NPR News

The Two-Way
7:20 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Jenner: 'For All Intents And Purposes, I Am A Woman'

From left, Bruce Jenner, Kanye West and Kim Kardashian attend FOX's "The X Factor" Season 2 Top 10 Live Performance Show on Nov. 21, 2012 in Hollywood, California.
Frank Micelotta AP

Bruce Jenner, a former world-renowned track and field athlete better known in recent years from the reality TV shows of his step-daughters, the Kardashian sisters, described a lifelong struggle with gender identity in an interview with ABC's Diane Sawyer on Friday night.

"For all intents and purposes, I am a woman," Jenner said. "I was not genetically born that way ... as of now I have all the male parts. As of now we're different, but we still identify as female."

Read more
The Two-Way
7:02 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Apprehensions Along Southern Border Drop Dramatically In 2015

The Department of Homeland Security says there has been a sharp drop in the apprehension of illegal crossers at the U.S. southern border.

NPR's John Burnett reports that the first six months of fiscal year 2015 saw a 28 percent drop compared to the same period of 2014. John filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Read more
The Two-Way
5:42 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

#NPRreads: Rube Goldberg Machine's Dark Origins And Spalding Gray's Last Days

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 5:51 pm

#NPRreads is a new feature we're testing out on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom will share pieces that have kept them reading. They'll share tidbits on Twitter using the #NPRreads hashtag, and on occasion we'll share a longer take here on the blog.

This week, we bring you four reads:

From Ina Jaffe, a correspondent on NPR's National Desk:

Read more
The Salt
5:08 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

PepsiCo Swaps Diet Drink's Aspartame For Other Artificial Sweeteners

Beginning in August, a newly formulated aspartame-free Diet Pepsi will hit the shelves, the company says.
PepsiCo

If you like the idea of zero or low-calorie sodas, but you're turned off by the artificial sweetener aspartame, you're not alone.

Sales of diet soda have fallen off significantly in the U.S. And when PepsiCo started asking consumers what they didn't like, aspartame was at the top of the list.

"It's literally the number one complaint we've heard from diet-cola consumers as to why they're drinking less and less diet cola, " Seth Kaufman, a senior vice president for PepsiCo, tells The Salt.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:06 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

A Most Indelible Ink: A Magazine Printed Using Blood

The magazine Audio Kultur printed this poster, which commemorates the 100th anniversary of the massacre of 1.5 million Armenians, using blood.
Audio Kultur

"Written in blood" is usually hyperbole. Not so in the case of the latest issue of a Lebanese music and culture magazine.

Audio Kultur used real blood to publish the magazine commemorating the 100th anniversary of the massacre of 1.5 million Armenians.

Read more
The Salt
5:01 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

These Animals Might Go Extinct Because No One Wants To Eat Them

Choctaw boar
The Livestock Conservancy

The Steller's sea cow, the passenger pigeon and the New Zealand moa all went extinct because people developed a taste for their meat.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:35 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Baltimore Police: Freddie Gray Should've Gotten Medical Help At Scene Of Arrest

Baltimore Police Department Commissioner Anthony Batts speaks about the investigation into Freddie Gray's death at a news conference on Friday in Baltimore.
Patrick Semansky AP

Police officials in Baltimore admitted that their officers should have provided medical attention immediately following the arrest of Freddie Gray.

Instead, Deputy Police Commissioner Kevin Davis said during a press conference, police officers put handcuffed Gray and put him in the back of a police van without ever buckling him in.

The van went on to make three different stops across town. At the first, Gray was shackeled, but at no point said Commissioner Anthony Batts was Gray ever buckled into the van.

Read more
Parallels
3:24 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Clearing The Tangled Path For Land Ownership In The West Bank

One of the first homes going up on land bought and sold as part of a Canadian-Palestinian investment firm's effort to properly register plots. Much land in the West Bank is not registered and has no title deed, creating problems for economic development.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 4:55 pm

High on a West Bank hilltop, the extended Dissi family gathered on a recent weekend for a day out in the Palestinian countryside.

Aunts, uncles and cousins came to see the half-built weekend home of Taysier Dissi, an electrician and father of three. The concrete-block shell, with windows set and stairs roughed in, is placed just right for the view.

This will be the family's getaway from their home in the cramped confines of Jerusalem's often tense Old City. Dissi paid about $30,000 for one-third of an acre here, bought from a Palestinian-Canadian company, UCI.

Read more
U.S.
3:22 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

What's That Smell? The Beautiful Tree That's Causing Quite A Stink

Callery pear trees in Pittsburgh. The smell of the invasive trees has been compared to rotting fish and other stinky things.
Luke H. Gordon Flickr

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 4:55 pm

It's springtime in Pittsburgh, and throughout the city, Callery pear trees are sprouting beautiful, white blossoms.

But that's just the problem. Simply put, these trees stink.

"This whole place smells like dead fish," says Sheila Titus. "I mean everywhere. Everywhere you see one of these trees with the white on them."

Titus has lived in her home in the now hip neighborhood of Lawrenceville for 49 years. Two decades ago, her grandson and his 7th grade class planted a row of Callery pears across the street from her house.

Read more
U.S.
3:22 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

LGBT Activists Push States To Expand Anti-Discrimination Laws

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 6:27 pm

Same-sex marriage is legal in most states but so is discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the areas of employment, housing and public accommodation.

Gay-rights activists say this creates a contradiction because in many states someone can legally marry a person of the same gender and then get fired for being gay. They are lobbying state legislatures to add LGBT people to anti-discrimination laws that already include things like race, age, religion and disability.

Read more
Africa
3:22 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Lawless Libya: The Jumping Off Point For Migrants Heading To Europe

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 4:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Health
2:24 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

HIV Outbreak In Indiana Grows With Nearly 140 Confirmed Cases

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 4:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
2:24 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Keith Murdoch, Father Of Media Baron, Disclosed Disaster At Gallipoli

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 3:22 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
2:24 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

In Charlotte, N.C., Police Use Simulators To Engage Community Amid Distrust

Charlotte Police Chief Rodney Monroe answers questions from the group.
Lisa Wolf WFAE

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 5:41 pm

Usually police simulators are tucked away in training academies. But in a Charlotte, N.C., middle school gym, a crowd of 100 people watches Capt. Rob Dance as he leads a teenager through a simulated traffic stop that goes bad.

The simulator lets out several loud bangs. Dance notices the teen is nervous, his hands are shaking.

"You shot 24 times," he tells the student. "Did you realize that?"

Read more
It's All Politics
2:24 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Young Trafficking Victim's Story On NPR Leads To Senator's Amendment

"I never thought that my story would have touched somebody so much that they went in front of Congress to present a bill," the young woman, whom NPR is not naming, said of Shaheen. "There's a lot of voices out there that can't tell her thank you."
Evie Stone NPR

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 4:39 pm

Hearing the words of a 24-year-old victim of human trafficking — and her struggle to wipe away her conviction on prostitution charges — inspired New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen.

That young victim, who was featured in an NPR story in February, endured years of rapes and brutal assaults by pimps who forced her into prostitution.

"I'm not ever going to forget what I've done or what I've gone through. But at the same time, I don't want it thrown in my face every time I'm trying to seek employment," she said. "I don't want to have to explain myself every time."

Read more
The Two-Way
2:05 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Scientists Discover Massive New Magma Chamber Under Yellowstone

The Grand Prismatic hot spring in Yellowstone National Park is among the park's myriad hydrothermal features created by the fact that Yellowstone is a supervolcano.
Robert B. Smith AP

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 3:14 pm

There's more to Yellowstone National Park than meets the eye. Much more, as it turns out.

You might already know that a supervolcano dominates the famous park that is situated on land in Wyoming and Montana. A shallow subsurface magma chamber has long been known.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:46 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Sabeen Mahmud, Pakistani Social Activist, Shot Dead In Karachi

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 2:53 pm

Sabeen Mahmud, a Pakistani social activist who ran Karachi's Second Floor cafe, was shot dead Friday by unknown gunmen in the port city.

The Dawn newspaper reports that Mahmud and her mother were on their way home from the cafe, known locally as T2F, at 9 p.m. local time when they were attacked. She died on her way to the hospital, the newspaper reported; doctors retrieved five bullets from her body. Her mother is in critical condition, the newspaper added.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

At A Georgia University, Tension Between Free Speech, Patriotism Sparks Protest

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 1:55 pm

An incident that sparked tensions between the ideals of patriotism and free speech has culminated in a mass protest that shut down the campus of Valdosta State University in south Georgia on Friday.

According to several local media outlets, thousands of protesters from around the state flooded onto the college campus to fly American flags.

Read more
NPR Story
12:41 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

An Audio Postcard From A Columbus Barbershop

Peter gets a hair cut from Jim Morris in Columbus, Ohio. (Peter O'Dowd)

Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd is retracing part of the route that Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train took 150 years ago. The train was carrying the body of the late president and was making its way to Springfield, Illinois from Washington, D.C.

Read more
NPR Story
12:41 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

James Brown Documentary Wins A Peabody Award

The HBO film “Mr. Dynamite: The Rise of James Brown” won a Peabody Award this week. When the documentary first premiered, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson spoke with the filmmaker, Alex Gibney, longtime Brown trombonist Fred Wesley and Michael Veal, a professor of ethnomusicology. We revisit that conversation.

Read more
NPR Story
12:41 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Drone Strike Deaths Raise Questions

President Barack Obama makes a statement in the Brady Briefing room at the White House April 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. President Obama talked about a US drone strike that targeted a suspected al Qaeda compound in Pakistan but inadvertently killed an American and Italian being held hostage by the group. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Italy says it wants more information from the United States about how an Italian aid worker was killed in a U.S. drone strike on the Afghan-Pakistani border.

Read more
Shots - Health News
12:21 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

CDC Warns More HIV, Hepatitis C Outbreaks Likely Among Drug Users

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 4:55 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that the U.S. epidemic of opioid abuse could lead to more severe outbreaks of HIV and hepatitis C nationally, much like the outbreak now seen in Indiana. A health advisory the agency released Friday outlines steps that state health departments and medical providers should take to minimize the risk of that happening.

Read more
Parallels
12:20 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Remembering Gallipoli, A WWI Battle That Shaped Today's Middle East

Allied troops at the ANZAC Cove in the Gallipoli peninsula, during World War I. Britain, France, Australia and New Zealand fought for nine months but could not defeat the Ottomans. Overall, a half-million were killed or wounded.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 6:14 pm

Heads of state and thousands of guests traveled to the windswept shores of western Turkey on Friday to mark the 100th anniversary of one of World War I's most infamous battles. The Gallipoli campaign saw Ottoman forces, fighting under German command, repel an Allied attack led by Britain and France.

Nine months of fighting left a half-million dead and wounded on both sides. The Allies withdrew, setting in motion events that would leave the region forever changed.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:00 am
Fri April 24, 2015

'Bali Nine' Ringleaders Could Face Indonesian Firing Squad Within Days

File photos from Jan. 2006 show Australian drug traffickers Myuran Sukumaran, left, and Andrew Chan during their trial in Bali, Indonesia. Indonesian authorities are reportedly ready to set an execution date for the pair.
Firdia Lisnawati AP

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 10:33 am

Indonesia has indicated that it is likely to execute the ringleaders of the so-called Bali Nine – a group of Australians held in the country after being convicted of drug smuggling in 2006.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:20 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Richard Corliss, 'Time' Film Critic, Dies At 71

Richard Corliss
Stefanie Keenan WireImage

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 10:42 am

Richard Corliss, the longtime film critic for Time, has died in New York, the magazine announced on its website. He was 71.

Corliss died Thursday night following a stroke he suffered a week ago, Time said. He is survived by his wife, Mary Corliss, and his brother Paul Corliss of New Jersey.

Time said Corliss, who reviewed films for the magazine for 35 years, "conveyed nothing so much as the sheer joy of watching movies — and writing about them.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:43 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Native American Actors Walk Off The Set Of Adam Sandler Comedy

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 10:11 am

Native American actors have walked off the set of an Adam Sandler movie that they say insults their culture.

Read more
Shots - Health News
8:36 am
Fri April 24, 2015

To Weather Criticism, It Helps To Think Of The Big Picture

Think back to the last time you got negative feedback — like when your doctor suggested you lay off the cigarettes or when your mother advised you to get rid of that ridiculous goatee.

Though we all understand the value of constructive criticism, we don't like hearing that we've done something wrong. And the knee-jerk reaction is to act defensive.

But if you focus on the big picture and future goals, you may be able to trick your mind into being a bit more receptive.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:25 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Alleged Skipper Of Migrant Boat Appears In Italian Court

Mohammed Ali Malek is seen at Catania's tribunal, on Friday. Italian prosecutors blamed the captain of a grossly overloaded fishing boat for a collision that capsized and sank his vessel off Libya, drowning hundreds of migrants.
Antonio Parrinello Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 11:21 am

The man who authorities say captained a boat carrying migrants from Libya that capsized in the Mediterranean, killing more than 700, has appeared in an Italian court. He faces possible charges of homicide and human trafficking.

An attorney for Mohammed Ali Malek, 27, from Tunisia, says that his client was a passenger – not skipper – of the overloaded fishing boat that reportedly collided with a merchant ship and then capsized. Hundreds of migrants were allegedly locked below deck and unable to escape when the boat sank.

Read more
NPR Ed
7:28 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Uncomfortable Conversations: Talking About Race In The Classroom

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 10:21 am

Open up the newspaper or turn on the news these days, and you'll find plenty of talk about race and racism. But it's a different story in many classrooms.

Some teachers don't consider race germane to their math or English syllabus. Others strive for colorblindness in the classroom, wanting to believe we live in a post-racial society. Unfortunately, says H. Richard Milner, we don't.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:55 am
Fri April 24, 2015

More Than A Dozen Hurt After High School Stage Collapses In Indiana

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 8:34 am

A stage collapse at a musical performance at a surburban Indianapolis high school has left more than a dozen students with minor injuries.

In a video of the accident at Westfield High School, students are seen clapping and dancing as they sing the finale of a stage show featuring '80s music when the stage suddenly drops from underneath them.

WLS TV reports that people then began yelling for help.

Read more

Pages