NPR News

The Two-Way
11:38 am
Tue October 21, 2014

American Freed After Months Of Detention In North Korea

Jeffrey Fowle, an American that had been detained in North Korea, speaking to The Associated Press, last month in Pyongyang. Fowle was released by North Korean authorities and flown back to the United States on Tuesday.
Wong Maye-E AP

Updated at 1:35 p.m. ET

Jeffrey Fowle, one of three Americans held by North Korea, has been released, the White House says.

Fowle, 56, who was detained in June, allegedly for leaving a Bible in his hotel room in North Korea, was home today after negotiators secured his release.

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The Protojournalist
11:37 am
Tue October 21, 2014

The Yarmulke Comes To 3-D Printing

A yarmulke produced from a 3-D printer.
Craig Kaplan

What do you get when you combine a computer science background with Judaica? A 3-D printed kippah.

Craig Kaplan, an associate professor in the Computer Graphics Lab at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, rarely leaves the house without his Panama hat in warmer weather.

He wanted to design a 3-D printed version of the traditional hat, but he decided to start with an easier shape to reproduce: a yarmulke, or kippah — a plate-shaped head covering worn by observant Jews.

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The Two-Way
11:36 am
Tue October 21, 2014

'Mr. President, Don't Touch My Girlfriend,' Chicago Voter Teases Obama

President Barack Obama casts a ballot in early voting for the 2014 midterm elections at the Dr. Martin Luther King Community Service Center in Chicago on Monday.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Things got heated at the Chicago polling place where President Obama cast an early ballot on Monday.

Obama was in his little booth, next to a young woman, when her boyfriend, whom CNN identified as Mike Jones, quips: "Mr. President, don't touch my girlfriend."

Obama held his own, replying, "I wasn't really planning on it."

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Shots - Health News
11:04 am
Tue October 21, 2014

When The Economy Goes Down, Vasectomies Go Up

Did worries about financial stability get more men to say no to fatherhood?
iStockphoto

The number of men getting vasectomies spiked during the Great Recession, rising one-third from 2006 to 2010, a study finds.

In 2006, 3.9 percent of men said they had had a vasectomy; in 2010, 4.4 percent reported having the surgery. That means an additional 150,000 to 180,000 men per year had vasectomies in each year of the recession.

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The Two-Way
10:36 am
Tue October 21, 2014

DHS: Arrivals From West Africa Must Arrive Through 5 U.S. Airports

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 11:01 am

Updated at 1:00 p.m. ET

The Department of Homeland Security has announced that all passengers arriving from Ebola-affected countries in West Africa must go by way of a handful of U.S. airports as part of measures to control the spread of Ebola.

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Parallels
10:12 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Israeli Homes, Decorated With A Shopping Spree In China

Adi Asulin stands in the kitchen of her family's remodeled apartment north of Tel Aviv. She saved thousands of dollars by flying to China to buy furnishings and flooring directly from manufacturers.
Emily Harris NPR

Adi Asulin lives in a fabulous apartment on the top floor of a seven-story building in the Israeli town of Ra'anana, north of Tel Aviv. The entry hall is long and light. Windows open onto an enormous balcony, which wraps around three sides of her home. The décor is fresh and white.

"It's all made in China," Asulin says.

Not just made in China. Nearly everything — the floors, the lighting, the furniture — she bought in China on a 10-day shopping spree.

The day after Asulin and her husband got keys to the place, she got on a plane to Guangzhou, in southern China.

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The Salt
10:05 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Can Hand-Cut, Artisanal Ice Make Your Cocktail That Much Better?

Joe Ambrose of Favourite Ice holds one of his crystal-clear artisanal cubes.
Jessica Sidman Washington City Paper

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 10:52 am

Now that we've entered the "craft cocktail" era, drinks with double-digit pricetags are just par for the course. And in many cities, there's a decent chance that your fancy craft drink now comes with a large, crystal clear cube or rectangle that melts unhurriedly in your glass. That's right: Artisanal ice is a thing.

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Parallels
9:47 am
Tue October 21, 2014

A Hong Kong Protest Camp Spawns Its Own Art

Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 10:56 am

Now in its improbable fourth week, the main pro-democracy protest camp in Hong Kong's Admiralty district is a sort of Woodstock on the South China Sea.

A sea of tents, the camp teems with street art and propaganda posters. They range from sculptures and cartoons to protest banners and the "Lennon Wall" — a reference to John Lennon and a similar wall in Prague — where people have written thousands of messages on colored Post-it notes.

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The Two-Way
9:37 am
Tue October 21, 2014

A Tale Of Two Cities: World Series Fever Takes Hold In SF, KC

Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo., a day before Game 1 of the 2014 World Series.
Rob Carr Getty Images

Millions of baseball fans and two cities 1,500 miles apart are getting ready for tonight's big game in Kansas City, Mo. The Royals are in their first World Series in nearly three decades. They face the San Francisco Giants, who are back again after missing their chance at the series last year.

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Goats and Soda
8:35 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Volunteer Recap: Why Wearing The Right Shoes In Rio Matters

Robert Snyder takes a break at Baia de Guanabara, Brazil's second largest bay.
Courtesy of Robert Snyder

Public health student Robert Snyder says he's been back and forth between U.S. and Brazil at least six times. While some trips were for fun, others were to study how diseases affect some of the country's poorest communities.

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Shots - Health News
8:14 am
Tue October 21, 2014

More Insurers Put Spending Limits On Medical Treatments

The California Public Employees' Retirement System has capped how much it will pay for some common medical procedures and tests.
Max Whittaker Getty Images

To clamp down on health care costs, a growing number of employers and insurers are putting limits on how much they'll pay for certain medical services such as knee replacements, lab tests and complex imaging.

A recent study found that savings from such moves may be modest, however, and some analysts question whether "reference pricing," as it's called, is good for consumers.

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The Two-Way
6:41 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Opera About 1985 Achille Lauro Hijacking Draws Protests At Met

Protesters rail outside the Metropolitan Opera at Lincoln Center on opening night of the opera "The Death of Klinghoffer" on Monday in New York.
Bryan Thomas Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 9:29 am

Former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani was among those who showed up at the Metropolitan Opera last night to denounce the production of The Death of Klinghoffer, which protesters say glorifies terrorism.

Chanting "Shame on the Met!" protesters, numbering about 400, said the performance of the 23-year-old opera was an affront to the memory of Leon Klinghoffer, a passenger on the Italian cruise liner Achille Lauro that was hijacked by members of the Palestinian Liberation Organization in 1985. Klinghoffer, 69, was shot in his wheelchair and dumped overboard.

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The Two-Way
5:12 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Hong Kong Leader Hints At Concessions As Talks With Students Begin

Hong Kong Federation of Students council members attend a meeting with senior Hong Kong government officials in Hong Kong on Tuesday.
Tyrone Siu Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 9:21 am

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

Hong Kong's Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying, at the start of talks today with student-led pro-democracy protesters, says although his Beijing-backed government cannot allow the public to nominate candidates to replace him in 2017, the process could be made "more democratic."

"There's room for discussion there," Leung told a small group of journalists on Tuesday. "There's room to make the nominating committee more democratic."

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Politics
4:45 am
Tue October 21, 2014

In Tight Races, Both Parties Bank On Early Votes

President Obama casts an early ballot for the midterm elections at the Dr. Martin Luther King Community Service Center in Chicago on Monday.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 9:17 am

On the first day for in-person early voting in Illinois, President Obama went to the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center to cast his ballot.

"I'm so glad I can early vote here," he told the elections worker checking him in.

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New Boom
4:40 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Some Millennials — And Their Parents — Are Slow To Cut The Cord

Stuart Kinlough Getty Images/Ikon Images

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 7:03 am

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

So your child moved back in with you after graduation, and it seems like she will never leave. Or worse, you're sending rent checks each month while she searches for jobs in the big city.

You often find yourself wondering if she will ever grow up. You're concerned that your child is suffering from delayed adolescence.

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Around the Nation
3:15 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Is That A Spoonful Of Spooky Cereal In Your Beer?

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Asia
3:15 am
Tue October 21, 2014

How To Pick An English Name (Tip: Stay Away From Food)

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 6:16 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
2:59 am
Tue October 21, 2014

The Short Shelf Life Of Urban School Superintendents

Los Angeles Unified School District Superintendent John Deasy, seen in a photo taken last year, says his resignation Thursday was "by mutual agreement.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 6:16 am

If you're a 12th-grader right now in the Los Angeles schools, that means you probably started kindergarten back in 2001. It also means that, as of this week, you've seen four superintendents come and go.

As we discussed today on Morning Edition, the ouster of John Deasy last week as the head of the nation's second-largest district has renewed a long-running debate about leadership of big-city schools, and particularly the challenges of raising achievement in such a politically charged environment.

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Parallels
2:59 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Kurds Leave Life In Europe To Fight ISIS In Their Iraqi Homeland

Aza Betwata (left) and his brother Mirwan (center) left Holland to join the Kurdish peshmerga fighting against ISIS militants in northern Iraq. Though the brothers come from a family of fighters, Aza had just two days of training — his brother must show him how to strip and clean his rifle.
Alice Fordham NPR

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 7:33 am

The men of the Betwata tribe gather to drink tea every morning in Irbil, Iraq, in an outdoor courtyard with curving pillars and climbing plants.

In northern Iraq, almost everyone is ethnically Kurdish, and most of them wear a traditional Kurdish baggy blue suit with a colored sash, and a black-and-white headdress. And they all talk about the war.

One of the men — Sarhad Betwata — is a general. The grizzled officer says he commands about 1,000 men and later this morning will head off from Irbil to the front lines against the Islamic State, close to the Syrian border.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:59 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Six Words: 'Must We Forget Our Confederate Ancestors?'

Waverly Adcock, a sergeant and founder of the West Augusta Guard, prepares his company for inspection and battle at a Civil War re-enactment in Virginia. Sara Smith, whose great-great-grandfather was wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, holds the Confederate battle flag.
Courtesy of Jesse Dukes

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 6:55 am

NPR continues a series of conversations from The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words.

Jesse Dukes does not have Confederate ancestors. But in the time he has spent writing about Civil War re-enactors, he has met many who say they do.

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Middle East
2:59 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Who Are The Kurds And What's Their Role In Mideast Politics?

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 6:16 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
2:59 am
Tue October 21, 2014

California Proposition Re-evaluates Approach To Crime

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 3:15 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
9:00 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Fashion Icon Oscar De La Renta Dies At 82

Designer Oscar de la Renta takes a bow with models Karlie Kloss (left) and Daria Strokous after his Spring 2015 collection was modeled Sept. 9 during Fashion Week in New York. De la Renta died on Oct. 20.
Diane Bondareff AP

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 8:18 am

Updated at 9:20 a.m. ET.

Fashion designer Oscar de la Renta, who designed gowns for first ladies and for Hollywood stars died Monday at his home in Connecticut. He was 82.

A statement from de la Renta's stepdaughter and her husband, Eliza Reed Bolen and Alex Bolen, did not give a cause of death, though the designer had been treated for cancer.

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Business
5:48 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Unrest In Ferguson May Speed Up Decline Of Real Estate

Children watch from their home in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 20 as people march about a mile to the police station to protest the shooting of Michael Brown. Brown's shooting in the middle of a street by a Ferguson police officer on Aug. 9 sparked protests, riots and looting in the St. Louis suburb. Some people are ready to leave the troubled city. Others say they will remain no matter what.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 11:09 am

A grand jury has yet to decide whether it will indict Darren Wilson, the police officer who fatally shot 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., this summer.

Protests over Brown's death are ongoing in Ferguson, though they are calmer than the sometimes violent clashes that happened immediately after the shooting.

Still, many residents there are worried about public reaction once the grand jury announces its decision, and some say they've had enough. They're planning to move. That could accelerate an already existing trend in the region.

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The Two-Way
5:41 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

CDC Announces New Guidelines For Health Care Workers Treating Ebola Patients

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 5:55 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new guidelines on Monday for health care workers caring for patients with Ebola.

The new guidelines "provide an increased margin of safety," CDC Director Tom Frieden said in a conference call with reporters.

Frieden added that they represented a "consensus" by the health care workers who have treated people with Ebola in the United States, including those workers at hospitals in Atlanta and Nebraska that have treated Ebola without further transmission.

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Shots - Health News
4:23 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

When Reassuring Isn't: The Rush To Test Cruise Passenger For Ebola

The cruise ship Carnival Magic floats behind a catamaran off Cozumel, Mexico on Oct. 17. The ship skipped a planned stop there Friday, the cruise line says, after Mexican authorities delayed granting permission to dock.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 8:41 am

Here's a question about the fine line between a prudent response and worrisome overkill: Is the sight of a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter hovering over a cruise ship to pick up a blood sample (which is to be tested for Ebola) a sight that should inspire feelings of reassurance, or a nagging sense that something is not quite right?

The question is still in the air after the weekend's effort to airlift a few milliliters of blood from a passenger who was on board what is now being called the Ebola Cruise.

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The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

This Past September Ranks As Hottest On Record, NOAA Says

Four months in 2014 have already been the warmest on record.
NOAA

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 4:34 pm

This past September was, on average, the hottest on record, meteorologists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Monday.

The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces was 60.3 degrees Fahrenheit, or 1.30 F hotter than the century average.

The AP reports:

"It was the fourth monthly record set this year, along with May, June and August.

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All Tech Considered
3:01 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Tunisia's Emerging Tech Sector Hampered By Old Policies

Ramzi El-Fekih, CEO of Creova, stands in his server room in Tunis. He has built a mobile payments company, but because of banking restrictions, Tunisians can use his product only for domestic purchases.
Aarti Shahani NPR

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 5:24 pm

This Sunday, Tunisia — the country that gave birth to Arab Spring — will elect a Parliament. Millions of citizens will vote at the polls, and thousands will run for office.

It's a sea change since the days of ousted dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. But behind the political gains, there is a sad fact: The new democracy is at an economic standstill. The technology sector — which many say could deliver jobs to unemployed young people — is victim to political inertia.

Startups In A Closed Economy

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The Two-Way
2:59 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Toyota Becomes Latest Automaker To Issue Recalls Over Faulty Airbags

Parts of pyro-electric airbag initiators lie in a production line at the international automotive supplier Takata Ignition Systems GmbH in Schoenebeck, Germany, Thursday, April 17.
Jens Meyer AP

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 3:33 pm

A massive auto recall on defective airbags was given fresh urgency on Monday, when the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration encouraged the owners of nearly 5 million cars to get them fixed "immediately." Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton told our Newscast unit some deaths have been tied to the defect:

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Book News & Features
2:24 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

'Lila' Sets The Stage For Marilynn Robinson's Earlier Works

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 4:03 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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