NPR News

Code Switch
12:39 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Study: At 'Rate My Professor,' A Foreign Accent Can Hurt A Teacher's Score

The biggest gaps overall were in the South.
Kat Chow/NPR

"So-and-so is really, really hard to understand." Or: "His accent is so distracting." I remember hearing off-the-cuff remarks like this a few times in college, complaints by classmates about TAs and instructors, almost all of them of Asian descent and non-native English speakers.

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All Tech Considered
12:38 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Mass-Market Stocks In Hand-Crafted Goods: Etsy Preps To Go Public

Etsy's IPO paperwork is full of numbers and facts — plus a few pages like this.
Etsy/SEC

For sale: lovingly hand-crafted shares of Etsy stock, proudly produced in the USA by a team of entrepreneurs, designers and coders. Please note, there may be some variation in size, color and profits.

A decade ago, Etsy launched as a way for crafters and DIY-ers to sell their handmade goods online. Now the New York-based e-commerce site has filed for an initial public offering.

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Music
12:09 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

On 'Collective Portrait,' Eddie Henderson Is Still Taking Risks At 74

Jazz trumpet and flugelhorn player Eddie Henderson was in his 30s when he debuted on record with Herbie Hancock. Before that he'd become a medical doctor, who went on to specialize in psychiatry, because it left his nights free to play the horn. With Henderson's new album, Collective Portrait, Fresh Air jazz Critic Kevin Whitehead says that decision is still paying off for him.

The Salt
12:03 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Snow Is Delicious. But Is It Dangerous To Eat?

When foraging for delicious bites of snow, steer clear of plowed piles and manure, researchers say.
Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 12:30 pm

Many people will see the snow that's currently blanketing much of the Eastern seaboard of the U.S. a nuisance coating sidewalks and roads. Others are celebrating it as an excuse spend the day swooshing down a hill.

As for me, I like to think of snow as food.

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Law
11:51 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Ferguson Police Begin Reform Following DOJ Report, Mayor Says

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 12:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
11:43 am
Thu March 5, 2015

It's World Book Day: Time For Reading Lists And Dress-Up

Fans are celebrating World Book Day Thursday. Here, a man browses through books at the Albertine, a French bookstore and library at the French Embassy in New York.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 12:33 pm

Put down that screen: Today's the day to celebrate holding a bound book in your hands. World Book Day celebrations include storytelling and dressing up as favorite characters. We bring you a roundup of stories and reading lists.

Many young (and less-young) readers are using the occasion to dress up as beloved characters from pirates and the doughnut-dispensing Mr. Panda to Hermione Granger of the Harry Potter series.

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The Two-Way
11:42 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Florida Man's Facebook Post Against Employer In Emirates Leads To Jail

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 12:11 pm

Ryan Pate's anger stemmed from Abu Dhabi-based Global Aerospace Logistics refusal to extend his leave so he could recover from a back injury. He took to Facebook in January to express his displeasure, calling his employers "backstabbers" and Arabs "filthy." When he returned to the Emirates, he received a call from the police asking him to come in.

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The Two-Way
11:41 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Ringling Bros. Says No More Circus Elephants By 2018

Elephant acts at Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus will be phased out by 2018, the circus' parent company said today. The elephants will retire to a conservation center in Polk City, Fla.
Tamika Moore AL.com/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 12:45 pm

What's the "Greatest Show On Earth" without elephants? Starting in 2018, anyone attending the iconic Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus act will find out.

Citing public concern about the elephants and how they are treated, the circus' parent company, Feld Entertainment, announced today that it would phase out use of the animals in its shows within three years.

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The Two-Way
11:04 am
Thu March 5, 2015

U.S. Appeals Court Overturns Gag Order In Mine Disaster Case

Former Massey Energy Company Chairman and CEO Don Blankenship, seen in July 2010, has pleaded not guilty to conspiracy charges associated with the 2010 West Virginia mine explosion that killed 29 men.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

A federal appeals court has vacated a sweeping gag order in the criminal case involving former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship and the 2010 Upper Big Branch coal mine disaster.

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Shots - Health News
10:54 am
Thu March 5, 2015

State Lawmakers Keep Busy While Supreme Court Weighs Obamacare

Latoya Watson of Washington, D.C., cheers during a rally outside the Supreme Court on Wednesday, when the justices heard arguments in King v. Burwell.
Andrew Harnik AP

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 12:03 pm

As the nation awaits a Supreme Court ruling on Obamacare, lawmakers in many states are moving ahead with a range of Affordable Care Act bills, some of which seek to bolster the law and others that are bent on derailing it.

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The Two-Way
10:01 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Plane Skids Off Runway At New York's LaGuardia; 6 Injured

A Delta jet which skidded off the runway at LaGuardia airport is attended by emergency personnel in New York City, on Thursday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 12:17 pm

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

A Delta flight carrying 130 passengers and crew skidded off a snow-covered runway at New York's LaGuardia Airport, slamming through a fence on the side of the tarmac. An officials says six people were hurt.

Initially authorities reported no injuries from the accident. Port Authority spokesman Joe Pentangelo said later that six people had been injured, but that none of the injuries were life threatening.

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The Two-Way
9:56 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Michael Brown's Family Will File Civil Suit Over His Death

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 11:01 am

The family of Michael Brown, the unarmed black man who was slain by Ferguson, Mo., police last August, say they will file a civil lawsuit over his death. Brown, 18, was shot and killed by Officer Darren Wilson, who is no longer with the city's police force.

The family's legal team "said the City of Ferguson and former Officer Darren Wilson will be named in the suit," The Associated Press reports.

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The Two-Way
9:38 am
Thu March 5, 2015

India Threatens BBC Over Decision To Air Rape Documentary In U.K.

British filmmaker Leslee Udwin addresses a news conference on her documentary India's Daughter on Tuesday. The film, which has been banned in India, was broadcast Wednesday in the U.K. — a decision that has angered the Indian government.
Altaf Qadri AP

India says it will take action against the BBC for broadcasting a documentary in the U.K. about the fatal 2012 gang rape of a young woman in New Delhi. The government, which has banned the Indian media from broadcasting India's Daughter or even showing clips from it pending an investigation, also ordered YouTube to take down the film.

As we reported Wednesday, the government is concerned by remarks made in the film by one of the rapists, Mukesh Singh.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Second-Day Proceedings Underway In Boston Marathon Trial

In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is depicted sitting in federal court in Boston on Dec. 18, 2014, for a pretrial hearing. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. He could face the death penalty if convicted.
Jane Flavell Collins AP

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 11:21 am

Jurors will hear more testimony today in the trial of Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the accused Boston Marathon bomber, a day after a dramatic admission of guilt and often-heartbreaking accounts from victims and survivors of the deadly 2013 attack that killed three people and wounded 260 others.

The trial began Wednesday with the admission of Tsarnaev's guilt by his defense attorney. NPR's Tovia Smith, who is covering the trial, told All Things Considered that was not surprising.

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History
8:10 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Billionaire's Research Team Discovers Japanese World War II Battleship

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
8:02 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Winter's Final Punch? Forecasters Say Maybe

Snow begins to fall Thursday morning along the National Mall, in Washington, D.C. The federal government closed its offices because of a new round of winter weather.
Andrew Harnik AP

Tired of winter? It could be the season's last gasp or just wishful thinking: an area ranging all the way from Texas to the mid-Atlantic was under a weather alert, with as much as 10 inches of new snow possible in the northern reaches.

The Weather Channel says:

"All told, roughly 83 million people were under some kind of warning or advisory for winter weather.

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The Two-Way
7:52 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Singapore Court Sentences 2 Germans To Caning And Jail Over Graffiti

Andreas Von Knorre (right), one of two German nationals arrested for vandalism in Singapore, arrives in a police car at the state court on Nov. 22, 2014. Both men were sentenced Thursday to a prison term and caning.
Roslan Rahman AFP/Getty Images

Two young German men who broke into a train depot in Singapore to spray-paint graffiti on a commuter train car have been sentenced to nine months in prison and three strokes from a cane. They were tracked down and arrested in Malaysia last November.

Andreas Von Knorre, 22, and Elton Hinz, 21, had been working in Australia when they traveled to Singapore and broke into the depot. They soon became the subject of an international pursuit.

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NPR News Investigations
7:19 am
Thu March 5, 2015

'Grand Bargain' In Workers' Comp Unravels, Harming Injured Workers Further

Joel Ramirez climbs back into his wheelchair with the help of Francisco Guardado, a home health aide, at his home in Rialto, Calif. Ramirez was paralyzed from the waist down in 2009 when a 900-pound crate fell on him at a warehouse. Changes to California workers' compensation laws have impacted his quality of care.
Patrick T. Fallon for ProPublica

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 9:13 am

Workers injured on the job are supposed to get guaranteed medical care and money to live on. Employers and their insurance companies pay for that.

And in return, employers don't get sued for workplace accidents. But this "grand bargain," as it's called, in workers' compensation, seems to be unraveling.

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The Two-Way
6:22 am
Thu March 5, 2015

North Korea: Attack On U.S. Ambassador Is 'Deserved Punishment'

U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert leaves Sejong Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Seoul, South Korea, after the attack.
Yonhap EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 11:27 am

Updated at 1:25 p.m. ET

North Korea is calling an attack on U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert by a knife-wielding political activist "deserved punishment" for America's joint military exercises with Seoul. Meanwhile, Lippert, who has received stitches to his face and undergone surgery on his arm after the assault, says he is "doing well."

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Parallels
5:51 am
Thu March 5, 2015

In Israel, A Vote To Choose A Leader And An Identity

Shoppers walk through a market in downtown Jerusalem last November, shortly before Israel's coalition government collapsed. As Israel prepares for elections on March 17, the diverse population has very different notions of what the country should look like.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 11:58 am

Israel's March 17 election is two years earlier than it should be, thanks to the collapse of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition government in December. Contributing to the breakup was an impassioned debate over whether a stronger legal emphasis on the country's Jewish character would ultimately make Israel less democratic.

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Around the Nation
5:30 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Ohio House Votes To Make 'Hang On Sloopy' State's Rock Song

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World
5:30 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Canadians Told To Stop Drawing Spock On $5

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
5:09 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Hillary Clinton Asks State Dept. To Release Her Emails To The Public

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, seen here at a U.N. event last March, has been criticized for using a private email account to conduct official business during her four years in the Obama administration.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 7:30 am

Responding to concerns over her use of a personal email account to conduct official business while in office, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says she wants the public to have access to her emails. The State Department says it will review messages for possible release.

The issue rose to importance earlier this week, after it was revealed that during her entire tenure at the State Department, Clinton used a personal email account — a move that had kept the emails out of the government's control and circumvented archival practices.

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NPR Ed
5:03 am
Thu March 5, 2015

The Legacy Of Booker T. Washington Revisited

Tuskegee began in 1881 with 30 students in a rundown church and a shanty. Its early buildings were in such bad shape that on rainy days a student had to hold an umbrella over Washington while he lectured.
LA Johnson/NPR

Let's face it, Booker T. Washington has a serious image problem. He was perhaps the most influential black man in America during the late 1800s, but is often remembered today as being subservient, a sellout even.

Yes, he pursued racial equality with discretion. His famous "Atlanta Compromise" speech of 1895 cautioned blacks against extremism and encouraged them to prove their worth by becoming productive members of society.

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Africa
3:06 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Boko Haram Ramps Up Attacks Despite Effort To Repel Them

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 8:11 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
1:58 am
Thu March 5, 2015

In Berlin, Grassroots Efforts Work To Integrate Inner-City Schools

Young fans of the German national soccer team drink iced tea in July 2010 as they watch the FIFA World Cup semi-final match Germany vs. Spain in an Arabic cafe in Berlin's Neukölln district. The neighborhood has gentrified rapidly in recent years, but many of the white families moving in leave once their children reach school age. Local groups are trying to change that.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 8:11 am

In parts of Berlin, racial segregation in schools is far from official policy, but it is often a reality. In the fast-gentrifying district of Neukölln, young, mainly white professionals usually move away as soon as their kids reach school-age.

But small, parent-led initiatives are working to change this trend and ensure their local schools better reflect the neighborhood.

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Science
1:45 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Jaw Fossil In Ethiopia Likely Oldest Ever Found In Human Line

With the help of researcher Sabudo Boraru (right), anthropologist Chris Campisano, of Arizona State University, takes samples from the fossil-filled Ledi-Geraru project area in Ethiopia. The jawbone was found nearby.
Courtesy of J Ramón Arrowsmith

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 10:55 am

Scientists working in Ethiopia say they've found the earliest known fossil on the ancestral line that led to humans. It's part of a lower jaw with several teeth, and it's about 2.8 million years old. Anthropologists say the fossil fills an important gap in the record of human evolution.

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Parallels
1:44 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Boris Nemtsov: 'He Directed His Words Against Putin Himself'

Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov, who was shot dead last Friday, was one of the most outspoken critics of President Vladimir Putin. No arrests have been made in his killing.
Ivan Sekretarev AP

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 8:11 am

Boris Nemtsov was just 37 when Russian President Boris Yeltsin named him deputy prime minister in 1997. Trained as a physicist, Nemtsov symbolized a new generation of young leaders who rose to power in the chaotic aftermath of the Soviet breakup.

But after Vladimir Putin became president, Nemtsov joined the liberal opposition and became an outspoken critic. He was arrested on several occasions, but continued his attacks on the Russian leader.

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Shots - Health News
1:43 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Fertility Clinic Courts Controversy With Treatment That Recharges Eggs

Along with sperm, the in vitro procedure adds fresh mitochondria extracted from less mature cells in the same woman's ovaries. The hope is to revitalize older eggs with these extra "batteries." But the FDA still wants proof that the technique works and is safe.
Chris Nickels for NPR

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 12:45 pm

Melissa and her husband started trying to have a baby right after they got married. But nothing was happening. So they went to a fertility clinic and tried round after round of everything the doctors had to offer. Nothing worked.

"They basically told me, 'You know, you have no chance of getting pregnant,' " says Melissa, who asked to be identified only by her first name to protect her privacy.

But Melissa, 30, who lives in Ontario, Canada, didn't give up. She switched clinics and kept trying. She got pregnant once, but that ended in a miscarriage.

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The Two-Way
9:42 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

House Approves Amtrak Funding, Rewrites Rules To Allow Furry Riders

Amtrak conductor Michael Laubauskas talks on a radio Feb. 19 as his train departs Trenton, N.J., for Washington, D.C. The U.S. House passed an Amtrak funding bill Wednesday that splits Amtrak's high-ridership Northeast Corridor line that runs from Boston to Washington from the less profitable part of the system.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 11:29 pm

Instead of fighting like cats and dogs, Congress appears to be coming together for a change, and maybe it's because of our feline and canine friends.

In a rare bipartisan vote, the House today approved an Amtrak funding bill that will keep the trains running for another four years, and allow some pets to ride along on the intercity passenger rail service.

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