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1:40 pm
Tue January 27, 2015

A Holocaust Survivor, Spared From Auschwitz At The Last Second

Jack Mandelbaum, a Holocaust survivor from the Polish city of Gdansk, annexed by Nazi Germany during WWII, poses in front of a photograph showing him as a youth.
Tobias Schwarz AFP/Getty Images

Seventy years ago, Soviet soldiers liberated Auschwitz, the most notorious of Nazi concentration camps.

Some 300 Holocaust survivors were at Auschwitz on Tuesday, along with several European presidents and other government officials, to honor at least 1.1 million people who were murdered, 1 million of whom were Jewish.

Among those killed there were Jack Mandelbaum's mother and brother. The Polish-born Mendelbaum survived, spared at the last minute by an officer of the dreaded SS who, yanked the teen away from his family and sent him instead to a forced labor camp.

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NPR Story
1:19 pm
Tue January 27, 2015

Proposal Could Open Parts Of Atlantic, Close Parts Of Arctic To Drilling

This 2007 photo provided by Shell Exploration & Production Company shows the Frontier Discoverer drilling rig as it sits in Dutch Harbor, Alaska. (Shell Exploration & Production via AP)

The Obama Administration today is proposing opening up parts of the Eastern seaboard to offshore drilling, while at the same time proposing a ban on drilling along some parts of Alaska’s Arctic coast.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Phil Flynn, an energy market analyst with Price Futures Group, and Bob Deans of the Natural Resources Defense Council, about the proposal — a win and a loss each for environmentalists and the oil industry

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NPR Story
1:19 pm
Tue January 27, 2015

Report: All 50 States Failing To Help Abused And Neglected Kids

A report released by the Children’s Advocacy Institute today shows that all 50 states have failed to meet minimum federal requirements for the care of abused and neglected kids.

The institute’s executive director Robert Fellmeth tells Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins that even when the federal government finds that a state is not meeting its requirements, not much changes.

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NPR Story
1:19 pm
Tue January 27, 2015

Why Aren't There More Latinos On TV?

Cristela Alonzo stars in the ABC sitcom "Cristela." She also created and writes for the show. (Adam Taylor/ABC)

The big four television networks have made progress in diversifying their casts, but only among African-American actors. That’s according to recent numbers compiled by the Associated Press.

Latinos represent about 17 percent of the American population, but on network T.V., that group represents less than 10 percent of characters.

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The Two-Way
11:42 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Obama Meets New Saudi King, Balancing Human Rights, U.S. Interests

President Obama meets Saudi King Salman bin Abdul Aziz in Riyadh on Tuesday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 12:39 pm

President Obama arrived in Saudi Arabia today to meet newly crowned King Salman and said in an interview that the U.S. needs to balance its concerns about Saudi human rights with "immediate concerns" such as counterterrorism and regional stability.

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Music Interviews
11:23 am
Tue January 27, 2015

At The BBC, The Beatles Shocked An Institution

Between 1962 and 1965, The Beatles were featured on 53 BBC radio programs. For The Beatles: The BBC Archives, executive producer Kevin Howlett had to search for many of these recordings, and they weren't easy to find.

Originally broadcast Nov. 27, 2013.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
10:03 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Number Of Exonerations Last Year Reached New High, Report Finds

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 1:40 pm

A record 125 people were exonerated last year in the U.S. after being falsely convicted of crimes, according to a new report. The number surpasses the previous record of 91 set in 2013.

Much of the increase was due to one county in Texas. Thirty-three people in Harris County had their drug convictions thrown out after lab tests found they tested negative for the presence of illegal substances.

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The Salt
9:30 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Beef Packers Block Plan To Revive Growth-Promoting Drug

Cattle in holding pens at the Simplot feedlot located next to a slaughterhouse in Burbank, Washington on Dec. 26, 2013. Merck & Co Inc is testing lower dosages of its controversial cattle growth drug Zilmax drug in an effort to resume its sales to the $44 billion U.S. beef industry.
Ross Courtney Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 12:08 pm

For more than a year, a once-popular drug that makes cattle put on weight faster has been stuck in a kind of veterinary purgatory.

As far as the Food and Drug Administration is concerned, the drug, Zilmax, is legal to use. But large meat packers, which dominate the industry, have ostracized it after the drug was accused of making animals suffer. The drug's manufacturer, Merck, has been working on a plan to rehabilitate it. But that effort has stalled.

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NPR Ed
8:51 am
Tue January 27, 2015

A Teacher's 'Pinch Me' Moment: Cheering The Super Bowl From The Sidelines

The Patriots cheerleaders perform in the first half against the Indianapolis Colts in the 2015 AFC Championship game.
Elsa Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:16 am

The NPR Ed team is discovering what teachers do when they're not teaching. Cartoonist? Carpenter? Dolphin trainer? Explore our Secret Lives of Teachers series.

Most teachers will watch the Super Bowl at home, cracking open a beer maybe, or yelling at their flat-screen TVs. Lauren Schneider will be right there on the sidelines, cheering on Tom Brady and her team just feet from the action.

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The Two-Way
8:28 am
Tue January 27, 2015

'I Don't Trust U.S. Politics,' Fidel Castro Reportedly Writes

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:51 am

Fidel Castro, the leader of the Cuban revolution, has remained silent ever since the the U.S. and Cuba announced plans for a rapprochement back in December.

Late last night, the official newspaper of the island's Communist party released a letter reportedly written by Castro.

If you remember, Castro stepped down as president of Cuba in 2006. He handed over the presidency to his brother Raúl and ever since, rumors of his death have emerged every few weeks.

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The Two-Way
8:17 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Holocaust Survivors Mark 70th Anniversary Of Auschwitz's Liberation

Holocaust survivors walk outside the gate of the of the Auschwitz Nazi death camp in Oswiecim, Poland, on Tuesday.
Alik Keplicz AP

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 11:07 am

Holocaust survivors gathered along with several world leaders today to mark the 70th anniversary of the liberation by the Soviet Red Army of the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp in Poland where more than 1 million people, mostly Jews, were killed.

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Middle East
8:13 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Mourning In Riyadh: Obama Visits New Saudi King To Offer Condolences

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:27 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
7:59 am
Tue January 27, 2015

The Cape Bears Brunt Of Blizzard's Onslaught

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:27 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
7:28 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Am I Responsible If The Insurance Exchange Flubs My Subsidy?

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 12:08 pm

Insurance and the subsidies available to buy it can be confusing. Here are some answers to recent questions from people who are running into difficulties with premiums and tax credits on their marketplace plans.

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Around the Nation
7:26 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Boston Copes With Its Deepening Blanket Of Snow

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:27 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
6:46 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Gunman Opens Fire At City Council Meeting In Minnesota

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 1:32 pm

Updated at 3:28 p.m. ET

The son of the man who reportedly shot and wounded two policeman said his father, 68-year-old Raymond K. Kmetz, had a history of making threats. Nathan Kmetz said he would provide additional information about his father later on Tuesday.

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The Two-Way
6:05 am
Tue January 27, 2015

LOOK! The Asteroid That Flew Past Earth Tuesday Has Its Own Moon

A series of images show that asteroid 2004 BL86 has a small moon.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 1:33 pm

In celestial terms, asteroid 2004 BL86 pretty much buzzed Earth, coming within 745,000 miles of our planet.

As NPR's Sam Sanders explained, it's the closest this asteroid will pass by Earth for at least the next two centuries. So when it flew by yesterday, scientists trained their instruments on it.

Scientists using the Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, Calif., captured a stunning set of images that revealed 2004 BL86 has a small moon.

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The Two-Way
5:12 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Winter Blizzard Skirts New York City, But Still Walloping Northeast

Times Square is mostly empty following road closures on Tuesday in preparation for what was predicted to be a major winter storm.
Alex Trautwig Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 12:19 pm

First the good news: Forecasts of a historic winter storm for the country's most populous city have failed to materialize.

Forecasters had called for up to 30 inches of snow in New York City, but as a new day dawned, meteorologists had downgraded the system to a winter storm from a blizzard and tempered their forecasts, saying when it was all done, the city would have about 12 inches of snow on the ground.

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Around the Nation
5:11 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Thieves With A Guilty Conscience Return Stolen Items

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:26 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
5:07 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Rhode Island School Releases Snow Day Video

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 5:39 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
3:18 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Family's Long Fight With Pentagon Returns Name To Unknown Soldier

Pvt. Arthur "Bud" Kelder served as a dental assistant in the Army during World War II.
Courtesy of the Kelder family

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:47 am

The remains of a World War II soldier who died in a prisoner of war camp in the Philippines — and the subject of a joint NPR/ProPublica investigation last year — have been identified as Pvt. Arthur "Bud" Kelder. His identification came after a long legal battle between his family and the Pentagon.

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NPR Story
3:02 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Obama Takes Heat For Proposing To End College Savings Break

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 5:05 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
1:48 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Child Abuse And Neglect Laws Aren't Being Enforced, Report Finds

Will Crocker Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:27 am

Laws intended to protect children from abuse and neglect are not being properly enforced, and the federal government is to blame. That's according to a study by the Children's Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law, which says children are suffering as a result.

The numbers are grim. Almost 680,000 children in the United States were the victims of abuse and neglect in 2013. More than 1,500 of them died.

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Parallels
1:37 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Russian Threats Expose Europe's Military Cutbacks

A soldier from the Swedish army participates in a military exercise at Hagshult Airbase in Sweden in November.
Jonathan Nackstrand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:27 am

An international cat-and-mouse game played out in the waters of Stockholm a few months ago.

The "mouse" was a foreign submarine — Russia is the main suspect — that got away.

And as Russia's military becomes more aggressive, European leaders fear they do not have the military power to deal with this new threat.

Take Sweden, for instance. Its days of military might are long gone.

The numbers tell the story, says Karlis Neretnieks, who used to run Sweden's National Defense College and has had a long career in the military.

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NPR Story
9:17 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Obama And Modi Aim To Strengthen U.S.-India Ties

U.S. President Barack Obama (center), Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (right) and Indian President Pranab Mukherjee (left) attend a reception at Rashtrapati Bhawan, the Presidential Palace, in New Delhi on January 26, 2015. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:58 pm

On a three-day visit to India, President Obama became the first American president to serve as guest of honor for India’s Republic Day, a major holiday marking when the country’s postpartition democratic Constitution came into force in 1950.

Meeting with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, both claimed breakthroughs on nuclear, environmental and defense negotiations.

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NPR Story
9:17 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Fuel Is Cheap, So Why Are Airfares High?

A U.S. Airways Airbus A320 airplane takes off from a runway at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Virginia, September 23, 2013. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:58 pm

This week could be a nightmare for anyone hoping to travel in or out of the Northeast. But when weather cooperates, it’s a great time for road trips, with oil prices at the lowest levels in years. It seems the same should be true for air travel. Not so.

Airlines are happy to keep prices high, because their customers just keep coming. Seth Kaplan of Airline Weekly joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.

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NPR Story
9:16 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Bloom Of Arab Spring Fades In Egypt

Egyptian protesters shout slogans during a demonstration against President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi and marking the fourth anniversary of the 2011 uprising, on January 25, 2015 in the capital Cairo. (Mohamed El- Shahed/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:58 pm

At least 18 people were killed in clashes with police over the weekend on the fourth anniversary of the revolution that ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. Dozens were injured and hundreds more arrested.

It’s the latest blow for the democracy movement that filled Cairo’s Tahrir Square in the early days of 2011.

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NPR Story
9:16 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

One Greek's View On The Election

The world is waiting to see how Greece's new Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras takes on the country's economic problems, but some locals don't believe he can deliver. (Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:58 pm

Christina Androulidaki owns an art gallery in Athens. She did not vote for the Syriza party because she’s not sure that Alexis Tsipras can live up to his promises to renegotiate the bailout. She joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the election.

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Carnegie Hall Live
9:16 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Carnegie Hall Live: The Chicago Symphony Plays A Colorful Concert

Riccardo Muti leading the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.
Todd Rosenberg Courtesy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 12:59 pm

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra arrives at Carnegie Hall with a program that portrays choppy waters and changing tides, opening with Mendelssohn's Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage Overture followed by Debussy's La mer.

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NPR Story
9:14 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

What's The Future Of The Euro In Greece?

Newly elected Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras has vowed to end austerity policies and renegotiate the country's debt, triggering questions about whether Greece will continue to use the Euro. (Danial Roland/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:58 pm

Greece’s Syriza party gained the key backing needed to form a government today, creating a surprise alliance with a small right-wing party that signals possible confrontation over the country’s bailout.

The right-wing Independent Greeks party said it would back Syriza leader Alexis Tsipras to be the next prime minister, after he fell just short of the majority needed to govern alone following Sunday’s poll.

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