NPR News

The Two-Way
6:09 am
Thu August 28, 2014

USC's Josh Shaw Suspended For Making Up Heroic Tale

Josh Shaw of the USC Trojans celebrates in Los Angeles, California.
Jeff Gross Getty Images

The University of Southern California has suspended cornerback Josh Shaw after he admitted to fabricating a heroic tale that explained his sprained ankle.

CBS News reports:

Shaw has been suspended indefinitely from all of the Trojans' team activities after acknowledging his heroic tale was "a complete fabrication," the school announced in a statement Wednesday.

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The Two-Way
5:26 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Ukrainian President Says Russian Troops Have Entered His Country

Women rush across the street after shelling in the town of Donetsk, Ukraine on Wednesday.
Mstislav Chernov AP

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko says Russian troops entered his country on Thursday.

Poroshenko said he was canceling a trip to Turkey and he was asking the United Nations Security Council to meet to provide an assessment of the "sharp aggravation of the situation in Ukraine."

Another Ukrainian official told CNN that the movement of Russian troops amounted to a "full-scale invasion."

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Animals
5:20 am
Thu August 28, 2014

China Accuses Panda Of Faking Pregnancies To Get Treats

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
5:02 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Telling Crimea's Story Through Children's Books

Author Lily Hyde adds a dash of magic to her children's stories about Eastern Europe.
Corbis

Understanding all the players, alliances and political stakes in the rapidly shifting crisis in Ukraine can be challenging for anyone unfamiliar with Eastern Europe and its history. And it doesn't get any simpler when you step back a century or two β€” which is why Lily Hyde's stories blending history, myth and geopolitics are grabbing the attention of readers, reporters and activists alike.

We all want to believe in fairy tales. Hyde takes it one step further, using fairy tales as inspiration to share stories about Eastern European history with children and young adults.

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Sports
4:40 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Jamaica Sets Its Sights On Winter Olympic Hockey Team

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:20 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
3:02 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Ex-Assistant Pleads Guilty To Art Theft

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 4:32 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:02 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Colossal Dam Removal Project Frees Washington's Elwa River

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 4:25 am

Copyright 2014 Puget Sound Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.kuow.org.

Law
1:47 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Former Border Protection Insider Alleges Corruption, Distortion In Agency

James Tomsheck poses in his office in Washington in June 2009. At the time, he was assistant commissioner for internal affairs with U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 6:53 am

Two months ago, James Tomsheck was pushed out of his job as internal affairs chief for U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

At the time, authorities criticized him for not doing enough to investigate abuse and corruption.

But now Tomsheck tells a very different story: about a culture that goes out of its way to evade legal restraints.

Use of force by law enforcement agents along the Southwest border has drawn attention and criticism recently, after reports that Border Patrol agents shot and killed unarmed migrants and faced no consequences.

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Science
1:46 am
Thu August 28, 2014

An Icy Solution To The Mystery Of The Slithering Stones

The cavity in this rock will carry the GPS instrument package and its battery pack across the desert.
Richard Norris

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 3:52 am

A century ago, miners working in California's Death Valley reported seeing boulders on the desert floor with long trails behind them β€” as if the stones had been pushed across the sand. But, despite 60 years of trying, no one ever saw what moved them.

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Planet Money
1:44 am
Thu August 28, 2014

A Mall With Two Minimum Wages

Wetzel's Pretzels employee Emperatriz Orozco hands out free samples at the Westfield Valley Fair Mall.
Steve Henn NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 3:50 am

The Westfield Valley Fair Mall straddles two cities. One side of the mall is in Santa Clara, but walk a few feet down the mall, and you're in San Jose. In 2012, San Jose voters agreed to raise the city's minimum wage from $8 to $10 an hour.

Philip Sandigo manages a shoe store on the $8-an-hour side. When San Jose raised the minimum wage, he lost about half his staff.

They went to the stores on the side of the mall that paid $2 an hour more.

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The Salt
1:43 am
Thu August 28, 2014

How Foster Farms Is Solving The Case Of The Mystery Salmonella

Bob O'Connor, a Foster Farms veterinarian, holds an 11-day-old chick at a ranch near the town of Merced, in California's Central Valley.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 6:14 am

Foster Farms, California's biggest chicken producer, has been accused of poisoning people with salmonella bacteria. After an outbreak last fall, the U.S. Department of Agriculture threatened to shut down three of the company's plants.

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Parallels
1:42 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Brooklyn Man Fights In Syria; Officials Unsure Of The Threat

This image obtained by NPR shows Ahmed al-Moflihi, a Yemeni-American who is believed to have fought in the Syrian civil war.
NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 6:31 am

Mocha Hookah is a little Middle Eastern restaurant and cafe on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn where you can pick up a shawarma gyro sandwich and a falafel platter and still get change back from your $20 bill. Walk inside and there's Arabic music, soccer games on flat screen televisions, and a hookah, or water pipe, set up at every table.

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It's All Politics
4:41 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Former Iowa Lawmaker Admits To Getting Payoff Before 2012 Caucuses

Kent Sorenson says he was paid for his endorsement of Ron Paul in the 2012 presidential campaign β€” and that the exchange was hidden from the public.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 7:24 pm

A former Iowa state senator says he concealed money he took for shifting loyalty from Rep. Michele Bachmann to then-Rep. Ron Paul during the 2012 presidential campaign.

There's always a certain amount of weirdness in the Iowa presidential caucuses, and in the 2012 cycle the peak weirdness might have come just before New Year's. Republican state Sen. Kent Sorenson, the Iowa chairman for Bachmann's campaign, jumped to the Paul campaign six days before the voting β€” immediately setting off rumors that he had taken a payoff for switching sides.

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The Two-Way
4:21 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

ACLU, U.S. Settle Lawsuit On Deportation Of Immigrants

Marta Mendoza, a 47-year-old Mexican woman, had lived in the Los Angeles area illegally for 32 years. There, she raised six children, all U.S. citizens.

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Men In America
4:04 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Freemasonry Still Alive And Well, And (Mostly) Men-Only

Danny Done, 26, worshipful master of the Queen Anne Masonic Lodge in Seattle. The fraternity is "a really interesting social network that's not online," he says.
Martin Kaste NPR

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

The members of the Queen Anne Masonic Lodge near downtown Seattle are on the young side. The guy in charge is 26.

Danny Done, the lodge's worshipful master, is lounging on his designated chair in the room reserved for private ceremonies.

His title comes with a top hat, though he avoids putting it on β€” he says it makes him look dorky. But he does like other aspects of Masonic regalia, like his Templar sword. Done uses it to point to a diagram on the wall that charts out the different kinds of Masonry.

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Law
3:49 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

In Settlement, Homeland Security Agrees To Reform 'Voluntary Departures'

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 8:12 pm

The Department of Homeland Security is settling a lawsuit with the ACLU, which deals with immigrants who were improperly pushed to leave the country. The suit alleged that DHS agents coerced immigrants living in the U.S. illegally to take part in a process called "voluntary departure."

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The Salt
3:40 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Diplomats And Lawyers Try To Define 'Culturally Acceptable Food'

Tractors sit on a sugarcane plantation on the land of a Guarani-KaiowΓ‘ indigenous community in Brazil, where Oxfam has alleged "land grabs" unfairly take land from the poor. The United Nations is drafting voluntary guidelines for "responsible investment in agriculture and food systems" in response to such concerns.
Tatiana Cardeal Courtesy of Oxfam

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 4:31 pm

Here's a fine topic for a graduate seminar in anthropology: What makes food culturally acceptable? Cue discussions of values and taboos, tastes and traditions.

Now make room for diplomats and lawyers, because this question has popped up, improbably, during international negotiations at the U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome.

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Shots - Health News
3:04 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Life After Ice Buckets: ALS Group Faces $94 Million Challenge

Bill Gates, Martha Stewart, LeBron James, Lindsay Lohan, Kermit the Frog and Conan O'Brien all got icily drenched for charity.
via YouTube

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

The ALS ice bucket challenge continues to bring in huge donations this summer for efforts to cure and treat what's commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. As of today, the viral campaign has raised more than $94 million for the ALS Association. That's compared with $2.7 million raised by the group during the same time last year.

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Parallels
3:02 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

When Do Food Shortages Become A Famine? There's A Formula For That

A child with suspected malnutrition is examined at a medical clinic in Malakal, South Sudan, in July.
Matthew Abbott AP

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

Chris Hillbruner has a little-known job with an extraordinary responsibility: to determine how close a given country has come to famine.

In his six years at the U.S. government's Famine Early Warning Systems Network, or FEWS NET, he's only officially declared famine once before, in Somalia in 2011.

Hillbruner explains that the bar for declaring famine was deliberately set high to avoid the confusion of the 1980s and 1990s, when well-meaning aid agencies acted like the boy who cried wolf.

"Famine," Hillbruner says, "is a word that gets thrown around a lot."

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Around the Nation
2:59 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Chicago Greets Little League National Champs As Returning Heroes

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

Chicago has gathered for a parade to celebrate the Jackie Robinson West baseball team, which won the U.S. championship at the Little League World Series. Chicago Public Radio's Natalie Moore reports that this all-black team has helped to unify a city reeling from North and South Side segregation, as well as renewed attention on the city's violence.

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Parallels
2:47 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Before Leaving Afghanistan, U.S. Troops Must Declutter

A construction excavator demolishes a B-hut at the huge Bagram Air Field north of Kabul. The military used the structures as bunks and offices during the 13-year war but is tearing them down as most of the military prepares to leave by year's end.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

Sgt. 1st Class Tom Albert is with the Army's 2nd Engineers at the massive Bagram Air Field north of Kabul, and he's overseeing operation Clean Sweep here. It's a huge job, because American troops and equipment are scheduled to be out of Bagram and other bases by the end of the year.

The U.S. and Afghanistan are still trying to work out a deal that would allow nearly 10,000 military personnel to stay, but even that would be just a fraction of the force that's been here for the past 13 years.

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Business
2:47 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

As BK Takes Tim Hortons, Canadians Stay Loyal To Their National Icon

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Politics
2:47 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Mapping Out The End Days Of The Midterm Campaign

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Around the Nation
2:47 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Surfers Flock To The Water, As Huge Waves Hit The West Coast

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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National Security
2:47 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

The Life Of The Man Who Died Fighting For ISIS

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

Douglas McAuthur McCain was a U.S. citizen raised in Minnesota. He also just earned a dubious distinction, as the first American to die in Syria fighting for the extremist group that calls itself the Islamic State. For more on McCain, Robert Siegel speaks with Michael Schmidt of The New York Times.

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Media
2:47 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

London 'Times' Goes Retro With Stereo Typing

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

Robert Siegel speaks to Patrick Kidd, the editor of The Times Diary, about the sounds of mechanical typewriters piped into the newsroom of The Times in London. The idea is that the sounds will increase energy levels and help reporters hit deadlines.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Science
1:53 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

There's A Big Leak In America's Water Tower

Joe Giersch, an ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, studies stoneflies that live only in the melt from glaciers and snowpack in the northern Rockies.
Clint Muhlfeld USGS

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

The northern arm of the Rocky Mountains is sometimes called "the crown of the continent," and its jewels are glaciers and snowfields that irrigate large parts of North America during spring thaw.

But the region is getting warmer, even faster than the rest of the world. Scientists now say warming is scrambling the complex relationship between water and nature and could threaten some species with extinction as well as bring hardship to ranchers and farmers already suffering from prolonged drought.

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Parallels
12:35 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

It's Not Whisky, But Everyone In Scotland Drinks It By The Bottle

Irn Bru is a hugely popular Scottish soda that may even outsell Coca-Cola in Scotland. It also symbolizes local pride in a place that will vote on whether to break away from the United Kingdom next month.
Courtesy of Irn Bru

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

For a visitor to Scotland, it can be difficult to understand the local passion for a neon orange soda that locals call "the brew." The drink is Irn Bru (pronounced "iron brew").

You can find it from McDonald's to corner stores and pubs across Scotland. It is such a powerful force that it may even outsell Coca-Cola here β€” making it one of the few places on the globe where Coke isn't the leading brand.

"This stuff runs in my blood," says Chris Young, as he walks through downtown Glasgow carrying a bottle.

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Television
11:57 am
Wed August 27, 2014

Aaron Paul On Playing A Meth Dealer On 'Breaking Bad'

Paul won the Emmy for outstanding supporting actor in a drama series for playing student-turned-drug dealer Jesse Pinkman. In 2011, he said his character was supposed to die in the first season.

Originally broadcast Sept. 19, 2011.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Interviews
11:57 am
Wed August 27, 2014

Sarah Silverman Discusses Her Movie 'Jesus Is Magic'

Silverman won the Emmy for best writing for a variety special for her HBO special We Are Miracles. In 2005, she spoke with Fresh Air about her movie based on her acts in New York and Los Angeles.

Originally broadcast Nov. 09, 2005.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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