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The State Department released around 7,000 of Hillary Clinton's emails Monday from her time as secretary of state. This batch is the latest in a series of monthly, court-ordered releases that started in May. This is the largest batch so far.

Kim Davis, the Rowan County clerk in Kentucky who has repeatedly refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, lost her bid for a stay Monday when the U.S. Supreme Court denied her application.

As is often the case in such rejections, the decision came without comment: "The application for stay presented to Justice Kagan and by her referred to the Court is denied."

The court's one-line order did not mention whether any justices dissented.

A jury has found Frazier Glenn Cross Jr., also known as Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., guilty of murder for killing three people in attacks at a Jewish community center and a Jewish retirement home near Kansas City, Mo. The jury will next decide whether he should be executed.

In their deliberations, the jurors took less than two hours to return the guilty verdict, The Kansas City Star reports.

Terry Loewen, who pleaded guilty to attempting to drive an explosives-laden vehicle and detonate it at an airport in Wichita, Kan., has been sentenced to 20 years in federal prison. Loewen, an avionics technician, had an employee access card at the airport.

Loewen was arrested in 2013; investigators said he spent months planning his attack, discussing his work with what he thought was a group of conspirators — but was actually a team of undercover FBI agents.

From member station KMUW in Wichita, Abigail Wilson reports:

The latest batch of Hillary Clinton's emails from her time as secretary of state contains 150 the government now considers "confidential," the State Department said Monday.

"We stand by our contention that the information we've upgraded was not marked 'classified' at the time the emails were sent," State Department spokesman Mark Toner said Monday in a press briefing.

5-Hour Line Turns Barbecue Pilgrims Into Cash Cow For Locals

5 hours ago

Texas has a barbecue joint known as much for the line of people waiting outside as for its tender brisket.

At Franklin Barbecue in Austin, people start lining up around 5 a.m., waiting six hours, chatting with others in line until the restaurant opens at 11 a.m.

This barbecue place is such a big deal that entrepreneurs like Desmond Roldan are cashing in on its fans.

"People know me. I'm a big deal," he says, chuckling.

The ride-hailing service Uber has served more than 1 million customers in Philadelphia, despite operating under disputed terms for nearly a year. Now the city's regulators are taking the company to court.

Uber says it doesn't plan to stop operating in the city where it first launched service last October.

If, like me, you're an amateur taster of beer and wine, inevitably you've asked yourself why you don't taste that hint of raspberry or note of pine bark that someone else says is there.

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Prosecutors say the man charged with fatally shooting a sheriff's deputy at a Houston-area gas station fired his weapon at the victim a total of 15 times, including in the back of the head.

Shannon Miles, who is charged in the capital murder of 47-year-old Deputy Darren Goforth, was in a Texas district court Monday and is being held without bond. Harris County District Attorney Devon Anderson did not comment on a motive but said Miles used a .40 pistol during the encounter.

Sometimes fast food just isn't fast enough. A new highly automated restaurant that opened in San Francisco on Monday looks to speed service through efficiency — you won't see any people taking your order or serving you at the Eatsa quinoa eatery.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

As part of a series of listening sessions across the country, representatives from the Bureau of Land Management recently came to Gillette, Wyoming, to meet with residents about the agency’s federal coal program.

The BLM says it wants to modernize the program to ensure American taxpayers receive a fair return on mining on federal lands. A reformed program will be an additional blow to the coal industry, already struggling with declining production and restrictive regulations.

Daniel James Brown‘s book about the University of Washington’s eight-oar rowing team, “The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics” was a bestseller for months when it was published in 2013.

The U.S. open gets underway today, and there’s a buzz in the air as Serena Williams tries to complete her first Grand Slam – winning all four major tennis competitions in one season.

For what is believed to be the first time in history, tickets for the women’s final sold out before tickets for the men’s final. Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins speaks with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News for a look at the U.S. Open and women’s tennis through a business lens.

Dr. David Burkons graduated from medical school and began practicing obstetrics and gynecology in 1973, the same year the Supreme Court issued its landmark abortion decision in Roe v. Wade.

Burkons liked delivering babies. But he is also committed to serving all his patients, including those who choose abortions.

A longtime federal judge struggled Monday over what constitutes justice for members of one of Washington, D.C.'s most notorious drug rings.

Senior U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth pressed a public defender about the fate of Melvin Butler, a man who helped flood the city with cocaine that contributed to waves of violence in the late 1980s.

"You're saying that I can't consider the fact that he was one of the biggest drug dealers in the history of our city?" the judge asked. "Congress has tied my hands and I can't consider that?"

Police in Thailand are looking for two new suspects, a woman and a man, in connection with a bombing in Bangkok that left 20 dead.

Michael Sullivan filed this report from Thailand for Newscast:

The phrase "police militarization" conjures up an image of cops wrapped in Kevlar, barging into homes with semi-automatic weapons. But familiar as that image is, we don't know how common it is. There are simply no good statistics on police tactical operations in America. The federal government doesn't keep track, and neither do the states — with one exception: Utah.

In case you didn't stay up late to watch the MTV Video Music Awards, there are really only two moments that matter.

They'll be the talk of the water cooler today, so you might as well take a look. Here are the two moments that matter:

1. After receiving the Video Vanguard award, the rapper Kanye West delivered a 13-minute soliloquy in which he sorta, kinda apologized for his past behavior and then he got ahead of the news cycle by announcing he's running for president in 2020.

Selfie Leads To Car Crash, Police Say

16 hours ago
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Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

European ministers have called for an emergency summit to discuss the hundreds of thousands of migrants who are pouring into European countries.

As The New York Times reports, almost as soon as Germany, France and the U.K. made the call, Luxembourg, which currently holds the EU presidency, obliged by setting a meeting date for Sept. 14 in Brussels.

The Times reports:

The 'Trump Effect' Alienating Conservative Latinos

18 hours ago

The current front-runner in the Republican presidential primary, Donald Trump, is sparking a debate about immigration that's beginning to alienate some conservative Latinos.

"He drowns out a lot of the conservative field, and it's very bad for the Republican Party," said Ricky Salabarria, a 22-year-old consultant with a pair of Ray-Ban sunglasses tucked into his pink dress shirt.

Salabarria was among a half-dozen young conservatives at a networking event in Northern Virginia. He's from Florida, and his family is originally from Cuba and Spain.

Participation in sports by girls and young women has soared in recent decades — by 560 percent among high school students since 1972, and 990 percent among college students, according to the Women's Sports Foundation. Highly committed young female athletes now run track and play soccer, basketball, water polo and other demanding sports that require strong bodies.

It seems to be part of human nature to want to belong to a group. People constantly form groups, in all kinds of situations, and high-stakes negotiations on climate change are no exception.

Ever heard of the Umbrella Group? Or the Like-Minded Developing Countries? How about the Group of 77? (Here's a hint — it doesn't actually have 77 countries.)

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This summer we've been hearing about trails that lead somewhere amazing and unexpected. To take us to new destinations, here's a voice we heard from the beginning of the summer.

Wes Craven, the legendary horror director behind the A Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream franchises, has died at 76.

His verified Twitter account posted about his death Sunday evening. The Associated Press reports that he had brain cancer and died in his Los Angeles home, according to a statement from his family.

There may be an octopus arms race underway. And that's not even a joke about tentacles: Octopuses are actually fighting, and potentially using weapons.

The creatures are hardly team players under the best of circumstances.

"Octopuses in general are regarded as fairly solitary animals," says Peter Godfrey-Smith, a marine biologist at the City University of New York. He is studying octopuses in Australia's Jervis Bay — specifically, the common Sydney octopus, also known as the gloomy octopus.

The White House announced Sunday that President Obama is changing the name of North America's highest peak.

Mount McKinley — named after William McKinley, the 25th president, who served in the White House until his assassination in 1901 — is returning to its traditional Alaska Native name, Denali.

Obama will make a public announcement of the name change in Anchorage Monday, during a three-day visit to Alaska.

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