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The Two-Way
6:22 am
Thu March 5, 2015

North Korea: Attack On U.S. Ambassador Is 'Deserved Punishment'

U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert leaves Sejong Center for Performing Arts in downtown Seoul, South Korea after the attack.
Yonhap EPA/Landov

North Korea is calling an attack on U.S. ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert by a knife-wielding political activist "deserved punishment" for America's joint military exercises with Seoul. Meanwhile, Lippert, who has received stitches to his face and undergone surgery on his arm after the assault, reports that he is "doing well."

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Parallels
5:51 am
Thu March 5, 2015

In Israel, A Vote To Choose A Leader And An Identity

Shoppers walk through a market in downtown Jerusalem last November, shortly before Israel's coalition government collapsed. As Israel prepares for elections on March 17, the diverse population has very different notions of what the country should look like.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Israel's March 17 election is two years earlier than it should be, thanks to the collapse of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition government in December. Contributing to the breakup was an impassioned debate over whether a stronger legal emphasis on the country's Jewish character would ultimately make Israel less democratic.

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World
5:30 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Canadians Told To Stop Drawing Spock On $5

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
5:30 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Ohio House Votes To Make 'Hang On Sloopy' State's Rock Song

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
5:09 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Hillary Clinton Asks State Dept. To Release Her Emails To The Public

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, seen here at a UN event last March, has been criticized for using a private email account to conduct official business during her four years in the Obama administration.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Responding to concerns over her use of a personal email account to conduct official business while in office, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says she wants the public to have access to her emails. The State Department says it will review messages for possible release.

The issue rose to importance earlier this week, after it was revealed that during her entire tenure at the State Department, Clinton used a personal email account — a move that had kept the emails out of the government's control and circumvented archival practices.

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NPR Ed
5:03 am
Thu March 5, 2015

The Legacy Of Booker T. Washington Revisited

Tuskegee began in 1881 with 30 students in a rundown church and a shanty. Its early buildings were in such bad shape that on rainy days a student had to hold an umbrella over Washington while he lectured.
LA Johnson/NPR

Let's face it, Booker T. Washington has a serious image problem. He was perhaps the most influential black man in America during the late 1800s, but is often remembered today as being subservient, a sellout even.

Yes, he pursued racial equality with discretion. His famous "Atlanta Compromise" speech of 1895 cautioned blacks against extremism and encouraged them to prove their worth by becoming productive members of society.

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Africa
3:06 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Boko Haram Ramps Up Attacks Despite Effort To Repel Them

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 5:30 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
2:03 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Federal Regulators Link Workers' Comp Failures To Income Inequality

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 5:30 am

A few hours after ProPublica and NPR issued the first in a series of reports about workers' compensation "reforms" sweeping the country, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration coincidentally released a paper linking workplace injuries to income inequality.

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Parallels
1:58 am
Thu March 5, 2015

In Berlin, Grassroots Efforts Work To Integrate Inner-City Schools

Young fans of the German national soccer team drink iced tea in July 2010 as they watch the FIFA World Cup semi-final match Germany vs. Spain in an Arabic cafe in Berlin's Neukölln district. The neighborhood has gentrified rapidly in recent years, but many of the white families moving in leave once their children reach school age. Local groups are trying to change that.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 7:12 am

In parts of Berlin, racial segregation in schools is far from official policy, but it is often a reality. In the fast-gentrifying district of Neukölln, young, mainly white professionals usually move away as soon as their kids reach school-age.

But small, parent-led initiatives are working to change this trend and ensure their local schools better reflect the neighborhood.

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Science
1:45 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Jaw Fossil In Ethiopia Likely Oldest Ever Found In Human Line

With the help of researcher Sabudo Boraru (right), anthropologist Chris Campisano, of Arizona State University, takes samples from the fossil-filled Ledi-Geraru project area in Ethiopia. The jaw bone was found nearby.
Courtesy of J Ramón Arrowsmith

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 5:30 am

Scientists working in Ethiopia say they've found the earliest known fossil on the ancestral line that led to humans. It's part of a lower jaw with several teeth, and it's about 2.8 million years old. Anthropologists say the fossil fills an important gap in the record of human evolution.

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Parallels
1:44 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Boris Nemtsov: 'He Directed His Words Against Putin Himself'

Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov, who was shot dead last Friday, was one of the most outspoken critics of President Vladimir Putin. No arrests have been made in his killing.
Ivan Sekretarev AP

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 5:30 am

Boris Nemtsov was just 37 when Russian President Boris Yeltsin named him deputy prime minister in 1997. Trained as a physicist, Nemtsov symbolized a new generation of young leaders who rose to power in the chaotic aftermath of the Soviet breakup.

But after Vladimir Putin became president, Nemtsov joined the liberal opposition and became an outspoken critic. He was arrested on several occasions, but continued his attacks on the Russian leader.

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Shots - Health News
1:43 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Infertility Clinic Courts Controversy With Treatment That Recharges Eggs

Along with sperm, the in vitro procedure adds fresh mitochondria extracted from less mature cells in the same woman's ovaries. The hope is to revitalize older eggs with these extra "batteries." But the FDA still wants proof that the technique works and is safe.
Chris Nickels for NPR

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 7:10 am

Melissa and her husband started trying to have a baby right after they got married. But nothing was happening. So they went to an infertility clinic and tried round after round of everything the doctors had to offer. But nothing worked.

"They basically told me, 'You know, you have no chance of getting pregnant,' " says Melissa, who asked to be identified only by her first name to protect her privacy.

But Melissa, 30, who lives in Ontario, Canada, didn't give up. She switched clinics and kept trying. She got pregnant once, but that ended in a miscarriage.

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The Two-Way
9:42 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

House Approves Amtrak Funding, Rewrites Rules To Allow Furry Riders

Amtrak conductor Michael Laubauskas talks on a radio Feb. 19 as his train departs Trenton, N.J., for Washington, D.C. The U.S. House passed an Amtrak funding bill Wednesday that splits Amtrak's high-ridership Northeast Corridor line that runs from Boston to Washington from the less profitable part of the system.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 11:29 pm

Instead of fighting like cats and dogs, Congress appears to be coming together for a change, and maybe it's because of our feline and canine friends.

In a rare bipartisan vote, the House today approved an Amtrak funding bill that will keep the trains running for another four years, and allow some pets to ride along on the intercity passenger rail service.

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Shots - Health News
5:40 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Justices Roberts And Kennedy The Key Votes In Health Law Case

Fans and foes of Obamacare jockeyed for position outside the Supreme Court Wednesday. Inside, the justices weighed arguments in the case of King v. Burwell, which challenges a key part of the federal health law.
Pete Marovich UPI/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 6:04 am

With yet another do-or-die test of Obamacare before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, the justices were sharply divided.

By the end of the argument, it was clear that the outcome will be determined by Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Anthony Kennedy. The chief justice said almost nothing during the argument, and Kennedy sent mixed signals, seeming to give a slight edge to the administration's interpretation of the law.

Judging by the comments from the remaining justices, the challengers would need the votes of both Roberts and Kennedy to win.

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Parallels
5:37 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Many French Muslims Find Lives Of Integration, Not Separation

Three women, two of them partially veiled, walk past a hijabs shop in Paris. The wearing of the veil has been a serious point of contention in France, with the government banning its use in public schools and the wearing of face-covering garments, including burqas and niqabs, in public.
Miguel Medina AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 7:11 am

Excited children shout out the answers during a Sunday afternoon Arabic class at the grand mosque in the Paris suburb of Argenteuil. The mosque has thousands of worshipers and is one of the largest in Western Europe.

Aboubakar Sabri is a part-time imam there. During the week he runs a successful elevator-construction firm in Paris. Sabri came to France from Morocco in 1980 for doctoral studies at the Sorbonne, then stayed and raised three daughters.

He says Muslims can live perfectly well in French secular society.

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The Two-Way
4:47 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

American Ambassador Attacked In South Korea

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 5:35 pm

The United States ambassador to South Korea was attacked on the streets of Seoul, Thursday morning Korean time.

Appearing on CNN, State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said Mark Lippert is now in the hospital and officials have yet to determine a motive.

"We will do a full investigation," Harf said, adding that the "injuries are not life threatening."

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The Two-Way
4:19 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

House Benghazi Committee Issues Subpoena For Clinton Emails

Hillary Clinton, seen here in 2011 during her tenure as secretary of state, used a personal email account instead of an official government account.
POOL Reuters /Landov

The House Select Committee on Benghazi has issued a subpoena for all emails related to Libya or Benghazi that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton may have sent from a private email account.

This is the first concrete fallout from a revelation by The New York Times that Clinton conducted official business through a personal account that was not and is still not controlled by the federal government.

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The Salt
4:14 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Dump The Lumps: The World Health Organization Says Eat Less Sugar

Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Sugar is sweet.

But too much of it can expand our waistlines, rot our teeth and increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

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The Two-Way
4:11 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Is Fighting Racism In Soccer 'A Lost Cause'? FIFA President Says No

Soccer player Dani Alves has said fighting against racism in Spanish soccer is a lost cause.
David Ramos Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 10:56 pm

FIFA president Sepp Blatter says he's concerned about the findings of a recent study regarding racism in Russia, which will host the 2018 World Cup.

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Goats and Soda
3:48 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

How To Help Children Orphaned By Ebola

Promise Cooper, 16, Emmanuel Junior Cooper, 11, and Benson Cooper, 15, of Monrovia lost their mother, Princess, in July and their father, Emmanuel, in August.
Jerome Delay AP

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 6:05 pm

The Ebola epidemic has taken a heartbreaking toll on children.

More than 1,000 children have died from the disease. Even more have lost parents, grandparents and siblings.

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Around the Nation
3:33 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Northwest Oil Terminal Plan Would Mean Jobs — And More Oil Trains

Proponents of the terminal plan say it would bring economic development to the Vancouver area, just over Columbia River from Portland, Ore.
Conrad Wilson OPB News

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 6:29 pm

America's oil boom is going through some growing pains. But despite the recent dip in oil prices, some segments of the industry are focused on long-term growth.

In southwestern Washington state, oil companies want to build the largest oil-by-rail terminal in the country at the Port of Vancouver, on the banks of the Columbia River.

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Law
3:33 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Clinton's Use Of Personal Email Could Hamper Archiving Efforts

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 8:24 pm

NPR's Melissa Block talks to Jason R. Baron, former director of litigation at the National Archives, about federal laws governing email. Until four months ago, officials could use personal email as long as they forwarded it to agency records.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
3:33 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Boston Marathon Bombing Trial Opens With Admission Of Guilt

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 6:29 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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The Salt
2:41 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

McDonald's Says It Won't Be Serving Chicken Raised On Antibiotics

An order of McDonald's Chicken McNuggets in Olmsted Falls, Ohio. McDonald's says it plans to start using chicken raised without antibiotics important to human medicine.
Mark Duncan AP

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 3:20 pm

Fast food giant McDonald's announced Wednesday it will begin sourcing chickens raised without antibiotics.

Over the next two years, the chain says its U.S. restaurants — which number around 14,000 — will transition to the new antibiotics policy, which prohibits suppliers from using antibiotics critical to treating human illness.

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The Two-Way
2:34 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Ferguson Documents: Justice Investigation Backs Former Officer Wilson

People rally in Union Square before marching through the street in protest to the Ferguson grand jury decision to not indict officer Darren Wilson in the Michael Brown case.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

When a grand jury decided not charge former Officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, Ferguson, Mo., ended up in flames.

Protesters decried the injustice and faced off violently with police officers and the National Guardsmen who were brought in to ensure peace.

Robert McCulloch, the prosecuting attorney in the case, also decided to release reams of documents with the evidence presented to the grand jury.

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NPR Ed
2:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

In LA, Clearing A Backlog Of Aging Instruments

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 6:29 pm

There are about 800 schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District, and hundreds of them have music programs. There are jazz bands, choirs, orchestras and marching bands. But for a couple of years, teachers and student musicians have faced a big problem: broken strings, worn-out horns and out-of-tune pianos — a backlog of aging instruments that the district is scrambling to repair and replace.

Instruments like the violin in senior Melissa Valenzuela's hands.

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NPR Story
2:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

A Snowshoe Trek From An Adirondack Mountain Summit

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 6:29 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Monarch Butterfly Population Rejuvenated After Last Year's Record Low

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 6:29 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Science
2:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Archaeologists Use Moles To Solve Mysteries Of Middle Ages' Fort

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 6:29 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Moles get a bad rap. They dig tunnels destroying gardens and lawns.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

They're not particularly cute or cuddly - I mean, come on, there are games where the goal is to hit plastic moles on the head.

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It's All Politics
2:21 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Failed Keystone Veto Override Marks Another Win For Veto Pen

President Obama arrives at the TransCanada Stillwater Pipe Yard in Cushing, Okla., in 2012 after renewed momentum in Congress to approve construction of the northern leg of the Keystone XL pipeline.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Congress mustered big majorities for the Keystone XL, which you might think would mean that pipeline would soon be under construction to carry Canadian crude oil from Alberta to the Gulf of Mexico.

But you would be forgetting the presidential veto, which President Obama signed on Feb. 24 with little or no fanfare.

Wednesday, the Senate put an end to years of legislative effort by upholding the Obama veto. The Senate voted 62 to 37 in favor of the override, but it wasn't enough.

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