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If you want to know whether Hillary Clinton will stay close to Bernie Sanders Tuesday, or are looking for an early hint of how the Republican race will end up, here's a tip: Keep an eye on Rochester.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 KQED Public Media. To see more, visit KQED Public Media.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

They say when Punxsutawney Phil sees his shadow, it means six more weeks of winter.

When Dixville Notch, in the far northern reaches of New Hampshire, voted just after midnight Tuesday, it didn't predict six more weeks with Donald Trump.

But as with Pennsylvania's groundhog, the results — three votes for John Kasich, the only candidate to visit the town, and two for Trump, along with four for Bernie Sanders and zero for Hillary Clinton — are not necessarily predictive.

The sighs we notice usually accompany emotions like relief or discontent. But our brains are programmed to make us heave an unconscious sigh every five minutes or so — no matter how we feel.

"Sighing is vital to maintain lung function," says Jack Feldman, a brain scientist at UCLA. These periodic deep breaths reinflate tiny air sacs in the lungs that have gone flat. But the brain circuitry behind those reflexive sighs has been a mystery.

The wife of a dead ISIS leader has been charged with having a "role in a conspiracy that resulted in the death of American citizen Kayla Mueller in February 2015," Justice Department documents say.

Nisreen Assad Ibrahim Bahar, also known as Umm Sayyaf, is an Iraqi citizen and was the wife of ISIS leader Abu Sayyaf before he was killed in a U.S. military operation last year.

Beyonce's 'Formation' Is A Visual Anthem

12 hours ago

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says that Canada will cease its airstrikes against self-proclaimed Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria by Feb. 22.

It will remain part of the coalition targeting the militants.

Until very recently it was thought that just one bacterium was to blame for causing Lyme disease in humans. But it turns out that a second, related bug can cause it too.

In 2013, during routine testing of bacterial DNA floating around in the blood samples of people suspected of having Lyme disease, researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., realized they were looking at something different.

If you watched Sunday's Super Bowl, how did you get it? Over cable? Rabbit ears? (Yes, those still work.) Or did you stream it online?

Do you know any global health stories that should be getting coverage — but are overlooked by the media?

The Gulf of Mexico is now open for commercial fish farming.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced last month that, for the first time in the U.S., companies can apply to set up fish farms in federal waters.

The idea is to compete with hard-to-regulate foreign imports. But opening the Gulf to aquaculture won't be cheap, and it could pose environmental problems.

Let's Get People Talking

13 hours ago

What happens if NPR and its Member stations asked people all over the country the same question?

This year NPR's political team has worked hard to find new ways to address the campaign--getting past the horse race to the crucial conversations happening across the country.

During the last week of January, NPR piloted a coordinated political conversation with several Member stations to create a national conversation around a topic that's on everyone's mind: voter anxiety.

The problems with high lead levels in Flint, Mich.'s water started in April 2014, when the city switched water sources and began drawing its supply from the Flint River. The new water was harder, and government officials allowed it to corrode the city's pipes, leaching lead and other toxins into the tap water.

Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi rolled up with his motorcade over a massive red carpet to the opening of a social housing project, sparking outrage about apparent wastefulness in a country suffering from high levels of poverty.

According to local media reports, the red carpet was rolled out in 6th of October City, a suburb of Egypt's capital Cairo.

The Stream is your source for news, photos and analysis from NPR's political team on the ground in New Hampshire. For more coverage and analysis visit NPRPolitics.org or elections.npr.org.

10 Things To Know About New Hampshire

15 hours ago

Every four years, national presidential candidates descend upon the Granite State, with the national media in tow. While much of the focus is on the primary race tomorrow, we decided to do a little digging about what sets this state apart from the other 49.

Here are the 10 things you should know about New Hampshire:

Chipotle locations across the country are closed Monday for a few hours, for a company-wide food safety meeting.

The chain has been struggling since October with a string of E. coli outbreaks and norovirus incidents that have sent its sales and stock plummeting. Though there have been no new reports of illnesses since early December, and the CDC last week declared that Chipotle’s E. coli outbreak appears to be over, the company is still working to regain customer confidence.

Last night Beyoncé performed during the Super Bowl 50 halftime show. It seemed to be business as usual: leotard, hair blowing thanks to a wind machine and a squad of dancers backing her up. But was it business as usual?

The lyrics to her new song “Formation,” which was released on Saturday are more racially driven than anything she has ever sung before.

[Youtube]

Former President Bill Clinton levied an extended criticism of Bernie Sanders at a campaign stop in which he took issue with "sexist" attacks against his wife.

In the stretch run before the New Hampshire primary, the former president accused Sanders' supporters of slinging vitriol toward Clinton's female supporters, citing the tale of one female blogger who was bullied online.

At more than 1,100 feet long, it's large enough to hold more than 6,100 people — but on Sunday, a 168,000-ton Royal Caribbean cruise ship was tossed around by a winter storm that damaged the craft and left four people with minor injuries.

Photos sent by passengers aboard the Anthem of the Seas show high winds, turbulent seas and leaning decks.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

At midnight Tuesday the residents of tiny Dixville Notch, N.H., will welcome camera crews for the quadrennial ritual of casting the first votes in the nation's first presidential primary.

The remote town near the Canadian border is so small that it has only a roomful of registered voters and zero racial diversity. Its votes in recent cycles have been unreliable indicators of who will win the primary.

But the cameras will be there, nonetheless, because it is first, and because it is a tradition.

After an airplane passenger set off a bomb last week, the pilot managed to land the plane safely in Mogadishu, Somalia. Now CCTV footage released by the Somali government indicates airport workers may have been in on the attack.

The only casualty of the attack was the bomber, who apparently was sucked out of the hole in the side of the plane.

NPR's Gregory Warner tells our Newscast unit that the bomber was originally scheduled to fly on a Turkish Airlines flight. Here's more from Gregory:

For more than two decades, New Hampshire has been a place of redemption for the Clintons. That could come to an end Tuesday night.

The Granite State revived Hillary Clinton's 2008 campaign after a devastating Iowa loss to Barack Obama. That victory helped her become the new "Comeback Kid" — the same moniker her husband claimed after his strong finish in the state in 1992 jump-started his road to the Democratic nomination.

Only a few people survived when a boat carrying migrants capsized in the Aegean Sea on Monday, Turkish Coast Guard officials say. More than two dozen people perished — including about a dozen children.

Old Mouse Trap Still Works Just Fine

22 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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