NPR News

The Protojournalist
9:15 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Girl Scouts Look For A Way Out Of The Woods

Girl Scouts model contemporary uniforms.
From Girl Scouts of the USA website

The Girl Scouts organization wants s'more – members and leaders, that is.

Membership in Girl Scouts of the USA is on the decline. In the past year, according to the group's official blog, there has been a significant drop nationwide – down 400,000 girls and adults — from 3.2 million to 2.8 million.

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The Two-Way
9:03 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Canada's Parliament Gives Sergeant-At-Arms Standing Ovation

Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers is pictured in the Senate chamber on Parliament Hill in Ottawa in this file photo from June 3, 2011.
Chris Wattie Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 9:35 am

Barely 24 hours after a gunman attacked Parliament Hill in Ottawa, killing a soldier, lawmakers gave a standing ovation to Kevin Vickers, the legislature's sergeant-at-arms, for reportedly firing the shots that took down the alleged assailant.

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Economy
8:52 am
Thu October 23, 2014

You're Enjoying Low Gas Prices, But Is It Really A Good Sign?

Macy Gould shared this photo from Lexington, Ky., where the gas prices are under three dollars.
Macy Gould Instagram

All around the country, gasoline prices have been falling for weeks, down to an average of about $3 a gallon. Those lower prices are helping restrain inflation across the board.

On Wednesday, the Labor Department said its consumer price index barely inched up 0.1 percent last month. Over the last 12 months, the CPI has risen by 1.7 percent, roughly half of its historical average rate of increase.

That sounds great for consumers.

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Shots - Health News
6:58 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Scientists Fight For Superbug Research As U.S. Pauses Funding

A rogues gallery of the viruses (left to right) that cause MERS, SARS, and influenza.
Niaid; 3D4Medical; Niaid/Science Source

An unusual government moratorium aimed at controversial research with high-risk viruses has halted important public health research, scientists told an advisory committee to the federal government on Wednesday.

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The Two-Way
6:32 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Family Says Nurse Amber Vinson Is Free Of Ebola

Amber Vinson in a photograph taken earlier this week at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. Officials at Emory University Hospital and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention couldn't detect Ebola in Amber Vinson as of Tuesday evening, her family said in a statement.
AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 9:42 am

A Texas nurse who contracted Ebola while treating Thomas Eric Duncan in a Dallas hospital is now free of the potentially deadly virus, her family says.

Amber Vinson, 29, remains in treatment at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, but her family said in a statement that since Tuesday evening, doctors had been unable to detect traces of the disease in her blood.

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The Two-Way
5:57 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Details Emerge Of Alleged Assailant In Canadian Parliament Attack

A makeshift memorial sits on a downtown street a block away from Canada's National War Memorial in Ottawa to remember Canadian soldier Nathan Cirillo, who was shot and killed by an assailant Wednesday.
Warren Toda EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:57 am

Updated at 8:55 a.m. ET

Authorities in Canada today were taking stock of Wednesday's dramatic attack in the capital city that killed a soldier and led to a shootout inside a Parliament building between police and the alleged attacker, identified as 32-year-old Michael Zehaf-Bibeau.

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The Two-Way
5:33 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Tweets In Hong Kong Put Kenny G In Jam With Communist Party

After deleting tweets from a Hong Kong protest site, Kenny G said he was "not trying to defy government orders."
Tomasz Gzell EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:36 am

Politics between Hong Kong and mainland China are a minefield these days, and if Kenny G, the 1980s saxophone superstar, didn't know it, he does now.

Kenny G, who is hugely popular in mainland China, was in Hong Kong on Wednesday and decided to pop by the main pro-democracy protest camp, which is now in its fourth week.

He posed for photos with fans, flashed a peace sign and said he hoped the demonstrations would end peacefully.

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Europe
3:30 am
Thu October 23, 2014

How Much Would You Pay For A Putin-Themed Music Box?

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:09 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Education
3:30 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Wave Away Math Homework With An App

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World
3:30 am
Thu October 23, 2014

With Bears On The Streets, Canadian Town Cancels Halloween

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:09 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

American Made: The New Manufacturing Landscape
2:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

No Mere Merry-Go-Round: Ohio Carousel Maker Carves From Scratch

The National Zoo's carousel is among dozens that Carousel Works has installed around the U.S., each made to fit in with its surroundings.
James Clark NPR

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 8:58 am

Wooden carousels with carved and painted animals seem like a relic of the past. But Carousel Works in Mansfield, Ohio, is still making them to order.

"Our biggest trade secret is we've got this big barrel of elbow grease. You've gotta come in here and work every day," says co-owner Art Ritchie.

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Goats and Soda
2:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Ebola Is Keeping Kids From Getting Vaccinated In Liberia

A mom at the Community Clinic in Louisiana Township, about 15 miles from Monrovia, says all her children have been vaccinated.
Jon Hamilton NPR

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 7:21 am

When Ebola began killing people in the Monrovia suburb of Clara Town several months ago, some residents blamed vaccines.

One vaccinator in the town says mothers didn't want her near their babies.

"They had a notion that when the people come to the hospital, we would inject them and kill them," says vaccinator Che Che Richardson at the Clara Town Health Center, "because it was the hospital giving the people Ebola."

Rumors like that, combined with the closing of many health facilities, have caused childhood vaccinations rates to plummet in Liberia.

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Parallels
2:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Israel's Defense Minister: Mideast Borders 'Absolutely' Will Change

Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Ya'alon delivers a statement at the Israeli Defense forces headquarters in June 2014 in Jerusalem.
Thomas Coex AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:14 am

Israel's Defense Minister Moshe Ya'alon is known for his blunt manner, and in an interview with NPR, he says that a future map of the Middle East will look very different that the one that exists today.

The borders of many Arab states were drawn up by Westerners a century ago and wars in recent years show that a number of them are doomed to break apart, according to Ya'alon, a career soldier who became Israel's defense minister last year.

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Latin America
2:47 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Mexican Prosecutor Says Mayor, Wife Ordered Attack On Students

In Mexico City on Wednesday, people march to demand justice for 43 missing students. Mexican authorities ordered the arrest of the mayor of Iguala and his wife in connection with the attack.
Yuri Cortez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:59 am

Mexico's top prosecutor says a mayor and his wife ordered the attack on 43 students who have been missing for nearly a month. The couple — of the town of Iguala in the southern state of Guerrero — are now fugitives.

Thousands of protesters marched down Mexico City's grand Reforma Boulevard on Wednesday night, banging drums, carrying pictures of the 43 students who went missing on Sept. 26, and demanding the resignation of the governor of the state of Guerrero and even of President Enrique Pena Nieto.

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The Two-Way
9:55 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

5 Giants Pitchers Give Up 5 Runs In 6th As Royals Even World Series

San Francisco Giants pitcher Hunter Strickland watches Wednesday as Kansas City Royals Omar Infante runs around the bases after hitting a two-run home run during the sixth inning of Game 2 of baseball's World Series Wednesday
Matt Slocum AP

After the Royals' postseason winning streak was snapped Tuesday and the Giants led off Wednesday's game with a home run, one could excuse Royals fans for thinking the glow around this season was finally dimming.

But Kansas City quickly recovered, and had the game even, 2-2, before tearing through Giants pitcher after Giants pitcher in the sixth inning and handing the ball to their dominant bullpen. The 7-2 win evened the World Series at one win per team.

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The Two-Way
6:59 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Health Officials Announce New Monitoring For Travelers From West Africa

Bellevue Hospital nurse Belkys Fortune (left) and Teressa Celia, associate director of infection prevention and control, during a demonstration of procedures for possible Ebola patients on Oct. 8.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 10:20 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced new monitoring measures for people arriving to the U.S. from Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea, the three countries dealing with Ebola outbreaks.

Travelers from those countries will be monitored by public health officials for 21 days after their arrival, starting Monday. The CDC says 21 days is "the longest time it can take from the time a person is infected with Ebola until that person has symptoms of Ebola."

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The Two-Way
6:22 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Another Man Jumps White House Fence, But Is Stopped On The Lawn

Secret Service respond on the North Lawn of the White House after a man jumped the White House fence Wednesday night. This latest incident comes about a month after a previous fence-jumper sprinted across the lawn, past armed uniformed agents, and entered the Executive Mansion.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 10:40 pm

A month after a man armed with a knife leapt the White House fence and got deep into the first floor of the building, another man made a run across the North Lawn Wednesday night.

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The Two-Way
5:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

New Autopsy Report Suggests Michael Brown Was Shot At Close Range

Lesley McSpadden, right, the mother of 18-year-old Michael Brown, watches as Brown's father, Michael Brown Sr., holds up a family picture of himself, his son, top left in photo, and a young child during a news conference Monday, Aug. 11, in Ferguson, Mo.
Jeff Roberson AP

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch has published the official autopsy report on the shooting death of Michael Brown, the black, 18-year-old whose death at the hands of a white police officer set off weeks of protests this summer and fall in Ferguson, Mo.

The report suggests that Brown was shot at close range by Officer Darren Wilson. A toxicology report accompanying the autopsy report suggests Brown had marijuana in his system at the time of his death on August 9.

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Environment
3:26 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Coping In A Drier World: California's Drought Survival Strategy

The San Luis Reservoir in central California is the largest "off-channel" reservoir in the U.S. It is currently at less than 30 percent of its normal capacity.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 5:44 pm

The past few years have been California's driest on record. Forecasters predict that punishing droughts like the current one could become the new norm.

The state uses water rationing and a 90-year-old water distribution system to cope until the rains come. The system is a huge network of dams, canals and pipes that move water from the places it rains and snows to places it typically doesn't, like farms and cities.

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Goats and Soda
2:50 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Drones Are Taking Pictures That Could Demystify A Malaria Surge

Researchers download images after a drone flight in Sabah, Malaysia.
Courtesy of Trends in Parasitology, Fornace et al

Aerial drones are targeting a new enemy: malaria.

Four hundred feet above a Malaysian forest, a three-foot eBee drone hovers and takes pictures with a 16-megapixel camera every 10 to 20 seconds. But it's not gathering images of the mosquitoes that transmit malaria. Even today's best drones aren't capable of such a photographic marvel. Rather, the drone is looking at a changing landscape that holds clues to the disease's spread.

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Goats and Soda
2:46 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Surrogacy Storm In Thailand: A Rejected Baby, A Busy Babymaker

Thai surrogate mother Pattaramon Chanbua with her baby Gammy, who was born with Down Syndrome. An Australian couple who'd arranged for Pattaramon to serve as their surrogate rejected the child.
Nicolas Asfouri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:28 pm

Baby Gammy might mean the end of Thailand's lucrative surrogacy business.

He's the child who was carried by a surrogate mom in Thailand-- and rejected by the Australian couple who had agreed to pay the mother $12,000. The reason: Prenatal testing showed that the baby, a twin, had Down syndrome.

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All Tech Considered
2:44 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Cloud Data Security Concerns Raised After Reported Attack In China

A customer sets up her new iPhone 6 at an Apple store in Beijing on Friday. A group says the Chinese government backed an attack against users of Apple's iCloud service, but the government denies the claim.
Feng Li Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:28 pm

Apple CEO Tim Cook on Wednesday spoke with officials in China about data security and privacy. This meeting comes on the heels of a reported attack against users of Apple's iCloud service in China. Hackers allegedly were able to get hold of users' data by intercepting traffic on the Internet. They did not break into Apple servers.

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NPR Ed
2:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

The Slide Rule: A Computing Device That Put A Man On The Moon

LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:28 pm

The protractor and the Bunsen burner. Playing the recorder in music class. Drawing arcs and circles with a compass in geometry. These tools of the education trade become part of our lives for a semester or two and then we move on.

Today, NPR Ed begins a new series examining these icons of the classroom. We start off with a device that once was essential to higher-level math, in school and in the workplace, but now has all but disappeared:

The slide rule.

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Music Reviews
2:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Music Review: 'You're Dead!' By Flying Lotus

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:28 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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U.S.
2:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

How Did 'Good Girls' From Colorado Get Recruited By ISIS?

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:28 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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World
2:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Soldier, Gunman Dead After Ottawa Shooting

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:28 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Science
2:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Bigger Than A T. Rex, With A Duck's Bill, Huge Arms And A Hump

Reconstruction of Deinocheirus mirificus.
Yuong-Nam Lee/Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 6:24 pm

Scientists announced Tuesday they've solved the mystery of the Mongolian ostrich dinosaur.

The mystery began in 1965, when fossil hunters found a pair of 6-foot-long, heavily clawed arm bones in Mongolia's Gobi desert. Nobody had seen anything like them before. Now, scientists say, they've got the rest of the beast ... and dinosaur textbooks may need to be rewritten.

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

How Do You Judge A Secretary Of State?

Secretary of State John Kerry has a lot on his plate these days, including the fight against ISIS, Ebola, tensions with Russia and the possible nuclear deal with Iran.

He’s been traveling around the world, including a stop in Berlin today, to deal with these issues, just as past secretaries of state have done.

Is it too soon to judge his performance, and how does one even go about rating the success of a secretary of state?

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Colorado Backs Away From Pot Edibles Ban

A baked food made of marijuana is seen at Perennial Holistic Wellness Center medical marijuana dispensary, which opened in 2006, on July 25, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

This week public health officials proposed banning all marijuana-infused edibles except for hard candy and liquid drops, but backed away from the idea after critics said it would violate the state’s voter-approved legalization of recreational marijuana, which took effect in January.

A working group has until next year to come up with ways to regulate the sale of edibles, which now constitutes up to 40 percent of the lucrative marijuana industry in Colorado.

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Hoping For Turnaround, Target Offers Free Shipping

Retail giant Target is offering free shipping and bolstering advertising in an attempt to bring in business over the holiday season, amid slowing sales, a troubled expansion in Canada and last year’s massive data breach.

CNN’s Maggie Lake joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to talk more about this business move and what it means for customers.

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