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The Two-Way
12:43 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

U.S. Diplomatic Cable Puts Chill On ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

U.S. Ambassador to Israel Daniel Shapiro accepting the ALS "Ice Bucket Challenge." Soon after, the State Department warned that participation by high-profile diplomats was a violation of internal policy.
YouTube

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 12:54 pm

Don't expect Secretary of State John Kerry to accept the ALS "Ice Bucket Challenge" anytime soon: lawyers at the State Department have banned high-profile U.S. diplomats from participating in the fundraising phenomenon that has swept social media in recent weeks.

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NPR Story
12:35 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

The Challenges Of Recruiting An All-Volunteer Army

New recruits swear in during the Army Reserve Mega Event in Whitehall, Ohio, June 22, 2013. (Andrew Baba/U.S. Army)

The U.S. Army has been an all-volunteer force for more than 40 years because there is no military draft anymore. That means the service has to attract young men and women to sign up.

And according to the Army’s numbers they’re pretty good at it. The Army has met or exceeded its recruiting goals for each of the last nine years.

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Middle East
12:34 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Drawn To Conflict, Journalist James Foley 'Loved Telling These Stories'

During the nearly two years that journalist James Foley was held hostage in Syria, before he was killed by the Islamic State this week, Phil Balboni worked hard to get him released.

Balboni is the co-founder and CEO of the online international news company GlobalPost, which Foley was freelancing for at the time of his capture, in November 2012. Foley also was freelancing for GlobalPost when he was captured in Libya by dictator Moammar Gadhafi's forces, in 2011, and held for 44 days.

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NPR Story
12:19 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Recipes To Make The Most Of Summer Tomatoes

The tomato bounty from Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst's garden in Maine. (Kathy Gunst/Here & Now)

Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst joins hosts Jeremy Hobson and Meghna Chakrabarti with the summer’s bounties from her garden — tomatoes of all shapes and sizes. She has all sorts of ideas for how to cook with them, and shares these recipes:

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NPR Story
12:19 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

CDC Director On Release Of American Ebola Patients

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Dr. Tom Frieden testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, before the House subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations hearing on "Combating the Ebola Threat." (Molly Riley/AP)

As both American Ebola patients who were brought from Liberia to Atlanta for treatment are released, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks to Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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Music
12:02 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

A Sleek And Busy Walk With Jean-Luc Ponty

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 12:34 pm

French jazz violinist Jean-Luc Ponty played the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1967, which led to his getting an American record contract, and playing with George Duke, Frank Zappa, and the Mahavishnu Orchestra. Then he started his own jazz-rock fusion bands. Fresh Air critic Kevin Whitehead says before Ponty came to the States, he already had his concept.

Code Switch
11:17 am
Thu August 21, 2014

The Sleepy Road Near Our National Conversation On Race

Linda Owen takes a photo of her husband, Al, in front of Ferguson Brewing Co. near the city's historic district. The couple are from an unincorporated section of St. Louis County and were visiting Ferguson. They don't get down to West Florissant much anymore, although Linda, a retired teacher, has former students who live there and said she worries about how they're doing.
Eric Kayne for NPR

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 12:25 pm

On television, it's hard to get a sense of just how small the stretch of West Florissant Avenue — the thoroughfare in Ferguson, Mo., that's drawn international attention after the killing of Michael Brown — really is.

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The Salt
11:08 am
Thu August 21, 2014

California Drought Has Wild Salmon Competing With Almonds For Water

A field of almond trees is reflected in an irrigation canal in Firebaugh, Calif., in the San Joaquin Valley in 2009. The Almond Board of California says that in the past two decades, the industry has reduced its water consumption by 33 percent per pound of almonds produced.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

The ongoing California drought has pitted wild salmon against farmers in a fight for water. While growers of almonds, one of the state's biggest and most lucrative crops, enjoy booming production and skyrocketing sales to China, the fish, it seems, might be left high and dry this summer—and maybe even dead.

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Krulwich Wonders...
10:49 am
Thu August 21, 2014

When Venus Was Filled With Venusians — 50 Billion Of Them

Robert Krulwich NPR

What a difference 180 years makes.

Back in the 1830s, a Scottish minister and amateur astronomer named Thomas Dick tried to calculate the number of intelligent creatures in the universe. He assumed that all heavenly bodies supported intelligent life, maybe not exactly like us, but similar to us in size and habits of living. Then he took population figures for Great Britain and, assuming that space aliens lived just as densely, he projected populations onto various planets.

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Shots - Health News
10:07 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Mental Health Meets 'Moneyball' In San Antonio

Leon Evans, director of the community mental health system for Bexar County and San Antonio, broke through barriers that had hindered care.
Jenny Gold Kaiser Health News

The jails aren't overflowing in San Antonio anymore. People with serious mental illnesses have a place to go for treatment and the city has saved $10 million a year on. How did it happen?

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The Two-Way
9:50 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Thailand's Parliament Hands Prime Minister Post To Coup Leader

Thailand's newly appointed Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha gestures in a traditional greeting during his visit to a unit of the Queen's Guard outside Bangkok on Thursday.
Chaiwat Subprasom Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 1:22 pm

The man who toppled Thailand's democratically elected government in May has been chosen as the country's interim prime minister.

Not surprisingly, junta leader Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha's hand-picked legislature voted 191-0 with three abstentions to legitimize the coup leader's role as head of government. He was the only candidate.

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The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Is There Such A Thing As A 'Good Psychopath'?

kuzmafoto.com iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 11:50 am

Oxymoronic, isn't it, the idea of a "good psychopath"?

But in their just published book, The Good Psychopath's Guide to Success, Andy McNab and Kevin Dutton argue that relying on some psychopathic traits can lead to a more successful life.

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The Two-Way
8:59 am
Thu August 21, 2014

U.S. Won't Rule Out Attack In Syria To Hit Islamic State

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 10:53 am

American aircraft have carried out more strikes against the Islamic State, after the extremist group beheaded U.S. journalist James Foley. The attacks come despite threats to kill other hostages; a White House official says the U.S. could also target areas in Syria, if warranted.

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The Two-Way
8:53 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Bank Of America Reaches Record Settlement Over Mortgage Meltdown

The Countrywide Banking and Home Loans office in Glendale, Calif., in an April 2007 photo.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 1:22 pm

Bank of America Corp. has agreed to pay nearly $17 billion in a settlement with federal regulators over allegations that it misled investors into buying risky, mortgage-backed securities in the run-up to the 2008 financial meltdown.

The Department of Justice, which announced the $16.65 billion deal today, describes it as "the largest civil settlement with a single entity in history."

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Middle East
8:45 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Hamas Senior Leaders Killed In Predawn Israeli Airstrike

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 11:07 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Code Switch
8:34 am
Thu August 21, 2014

An Officer Shot A Black Teen, And St. Louis Rioted — In 1962

News outlets in 1962 paired this image of injured police officers with a story about the aftermath of a riot in a St. Louis suburb.
Proquest Historical Newspapers Archive

Amid the flurry of coverage about Michael Brown's death and the reaction in Ferguson, Mo., journalists have been unpacking St. Louis' long, tense history of racial unrest. In some of these stories, the parallels between the events of years past and those of the past few weeks are striking.

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The Two-Way
8:26 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Afghanistan Expels 'Times' Reporter Over Article About Potential Coup

New York Times correspondent Matthew Rosenberg stands at his desk at the paper's office in Kabul on Wednesday. Afghanistan gave Rosenberg 24 hours to leave the country.
Massoud Hossaini AP

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 9:37 am

One of the most heralded "success stories" of post-Taliban Afghanistan has been the growth of its independent media. Afghan and international news organizations in Afghanistan have largely enjoyed press freedoms rivaling those of many Western nations.

But today's expulsion of New York Times correspondent Matthew Rosenberg calls into question how much progress Afghanistan has made in terms of rule of law and press freedoms.

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The Two-Way
7:11 am
Thu August 21, 2014

After Night Of Calm, National Guard To Be Withdrawn From Ferguson

A clergyman leads demonstrators protesting the shooting death of Michael Brown down West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Mo., on Wednesday. A large contingent of clergy helped keep the mood calm after days of unrest.
Eric Kayne for NPR

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 1:24 pm

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon ordered the National Guard to begin withdrawing from the city of Ferguson after a night of relative calm in the wake of days unrest surrounding the fatal police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Guard members were first deployed on Monday to help restore order in the St. Louis suburb after sometimes violent confrontations between police and protesters.

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The Two-Way
6:15 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Hamas Says Israeli Airstrike Killed 3 Senior Commanders

Palestinian emergency personnel dig through the rubble of a building destroyed by an Israeli military strike in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on Thursday. Hamas announced that three of its senior military commanders were killed in a predawn Israeli airstrike.
Said Khatib AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 9:56 am

An Israeli attack on a house has killed three military commanders in Gaza, Hamas says, including one of the group's most senior leaders. Thursday's strike follows what Hamas says was a failed attack on its top military leader earlier this week.

From Gaza, NPR's Philip Reeves reports:

"The attack happened overnight and targeted a residential house in Rafah close to Gaza's border with Egypt.

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NPR Ed
5:16 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Notebooks And Pencils And Pens, Cha-Ching!

On the left, supplies on the back-to-school list for third-graders in Arlington, Texas; on the right, the items fifth-graders need in Palmer, Alaska.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 7:12 am

Millions of families are heading to Target or Wal-Mart this month to make sure their kids have what they need for the first day of school. And, as many parents know, those glue sticks and gym clothes can really add up.

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Around the Nation
5:06 am
Thu August 21, 2014

George Bush Challenges Bill Clinton To Ice Bucket Challenge

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 11:07 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Former president George W. Bush has responded to the Ice Bucket Challenge.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "TODAY SHOW")

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The Two-Way
5:05 am
Thu August 21, 2014

'I Am Thrilled To Be Alive': American Ebola Patients Released From Hospital

Ebola virus survivor Dr. Kent Brantly (center) and his wife, Amber (left), walk at a news conference at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta Thursday. Brantly and aid worker Nancy Writebol were discharged from the hospital less than a month after they contracted Ebola while treating patients in Liberia.
Erik S. Lesser EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 12:31 pm

The two U.S. patients who were treated for Ebola have been discharged from Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, where they had been in an isolation ward since returning from Liberia early this month. They are the first patients treated for Ebola on American soil.

Dr. Kent Brantly and missionary Nancy Writebol have been released after "a rigorous course of treatment and thorough testing," Emory's Dr. Bruce Ribner said. He added that he's confident that their release from care "poses no public health threat."

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Europe
4:55 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Oslo Police Arrest Intoxicated Segway Driver

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 11:07 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Europe
3:07 am
Thu August 21, 2014

As Ukraine Presses Military Offensive, The Facts Are Fuzzy

Ukrainian soldiers muster at a point close to Luhansk in eastern Ukraine on Wednesday, as Ukrainian troops make a push into rebel-held territory.
Petro Zadorozhnyy AP

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 1:17 pm

The Ukrainian government claims its armed forces have recaptured a large part of the eastern city of Luhansk following fierce battles Wednesday with pro-Russian separatist fighters.

This is part of a broader campaign by the Ukrainians that has been marked by a number of successes recently. But as is often the case here, it's impossible to independently verify what either side says. Both the military and the rebels prevent reporters from getting near embattled areas, and in many places like Luhansk, phones and Internet are not working.

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NPR Story
3:07 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Other Hostages Are In Danger, White House Official Says

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 11:07 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Sports
3:07 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Female Pitcher Mo'Ne Davis Is A Hit At Little League World Series

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 11:07 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
1:42 am
Thu August 21, 2014

How Much Bigger Is The Ebola Outbreak Than Official Reports Show?

Workers with the aid group Doctors Without Borders prepare a new Ebola treatment center near Monrovia, Liberia, on Sunday. The facility has 120 beds, making it the largest Ebola isolation clinic in history.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 1:05 pm

The latest numbers on the Ebola outbreak are grim: 2,473 people infected and 1,350 deaths.

That's the World Health Organization's official tally of confirmed, probable and suspect cases across Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. But the WHO has previously warned that its official figures may "vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak."

So how bad is it really?

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Around the Nation
1:41 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Holder Seeks To Soothe Nerves During Visit To Ferguson

Attorney General Eric Holder participates in a closed-door meeting Wednesday with students at St. Louis Community College, Florissant Valley.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 11:07 am

The nation's top law enforcement officer traveled to Ferguson, Mo., on Wednesday to wrap his arms around a community in pain.

Attorney General Eric Holder hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown, the unarmed 18-year-old killed by a police officer earlier this month.

From the moment he walked into a soul food restaurant in Ferguson, the attorney general found friends and began getting reports on the community's mood after days of protests and sporadic violence.

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The Two-Way
6:30 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

Macy's To Pay $650,000 In Settlement Over Alleged Racial Profiling

Customers at Macy's flagship store in New York City say they were discriminated against. Macy's agreed to a settlement.
Eric Thayer Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 6:51 pm

Macy's has agreed to a settle over complaints of racial profiling in its flagship New York City store. The department store will pay $650,000, according to a statement from the New York attorney general's office.

This deal follows a similar deal earlier this month with Barneys in New York.

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National Security
6:30 pm
Wed August 20, 2014

U.S. Reveals Failed Special Forces Mission To Rescue Hostages

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 7:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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