NPR News

The Two-Way
1:44 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

Dzhokhar Tsnarnaev's Lawyers File Motion For New Trial

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 1:45 pm

Less than two weeks after he was sentenced to death for his role in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, Dzhokhar Tsnarnaev has begun the process of seeking a new trial.

Tsnarnaev's lawyers filed a preliminary motion Monday that will reportedly seek to overturn his conviction and his death sentence. More from the Associated Press:

"The motion did not contain any details on what grounds they plan to argue, saying only that a new trial is 'required in the interests of justice.' "

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NPR Story
12:45 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

The Rise Of The MP3 And The Fall Of The CD

Stephen Witt is author of "How Music Got Free." (Photo on right by Chad Griffith)

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 12:13 pm

How did music go from being something you got on CD to something you got online? That’s what Stephen Witt chronicles in his new book “How Music Got Free: The End of an Industry, The Turn of the Century, and the Patient Zero of Privacy.”

Witt profiles the German audio engineers who came up with the MP3 technology and a worker in a CD plant who leaked almost two thousand albums.

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NPR Story
12:44 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

5-Time Deported Mexican Immigrant Admits To Killing

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 12:13 pm

The Mexican immigrant arrested for seemingly randomly killing a woman as she strolled with her father at the popular Pier 14 tourist spot in San Francisco last week is admitting to the crime, in a local television interview.

Francisco Sanchez appeared confused at times in the interview with KGO-TV in San Francisco. He had been deported five times before the shooting. Donald Trump, who’s running for President, tweeted that the shooting is an example of the broken immigration system.

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NPR Story
12:44 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

Political Rhetoric Soars Across Europe After Greek Vote

The European Union flag flies over the Reichstag in Berlin on July 6th -- the day after a majority of people voted "no" in the Greek bailout referendum. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 12:13 pm

With uncertainty over Greece’s future in the Eurozone, the country is standing on an economic cliff. But politically speaking, there is much at stake as well. Sunday’s vote has significant political implications both in Europe and across the globe.

NPR Story
12:43 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

A Look At What's Coming Up This Week In American Politics

US Secretary of State John Kerry, British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (C) and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov (R) sit around the table at the Palais Coburg Hotel where the Iran nuclear talks meetings are being held in Vienna, Austria on July 6, 2015. (Carlos Barria/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 12:13 pm

Kicking off a busy week in the nation’s capital, NPR’s Ron Elving joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss what Republican presidential candidates are, or are not, saying about Puerto Rico’s debt, where nuclear talks with Iran stand, and what legislation Congress will take up when it returns from recess tomorrow.

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NPR Story
12:43 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

Reforesting After Fracking: Working To Restore Pennsylvania's Drilled Land

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 12:13 pm

While most of the attention on the impacts of fracking has focused on things like drinking water, air pollution and earthquakes, state regulators in Pennsylvania are working on another less-discussed, but no less serious, side effect of oil and gas development: forest fragmentation.

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The Salt
12:15 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

Mechanization Brings Quick Change To Borneo Region Known For 'Slow Rice'

Workers with Ceria wait for a pipe-welding machine to finish connecting two sections of plastic irrigation pipe in Bario, Malaysia. The company has brought mechanized farming to the Kelabit Highlands.
Jerry Redfern for NPR

Change typically doesn't come fast or often in the Kelabit Highlands in the interior of Malaysian Borneo. "Go slowly" is both a motto and a way of life here. For centuries, even millennia, locals have gathered and grown their own foods in the dense tropical jungle.

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NPR Story
12:13 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

Grownups Read Things They Wrote As Kids: Dear Mr. Prime Minister

On a stage in Toronto, a grownup reads something she wrote as a kid. (Photo via Grownups Read Things They Wrote As Kids' Facebook)

A Canadian podcast series features grown-ups reading things they wrote as kids.

All this week, we’ll hear excerpts from the series and today Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with the podcast’s creator and producer Dan Misener, as they listen to a bit of Caleb Beyers giving advice to the Prime Minister on nuclear disarmament.

Interview Highlights: Dan Misener

On how the podcast was born

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NPR Story
12:13 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

Aetna Acquires Humana As Other Health Insurers Look to Merge

Aetna Inc., the nation's third largest insurer, headquartered in Hartford, Conn., bought its rival Humana for $37 billion. (Jessica Hill/AP Photo)

The recent Supreme Court decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act was a relief to the six and a half million Americans who receive subsidies to purchase health insurance. It was also a relief for the health insurance industry.

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

Greece's 'Erratic Marxist' Leaves Legacy Of Sound Bites

Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis walks toward his motorcycle following a meeting with Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras in Athens, Greece, on March 15. Varoufakis said today he was resigning, a day after Greeks voted to reject terms of a bailout imposed by Greece's creditors. Varoufakis was one of the leading campaigner behind the "no" vote.
Pantelis Saitas EPA /Landov

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Movie Reviews
12:01 pm
Mon July 6, 2015

Country's Kacey Musgraves Mixes Wit And Sincerity In 'Pageant Material'

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
11:47 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Cuba Is First To Earn WHO Seal For Ending Mother-Baby HIV Transmission

A pregnant woman in Cuba with HIV would be referred to a policlinic, like the one above, for specialized care.
Courtesy of Pan American Health Organization/WHO

A woman has HIV. She becomes pregnant. What are the chances that she can deliver a baby who is not infected?

In some countries, like Yemen, for example, only 11 percent of pregnant women with HIV receive treatment to prevent their babies from being infected. For women who aren't part of that fortunate group, the chance of passing HIV to their infant is as high as 45 percent.

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Goats and Soda
11:40 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Monsoon Takes A Break; Tibetans Celebrate Dalai Lama's 80th Birthday

Tibetan men living in Kathmandu, Nepal, danced Monday during celebrations to mark the 80th birthday of the Dalai Lama.
Niranjan Shrestha AP

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 12:03 pm

This weekend the monsoon started pouring down on the hilly streets of Dharamsala in northern India. But the rain held off on Monday as thousands of Tibetans gathered at the town's Buddhist temple to celebrate the Dalai Lama's 80th birthday.

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Shots - Health News
11:18 am
Mon July 6, 2015

After Measles Outbreaks, Parents Shift Their Thinking On Vaccines

Most of the people who got measles in last year's outbreaks hadn't been vaccinated with the MMR vaccine.
Photo illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 12:16 pm

Nothing like a good measles outbreak to get people thinking more kindly about vaccines.

One third of parents say they think vaccines have more benefit than they did a year ago, according to a poll conducted in May.

That's compared to the 5 percent of parents who said they now think vaccines have fewer benefits and 61 percent who think the benefits are the same.

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The Two-Way
10:52 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Burt Shavitz, Namesake And Co-Founder Of Burt's Bees, Dies

Burt Shavitz, who co-founded Burt's Bees, died Sunday in Bangor, Maine.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 1:56 pm

Burt Shavitz, the man whose face is on your minty Burt's Bees lip balm and body wash, died on Sunday in Bangor, Maine. He was 80.

NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports that Shavitz's death was as a result of respiratory complications.

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Parallels
10:22 am
Mon July 6, 2015

What's Next For Greece?

Greek supporters of the "no" vote celebrate at Syntagma Square in Athens on Sunday night after the results were announced. Greeks overwhelmingly rejected the demands of creditors for more austerity in return for rescue loans. But the country has no clear way out of its financial crisis.
Petr David Josek AP

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 10:57 am

Greeks waved flags and danced in the streets after they overwhelmingly voted to reject further austerity measures from their international creditors. But now comes the reckoning, as Greece faces the realities of an economy out of money and creditors out of patience.

Here are some of the fundamental questions:

When will the banks reopen?

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The Two-Way
9:44 am
Mon July 6, 2015

A Hacker Is Hacked: Controversial Italian Cyber Espionage Company Is Targeted

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 12:14 pm

A controversial cyber espionage company called Hacking Team is reeling this morning after hackers gave it a taste of its own medicine by breaking into its systems, downloading hundreds of gigabytes of data and throwing it all on the open Internet.

Hacking Team has not said whether the leaked documents are legitimate, but NPR verified that at least the hacked personal passwords do check out.

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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Pope Kicks Off Three-Nation Tour In Ecuador

Pope Francis waves to the crowd as he rides aboard the Popemobile in the streets of Quito, Ecuador, on Sunday.
Dolores Ochoa AP

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 9:14 am

Pope Francis is making his first visit as pontiff to Spanish-speaking countries in South America.

Francis landed in Quito, Ecuador, on Sunday and was welcomed by hundreds of thousands. The New York Times reports:

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Around the Nation
4:21 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Missing Comma Gets Woman Out Of A Parking Ticket

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 6:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
3:59 am
Mon July 6, 2015

9-Year-Old Fisherman Lands 600 Pound Sturgeon

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 6:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:01 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Politics In The News: Iran Nuclear Talks

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 6:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:01 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Waiting For An Accord, IAEA Readies To Verify Iran's Nuclear Program

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 12:10 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's All Politics
1:47 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Liberal Minority Won Over Conservatives In Historic Supreme Court Term

An American flag flies over the U.S. Supreme Court June 29, 2015 in Washington, D.C. This past term, the liberal position won in 19 of the 26 closely-divided ideological cases and eight out of 10 of the most important ones.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 7:51 am

It was a historic term, a surprisingly liberal term — and a nasty term.

That's the essence of the tea-leaf reading about the U.S. Supreme Court term that just concluded. Astonishingly — though the court is dominated by conservative justices — the liberal minority, disciplined and united, drove the direction in a startling number of cases, while the conservatives splintered into multiple factions.

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Around the Nation
1:46 am
Mon July 6, 2015

A Few Miles From Mobile, A Wealth Of History, Nature — And Danger

A cypress tree swamp in Byrnes Lake, part of the more than 200,000-acre Mobile delta. It's the most biologically diverse river delta system in the country.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 8:44 am

This summer, Morning Edition is taking you on adventures off the beaten path — trails that transport us to a special, hidden place. We start just minutes from downtown Mobile, Ala., at the point where five rivers converge in the Mobile Bay Delta. With our trail guide, we discover centuries of history, and biodiversity like no other place in the country.

The point where five rivers empty into Mobile Bay is a fisherman and hunter's paradise, but it's also a draw for naturalists and history buffs.

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Shots - Health News
1:45 am
Mon July 6, 2015

People With Brain Injuries Heal Faster If They Get Up And Get Moving

Nurses Katherine Malinak and Amy Young lift Louis DeMattio, a stroke patient, out of his hospital bed using a ceiling-mounted lift at the Cleveland Clinic.
Dustin Franz for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 6:00 am

When Kate Klein began working as a nurse in the Cleveland Clinic's Neurointensive Care Unit, one of the first things she noticed was that her patients spent a lot of time in bed. She knew patients with other injuries benefitted from getting up and moving early on, and she wondered why not patients with brain injuries.

"I asked myself that question. I asked my colleagues that question," Klein says. "Why aren't these patients getting out of bed? Is there something unique about patients with neurologic injury?"

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The Two-Way
1:45 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Pluto-Bound Spacecraft Nears Its Quarry

NASA's New Horizons mission will be the first ever to visit Pluto and its moons. This artist's conception shows the probe as it passes the dwarf planet.
JHUAPL/SwRI

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 6:12 am

It's taken nearly a decade and three billion miles to get there, but scientists are about to get their first look at Pluto.

The New Horizons spacecraft is closing fast on the tiny world once thought to be at the edge of our solar system. On Tuesday the probe will begin an intensive nine-day scientific study of Pluto and its moons.

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U.S.
1:43 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Corruption On The Border: Dismantling Misconduct In The Rio Grande Valley

Jonathan Treviño shows seized contraband. The former police narcotics squad leader is currently serving 17 years in prison for reselling narcotics back to drug dealers.
Courtesy of Jonathan Treviño

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 9:57 am

This week, NPR examines public corruption in South Texas. The FBI has launched a task force to clean up pervasive misconduct by public servants in the Rio Grande Valley. But as NPR's John Burnett and Marisa Penaloza report, the problems are entrenched.

The Rio Grande Valley of Texas is a world apart, isolated by empty ranch land to the north, the Gulf to the east, and Mexico to the south. A million-and-a-half people live there amid dazzling wealth and stark poverty.

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Europe
8:11 pm
Sun July 5, 2015

After Rejecting Bailout Plan, Greece's Economic Future Is 'Invisible'

Greeks stand outside of a local school in Athens that served as a voting station.
Chris Arnold NPR

Originally published on Sun July 5, 2015 9:23 pm

The Greek word for no is oxi, and across Athens and the Greek Islands on Sunday, it was everywhere: on posters, spray-painted on walls and old cars.

And it was also on ballots: Greek voters voted oxi Sunday in a historic referendum over the country's economic future.

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The Two-Way
6:30 pm
Sun July 5, 2015

U.S. Women Win World Cup Final 5-2, After Spectacular Start

To the delight of American fans, Carli Lloyd of the United States scored a hat trick in the first 15 minutes of the FIFA Women's World Cup Final against Japan on Sunday.
Kevin C. Cox Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 9:37 am

The U.S. team won the Women's World Cup soccer final 5-2 in a game that brought U.S. fans to their feet, reduced polished sportswriters to all-caps expressions of awe and rewrote FIFA records — and that was just in the first half.

The game began in spectacular fashion: In the first five minutes, captain Carli Lloyd scored two swift goals — the fastest two goals in FIFA history, according to the FIFA Women's World Cup Twitter account.

Just a few minutes later, Lauren Holiday brought the score up to 3-0.

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History
4:57 pm
Sun July 5, 2015

Is It All Greek To You? Thank Medieval Monks, And The Bard, For The Phrase

Greek flags fly beside those of the European Union in Athens. Many people chalk the phrase up to Shakespeare, but its origins likely date back much earlier than that --€” to medieval monks eager for a cop-out.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 5, 2015 8:11 pm

If you've been following the Greek financial crisis, you've certainly seen this old cliche in the headlines.

In USA Today, there was "If 'it's all Greek to you,' here's the skinny on debt crisis." The BBC says, "All Greek to you? Greece's debt jargon explained."

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