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Why Are Migrants Surging Into Europe Now?

39 minutes ago

The United Nations says more than 300,000 migrants have set out from North Africa and the Middle East on the Mediterranean Sea for Europe this year so far — 40 percent more than in all of last year.

Defying court decisions that go all the way up to the U.S. Supreme Court, Kim Davis, the Rowan County (Ky.) Clerk, continued to deny marriage licenses on Wednesday in protest of same-sex marriage.

As Kentucky Public Radio's Ryland Barton reports, Davis, who has become a divisive figure in the national debate on gay marriage, has been summoned to a federal court on Thursday for a hearing on whether to hold her in contempt.

With that, here's what we know about Davis:

Of the more than 7,000 pages of Hillary Clinton's emails released by the State Department earlier this week, one was (literally) fishy:

Gefilte fish is a Jewish dish (some would say delicacy) made of chopped fish. The night of the email release, reaction and theories on the story behind that email came in quickly:

In reality, the email was sent during a 2010 U.S.-Israeli trade dispute. Israel had imposed a large tariff on imported carp (often used in the dish). That tariff was particularly harming one American fishery that exported a lot of carp to Israel.

In 1938, an Austrian pediatrician named Hans Asperger gave the first public talk on autism in history. Asperger was speaking to an audience of Nazis, and he feared that his patients — children who fell onto what we now call the autism spectrum — were in danger of being sent to Nazi extermination camps.

As Asperger spoke, he highlighted his "most promising" patients, a notion that would stick with the autistic spectrum for decades to come.

Law enforcement authorities in Illinois have widened their search for three suspects wanted in connection with Tuesday's shooting death of a police officer in the community of Fox Lake.

Officers from local, state and federal agencies have been searching the area where Lt. Charles Joseph Gliniewicz, 52, was shot — so far without success. NPR's Cheryl Corley reports from Chicago:

Starting Oct. 6, Egg McMuffins, hotcakes, hash browns and more will be available all day at McDonald's.

On Tuesday, the company officially approved the decision to offer breakfast items all day at its more than 14,000 U.S. locations, which generally stopped selling the menu items around 10:30 or 11 a.m. The restaurant giant has been testing the all-day breakfast plan at select locations in the U.S. since this spring, and based on the results, franchises voted in favor of expanding the offering.

In April, Chipotle Mexican Grill made a big splash when it launched a campaign called G-M-Over It.

"When it comes to our food, genetically modified ingredients don't make the cut," the chain said.

And customers seemed to eat up the message.

But a new class-action lawsuit against the Mexican chain alleges that the campaign's marketing claims don't hold up.

By the time DeAngelo Cortijo was 14, he had been in more than a dozen foster homes. He had run away and lived on the streets for months, and he had been diagnosed with bipolar and anxiety disorders, attachment disorder, intermittent explosive disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder. He had been in and out of mental hospitals and heavily medicated.

Cortijo, who was born in San Francisco, was taken from his mother after she attempted suicide when he was 3.

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch has strongly condemned shootings of law enforcement officers in Texas and Illinois and issued an unequivocal message of support for police.

"We have had four more guardians slain, and frankly our hearts are broken," the attorney general said Wednesday in remarks to a fair housing conference in Washington, D.C. "I offer the families of these officers my condolences, and I ask that all of us come together and keep them in our prayers."

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Maryland Sen. Barbara Mikulski announced Wednesday that she will support the Iran nuclear agreement, giving the White House the final vote needed to protect the accord from a Republican-led effort to defeat the measure.

A recent outbreak of Salmonella in frozen tuna might have sushi lovers wondering if it's safe to eat that raw fish.

The outbreak in question began in California in March. All told, it sickened 65 people in 11 states. There were 35 cases in California, with another 18 in Arizona and New Mexico. The rest of the cases were scattered across the country, including four in Minnesota.

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Update at 11:52 a.m. ET. Judge Denies Two Key Motions:

A judge in Baltimore handed prosecutors two pretrial victories on Wednesday in relation to the Freddie Gray case, a 25-year-old man who died after suffering injuries in police custody.

NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports that the judge rejected a motion to dismiss charges against six police officers who were allegedly involved in Gray's arrest and death. And the judge also dismissed a motion that sought to remove Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby from the case.

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For a second day, thousands of stranded migrants, including refugees from Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq, have camped out at the main train station in Budapest.

As we've reported, the Hungarian government was allowing the migrants to leave without a passport check, but on Tuesday migrants were barred from boarding trains that were headed toward Western Europe.

Reporting from the Keleti Railway Station in Budapest, Joanna Kakissis tells our Newscast unit that the train station has become the latest flashpoint in this migrant crisis. She filed this report:

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This post was updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

Congress votes on President Obama's nuclear deal with Iran this month. Most lawmakers have said they oppose the deal, yet he has a good chance of winning.

That is because the deal will be considered under rules that favor him, even if only a minority supports him in Congress.

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On the border between Thailand and Cambodia yesterday, police arrested a man. The Thai police took the man's fingerprints, and they now say his fingerprints match those found elsewhere on bomb-making equipment.

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Results of a new poll out this morning suggest that Pope Francis is extremely popular among American Catholics.

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Ninety percent of those surveyed by the Pew Research Center had a favorable view of the pope.

More adults across the country are strapping on helmets and hopping on bikes to get to work. That's good news for people's hearts and waistlines, but it also means more visits to the emergency room.

Hospital admissions because of bike injuries more than doubled between 1998 and 2013, doctors reported Tuesday in JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Association. And the rise was the biggest with bikers ages 45 and over.

Kentucky's Gov. Steve Beshear says he's powerless to stop Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis from refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples — something she has done for consecutive days, flouting rulings from federal courts that include the Supreme Court and prompting a motion to hold her in contempt of court.

The federal trial of a Madison Police Department officer accused of using excessive force on an unarmed Indian man began in Huntsville Tuesday.

Madison Police Department officer Eric Parker is charged with violating the civil rights of Sureshbhai Patel, an unarmed 57-year-old Indian man, during a daytime confrontation in February. The encounter was caught on a police cruiser dash cam video. Patel is seen being forcefully swept off his feet and slammed to the ground, causing severe injuries.

The incident sparked an international outcry.

Carly Fiorina was relegated to the JV squad in the Fox News GOP presidential debate in August, but her strong performance that night helped her race past several of her peers in recent polls.

That surge in polling wasn't enough to get her into the next big debate — but it might be now.

That's because CNN Tuesday afternoon changed its criteria for who will get into its main Sept. 16 debate in such a way that Fiorina is much more likely to be included.

Both the Nasdaq and the Dow Jones index were hit by losses Tuesday, as concerns again rose about China's economy. The Dow is now down nearly 10 percent in 2015, after falling 469 points Tuesday to close at 16,058.

Markets in Europe and Asia also suffered, after renewed worries about a slowdown in China, the world's second-largest economy.

"The latest evidence is China's purchasing manager's index," NPR's John Ydstie reports, "which shows the country's manufacturing sector contracting."

The largest fish farm in America could be built 4 miles off San Diego's coast.

Rose Canyon Fisheries could have a footprint on the ocean floor of 1.3 square miles, about the same size as New York's Central Park. The goal is to produce 11 million pounds of yellowtail and sea bass each year.

More than a month after his trial on murder charges ended in a mistrial for the second time, former Eutawville, S.C., police Chief Richard Combs has been sentenced to a year of home detention. Combs agreed to plead guilty to misconduct in office Tuesday.

Combs, who is white, was the head of the police department in the small town of Eutawville back in May 2011, when he shot and killed 54-year-old Bernard Bailey, who was black, as Bailey tried to drive away from the Eutawville Police Department.

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