NPR News

The Two-Way
5:56 am
Mon April 21, 2014

'Murder,' South Korean Leader Says Of Ferry Captain's Actions

A prayer for the missing and dead: Family members and friends have gathered in the port city of Jindo, South Korea, as the search continues for the scores of passengers still missing after last Wednesday's ferry disaster. At the water's edge, many are offering prayers — including this woman.
Issei Kato Reuters/Landov

"The conduct of the captain and some crew members is wholly unfathomable from the viewpoint of common sense, and it was like an act of murder that cannot and should not be tolerated."

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Business
5:53 am
Mon April 21, 2014

GM To Boost Car Production In China

General Motors said on Sunday it will be able to produce 5 million cars per year by the end of 2015. It sold just over 3 million vehicles in China last year.

Around the Nation
5:53 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Florida Proposes New Rules Regarding Alligators

A state commission proposed a ban on selling stuffed baby alligators in "unnatural positions." It's designed to discourage baby gator hunting. If passed, no more little gators waving on a surfboard.

The Two-Way
5:34 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Book News: 'Rabbit-Proof Fence' Author Doris Pilkington Garimara Dies

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
5:17 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Miss America Asks School To Reconsider Student's Punishment

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

When Miss America visited Patrick Farves high school, he asked her to the prom. She can't go, and the school punished him for asking. But she reportedly asked the school to rethink the suspension.

News
4:56 am
Mon April 21, 2014

The Boston Marathon Through The Eyes Of Two Men Who Love It

Boston Marathon race director Dave McGillivray (right) greets runners during the Boston Athletic Association 10K race in Boston.
Aram Boghosian Boston Globe via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:13 am

Dave McGillivray likely knows the Boston Marathon better than anyone else.

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The Two-Way
4:53 am
Mon April 21, 2014

It's Time To Run Again In Boston: Here's The Schedule

Runners, their friends and family members posed Sunday for photos at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, which is being run on Monday.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

We don't need to go on at length about why today's running of the Boston Marathon is important.

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Code Switch
3:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

In Asian-Majority District, House Race Divides Calif. Voters

Rep. Mike Honda (left) walks down the House steps with Rep. Raul Ruiz after a vote at the Capitol on March 20, 2013.
Bill Clark CQ-Roll Call

The U.S. mainland's only Asian-majority congressional district sits in California's Silicon Valley, where two Indian-American candidates are trying to oust Japanese-American Congressman Mike Honda.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Boxer Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter Dies At 76

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:08 am

The former fierce middleweight prizefighter became an international symbol after he was convicted twice for a 1966 triple murder. Carter's conviction was eventually overturned by a federal judge.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

'Transcendence': Latest Sci-Fi Movie About Artificial Intelligence

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:25 am

Transcendence is an ambitious and provocative film about the perils and pleasures of artificial intelligence that is intriguingly balanced between being a warning and a celebration.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Dominated By 1 Point Of View, Late-Night TV Needs New Voices

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:08 am

On Tuesday, Stephen Colbert stops by the CBS Late Show to greet the man he'll replace next year, David Letterman. It also spotlights a reality in late-night TV --almost every host is a white man.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Army's Updated Rules On Hair Styles Tangle With Race

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:08 am

As some Army regulations on hair styles spark protest from African American women, David Greene talks to professor Lori Tharps, co-author of Hair Story: Untangling the Roots of Black Hair in America.

All Tech Considered
1:44 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Who Should Pay To Keep The Internet's Locks Secure?

A lock icon signifies an encrypted Internet connection. But thanks to a recently discovered (and now fixed) bug, it's been bleeding out information for a few years.
Mal Langsdon Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 3:03 am

The encryption code unlocked by the Heartbleed bug last week provided vital security for some of the most widely used websites on the Internet. Fortune 1000 companies rely on the open source code for their core business. But it turns out no one is paying for it.

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Your Money
1:42 am
Mon April 21, 2014

How Do Companies Boost 401(k) Enrollment? Make It Automatic

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

More Americans are saving for retirement through their employers' 401(k) programs. That's because in recent years they've been given a strong nudge — more companies are automatically enrolling workers in retirement savings programs.

Some firms are also automatically increasing the amount employees contribute. That's just as important, experts say.

And all this makes a big difference: Without it, millions of Americans don't save at all.

Making Time For Retirement Planning

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Shots - Health News
1:41 am
Mon April 21, 2014

For The Children's Sake, Put Down That Smartphone

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

It's not just kids who are overdoing screen time. Parents are often just as guilty of spending too much time checking smartphones and e-mail — and the consequences for their children can be troubling.

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Shots - Health News
1:40 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Scribes Are Back, Helping Doctors Tackle Electronic Medical Records

Medical scribe Connie Gayton keeps the electronic records allowing Orthodpedic surgeon Devesh Ramnath to focus on his patients.
Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Like many other doctors across the country, Dr. Devesh Ramnath, a Dallas orthopedic surgeon, recently made the switch from paper to electronic medical records. This meant he no longer had to just take notes when he was examining a patient — he also had to put those notes into the computer as a permanent record.

"I was really focused on just trying to get the information in, and not really focusing on the patient anymore," Ramnath says.

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Around the Nation
1:39 am
Mon April 21, 2014

LA County's New Watchdog May Not Have Much Bite

Prosecutor Max Huntsman delivers his closing arguments in the corruption trial of Angela Spaccia, the former city manager of Bell, Calif., in November. Huntsman's new challenge is to monitor the scandal-ridden LA County Sheriff's Department.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:08 am

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is one of the nation's most troubled law enforcement agencies.

Eighteen current and former deputies are facing felony charges as part of a federal probe into allegations of widespread prisoner abuse in county jails. The federal government is also investigating alleged cases of deputies on patrol using excessive force during routine traffic stops, and targeting blacks and Latinos.

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Parallels
6:05 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Six Things I Saw In Eastern Ukraine

A tank in Kramatorsk.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 2:07 am

Join NPR's London Correspondent Ari Shapiro Monday, April 21, at 2 p.m. Eastern Time, for a live Facebook chat about his reporting in Ukraine.

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National Security
3:18 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Hey, Kids, Remember You're On Our Side: The FBI Makes A Movie

YouTube

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 4:43 pm

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News
3:12 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

In South Korea, Ferry Rescue Efforts Yield Only Grisly Results

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 4:43 pm

It's been a grim Easter Sunday in South Korea as the death toll continues to rise from the ferry disaster that left nearly 300 passengers, many of them high school students, dead or missing.

Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

A Scientific Experiment: Field Trips Just For Teachers

Science teachers huddle over bacteria colonies at Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry. The museum plans to train 1,000 area educators to be better science teachers in the next five years.
Linda Lutton WBEZ

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 4:43 pm

In a classroom across from the coal mine exhibit at the Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry, students are huddled around tables, studying petri dishes of bacteria.

But these aren't school-age kids — these students are all teachers, responsible for imparting science to upper-elementary or middle-school students.

That's a job that many here — and many teachers in grammar schools around the country — feel unprepared for.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Honey, Blood And Harmony: Jordi Savall's Balkan Journey

Early music specialist Jordi Savall has turned his attention to the widely varied music of the Balkans. "For me," he says, "it's one of the most exciting projects that happened in the last 20 years."
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 4:43 pm

Jordi Savall has made a career of reviving ancient music. Whatever the age of the songs, though, he doesn't play them as museum-piece recreations, preserved in isolation. Savall takes great pleasure in smashing together music from different times and different cultures.

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Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

California's Drought Ripples Through Businesses, Then To Schools

Cannon Michael's farm grows tomatoes, melons and onions, among other crops. This year, however, Michael will have to fallow one-fifth of the land due to the drought
Thomas Dreisbach NPR

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 4:43 pm

Cannon Michael runs an 11,000-acre farm in California's Central Valley. His family has been farming in the state for six generations.

Michael's multi-million-dollar operation usually provides a wealth of crops including tomatoes, onions and melons. But recently, he's pretty pessimistic about work.

"It is going to be a year that's probably, at best, maybe break even. Or maybe lose some money," Michael tells NPR's Arun Rath.

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The Two-Way
2:59 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Ferry Transcript Shows Confusion And Panic: 'Please Come Quickly'

A relative waits for word of missing passengers of a sunken ferry in Jindo, South Korea. A newly released transcript depicts a scene of confusion on the stricken ferry as it sank.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 3:56 am

For more than 40 minutes as their ship foundered last Wednesday, crew members of the South Korean ferry Sewol spoke with local maritime traffic services about a possible rescue. The conversation centered on getting help to the ship and on getting its passengers off the ferry, according to a transcript released Sunday.

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Around the Nation
2:34 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Service Dog Guides Marathon Bombing Victims Through A Grim Year

Jessica Kensky lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombing. When she says, "Brr, I'm cold," Rescue the assistance dog knows to bring her the blanket.
Courtesy of Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 4:43 pm

At Monday's Boston Marathon, many runners will be on the course to honor the 16 people who lost limbs in last year's bombing. One married couple was among them: Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes.

Among many dark stories of that day, theirs is among the darkest. They were newlyweds of just seven months when each had their left leg blown off. Their injuries were so severe that they were some of the last victims to leave the hospital.

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The Two-Way
2:29 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

It's 4:20 On 4/20: Denver Hosts The Cannabis Cup Today

With the Colorado state capitol in the background, Cannabis Cup attendees dance and smoke pot at the annual 4/20 marijuana festival in Denver.
Brennan Linsley AP

Tens of thousands of people are attending the Cannabis Cup in Denver this weekend, the first time the marijuana festival and trade show is held in Colorado since the state legalized recreational pot in January.

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Parallels
1:23 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

'A Wound That Doesn't Close': Armenians Suffer Uncertainty Together

Ahead of Easter Mass, a worshiper lights candles at St. Elie Armenian Catholic Church in downtown Beirut.
Susannah George

At St. Elie Armenian Catholic Church in downtown Beirut, Zarmig Hovsepian lit three candles and slowly mouthed silent prayers before Easter Mass. After reciting "Our Father," she added a prayer of her own: "For peace, for Lebanon and the region," she said, underscoring the deep sense of apprehension beneath the surface of otherwise festive Easter celebrations.

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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Sun April 20, 2014

The Florida Church Whose Worshipers Are All Tourists

A map image shows the exterior of the Basilica of the National Shrine of Mary, Queen of the Universe, a church that serves tourists visiting Walt Disney World in Florida.
Google Maps

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 12:31 pm

Easter Sunday is a busy time for many Christian churches. And for one Florida church, "busy" only begins to describe it. The Basilica of the National Shrine of Mary, Queen of the Universe has no permanent members, but it will host tens of thousands of worshipers today.

That's because the church is across the street from Walt Disney World. The main basilica was built in the early 1990s, to give visitors to the resort complex a place to worship. As its website clarifies, Mary, Queen of the Universe Shrine is not a parish church.

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Religion
9:53 am
Sun April 20, 2014

This May Be Rogue Parishioners' Last Easter In Closed Church

Since 2004, members of the Saint Frances Cabrini Catholic Church have continuously occupied the building to keep it from shutting down.
Maryellen Rogers

Nearly a decade has passed since the doors of the Saint Frances Cabrini Catholic Church were shut and its holy water dried up.

With the Archdiocese of Boston strapped for cash, it was one of dozens of churches in the area to be closed and sold off. At the time, the archdiocese was in the throes of the clergy sex abuse crisis. It had agreed to pay nearly $85 million to more than 500 people who said they were abused by priests.

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The Two-Way
9:31 am
Sun April 20, 2014

'Hurricane' Carter Dies; Boxer Was Wrongfully Convicted Of Murder

Hurricane, starring Denzel Washington." href="/post/hurricane-carter-dies-boxer-was-wrongfuly-convicted-murder" class="noexit lightbox">
Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, the former boxer who spent years wrongfully incarcerated for murder, has died at age 76. his life inspired a Bob Dylan protest song and the film Hurricane, starring Denzel Washington.
Paul Kane Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 12:24 pm

Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, the former boxing champion whose conviction for a triple murder was overturned after he served nearly 20 years in prison, has died of prostate cancer. Carter, whose story inspired a Bob Dylan song and a Denzel Washington film, was 76.

Carter was a contender for the middleweight boxing crown in the 1960s, but his life and career were derailed when he and another man were convicted of three murders that took place at a bar in Paterson, N.J., in 1966.

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