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A summer already full of high-profile hip-hop releases just got hotter. NPR Music's Ann Powers and Rodney Carmichael break down the surprise release of Jay-Z and Beyoncé's joint album, Everything Is Love, and explore how it sounds both on its own and compared to the competition.

Whenever you bring together dozens of different countries from around the globe, there's bound be some cross-cultural confusion. The World Cup is no exception.

And if you're Shin Tae-yong, coach of the South Korean national team, you figure out how to work that confusion to your advantage. In a press conference Sunday, Shin explained the unusual tactic he'd employed against scouts from the Swedish team: He'd had his team members swap jersey numbers for the warm-up games, in hopes that scouts wouldn't be able to tell the players apart.

It's been a decade since the financial crisis drove up the unemployment rate in the U.S. and forced people in the prime of their careers to give up looking for work.

Even today, as employers add jobs at a furious pace, the workforce participation rate still hasn't recovered. And now researchers think they know one reason why: the opioid crisis.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

President Trump Monday announced his intention to create a "space force" that would oversee the military's activities off-world.

"When it comes to defending America, it is not enough to merely have an American presence in space," Trump said at a meeting of the National Space Council, which oversees the nation's space policy. "We must have American dominance in space. So important."

With about 80 percent of 911 calls made from mobile devices, it's sometimes difficult for emergency responders to pinpoint the location of those callers.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ahmed Alaa describes raising a rainbow flag at a crowded concert in Cairo last September as "the best moment" of his life. In photos from the event, he looks ecstatic as he waves the flag in the spotlights of the outdoor stage hosting the Lebanese indie rock band Mashrou' Leila.

He posted the photos on Facebook, and others did too. The next morning, he woke up to death threats.

A recent report from the American Psychiatric Association urges people to “participate in policy and advocacy to combat climate change.”

And that’s just one of the medical groups writing about the connection between adverse mental health effects and global disasters related to changing climate.

The policy of separating children from their families at the Mexican border is dividing Republicans as Democrats push to end the practice.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Sen. Chris Van Hollen (@ChrisVanHollen), a Democrat from Maryland, about visiting a border patrol processing center over the weekend in McAllen, Texas.

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Across the country and beyond, drug donations are quietly emerging. At least 37 states in the U.S. have created drug donation programs for unused medication.

House Republican leaders are reworking their "compromise" immigration bill to include a provision that modifies — but doesn't completely end — the "zero tolerance" policy being enforced now by the Trump administration.

The first week of the World Cup is arguably the best: three matches a day, none at the same time. It is Soccer Christmas for futbol fans, and it's hard to get much work done at the office.

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The U.S. Supreme Court punted Monday on its biggest decision of its term so far. The justices had been expected to rule on the limits of partisan gerrymandering.

Instead, the court sidestepped the major issues on technical grounds, sending the issue back to the lower courts for further examination.

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Updated at 1:50 p.m. ET

Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong took ownership of the Los Angeles Times in style with a full-page note to his readers and his new employees on Sunday.

Soon-Shiong bought the newspaper from its former corporate owners, the Chicago-based Tronc newspaper company. NPR spoke to Soon-Shiong about his ambitions for the newspaper.

Updated at 6:35 p.m. ET

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is continuing to defend the Trump administration's controversial "zero tolerance" policy that results in separating children from their parents who enter the U.S. illegally.

Nielsen appeared at the White House press briefing on Monday, falsely blaming Democrats for the current crisis and arguing that the impetus is on Congress to pass a law to close legal loopholes.

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At least five people are dead and several injured after a high speed chase by U.S. Border Patrol agents and local sheriff deputies in south Texas ended in a fatal car crash on Sunday.

Dimmit County Sheriff Marion Boyd told the Associated Press 14 people had been crammed into the car and that the driver lost control as it was fleeing Border Patrol agents topping 100 mph near Big Wells, Texas.

"From what we can tell the vehicle ran off the road and caught gravel and then tried to recorrect," Boyd said, adding that "caused the vehicle to turn over several times."

Morning News Brief

12 hours ago

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We begin about 40 miles outside El Paso, Texas, where the federal government is holding around 100 detained migrant boys in a desert tent encampment.

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Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

A magnitude 6.1 earthquake rocked the Osaka region of western Japan on Monday morning, killing at least four people and injuring more than 350 others, NHK reported.

The temblor struck shortly after 8 a.m. local time, causing severe damage to roads, bursting water mains and setting fires across the prefecture.

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Colombia has elected a new president. Ivan Duque is his name. He's a conservative, and he defeated a onetime leftist rebel named Gustavo Petro. The winner promises to be tough on drugs and on former rebels. John Otis has more.

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Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz and FBI Director Christopher Wray headed to Capitol Hill Monday for a grilling from senators — that quickly turned partisan — about the inspector general's scathing report on the FBI's mishandling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation in 2016.

On Sunday, Colombia elected a new president, Ivan Duque, a conservative former senator who's pledged to rewrite a divisive peace treaty that ended the country's 50-year-old guerrilla war.

In the second and final round of elections, Duque won 54 percent of the vote, defeating former guerrilla fighter and onetime Bogota Mayor Gustavo Petro, 58, who captured about 42 percent in the runoff. Duque will succeed outgoing President Juan Manuel Santos.

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