NPR News

It's All Politics
3:41 am
Sat April 18, 2015

The Cat-And-Mouse Game Of The Great Clinton Chase, Iowa Edition

Reporters and campaign staffers rush to their cars to get to Hillary Clinton's first Iowa campaign stop.
Tamara Keith NPR

Editor's Note: This is a reporter's notebook from NPR's Tamara Keith, who is covering the Hillary Clinton campaign.

The e-mail from the Clinton campaign came late on Monday. Meet at the Panera Bread in Davenport, Iowa, at 9:45 in the morning. I was to be one of about a dozen reporters in a press pool given access to an unpublicized stop. What we quickly learned was that the restaurant was a decoy. The unannounced meet-and-greet was happening at a small coffee shop 20 minutes away in Le Claire.

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Parallels
3:16 am
Sat April 18, 2015

From Losers To Possible Kingmakers, A Scottish Party Come Back Strong

Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland's first minister and leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP), delivers a speech in Glasgow, Scotland, on March 28. After its loss at the polls last year on the issue of Scottish independence, the party has quadrupled its membership and is on the ascendant.
Russell Cheyne Reuters/Landov

Political life is full of comeback stories, but few are quite as dramatic as the boomerang that Scottish nationalists have experienced over the last six months.

Last September, the Scottish National Party lost a vote on whether to break away from the United Kingdom.

Now, membership in the SNP has quadrupled, and that unexpected turn of events means that this party, dismissed as a loser last fall, could determine who becomes the next prime minister after British elections in a few weeks.

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Goats and Soda
2:59 am
Sat April 18, 2015

In 'Song Of Lahore,' A Race To Revive Pakistani Classical Music

Asad Ali, 63, was unemployed for four years when Pakistan banned live music in 1977. He now plays the guitar for Sachal Studios Orchestra around the globe and in his hometown, Lahore.
Courtesy of Mobeen Ansari

In his home in Lahore, Pakistan, Saleem Khan holds up his late father's violin. There are no strings, the wood is scratched and the bridge is missing.

"There was a time when people used to come to Lahore from all over the world to hear its musicians," the 65-year-old violinist says in the new documentary, Song of Lahore. "Now we can't even find someone to repair our violins."

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It's All Politics
8:33 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

On Links As In Life, D.C. Bipartisan Relations Are Deep In The Rough

Hill staffers and PGA professionals mingle Wednesday at this year's National Golf Day event on Capitol Hill, which included an annual Democrats versus Republicans putting challenge.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 10:19 pm

Earlier this week, members of Congress and their staffs were greeted by a makeshift golf expo set up in the Rayburn House Office Building.

The event included golf shot simulators, certified golf instructors and a putting challenge between Democrats and Republicans. It was all part of National Golf Day, an annual event organized by the industry that promotes the economic and health benefits of the sport.

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The Two-Way
6:48 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

A Ticking Clock Threatens Obama's Immigration Plan

A federal appeals court in New Orleans heard oral arguments in a case that could determine the viability of President Obama's plan to temporarily shield more than four million undocumented immigrants from deportation and issue them work permits.

At stake is whether the president will get to implement his plan before his term expires.

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The Salt
4:38 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

How The Food Industry Relies On Scientists With Big Tobacco Ties

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 6:30 pm

This story is excerpted from an investigation by the Center for Public Integrity, a nonpartisan, nonprofit investigative news organization.

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NPR Story
4:31 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Video Of Apparent Chemical Attack In Syria Moves U.N. To Tears

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 12:32 pm

Member of the United Nations Security Council were moved to tears Thursday after they were shown footage of an apparent chlorine gas attack in northwest Syria last month. The footage is said to show the unsuccessful attempts of doctors to revive three children no more than four years old.

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NPR Story
4:31 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

As Army Shrinks, Soldiers Forced To Return To Civilian Life

Justin Blodgett in Afghanistan before the helicopter crash that lead to his separation from the Army. (NCPR)

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 12:32 pm

Budget cuts are forcing the Army to reduce its force by 70,000. As troops begin to transition out, many soldiers, including those who thought they would make a career in the military, are having a difficult time finding jobs.

Julia Botero of Here & Now contributor North Country Public Radio talks with soldiers who are trying to come to terms with returning to civilian life.

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Health
4:30 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Physicians Urge Columbia To Fire Dr. Oz For Promoting 'Quack Treatments'

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

NPR's Robert Siegel speaks with Michael Specter, staff writer at The New Yorker about some physicians' calls for Columbia University to sever ties with TV's Dr. Oz over what they call his "disdain for science" and promotion of questionable treatments.

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Politics
4:30 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Hillary Clinton Supports Amendment To Get Hidden Money Out Of Politics

"We need to fix our dysfunctional political system and get unaccounted money out of it, once and for all, even if that takes a constitutional amendment," Hillary Clinton said at Kirkwood Community College in Iowa Tuesday.
Michael B. Thomas AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 10:27 pm

Hillary Clinton made a surprising move this week. It wasn't running for president — she'd already set the stage for that — but embracing the idea of a constitutional amendment to restrict or eliminate big money in politics.

The notion of amending the Constitution this way has been discussed, literally for decades. But Clinton is joining a new, if small, chorus of prominent politicians who are talking it up.

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The Two-Way
4:30 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Oklahoma Approves Nitrogen Asphyxiation For Executions

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 3:57 pm

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed a law today allowing nitrogen to be used in executions in the state in case lethal injection is ruled unconstitutional or the drugs are not available.

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World
3:30 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Syrian Government Believed To Be Behind Chlorine Gas Attack

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
3:20 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

As Ebola Cases Dwindle, West Africa Turns To Economic Recovery

Liberian workers dismantle shelters in an Ebola treatment center in the Paynes Ville neighborhood of Monrovia. Doctors Without Borders closed the center last month because it was no longer needed.
Zoom Dosso AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 4:28 pm

West Africa is about to receive a hefty infusion of cash. This Friday the World Bank unveiled a major aid package for the three West African countries at the center of this past year's Ebola epidemic.

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

First-Place Fake-Out: Woman Who Didn't Run Marathon Stripped Of Title

Last Sunday, runner Kendall Schler was the first to cross the finish line at the GO! St. Louis Marathon. She received a $1,500 check and a photograph with Jackie Joyner-Kersee at the finish line. Trouble is Schler of Columbia, Mo., had not run the entire 26.2-mile course.

That's not all. Schler, race organizers say, also faked her third-place finish at last year's race – with a time that allowed her to qualify for the prestigious Boston Marathon this year.

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Remembrances
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Bill Arhos, 'Austin City Limits' Founder, Dies At 80

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Back in 1974, an up-and-coming musician stepped onto the stage of a brand-new show on PBS called "Austin City Limits."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "AUSTIN CITY LIMITS")

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Remembrances
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Remembering Don Quayle, NPR's First President

Don Quayle, the first president of NPR, has died at the age of 84.
Sam Kittner WAMU 88.5

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

The first president of National Public Radio has died. Don Quayle was 84 years old. He had a long career in public broadcasting — both television and radio. NPR's Susan Stamberg reflects on his impact.

Don Quayle gave me my first radio job. It was the early '60s and he was head of the Educational Radio Network — the precursor of NPR — a skinny little network of 12 East Coast stations that developed a daily drive-time news show. He hired me to help produce it. When this national network arose, he was an obvious choice to run it.

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NPR Ed
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

In New Orleans, A Second-Chance School Tries Again

Students arrive at CLA. More than half end up here after being expelled from other schools, usually for fighting, weapons or drugs.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

Principal Nicholas Dean looks at his scarred, broken office door with resignation.

"Time to get a new lock," he says.

Over the weekend, a person or persons smashed into his office, found the keys to the school van and drove off in it.

It's another day at Crescent Leadership Academy, one of New Orleans' three second-chance schools for students who have not been successful elsewhere.

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It's All Politics
3:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Oklahoma City Bombing A 'Wake-Up Call' For Government Security

The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was "literally right up against the road so it was extremely vulnerable," said architect Barbara Nadel. One of the government's first responses was to close a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

Twenty years ago this Sunday, a truck bomb exploded next to the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. One hundred sixty-eight people were killed in the blast, hundreds were injured.

The bombing prompted heightened security at federal buildings — around the nation, and especially here in Washington.

One of the government's first responses to the bombing was closing a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.

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The Salt
2:58 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Running A Marathon? How To Eat and Drink So You Don't Hit The Wall

Performance nutrition experts recommend stopping at all the hydration stations for a quick fill-up of a sports drink to replenish the glycogen that's being burned during a marathon.
iStockphoto

Elite runners know the drill. When you run a marathon, you've got to consume extra amounts of carbohydrate — either from food or energy gels or energy drinks — in order to go the distance.

And if you don't fuel up enough? You may hit the wall during the big event, which, believe me, is pretty miserable.

The wall comes on abruptly. Suddenly your legs feel like lead. And then you're woozy.

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Around the Nation
2:50 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

As Lake Mead Levels Drop, The West Braces For Bigger Drought Impact

Lake Mead is at its lowest levels since it was built in the late 1930s.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 8:05 pm

The historic four-year drought in California has been grabbing the headlines lately, but there's a much bigger problem facing the West: the now 14-year drought gripping the Colorado River basin.

One of the most stunning places to see its impact is at the nation's largest reservoir, Lake Mead, near Las Vegas. At about 40 percent of capacity, it's the lowest it's been since it was built in the 1930s.

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It's All Politics
1:29 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

5 Things You Should Know About Mike Huckabee

Huckabee ran the Marine Corps Marathon in 2005.
Kevin Wolf AP

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 5:09 pm

When former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee ran for president in 2008, he surprised many political watchers with a big a victory in the Iowa caucus. "What we have seen is a new day in American politics," he said after he was declared the winner. "This election will start a prairie fire of hope and zeal."

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The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

WATCH: Chimps In Uganda Look Both Ways Before Crossing

A troop of chimpanzees in Uganda has learned to look both ways before crossing a busy highway.
New Scientist

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 4:32 pm

Call it Darwinian evolution in action: A troop of wild chimpanzees in Uganda has learned a valuable survival skill — to look before crossing.

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The Two-Way
1:04 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

U.N., Oxfam Report At Least 120,000 Displaced In Yemen Fighting

Militants loyal to Yemen's President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi take their positions in Taiz, Yemen, late last month after at least 45 people were killed in north Yemen after an airstrike hit a camp for internally displaced people.
Anees Mahyoub UPI/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 1:41 pm

Tens of thousands of people have been displaced in the fighting in Yemen, the United Nations says today in a new report, which warns that the figure could rise dramatically unless the conflict is ended.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) says the number of displaced persons in Yemen is estimated at between 120,000 and 150,000. (Separately, Oxfam puts the figure at 121,000).

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NPR Story
12:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

2015 Boston Marathon Preview

A worker adjusts lights on the photo bridge near the Boston Marathon finish line Thursday, April 16, 2015, on Boylston Street in Boston. The 119th Boston Marathon will be run on Monday. (Steven Senne/AP)

The 119th Boston Marathon, the world’s oldest, will be run on Monday. The 26.2-mile race starts in rural Hopkinton, Mass., and takes the runners through several other communities before finishing in downtown Boston.

That’s where two bombs exploded during the 2013 race, killing three people and injuring more than 260. The attack sparked increased security for spectators and runners that will remain in place for the second year.

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NPR Story
12:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

DJ Sessions: Swing And Vintage Jazz

Artie Shaw plays the clarinet on Sept. 10, 1941. The clarinetist and bandleader's recording of "Begin the Beguine" epitomized the Big Band era. (AP)

Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson is broadcasting from Washington, D.C., and sits down with Rob Bamberger, the longtime host of “Hot Jazz Saturday Night” on WAMU in Washington. Bamberger brings us sounds from Jelly Roll Morton to Artie Shaw and His Orchestra.

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NPR Story
12:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Obama Immigration Policy Up For Debate In Federal Court

The John Minor Wisdom U.S. Courthouse, home of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, New Orleans, Louisiana. (Bobak/Wikimedia Commons)

In November, President Obama announced executive actions that would allow 5 million undocumented immigrants to stay in the country and obtain work permits. Not long after, a Texas judge ordered a freeze on those actions.

Today the Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in New Orleans will be hearing arguments from federal lawyers and 26 states opposing Obama’s order on whether to lift the freeze and allow his policies to move forward, or to leave the immigration policies in limbo.

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Pop Culture
11:17 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Comedian Joel McHale Talks Dyslexia, Bad TV And Filming A Thriller

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm David Bianculli sitting in for Terry Gross.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "COMMUNITY")

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The Two-Way
10:09 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Violence Against Immigrants In South Africa Turns Deadly

South African hostel dwellers demonstrate against foreigners in Johannesburg on Friday after overnight violence between locals and immigrants in the city.
Shiraaz Mohamed AP

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 11:07 am

Violence against immigrants in South Africa has killed at least five people, resulted in attacks on businesses owned by foreigners and sent thousands to take refuge at temporary shelters.

A massive rally against xenophobia was held Thursday in Durban, the coastal city that has been the scene of much of the unrest. Migrants from Africa and South Asia have been the target of the violence, which was condemned by President Jacob Zuma.

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Shots - Health News
9:31 am
Fri April 17, 2015

The State Of The Cancer Nation

Matt Stiles and Christopher Groskopf/NPR

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 6:40 pm

While a cure for cancer remains elusive, we already know how to keep many cases of the disease from developing in the first place.

People can reduce cancer risks by keeping a healthful weight and avoiding cigarettes.

But smoking, obesity and other major cancer risk factors remain common, and they still vary widely across the country.

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The Two-Way
8:59 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Key Figure In Saddam's Regime Reportedly Killed By Iraqi Forces

Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri, a former member of Saddam Hussein's inner circle (shown here in 2002), leads one of the Sunni armed factions helping ISIS in its fight against the Iraqi government.
Jassim Mohammed AP

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 12:06 pm

Iraqi forces claim to have killed Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri, who served in Saddam Hussein's leadership circle and is believed to have been instrumental in the sudden rise of the self-declared Islamic State.

But an official from Saddam's Baath Party has denied the report.

Douri, 72, is the "king of clubs" in the deck of playing cards U.S. troops used to identify key figures in Saddam's regime following the 2003 invasion that toppled the Baathist regime.

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