NPR News

The Two-Way
9:55 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

5 Giants Pitchers Give Up 5 Runs In 6th As Royals Even World Series

San Francisco Giants pitcher Hunter Strickland watches Wednesday as Kansas City Royals Omar Infante runs around the bases after hitting a two-run home run during the sixth inning of Game 2 of baseball's World Series Wednesday
Matt Slocum AP

After the Royals' postseason winning streak was snapped Tuesday and the Giants led off Wednesday's game with a home run, one could excuse Royals fans for thinking the glow around this season was finally dimming.

But Kansas City quickly recovered, and had the game even, 2-2, before tearing through Giants pitcher after Giants pitcher in the sixth inning and handing the ball to their dominant bullpen. The 7-2 win evened the World Series at one win per team.

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The Two-Way
6:59 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Health Officials Announce New Monitoring For Travelers From West Africa

Bellevue Hospital nurse Belkys Fortune (left) and Teressa Celia, associate director of infection prevention and control, during a demonstration of procedures for possible Ebola patients on Oct. 8.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 10:20 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced new monitoring measures for people arriving to the U.S. from Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea, the three countries dealing with Ebola outbreaks.

Travelers from those countries will be monitored by public health officials for 21 days after their arrival, starting Monday. The CDC says 21 days is "the longest time it can take from the time a person is infected with Ebola until that person has symptoms of Ebola."

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The Two-Way
6:22 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Another Man Jumps White House Fence, But Is Stopped On The Lawn

Secret Service respond on the North Lawn of the White House after a man jumped the White House fence Wednesday night. This latest incident comes about a month after a previous fence-jumper sprinted across the lawn, past armed uniformed agents, and entered the Executive Mansion.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 10:40 pm

A month after a man armed with a knife leapt the White House fence and got deep into the first floor of the building, another man made a run across the North Lawn Wednesday night.

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The Two-Way
5:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

New Autopsy Report Suggests Michael Brown Was Shot At Close Range

Lesley McSpadden, right, the mother of 18-year-old Michael Brown, watches as Brown's father, Michael Brown Sr., holds up a family picture of himself, his son, top left in photo, and a young child during a news conference Monday, Aug. 11, in Ferguson, Mo.
Jeff Roberson AP

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch has published the official autopsy report on the shooting death of Michael Brown, the black, 18-year-old whose death at the hands of a white police officer set off weeks of protests this summer and fall in Ferguson, Mo.

The report suggests that Brown was shot at close range by Officer Darren Wilson. A toxicology report accompanying the autopsy report suggests Brown had marijuana in his system at the time of his death on August 9.

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Environment
3:26 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Coping In A Drier World: California's Drought Survival Strategy

The San Luis Reservoir in central California is the largest "off-channel" reservoir in the U.S. It is currently at less than 30 percent of its normal capacity.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 5:44 pm

The past few years have been California's driest on record. Forecasters predict that punishing droughts like the current one could become the new norm.

The state uses water rationing and a 90-year-old water distribution system to cope until the rains come. The system is a huge network of dams, canals and pipes that move water from the places it rains and snows to places it typically doesn't, like farms and cities.

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Goats and Soda
2:50 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Drones Are Taking Pictures That Could Demystify A Malaria Surge

Researchers download images after a drone flight in Sabah, Malaysia.
Courtesy of Trends in Parasitology, Fornace et al

Aerial drones are targeting a new enemy: malaria.

Four hundred feet above a Malaysian forest, a three-foot eBee drone hovers and takes pictures with a 16-megapixel camera every 10 to 20 seconds. But it's not gathering images of the mosquitoes that transmit malaria. Even today's best drones aren't capable of such a photographic marvel. Rather, the drone is looking at a changing landscape that holds clues to the disease's spread.

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Goats and Soda
2:46 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Surrogacy Storm In Thailand: A Rejected Baby, A Busy Babymaker

Thai surrogate mother Pattaramon Chanbua with her baby Gammy, who was born with Down Syndrome. An Australian couple who'd arranged for Pattaramon to serve as their surrogate rejected the child.
Nicolas Asfouri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:28 pm

Baby Gammy might mean the end of Thailand's lucrative surrogacy business.

He's the child who was carried by a surrogate mom in Thailand-- and rejected by the Australian couple who had agreed to pay the mother $12,000. The reason: Prenatal testing showed that the baby, a twin, had Down syndrome.

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All Tech Considered
2:44 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Cloud Data Security Concerns Raised After Reported Attack In China

A customer sets up her new iPhone 6 at an Apple store in Beijing on Friday. A group says the Chinese government backed an attack against users of Apple's iCloud service, but the government denies the claim.
Feng Li Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:28 pm

Apple CEO Tim Cook on Wednesday spoke with officials in China about data security and privacy. This meeting comes on the heels of a reported attack against users of Apple's iCloud service in China. Hackers allegedly were able to get hold of users' data by intercepting traffic on the Internet. They did not break into Apple servers.

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Music Reviews
2:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Music Review: 'You're Dead!' By Flying Lotus

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:28 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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U.S.
2:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

How Did 'Good Girls' From Colorado Get Recruited By ISIS?

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:28 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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World
2:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Soldier, Gunman Dead After Ottawa Shooting

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:28 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Science
2:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Bigger Than A T. Rex, With A Duck's Bill, Huge Arms And A Hump

Reconstruction of Deinocheirus mirificus.
Yuong-Nam Lee/Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 6:24 pm

Scientists announced Tuesday they've solved the mystery of the Mongolian ostrich dinosaur.

The mystery began in 1965, when fossil hunters found a pair of 6-foot-long, heavily clawed arm bones in Mongolia's Gobi desert. Nobody had seen anything like them before. Now, scientists say, they've got the rest of the beast ... and dinosaur textbooks may need to be rewritten.

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NPR Ed
2:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

The Slide Rule: A Computing Device That Put A Man On The Moon

LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:28 pm

The protractor and the Bunsen burner. Playing the recorder in music class. Drawing arcs and circles with a compass in geometry. These tools of the education trade become part of our lives for a semester or two and then we move on.

Today, NPR Ed begins a new series examining these icons of the classroom. We start off with a device that once was essential to higher-level math, in school and in the workplace, but now has all but disappeared:

The slide rule.

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

How Do You Judge A Secretary Of State?

Secretary of State John Kerry has a lot on his plate these days, including the fight against ISIS, Ebola, tensions with Russia and the possible nuclear deal with Iran.

He’s been traveling around the world, including a stop in Berlin today, to deal with these issues, just as past secretaries of state have done.

Is it too soon to judge his performance, and how does one even go about rating the success of a secretary of state?

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Colorado Backs Away From Pot Edibles Ban

A baked food made of marijuana is seen at Perennial Holistic Wellness Center medical marijuana dispensary, which opened in 2006, on July 25, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

This week public health officials proposed banning all marijuana-infused edibles except for hard candy and liquid drops, but backed away from the idea after critics said it would violate the state’s voter-approved legalization of recreational marijuana, which took effect in January.

A working group has until next year to come up with ways to regulate the sale of edibles, which now constitutes up to 40 percent of the lucrative marijuana industry in Colorado.

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Hoping For Turnaround, Target Offers Free Shipping

Retail giant Target is offering free shipping and bolstering advertising in an attempt to bring in business over the holiday season, amid slowing sales, a troubled expansion in Canada and last year’s massive data breach.

CNN’s Maggie Lake joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to talk more about this business move and what it means for customers.

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Shots - Health News
1:54 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Poll: Broad Support In U.S. For Ebola Travel Ban

A passenger wearing a face mask arrives at Los Angeles International Airport Friday. Federal officials now require people traveling from West Africa to enter the U.S. at one of five airports equipped to screen them for signs of Ebola.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 2:45 pm

How do Americans feel about Ebola and the U.S. response to the outbreak so far?

NPR and our partners at Truven Health Analytics asked more than 3,000 adults in a poll conducted online and by phone (mobile and landline) Oct. 1-15.

Nearly everyone — 97 percent — knew about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, and a slim majority of those people, or 53 percent, believe the U.S. government has taken a leadership role in response.

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Parallels
1:19 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

High In The Andes, Bolivia's Gondolas In The Sky Ease Congestion

Passengers ride a cable car that links downtown La Paz with El Alto, Bolivia, in September. The trip costs about 40 cents and takes 10 minutes — compared with 35 cents and a half-hour by minibus.
Juan Karita AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:28 pm

La Paz is a tough city for mass transit. It was built by Spanish conquistadors, who laid out narrow, winding streets, and sits in a bowl-like depression with neighborhoods rising up the craggy slopes of the Andes Mountains.

The landscape is too steep for a subway. So the Bolivian capital relies on 40,000 minibuses. These can handle the hills, but there aren't enough of them. What's more, the minibuses have made the city's traffic jams even worse.

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Shots - Health News
12:44 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

A 45,000-Year-Old Leg Bone Reveals The Oldest Human Genome Yet

Researcher Svante Pääbo, was able to extract a complete genome from this ancient human leg bone.
Bence Viola Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 12:49 pm

Researchers have successfully decoded the genes of a 45,000-year-old man from Siberia. The results offer clues about early human life outside of Africa as well as how humans interacted with Neanderthals and other groups around at the time.

The complete set of genes is the oldest genome of its kind, according to Svante Pääbo, a director at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig. "It's almost twice as old as the next oldest genome that has been sequenced."

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The Salt
12:42 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

More Cities Are Making It Illegal To Hand Out Food To The Homeless

The homeless and others in need enjoy lunch at the Los Angeles Mission on Nov. 23, 2011, in celebration of Thanksgiving. Legislation to ban organizations from serving food to homeless people in public places has been proposed in Los Angeles.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 2:30 pm

If you don't have a place to live, getting enough to eat clearly may be a struggle. And since homelessness in the U.S. isn't going away and is even rising in some cities, more charitable groups and individuals have been stepping up the past few years to share food with these vulnerable folks in their communities.

But just as more people reach out to help, cities are biting back at those hands feeding the homeless.

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Remembrances
11:32 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Ben Bradlee On Journalism: Be 'Fair' And 'Honest,' But Don't 'Back Down'

Bradlee was the executive editor for the Washington Post from 1968 to 1991. He published the Pentagon Papers and covered Watergate. Bradlee, who died Tuesday at 93, talked with Fresh Air in 1995.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:18 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Blackwater Guards Found Guilty In 2007 Shootings In Iraq

Former Blackwater Worldwide guard Nicholas Slatten leaves federal court in Washington in June. Slatten on Wednesday was found guilty of first-degree murder in the deaths of 14 Iraqi civilians in 2007.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 12:42 pm

Four private security guards working for the Blackwater Worldwide firm who were charged in the 2007 shootings of more than 30 Iraqis have been found guilty by a federal jury.

Nicholas Slatten was found guilty of first-degree murder, and three others — Paul Slough, Evan Liberty and Dustin Heard — were found guilty of multiple counts of voluntary manslaughter.

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Parallels
9:19 am
Wed October 22, 2014

The Crime That Has Shocked Pakistan

Abdul Sattar Edhi, 86, is an iconic figure in Pakistan who founded and runs the country's best-known charitable group. The Edhi Foundation was robbed of more than $1 million on Sunday, a crime that has provoked outrage.
Rizwan Tabassum AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 10:53 am

The man whom some revere as Pakistan's greatest living philanthropist wears a long white beard, simple robes fashioned from coarse dark-blue cotton, and an air of calm authority that contrasts strikingly with the raucous port city that is his home.

Abdul Sattar Edhi is sitting in the ramshackle building that serves as both his house and the headquarters of his giant charitable foundation that has, for decades, been saving lives among the helpless, lost, abandoned, abused and destitute of one of the world's toughest, roughest towns — Karachi.

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The Two-Way
7:41 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Congolese Doctor Denis Mukwege Receives Sakharov Prize

Dr. Denis Mukwege (left) listens as Britain's Foreign Secretary William Hague speaks after the two men were presented Georgetown University's annual Hillary Rodham Clinton Award for Advancing Women in Peace and Security, at Georgetown University in Washington, in February.
Mike Theiler Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 8:11 am

Congolese gynecological surgeon Denis Mukwege has won the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought, awarded for his work treating thousands of women who have been victims of rape in his country.

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The Two-Way
6:36 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Hong Kong Students March On Chief Executive's Residence

Pro-democracy protesters carrying portraits of Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying march to his residence in Hong Kong on Wednesday.
Bobby Yip Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 9:27 am

Activists in Hong Kong, angered by what they perceive as little progress in talks on democratic reforms with the government, marched to the home of the territory's chief executive to demand his ouster.

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The Two-Way
5:36 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Pentagon Says It Will Investigate Stray Arms Drop Over Syria

Video allegedly showing Islamic State militants rifling through a box of U.S.-supplied grenades intended for Kurdish fighters.
YouTube

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 12:55 pm

The Pentagon says it will investigate a video released by the self-declared Islamic State showing its fighters purportedly rifling through crates of U.S. arms intended for Kurdish forces fighting the extremist group.

Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby said: "We're still taking a look at [the video] and assessing the validity of it."

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The Two-Way
5:11 am
Wed October 22, 2014

American Freed By North Korea Arrives Home

This undated employee photo provided by the city of Moraine, Ohio, shows Jeffrey Edward Fowle, who was released by North Korea on Tuesday after a six-month detention.
AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 9:56 am

Updated at 10:55 a.m. ET

Jeffrey Fowle, an American held since May in North Korea for allegedly leaving a bible at a club for foreign sailors, has arrived at a U.S. Air Force base in his home state of Ohio after Pyongyang released him on a "special dispensation."

Fowle, 56, landed early today at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton. He disembarked carrying two bags and was met with embraces from family members.

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Music News
3:13 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Taylor Swift Sells White Noise In Canada

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 5:32 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. You might say the musician Taylor Swift is so popular fans will listen to whatever she puts out. Like this single from an upcoming album...

(WHITE NOISE)

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Media
2:33 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Inside Larry King's Complicated Mind, As Shown In Late-Night Tweets

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 5:32 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
2:33 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Concern Over New-Voter Registration In Georgia Ahead Of Election

A voter casts her ballot at a polling site for Georgia's 2014 primary election in Atlanta.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 3:26 pm

This election season is proving to be tough for Democrats, but many believe they can turn the red state of Georgia blue with the help of new voters.

One voter registration campaign led by the New Georgia Project, a "nonpartisan effort" according to its website, has targeted black, Latino and Asian-American residents.

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