NPR News

The Salt
2:41 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

McDonald's Says It Won't Be Serving Chicken Raised On Antibiotics

An order of McDonald's Chicken McNuggets in Olmsted Falls, Ohio. McDonald's says it plans to start using chicken raised without antibiotics important to human medicine.
Mark Duncan AP

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 3:20 pm

Fast food giant McDonald's announced Wednesday it will begin sourcing chickens raised without antibiotics.

Over the next two years, the chain says its U.S. restaurants — which number around 14,000 — will transition to the new antibiotics policy, which prohibits suppliers from using antibiotics critical to treating human illness.

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The Two-Way
2:34 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Ferguson Documents: Justice Investigation Backs Former Officer Wilson

People rally in Union Square before marching through the street in protest to the Ferguson grand jury decision to not indict officer Darren Wilson in the Michael Brown case.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

When a grand jury decided not charge former Officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, Ferguson, Mo., ended up in flames.

Protesters decried the injustice and faced off violently with police officers and the National Guardsmen who were brought in to ensure peace.

Robert McCulloch, the prosecuting attorney in the case, also decided to release reams of documents with the evidence presented to the grand jury.

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U.S.
2:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

A Ruling Against Obamacare Would Have Broad Implications

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act gather in front of the U.S Supreme Court during a rally Wednesday. The court heard arguments in the case and is expected to announce its decision in June.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 3:06 pm

The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in a case that could end Obamacare subsidies for policyholders in a majority of states, including Texas, Florida, Illinois, Pennsylvania and Ohio. If the court sides with the plaintiffs, it would mean millions of people could no longer afford health insurance.

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Energy
2:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

West Virginia Derailment Raises Concerns About Volatility Of Bakken Oil

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 2:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
2:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

In LA, Clearing A Backlog Of Aging Instruments

There are about 800 schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District, and hundreds of them have music programs. There are jazz bands, choirs, orchestras and marching bands. But for a couple of years, teachers and student musicians have faced a big problem: broken strings, worn-out horns and out-of-tune pianos — a backlog of aging instruments that the district is scrambling to repair and replace.

Instruments like the violin in senior Melissa Valenzuela's hands.

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NPR Story
2:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

A Snowshoe Trek From An Adirondack Mountain Summit

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
2:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Monarch Butterfly Population Rejuvenated After Last Year's Record Low

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 3:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Science
2:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Archaeologists Use Moles To Solve Mysteries Of Middle Ages' Fort

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's All Politics
2:21 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Failed Keystone Veto Override Marks Another Win For Veto Pen

President Obama arrives at the TransCanada Stillwater Pipe Yard in Cushing, Okla., in 2012 after renewed momentum in Congress to approve construction of the northern leg of the Keystone XL pipeline.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Congress mustered big majorities for the Keystone XL, which you might think would mean that pipeline would soon be under construction to carry Canadian crude oil from Alberta to the Gulf of Mexico.

But you would be forgetting the presidential veto, which President Obama signed on Feb. 24 with little or no fanfare.

Wednesday, the Senate put an end to years of legislative effort by upholding the Obama veto. The Senate voted 62 to 37 in favor of the override, but it wasn't enough.

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The Two-Way
2:20 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

India Bans Film About Infamous 2012 Gang Rape

British filmmaker Leslee Udwin addresses a press conference on her film India's Daughter. India has ordered the film not to be shown pending an investigation into how filmmakers were able to interview the men convicted of the deadly rape of a 23-year-old woman in 2012.
Altaf Qadri AP

India is banning a documentary about the deadly gang rape of a young woman in 2012 amid concerns over remarks made by one of her convicted rapists. The government also says it will investigate how the film crew gained access to him on death row.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Mobile Gaming Prepares To Overtake Traditional Video Games

Mobile phone app designer Fung Kam-keung, CEO and founder of Awesapp Limited, plays on a smartphone with one of his latest app game called 'Yellow Umbrella' at the Awesapp Limited office in Hong Kong on October 23, 2014. (Nicholas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 1:49 pm

Mobile games – the apps you download onto your phone or tablet – used to be a bit of an afterthought in the gaming industry, behind the bigger console and computer markets.

But mobile games are growing fast, and are reaching millions of users who don’t consider themselves gamers.

The mobile gaming industry held its annual awards dinner last night, and the game Monument Valley took the Grand Prix.

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Parallels
1:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

The Anti-Pollution Documentary That's Taken China By Storm

Journalist Chai Ling used $160,000 of her own money to produce a documentary on China's air pollution problem.
Screenshot/Under the Dome

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 3:35 pm

Two hundred million and counting: That's how many times a documentary about China's massive air pollution problem has been viewed online since the weekend. Environmentalists are hailing it as an eye-opener for Chinese citizens.

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The Two-Way
1:21 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Senate Fails In Bid To Override Obama's Veto On Keystone XL Pipeline

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 2:19 pm

The Senate has failed to override President Obama's veto on a measure to approve the Keystone XL pipeline project.

The final vote was 62-37, short of the two-thirds needed to override the presidential veto. Supporters of the measure had previously said they lacked the votes.

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Smarter Robots In The Works

CoBot, short for Collaborative Robot, is designed to be an office helper. The bots, made by a team at Carnegie Mellon University led by professor Manuela Veloso, can navigate around a building on their own. They are also smart enough to know when to ask humans for help, such as to press buttons and open doors. (cs.cmu.edu)

Having robot office helpers could be pretty handy. But today’s machines are nowhere close to the smart, free-roaming robots you see in movies. Right now, robots couldn’t get around a building without tripping on chairs or getting stuck behind doors.

From Here & Now’s tech partner IEEE Spectrum, Prachi Patel reports on a new bot that will work better in human environments.

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

70 Years After Hitler's Death, Germany To Republish 'Mein Kampf'

One of two rare copies of "Mein Kampf," signed by the young Nazi leader Adolf Hitler and due for auction, are pictured in Los Angeles, California on February 25, 2014. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

Adolf Hitler’s manifesto “Mein Kampf” is a rambling, hate-filled, disjointed and sometimes unintelligible blueprint for the Third Reich. When a new annotated edition of the book is published in Germany in January 2016, it will mark the first time in almost 70 years that the text will be found in German bookstores.

After the war, the occupying allies banned the book, and the rights passed to Hitler’s home state of Bavaria. But the copyright expires at the end of the year, and all 16 German states have agreed that the book can be re-released, as long as it contains annotations.

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The Two-Way
12:47 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Jawbone Fossil Fills Big Gap In Human Evolution, Scientists Say

This 2013 photo shows the LD 350-1 mandible just steps from where it was found in Ethiopia. The jawbone fragment is the oldest known fossil from an evolutionary tree branch that eventually led to modern humans, scientists say.
Kaye Reed AP

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 2:59 pm

A partial jawbone found in Ethiopia is the oldest human-related fossil, scientists say.

NPR's Christopher Joyce, who is reporting on the story, tells our Newscast unit that the discovery fills in an important gap in human evolution. He says:

"The fossil consists of a partial jawbone and several teeth. It dates to about 2.8 million years ago.

"The team says the fossil appears to belong to an individual from the beginning of the ancestral line that led to humans. That would make it the earliest known Homo — the human genus.

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Shots - Health News
12:45 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Programs Help Students Cut Back On Booze, But Not For Long

Women and younger students were more likely to drink less after alcohol-education programs.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 2:35 pm

Most colleges require students to go through some sort of alcohol education program. When I was a freshman in college, I was required to play a video game that involved helping Franklin the frog navigate through various college parties without succumbing to alcohol poisoning. (Easy, Frank — remember to hydrate).

Other universities require students to watch educational videos or take online quizzes about appropriate alcohol use.

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Shots - Health News
12:45 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Few Clues On Health Law's Future Emerge In Supreme Court Arguments

Opponents of the Affordable Care Act protest outside the Supreme Court Wednesday before oral arguments in the second major challenge to be heard by the justices.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 1:30 pm

For the second time in three years, the Affordable Care Act went before the Supreme Court Wednesday. And before a packed courtroom, a divided group of justices mostly picked up right where they left off the last time.

Once again, people inside the courtroom and out were left to wonder where Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Anthony Kennedy, considered swing votes in the case, stand. A decision is expected by the end of June.

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Author Interviews
12:20 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

A 'Girl In A Band': Kim Gordon On Life After Sonic Youth

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Music
12:20 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Nora Jane Struthers Is Wide Awake On New Album

Nora Jane Struthers is a singer-songwriter who grew up in New Jersey and was teaching high-school English in Brooklyn before moving to Nashville to attempt a full-time career in music. With her band The Party Line, she's just released a new album called Wake. Fresh Air rock critic Ken Tucker has a review.

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Shots - Health News
11:01 am
Wed March 4, 2015

People With Eczema Are Itching For Better Health Care

The itchy rash of eczema, also sometimes called atopic dermatitis, can be painful and unsightly.
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 12:50 pm

It might seem silly to miss work for a rash. But people who have eczema often have to put a lot of time and money into managing the itchy, inflamed rashes they get over and over. Lindsay Jones, who lives in Chicago, was diagnosed with eczema when she was 2 weeks old.

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Parallels
10:55 am
Wed March 4, 2015

The British Group With A Very Different Take On 'Jihadi John'

Mohammed Emwazi is a Kuwaiti-born Londoner believed to be "Jihadi John," the central figure in the beheading videos released by the self-declared Islamic State. A British group, Cage, was in contact with Emwazi several years ago and claims that his treatment by British security officials contributed to his radicalization.
Kyodo/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 2:30 pm

Every day new details emerge about Mohammed Emwazi, believed to be the masked man with a British accent known as "Jihadi John" who appears in execution videos by the self-declared Islamic State. At the center of Emwazi's story is a divisive London-based organization called Cage.

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The Two-Way
10:51 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Turkish Airlines' Near-Miss Creates Big Problem At Kathmandu's Tiny Airport

A Turkish Airlines jet is seen after it skidded off a slippery runway Wednesday while landing in dense fog at Tribhuwan International Airport in Kathmandu, Nepal.
Niranjan Shreshta AP

Turkish Airlines has the first slot for landing at the Kathmandu airport, just after 6 a.m. In the winter months, this often means long hours circling over the hills south of the Kathmandu Valley and waiting for the dense fog to lift. Today wasn't any different. At around 6 a.m. local time, flight TK726 crossed from India to Nepal, and the pilot advised passengers that fog over the airport meant a 90-minute delay. But not to worry, he said, there was plenty of fuel.

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The Two-Way
10:11 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Putin Speaks About The Killing Of Kremlin Critic Boris Nemtsov

Russian President Vladimir Putin (left) attends an Interior Ministry meeting Wednesday in Moscow. He condemned the death of Boris Nemtsov, saying it was a "disgrace" to Russia.
Alexei Druzhinin AP

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 12:20 pm

Russian President Vladimir Putin has for the first time spoken publicly about the killing of Kremlin critic Boris Nemtsov, calling his death a shameful tragedy. Nemtsov, a former deputy prime minister who became a major opposition figure, was shot four times in the back Friday as he was walking near the Kremlin.

"The most serious attention should be paid to high-profile crimes, including the ones with a political subtext," Putin said in a televised address to the Interior Ministry. He said the country should be devoid of the shame and tragedies it has recently seen and endured.

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Code Switch
9:46 am
Wed March 4, 2015

A Few Reactions To The DOJ's 'Scathing' Report On Ferguson Cops And Racial Bias

Ferguson Police Department and the Municipal Court in Ferguson, Mo.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 2:35 pm

The Justice Department reportedly did not find enough evidence to charge white former officer Darren Wilson with any civil rights violations for shooting Michael Brown last August. But they did find plenty of evidence of routine discrimination by Ferguson police against black residents.

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NPR Ed
9:36 am
Wed March 4, 2015

The Magic Trick That Could Help Students Pay For College

The IRS and the Department of Education have the power to make the FAFSA easier without cutting questions. So why haven't they?
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 3:37 pm

Read part one of our reporting on the FAFSA, "Shrink The FAFSA? Good Luck With That"

It's deadline time for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Better known as the FAFSA.

The daunting application — with its 108 questions — stands between many college hopefuls and much-needed financial aid.

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The Two-Way
8:34 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Japanese World War II Battleship Musashi Found, Billionaire Paul Allen Says

A valve on the Musashi.
Courtesy of Paul Allen

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 2:05 pm

The World War II-era Japanese battleship Musashi was sunk by U.S. warplanes on Oct. 24, 1944, during the Battle of Leyte Gulf, one of the war's largest naval battles. Despite numerous eyewitness accounts at the time, the location of the wreckage was never known. Until now.

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The Two-Way
8:29 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Born In 1898: World's Oldest Living Person Celebrates Birthday

Misao Okawa, the world's oldest living person, poses for a photo with her son Hiroshi Okawa, 92, (left) and other family members and friends on her 117th birthday celebration at Kurenai Nursing Home in Osaka, Japan.
Buddhika Weerasinghe Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 2:58 pm

It's now past midnight in Japan, meaning that Misao Okawa, the world's oldest human being, has officially turned 117. She was born on March 5, 1898, and lives in a retirement home in Osaka.

Okawa has reigned as the world's oldest living person since 2013, when Guinness World Records certified that she was 115.

Okawa celebrated her birthday by eating cake and taking photos with her family, which includes several great-grandchildren.

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Shots - Health News
8:25 am
Wed March 4, 2015

What's A Patient To Do When Hospital Ratings Disagree?

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 2:00 pm

When you face a choice about hotels, restaurants or cars, the chances are you head to the Web for help.

Online ratings have become essential tools for modern consumers. Health care is no exception to the ratings game, especially when it comes to hospitals.

Many people check up on hospitals before they check in as patients. But there's a catch. A hospital that gets lauded by one group can be panned by another.

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The Two-Way
7:12 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Man's Identity Questioned In LAPD Skid Row Shooting

Protesters gather in front of the Los Angeles Police Department Headquarters Tuesday, to express anger over the fatal shooting of an unarmed homeless man Sunday.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 7:48 am

New details have emerged in the case of a homeless man who was killed by Los Angeles police Sunday, as officials say he was the subject of a federal warrant related to violating probation. There's also word that he lived under a stolen identity; for now, his true name is a mystery.

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