumphed big on the GOP side, while Bernie Sanders crushed Hillary Clinton with Democratic voters, just as polls had predicted.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shortly after arriving in Washington for diplomatic meetings this week, Egypt's foreign minister, Sameh Hassan Shoukry, stopped by NPR to speak with Morning Edition's David Greene.

Shoukry, a veteran diplomat and former ambassador to Washington, represents the government of Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi, who led a military coup in 2013 and became president in 2014.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

New Hampshire prides itself on surprising people with the outcome of its first-in-the-nation presidential primary. This year, though, the top winner in each party was the candidate the polls had long predicted would win.

So if there was any surprise, it was that the candidates those polls had been smiling on were Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. Less than a year ago, neither would have been thought a likely candidate, let alone a plausible winner.

We all know live election coverage is hard — you have to cram a lot of quickly changing information into not a lot of time, and sometimes you forget to eat dinner. MSNBC's Chris Hayes must have been hungry, because here's what he said after Bernie Sanders was announced a winner:

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