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Most hospitals around the country aren't doing a good job of helping new moms who want to breast-feed, researchers report Tuesday in the journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Several common practices at the institutions may actually prevent moms from sticking with breast-feeding for six months — the duration thought to be most healthful for babies.

Women with cancer often lose their fertility after chemotherapy and radiation. But fertility can be restored in some women by removing all or part the ovary, freezing the tissue before cancer treatment and then transplanting it back afterward.

Danish researchers looked at 41 women who underwent the procedure between 2003 and 2014. They found that about one-third who tried to have a baby actually succeeded.

It's the largest number of transplants evaluated since doctors started doing the procedures in the early 2000s.

When it comes to eating well, should we consider both the health of our bodies and of the planet?

For the past few years, crime has been mostly a good news story — the crime rate remains near record lows. But several major U.S. cities have been experiencing a rise in homicides and other violence this year.

Now, the Justice Department is bringing together police and prosecutors to figure out what's going on, and how the federal government can help.

"China, China, China," rants Donald Trump, the presidential hopeful who loses no opportunity to blame America's economic woes on China and its "unfair" trade policies. But how did the fortunes of the free world and the Middle Kingdom become so inextricably intertwined? What started it all?

The roots of U.S.-China trade can be boiled down to one fragrant little word: tea. The history of the tea trade is a fascinating story of wealth, adventure and cultural exchange, but also a tragic one of human suffering and cruelty.

Among the institutions devastated by the flooding in South Carolina is the home of a ballet company.

Dancers from around the world have come to Columbia to dance in the Columbia Classical Ballet Company, founded more than 20 years ago by Radenko Pavlovich.

Now the company's 32 members have nowhere to rehearse or take classes. Their building, renovated just this summer, has been completely destroyed.

During the flooding, water reached up to the ceiling of the studio. Costumes and music scores were ruined.

America's retirement statistics are grim: About 40 percent of baby boomers have nothing saved for retirement, about a third of Americans who are currently retired rely on Social Security for almost all of their income, and the outlook for current workers isn't much better. About half of private sector employees have no retirement plan on the job.

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The signs read: "Take 'em down! Renoir sucks!" and "We're not iconoclasts[;] Renoir just sucks at painting!"

Led by Max Geller, a handful of people protested Monday outside Boston's Museum of Fine Arts.

Their grievance?

The fact that paintings by renowned French Impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir are hanging in the museum.

It sounds like a politician's dream: a machine that can tell you exactly what to say to change a voter's mind.

Well, that's what a political scientist has come up with — at least, a first tentative step in that direction.

Using text from a pro-Obamacare website and testing different combinations of sentences on volunteers, an algorithm created by Northeastern University assistant professor Nick Beauchamp was able to identify optimally persuasive terms that make people more inclined to support the landmark health care law.

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A former president of the U.N. General Assembly, John Ashe, is accused of accepting more than $1.3 million in bribes in return for his support of a real estate project in Macau, according to U.S. court documents.

Ashe is a former U.N. ambassador for Antigua and Barbuda who led the General Assembly from 2013 to 2014. He lives in New York state.

NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports:

Under the cover of darkness and using a crane, workers removed a 6-foot granite structure from the grounds of the Capitol in Oklahoma City.

The Ten Commandments monument has been the subject of controversy and debate for years. Back in June, the state Supreme Court decided that the religious display on public property violated the Constitution.

At the time, angry lawmakers even threatened to impeach the high court justices.

Two major, rival fantasy sports companies—FanDuel and DraftKings—are barring their employees from betting on fantasy games, amid allegations of insider trading.

This comes after an employee at DraftKings admitted to accidentally releasing valuable data, such as what players the majority of participants were betting on, ahead of the third week of N.F.L games. That employee won $350,000 at rival site, FanDuel, the same week.

The introduction of infant formula led many women to stop breastfeeding in the 1950s and ’60s. It has taken decades, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say breastfeeding rates are on the rise.

Although it’s the most natural way to feed babies, and there is a scientific consensus on the benefits of breastfeeding, it can be extremely difficult for some mothers.

The trio known as Algiers fuses gospel and punk music to confront racism, cultural assimilation and other issues specific to the American experience.

The band members are from Georgia, and there is a distinct Southern sound to much of their music.

Franklin James Fisher, Algiers’ lead singer and songwriter, talks to Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti about the band’s mission.

One of the more unattractive aspects of Washington life is the growth industry called line sitting. That is, rich lobbyists, lawyers and contractors pay someone to hold a place in line so the payer can get a much-in-demand seat at a Supreme Court argument or a congressional hearing. Now the U.S. Supreme Court has quietly struck one small blow for equality on that front. It has amended its rules to require that there are no sitters on the special line reserved for members of the Supreme Court bar.

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The sun was shining in South Carolina Tuesday, but people are still trying to recover from heavy rains that caused 18 dams to breach or fail in the state. Since severe flooding began over the weekend, at least 16 deaths have been reported, including two people who died in North Carolina.

Can You Really Roll Those Aches And Knots Away?

8 hours ago

When my husband has a particularly tough workout (or workday), he comes home and says, "I have to roll."

He's talking about using a foam roller on body parts including the hips, quads and calves, using his own body weight to supply the force. You've probably seen people rolling in your gym; some facilities even offer classes. The rollers are available in various sizes and can cost as little as $10 — more for fancier ones with grooves intended for more targeted pressure.

But do rollers actually work?

Can you fight terrorists the same way you battle ordinary criminals?

A prominent Kenyan crime fighter, Mohamud Saleh, is betting you can. He's testing his theory in Garissa, a city in northeastern Kenya thrust into the spotlight this April when Islamist militants attacked a campus dorm, killing 147 students.

Long before Garissa had a terrorism problem, it had a problem with bandits, as Daud Yussuf, a Kenyan journalist, remembers.

You've heard it a million times: The hours we spend sitting in front of our computers, sitting in front of the TV and sitting just about everywhere else are adding up. We are sitting ourselves to death.

So it came as welcome news when we read last week that just 10 minutes — 10 minutes! — of walking after sitting for a long period of time can restore the damage to our vascular system.

It's hard to deny that the NRA has won the gun debate over the past 20 years.

Despite mass shootings — and despite some 80 to 90 percent of Americans saying they are in favor of background checks — no legislation expanding on the 1993 Brady Bill has passed Congress.

What's going on? Well, the debate over guns is hardly ever solely about background checks or other seemingly popular measures intended to curb gun violence.

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"This is unacceptable." That's what NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg had to say about Russian military aircraft violating Turkey's airspace twice this weekend. Stoltenberg also has said he doubts Russia's explanation that it was an accident.

At issue most recently is the Turkish military's allegation that on Sunday, "a MiG-29 plane of unidentified nationality for five minutes and 40 seconds kept two Turkish F-16 planes on its radar as potential targets," reports the Russian news agency Tass.

Alaska Airlines Loses Its CEO's Luggage

14 hours ago
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Two scientists from Canada and Japan have won the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 for opening "a new realm in particle physics," the Nobel Prize committee says. Working far apart, both Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald showed how neutrinos shift identities like chameleons in space.

The international aid group Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières) is calling for an international investigation into what it calls a war crime in Afghanistan — Saturday's U.S. airstrikes that killed 22 people, including medical staff and patients at the organization's hospital in Kunduz.

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This is Nobel Prize season, and this morning comes the prize in physics. Joining me in the studio is NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel. Geoff, good morning.


GREENE: All right, so who won?