NPR News

Goats and Soda
10:17 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Live at 12:30 PM (ET): What's Next With The Ebola Disaster?

There's no escaping Ebola in West Africa. Here, a seller of bananas walks past a slogan painted on a wall in Monrovia, the capital of Liberia.
Domonique Faget AFP/Getty Images

Ebola has become a worldwide crisis that has now reached into the United States.

Today at 12:30 p.m., four experts will discuss the virus that has made headlines since the first case was documented in March. They will look at the reasons that one case in Guinea has sparked the world's largest outbreak, and how healthcare systems and humanitarian groups need to respond to help the affected countries and prevent further spread.

The participants are:

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The Protojournalist
9:35 am
Thu October 2, 2014

The Outhouse — And Other Rooms — Get A 21st Century Makeover

Sonoma Retreat by Aidlin Darling
Marion Brenner Courtesy of ASLA

Americans are discovering – or rediscovering — the allure of outdoor living, according to a 2014 survey by the American Society of Landscape Architects.

Whether the instinct stems from a primordial desire to reconnect with the natural world or to disconnect from in-house clutter and chaos, people who can afford it are transporting traditional indoor areas – kitchens, dining rooms, bedrooms, entertainment centers – outside.

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The Two-Way
9:14 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Ukraine Rebels Break Truce To Make Push For Donetsk Airport

Black smoke from an apparent shelling of the International airport rising into the sky while standing near a railway building, in Donetsk, Ukraine, on Thursday.
PHOTOMIG EPA/Landov

Fighting has resumed in eastern Ukraine as pro-Russian separatists have broken a much-violated nearly month-long truce in order to launch a military push to capture the government-held airport in Donetsk.

Reuters reports that the renewed fighting, which began on Wednesday, has escalated. Al-Jazeera reports "thick black smoke" over the airport on Thursday.

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The Two-Way
9:01 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Officials: 100 'Potential Contacts' Linked To Dallas Ebola Patient

A man diagnosed with the Ebola virus this week is being treated at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. The patient recently traveled to Dallas from Liberia.
Mike Stone Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 9:32 am

The number of "contact traces" for a man diagnosed with Ebola earlier this week in Dallas has risen to 100, officials say, as they add secondary contacts to a list of people being monitored for symptoms of the deadly virus.

Earlier today, Erikka Neros, a spokeswoman for the Dallas County Health and Human Services department, said the number of "contact traces" stood at about 80 because the 12 to 18 people known to have been directly exposed to the patient then had contact with others.

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Shots - Health News
8:59 am
Thu October 2, 2014

No, Seriously, How Contagious Is Ebola?

Adam Cole NPR

Holy moly! There's a case of Ebola in the U.S.!

That first reaction was understandable. There's no question the disease is scary. The World Health Organization now estimates that the virus has killed about 70 percent of people infected in West Africa.

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Goats and Soda
8:51 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Why A Thermometer Is A Good Tool For Airport Ebola Screenings

The United States has seen the first reported case of Ebola outside of Africa, brought by a Liberian national who traveled to Dallas two weeks ago. Airports in West Africa have promised to screen every passenger attempting to get on a plane, which has left many Americans wondering: Just how did an Ebola patient make it through four airports without being stopped?

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The Salt
8:30 am
Thu October 2, 2014

California Cracks Down On Farmers' Market Cheaters

A customer shops for produce at the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market in San Francisco in March.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 10:21 am

Could that beloved farmer at your farmers market possibly be lying to you, passing off supermarket produce as locally grown?

California's state officials seem to think so. Last week, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a new law that will raise a million dollars to deploy a small army of inspectors to farmers markets around the state. The inspectors will check for signs that farmers are selling fruits and vegetables that they didn't actually grow themselves, but instead picked up wholesale.

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Code Switch
7:14 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Can NBC's New Tiger Lily Overcome The Character's History?

Actress Alanna Saunders was recently cast as Tiger Lily in NBC's Peter Pan LIVE!
Bloc Academy

Across many stage and screen adaptations of J.M. Barrie's Peter Pan over the past century — such as Walt Disney's Peter Pan and Hook — the portrayal of the story's Native American characters has been an ongoing point of contention.

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The Two-Way
6:41 am
Thu October 2, 2014

U.N. Report Details Possible War Crimes By Islamic State Militants

Islamic State flags on the Mullah Abdullah bridge in southern Kirkuk earlier this week. A U.N. report says the extremist group has perpetrated possible war crimes and crimes against humanity.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 8:27 am

Updated at 8:40 a.m. ET

A United Nations report out today lists what it describes as a "staggering array" of possible war crimes and crimes against humanity by the self-declared Islamic State in Iraq, including mass executions, the kidnapping of women and girls to use as sex slaves and the use of child soldiers.

It also points to shelling and airstrikes by Iraqi security forces that killed civilians and "may have violated the principles of distinction and proportionality under international humanitarian law."

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Thu October 2, 2014

New Orleans Schools Face A Surge Of Unaccompanied Minors

Yashua Cantillano, 14, arrived in New Orleans in June from Tegucigalpa, Honduras. He's now enrolled in a charter school, Carver Prep, on the city's east side.
Mallory Falk/WWNO

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 9:10 am

For 14-year-old Yashua Cantillano, life in New Orleans is an improvement.

But that's not saying much.

Just three months ago, Yashua was in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, dodging gang members. He says they would drive by his school, guns visible, threatening to kill him, his younger brother — Yashua's whole family.

"We'd hide all day," Yashua says, "and that kept us from going to school."

After crossing the U.S. border illegally, he came to New Orleans and ultimately enrolled at Carver Prep, a small charter school on the city's east side.

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The Two-Way
5:26 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Hong Kong Leader Says Government Will Meet With Demonstrators

Student protesters in Hong Kong resist during a change of shift for local police but backed down after being reassured they could reoccupy the pavement outside the government compound's gate.
Wong Maye-E AP

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 10:22 am

Updated at 11:55 a.m. ET

Hong Kong's leader said today that his government has agreed to hold a dialogue with pro-democracy student activists to discuss reforms, but that such a discussion must take place within the context of Chinese law. He also renewed warnings to protesters not to occupy government buildings.

Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying appeared at a news conference with Chief Secretary Carrie Lam less than half an hour before a deadline set by student activists for his resignation.

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Asia
4:59 am
Thu October 2, 2014

China Searches Pigeons Used In Holiday Celebratons

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 5:05 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
4:16 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Even If He Wins, Einstein Can't Hold Office In Oakland, Calif.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:02 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Israel's Netanyahu Speaks Out Against Iran's Nuclear Program

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 6:16 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

National Security
3:02 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Amid Scandal, Secret Service Director Resigns

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 6:16 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Science
1:59 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Soil Doctors Hit Pay Dirt In Manhattan's Central Park

The Bronx may be up and the Battery down, but Central Park is where an amazing wealth of different sorts of microbes play.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 7:14 am

Manhattan's Central Park is surrounded by one of the densest cities on the planet. It's green enough, yet hardly the first place most people would think of as biologically rich.

But a team of scientists got a big surprise when they recently started digging there.

They were 10 soil ecologists — aka dirt doctors. Kelly Ramirez from Colorado State University was among them. "We met on the steps of the natural history museum at 7 a.m. with our collection gear, coolers and sunblock," she recalls.

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Cities Project
1:23 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Ghosts Of The Past Still Echo In Beirut's Fragmented Neighborhoods

Lebanon's parliament sits in Beirut's rebuilt Nejmeh Square, near the center of the city. Unlike many of Beirut's neighborhoods, the square is often mostly empty.
Tim Fitzsimons NPR

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 6:26 am

The heart of downtown Beirut is an elegant area, fringed with expensive buildings. But on a beautiful sunny day, you may not find anyone there — there's no cafe, no park, no place for people to hang out.

Even though the Lebanese capital is a bustling and even glamorous place, the heart of Beirut is empty.

That's because the ghosts of this otherwise vibrant city's past still play out in Beirut's neighborhoods. Decades after Lebanon's civil war in the 1980s, those divides still carve up the city and help determine who lives where and who interacts with whom.

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The Two-Way
6:27 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Man Convicted In 2010 Oregon Bomb Plot Sentenced To 30 Years

Mohamed Osman Mohamud, then 19, is shown after his arrest on Nov. 26, 2010, in Portland, Ore. Mohamud was convicted of planning to detonate a bomb during a Christmas tree-lighting ceremony.
Getty Images

A federal judge in Portland sentenced 23-year-old Mohamed Osman Mohamud to serve 30 years in prison, on Wednesday, over a 2010 plot to bomb a holiday tree-lighting ceremony.

The AP reports:

"Prosecutors had sought a 40-year term for Mohamed Mohamud, 23, in the 2010 plot that actually was an FBI sting. But U.S. District Court Judge Garr King said Mohamud's youth and remorse for his actions helped lower his sentence.

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The Two-Way
5:28 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

One Picture, Of 35,000 Walrus, Shows One Effect Of Global Warming

In this aerial photo taken on Sept. 27 and provided by NOAA, some 35,000 walrus gather onshore near Point Lay, Alaska.
Corey Accardo AP

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 7:32 am

This stunning picture is making the rounds on the Internet today:

It was released by NOAA's Aerial Surveys of Arctic Marine Mammals and shows an estimated 35,000 walrus "hauling out" on an Alaskan beach.

This is not normally how you would find them. The animals would normally be spread out on the sea ice, but, as you see in the picture, this year the ice has all melted.

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Shots - Health News
4:40 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

On The Alert For Ebola, Texas Hospital Still Missed First Case

Traffic moves past Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, where a patient showed up with symptoms that were later confirmed to be Ebola.
Mike Stone Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 6:57 am

Hospitals have been on the lookout for the Ebola virus in the United States, and Texas Health Presbyterian in Dallas was no exception. A nurse there did ask about the travel history of the patient who later turned out to be infected with the virus. But some members of the medical team didn't hear that the man had recently been in West Africa. So he was initially sent home — even though he was experiencing symptoms of Ebola, and that meant he was contagious.

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Shots - Health News
4:14 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Obamacare's First Year: How'd It Go?

In New Jersey in March, Dianna Lopez of the Center for Family Services (right) speaks with Betsy Cruz, of Camden, N.J., about health insurance coverage during an Affordable Care Act information session.
Lori M. Nichols South Jersey Times/Landov

Exactly one year ago, the Obamacare insurance exchanges stumbled into existence. Consumers struggled to sign up for its online marketplace — and the Obama administration was pummeled. Eventually, HealthCare.gov's problems were mostly fixed, and two weeks ago, the administration announced 7.3 million people have bought insurance through it so far this year.

So, was the health exchanges' first year a success — or something less?

Ask President Obama, and he says you measure the Affordable Care Act's success this way:

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Science
4:14 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

When Can A Big Storm Or Drought Be Blamed On Climate Change?

Melbourne visitors and residents took to the waters of Australia's St. Kilda Beach in January 2013 to escape a fierce heat wave.
Scott Barbour Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 6:52 pm

Nowadays, when there's a killer heat wave or serious drought somewhere, people wonder: Is this climate change at work? It's a question scientists have struggled with for years. And now there's a new field of research that's providing some answers. It's called "attribution science" — a set of principles that allow scientists to determine when it's a change in climate that's altering weather events ... and when it isn't.

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Parallels
4:14 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Movement Against Female Genital Mutilation Gains Spotlight In U.K.

British Prime Minister David Cameron speaks with campaigners against female genital mutilation at the Girl Summit in London in July.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

In Washington Thursday, a group of experts from across the government will hold its first meeting to address the practice known as female genital mutilation. This is one issue where the U.K. is far ahead of the United States.

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Law
4:14 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Michael Dunn Found Guilty In 'Loud Music' Killing

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In Jacksonville, Florida, today, Michael Dunn was found guilty of first-degree murder in the shooting of 17-year-old Jordan Davis in a dispute over loud music. NPR's Greg Allen reports this was Dunn's second trial in a case that drew national attention.

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The Two-Way
3:33 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Michael Dunn Found Guilty In Florida 'Loud Music' Shooting

Michael Dunn, center, looks back at his parents after a jury found him guilty in his retrial.
Bob.Mack AP

Michael Dunn, a 47-year-old Florida man, has been found guilty of first-degree murder in the shooting death of a teenager in the parking lot of a gas station.

This case dates back to 2012. Dunn shot and killed 17-year-old Jordan Davis after arguing over the volume of the music Davis was playing in his car. As we reported earlier this year, a jury was hung on the murder charge against Dunn and prosecutors decided to retry him.

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It's All Politics
3:29 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

The White House Could Be Made A Fortress, But Should It Be?

Visitors take photos in front of the White House.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 5:46 am

It turns out the Secret Service isn't too good at protecting the White House, and maybe one reason is that we don't want it to be.

Secret Service agents are famously willing to sacrifice their own lives to protect the president and his family. They are also trained to take the lives of others in defense of their protectees.

But are they equally prepared to do either of those things for the White House itself? Should it be policy for the armed agents around 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue to use deadly force whether the president or his family is present or not?

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All Tech Considered
3:15 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Facebook Apologizes For Name Policy That Affected LGBT Community

San Francisco City Supervisor David Campos (right) walks with drag queen Sister Roma to a news conference on Sept. 17 about a Facebook policy that requires people to use their "real" names on their profiles. The site said Wednesday it will modify how the policy is enforced.
Eric Risberg AP

Facebook has apologized for a policy that drew criticism from LGBT groups after it led to the deactivation of dozens of accounts belonging to drag queens. While the policy itself will stay in place, Facebook says, it will be changing how the rule is enforced.

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Shots - Health News
3:08 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Long-Term Birth Control Works Best For Teens, Pediatricians Say

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 9:46 am

"Always remember to use protection" is a fairly straightforward message for sexually active teens. But young women have a lot of options when it comes to the types of protection they can choose to use.

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Music Reviews
2:41 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Dionne Warwick, Reduced To An Essence

The new tribute album Dionne Dionne is a collaboration between singer Dionne Farris (known for her work with Arrested Development) and guitarist Charlie Hunter.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 5:29 pm

In title and concept, the new tribute album Dionne Dionne is a great gimmick. But if you've followed the career of Dionne Farris, having her record an entire album of Dionne Warwick covers isn't an obvious move, names aside. It's an idea that took root some 20 years ago: Farris met guitarist Charlie Hunter while the two were on tour as members of hip-hop groups, she with Arrested Development and he with The Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy.

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Shots - Health News
2:37 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Proton Center Closure Doesn't Slow New Construction

Construction is continuing at the Maryland Proton Treatment Center in downtown Baltimore. It's one of three such centers under development in the Washington, D.C., region.
Jenny Gold, KHN

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 4:14 pm

Proton beam radiation therapy has been touted as the next big thing in cancer care. The idea, enthusiasts say, is that doctors can deliver higher, more focused doses of radiation than they can in traditional therapy, with a lower risk of side effects. The massive machines, housed in facilities the size of football fields, have been sprouting up across the country for a decade.

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