NPR News

The Two-Way
5:49 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Lava Flow In Hawaii Spares Homes, But Threatens To Cut Off Community

Lava near the leading edge of the flow oozing over a concrete slab and towards a tangerine tree before solidifying near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii earlier this week.
U.S. Geological Survey AP

Officials in Hawaii are sending National Guard troops to the town of Pahoa on the Big Island, where a lava flow is creeping toward a main road, threatening to cut off the community.

Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira said 83 troops have been sent to the town of fewer than 1,000 to help provide security. They are to aid in a road block and with other safety issues, The Associated Press says.

"These are local troops, people from the community. They'll be here working to take care of their family and friends," Oliveira said.

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NPR Ed
5:03 am
Fri October 31, 2014

50 Great Teachers: A Celebration Of Great Teaching

LA Johnson/NPR

Anne Sullivan was a great teacher. Famously, she was the "Miracle Worker," who taught a blind and deaf girl named Helen Keller to understand sign language and, eventually, to read and write.

Socrates ... now there was a great teacher. More than two thousand years after he gave his last pop quiz, we still know him for the teaching style named after him, the Socratic method. And through the writings of his most famous pupil, Plato.

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The Two-Way
5:01 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Alleged Cop-Killer Due In Court After Arrest Ends Long Manhunt

An undated FBI handout shows alleged cop killer Eric Frein on the FBI Most Wanted list. A manhunt for an alleged cop killer ended 30 October 2014 with the capture of the man Pennsylvania police had been hunting for nearly seven weeks, state authorities said.
FBI EPA/Landov

Eric Frein, the man who allegedly shot and killed a police officer and wounded another before leading authorities on a massive seven-week manhunt through rural Pennsylvania, is due in court this morning following his arrest on Thursday.

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Digital Life
4:22 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Selfies With Bears Prompt Warning From Park Rangers

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Research News
4:19 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Less Than Jubilant Genes: Why The Brits Keep Calm

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 4:22 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

13.7: Cosmos And Culture
3:44 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Three Cheers For The Instant Replay

Madison Bumgarner and catcher Buster Posey of the San Francisco Giants celebrate after winning Game 7 of baseball's World Series against the Kansas City Royals.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 6:44 am

The Giants challenged a call in Game 7 of the World Series Wednesday night. It took the umpiring crew — in conference with the umpires holed up in the video monitoring station in New York City's Chelsea district — almost three minutes to overturn the on-field decision. They called the runner out at first, giving the Giants a potentially game-changing double-play.

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Parallels
2:57 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Why Deflation Is Such A Big Worry For Europe

A farmer protesting falling prices dumps cauliflower in front of the prefecture building of Saint-Brieuc in northwestern France, as police look on Sept. 24.
Fred Tanneau AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:42 am

Growth is slowing all over the world right now, and that's especially true in Europe. Much of the continent is on the brink of another recession and even the German economy is sputtering to a halt.

Some of the weakest countries, such as Spain and Italy, are actually experiencing deflation — a broad drop in incomes and asset values. Deflation is a painful process that can be hard to reverse once it starts.

Europe's long, slow economic downturn has taken its toll on Javier Oroz Rodriguez, who owns a butcher shop in downtown Madrid.

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The Salt
2:57 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Cash For Halloween Candy? Dentists' Buyback Program Is Booming

Dr. Curtis Chan, a dentist in Del Mar, Calif., loads up a truck with 5,456 pounds of candy to deliver to Operation Gratitude during the Halloween Candy Buy Back on Nov. 8, 2013. Dr. Chan personally collected 3,542 pounds of candy from patients.
Courtesy of Dr. Curtis Chan

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 4:22 am

If your little ghosts and goblins dump their candy on the living room floor tonight, go ahead: Let them at it. They can sort, then trade, and gorge on their favorites.

But if you're like many parents, by tomorrow morning you may want to get rid of some of this candy glut.

One possible solution? Check out the Halloween Candy Buy Back program, which was founded by dentist Chris Kammer in Wisconsin. Kammer's office offers $1 a pound to buy back candy collected by the young trick-or-treaters in his practice.

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Shots - Health News
2:57 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Virus Sleuths Chip Away At Ebola Mysteries

Stringy particles of Ebola virus (blue) bud from a chronically infected cell (yellow-green) in this colorized, scanning electron micrograph.
NIAID Science Source

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 6:31 am

Vincent Racaniello, who studies viruses at Columbia University, says Ebola has recently become his obsession.

"I find myself reading incessantly about Ebola when I should be doing other things," says Racaniello, host of the online show This Week in Virology, which has devoted several recent programs to Ebola.

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Shots - Health News
2:57 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Look Here: Phone App Checks Photos For Eye Disease

Examples of what the iphone app looks for: The white reflection from an otherwise dark pupil can indicate a tumor, a cataract, or other eye problems.
Claire Eggers NPR

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 6:06 am

There's now free software for your iphone that lets you check for early signs of certain eye diseases.

The idea for the app comes from a Baylor University chemist named Bryan Shaw — we introduced you to Shaw late last year.

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Politics
2:57 am
Fri October 31, 2014

For This Colorado Voter, Oil And Gas Debate Plays Out On His Property

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 4:22 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

StoryCorps
2:57 am
Fri October 31, 2014

For Morbid Anatomy Museum Founder, Spooky Things Are Life's Work

Joanna Ebenstein, founder of the Morbid Anatomy Museum in Brooklyn, has always had a fascination with creepy things since childhood. Her father, Bob, always nurtured her passion.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 4:22 am

Joanna Ebenstein is founder of the Morbid Anatomy Museum in Brooklyn's Gowanus neighborhood, which features a human skeleton, a pickled possum and a two-headed duckling, among other things.

Ebenstein and her father, Bob, recalled during a recent visit to StoryCorps, how ever since childhood, she's been fascinated with things that make most of us squirm, including black widow spiders.

"I used to catch them, and I'd put them in jars," says Joanna, 42.

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Parallels
2:29 am
Fri October 31, 2014

As Crimea's Borders Change, So Do Lives

Valentin Danilov, 83, is a former executive officer on a Soviet sub who proudly wears his old Soviet military uniform. Crimeans like Danilov have, without changing their residence, lived in three different countries in the past 25 years — the Soviet Union, then Ukraine and now Russia.
Max Avdeev for NPR

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 3:59 am

It was like a scene from an old Soviet movie playing out before our eyes in 2014.

Dozens of young Crimeans, with innocent faces and crisp blue uniforms, stand at attention and declare oaths of loyalty to Russia.

They are the first class of Crimean recruits training to be officers in Russia's Interior Ministry. Many will likely serve in the domestic security service, the modern-day KGB. Soviet music blares as the young trainees march beneath the looming statue of Lenin in the city square.

Nearby, the Russian flag flaps above a government building.

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The Two-Way
5:26 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Eric Frein, Suspected Of Killing Pennsylvania Trooper, In Custody

This undated photo of Eric Frein was released Tuesday by Pennsylvania State Police. Frein, 31, had been sought in connection with September's killing of a state trooper and the critical wounding of another.
AP

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 11:15 pm

Eric Frein, the suspect wanted in the shooting death of a state trooper and the wounding of another officer at a police barracks in northeastern Pennsylvania, is now in police custody, Pennsylvania State Police said on Thursday.

His capture marks the end of a month-long, intensive manhunt in the Pocono Mountains.

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Politics
5:23 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

The Devastating History Of Midterm Elections

History tells us that midterm elections are bad — sometimes very bad — for the party that controls the White House. President Obama and the Democrats are pushing for voter turnout in the final days before next Tuesday's midterm election. But they are also bracing for what could be a rough night of ballot counting.

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Around the Nation
4:20 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

The Billionaire Who Remade Retirement Living On A Massive Scale

Gary Morse, with wife Sharon, in 1999. Morse transformed a mobile home park in Florida into The Villages, a retirement community of more than 100,000 residents.
Stephen M. Dowell Orlando Sentinel

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 4:41 pm

Gary Morse, a visionary property developer, transformed a Florida mobile home park into the nation's largest retirement community. The billionaire died Wednesday at the age of 77.

Under Morse's direction, The Villages, northwest of Orlando, redefined retirement living. It's a community that is remarkable most of all for its size — home to nearly 100,000 residents living in dozens of communities, spread over an area the size of Manhattan.

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The Two-Way
4:06 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Red Cross Responds To NPR/ProPublica Report On Storm Response Inefficiencies

In the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, a former Red Cross official says, as many as 40 percent of the organization's emergency vehicles were assigned for public relations purposes. This photo, which shows one of the trucks on Long Island, N.Y., in January 2013, is one example of the many publicity photos taken by the Red Cross.
Les Stone American Red Cross

This week, NPR and ProPublica have been reporting on the Red Cross response in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, Hurricane Isaac and other major storms.

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Goats and Soda
3:38 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Awful Moments In Quarantine History: Remember Typhoid Mary?

Mary Mallon, known as "Typhoid Mary," was immune to the typhoid she carried. Working as a cook, she spread the disease in New York and ended up quarantined on Brother Island (above) for more than two decades.
Bettmann/Corbis

When American nurse Kaci Hickox came home after treating Ebola patients in Liberia, she was quarantined in a tent at Newark International Airport for three days — even though she showed no signs of illness.

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The Two-Way
3:38 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Maker Of 'Body Cams' Used By Police Reports Spike In Sales

Washington, D.C., police officer Debra Domino wears a body camera at City Hall in September.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 5:31 pm

Taser International is reporting a big jump in demand by police departments for "body cameras." The company, one of the biggest providers of body cams to police departments, says 2014 sales of its "Axon Body" model are up 300 percent over last year, and sales of its more expensive "Axon Flex" camera have doubled.

And what's interesting is that this spike started well before the August shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.

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Goats and Soda
3:25 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

So For Halloween You're Dressing Up As ... A Sexy Ebola Nurse?

Dallas-area resident James Faulk turned his yard into an Ebola treatment center for Halloween. But he has a serious side: his Twitter account raises funds for Doctors Without Borders, a group active in the fight against the virus.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

People living in the United States have little to no reason to fear contracting Ebola, a deadly viral illness causing an epidemic in West Africa. Yet on Friday night, some Americans will dress up in hazmat suits akin to what health workers wear when treating an Ebola patient.

And of course, there's even a "sexy" version.

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The Two-Way
3:10 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Watchdog Says Feds Shouldn't Have Let Man Take Grenade Parts To Mexico

A Justice Department watchdog says repeated failures by federal agents and prosecutors allowed a man to transport grenade parts to Mexican drug cartels.

The case, in which agents allowed the American to go through with potentially illegal behavior in order to catch bigger fish, is reminiscent of Operation Fast and Furious, the gun-walking scandal that plagued the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms for years.

NPR's Carrie Johnson tells our newscast unit that the Justice Department's Inspector General uncovered serious flaws. She filed this report:

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Shots - Health News
3:08 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Ebola Researchers Banned From Medical Meeting In New Orleans

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 4:27 pm

Louisiana health officials say that anyone who's been in an Ebola-affected country over the last three weeks will be quarantined in their hotel rooms.

The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene is telling researchers who've recently traveled to Ebola-affected parts of West Africa that they can't come to the society's annual meeting. That wasn't the medical group's idea.

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Politics
2:56 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Obamas Head To Connecticut As Tight Governor's Race Nears Close

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 4:27 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Politics
2:53 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

The Campaign That Seems More Crime Drama Than Congressional Race

Congressman Michael Grimm is facing a 20-count federal indictment but despite the charges, Grimm stands a decent chance of being reelected in New York.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 4:27 pm

A congressional race that sounds like the plot of a crime movie is playing out in Staten Island, N.Y. Republican Congressman Michael Grimm went undercover as 'Mikey Suits' when he was an FBI agent. Now Grimm is the one facing a 20-count federal indictment. But despite the charges, Grimm stands a decent chance of being reelected next week.

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The Two-Way
2:42 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Sweden Recognizes Palestine, Drawing Sharp Israeli Criticism

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 5:50 pm

Sweden today recognized Palestine, just weeks after incoming Prime Minister Stefan Lofven said his government would become the first major European nation to make the move.

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U.S.
2:42 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Nurse Kaci Hickox Takes A Bike Ride, Defying Maine's Quarantine

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 4:27 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
1:35 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Medicare Concedes, Agrees To Pay For Woman's Home Health Care

A disabled woman with serious health problems who successfully challenged Medicare for denying her home health care coverage has racked up another win against the government.

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Parallels
1:26 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

The Place Where Rutherford B. Hayes Is A Really Big Deal

Paraguayan government employee Daniel Alonso holds a portrait of Rutherford B. Hayes at the government building in Villa Hayes, the Paraguayan town named after the 19th U.S. president. Hayes is revered for a decision that gave the country 60 percent of its present territory.
Jorge Saenz AP

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 4:27 pm

Rutherford B. Hayes, the 19th U.S. president, doesn't get much respect. He's remembered, if at all, for losing the popular vote in 1876 but winning the presidency through Electoral College maneuvering. That gave rise to his nickname, "Rutherfraud."

But there's one place where Hayes stands as a historical heavyweight: in the tiny South American nation of Paraguay.

In fact, an industrial city on the banks of the Paraguay River is named Villa Hayes — Spanish for "Hayesville" — in his honor.

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Shots - Health News
12:53 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

What A Brush With SARS Taught A Doctor About Ebola

A man wears a protective mask as he carries a bouquet of flowers at Women's College Hospital in Toronto in March 2003, when SARS fears about were widespread.
Kevin Frayer AP

Back in 2003 I was a junior doctor working at a Chicago teaching hospital.

As one of the newer docs, my daily appointment schedule had lots of openings. Pretty much any assignment nobody else wanted came my way.

One morning the nurse who managed our clinic told me that my first patient for the afternoon may have been exposed to a deadly virus while he was traveling in Asia.

My job would be to dress up in a medical hazmat suit, examine him and figure out whether he should be quarantined.

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NPR Ed
12:03 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

So Who Was Socrates, Anyway? Let's Ask Some Kids

Who Was Socrates?
NPR

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 3:54 pm

In part two of our look at the ancient Greek philosopher, we ask students at a California school about the Socratic teaching method and the questions it inspires.

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