NPR News

The Two-Way
8:01 am
Fri August 1, 2014

During Transport, A Giraffe In South Africa Hits Head On Overpass, Dies

A pair of giraffes being transported in a crate approach a low bridge on a freeway in Centurion, South Africa on Thursday.
Thinus Botha Barcroft Media /Landov

As one South African journalist put it on Twitter, this tale is worthy of Aesop: It starts on a South African highway on Thursday. A truck is transporting two giraffes and as you might imagine, it creates a great buzz among drivers.

Pabi Moloi, a well-known TV and radio host, snaps a picture that portends trouble:

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All Tech Considered
7:48 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Simmering Online Debate Shows Emoji Is In The Eye Of The Beholder

What is this emoji?
NPR

Images, GIFs and emojis — particularly the latter — have morphed into ways we express our feelings. They've quickly replaced words and sentences in our texts, tweets and emails.

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The Two-Way
7:24 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Cantor To Step Down This Month To Make Room For Successor

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va., left, on Capitol Hill in Washington on Tuesday. Cantor relinquished his leadership post on Thursday and said he would step down before the end of his term.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Fresh from relinquishing his House majority leader position in the wake of a stinging primary defeat, Rep. Eric Cantor now says he will give up his Virginia congressional seat months before his term expires, to make room for his replacement.

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The Two-Way
6:44 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Unemployment Ticks Up To 6.2 Percent; 209,000 Jobs Added

Construction workers building a commercial complex Thursday in Springfield, Ill., earlier this month. The sector has been on a gradual rebound following a devastating hit during the housing collapse in 2008.
Seth Perlman AP

The nation's unemployment rate moved up a bit in the month of July, to 6.2 percent, as more Americans who'd been sitting on the sidelines started looking for work, according to the latest monthly report released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Nonfarm payrolls increased by 209,000 jobs, a bit less than economists had expected.

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The Two-Way
6:19 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Court In Uganda Throws Out Anti-Gay Law

Members of Uganda's gay community and gay rights activists react after the constitutional court overturned an anti-gay law.
Isaac Kasamani AFP/Getty Images

A court in Uganda has thrown out a controversial law that punished acts of homosexuality harshly, including with life in prison.

The AP reports the decision was a technical one. The court ruled that there was no quorum when Parliament met to pass the law.

The AP adds:

"'The speaker was obliged to ensure that there was quorum,' the court said in its ruling. 'We come to the conclusion that she acted illegally.'

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Shots - Health News
6:03 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Caffeine Gives Athletes An Edge, But Don't Overdo It

Peter Kennaugh of SKY Procycling enjoys an espresso ahead of first stage of the Tour de France 2013, in Corsica.
Scott Mitchell teamsky.com via Getty Images

After winning the Tour de France last Sunday, Vincenzo Nibali was tested for a bunch of performance-enhancing substances. But Nibali and his fellow competitors were welcome to have several cups of coffee (or cans of Red Bull), before their ride into Paris; caffeine is not on the World Anti-Doping Agency's banned list.

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Global Health
5:14 am
Fri August 1, 2014

CDC Chief On West African Ebola: 'We Know What To Do, But It's Not Easy'

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
5:00 am
Fri August 1, 2014

How To Mark 10 Years Of Co-Hosting 'Morning Edition'? Take A Break!

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:14 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
4:58 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Fighting Resumes In Gaza, As Israeli Military Says Cease-Fire Is Over

Gaza City, northern Gaza Strip, is seen shortly before the start of a proposed cease-fire on Friday.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 6:43 am

It was negotiated as a three-day humanitarian cease-fire that was to start at 8 a.m. local time today.

But just hours in, fighting erupted again in Gaza.

Palestinian authorities told the AP that at least 27 people were killed in Gaza after an Israeli tank opened fire. NPR's Emily Harris reports Israel accused Hamas of continuing its rocket fire.

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Remembrances
4:44 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Pa. Man's Parting Message: 'Please Don't Email Me, I'm Dead'

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:14 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
4:05 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Minnesota's Minimum-Wage Workers Get 75-Cent Increase

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:48 am

Copyright 2014 Minnesota Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.mpr.org/.

Middle East
4:05 am
Fri August 1, 2014

More Deadly Fighting In Gaza Puts Cease-Fire In Question

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:14 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
4:05 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Big Data Firm Says It Can Link Snowden Data To Changed Terrorist Behavior

This photo provided by The Guardian Newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the National Security Agency, on Sunday, June 9, 2013, in Hong Kong.
AP

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:15 am

For nearly a year, U.S. government officials have said revelations from former NSA contract worker Edward Snowden harmed national security and allowed terrorists to develop their own countermeasures. Those officials haven't publicly given specific examples — but a tech firm based in Cambridge, Mass., says it has tangible evidence of the changes.

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U.S.
3:37 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Assessing Obama's Foreign Policy After A Week Of Crises

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 4:05 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Strange News
3:30 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Syracuse Researchers Melt Rock, Grill A Steak Over Magma

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 4:05 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

National Security
3:03 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Inquiry Shows CIA Spied On Senate Panel That Was Investigating The Agency

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:14 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Iraq
3:00 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Militants In Iraq Seek Control Of Precious Weapon: Dams, Waterways

Brig. Gen. Mohammad Ali Mughdeed talks to the men he commands to protect the Mosul dam, a critical piece of infrastructure that supplies water and electricity. The dam is now close to the front line with the militants of the Islamic State in Iraq.
Alice Fordham NPR

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 8:49 am

In the searing heat of northern Iraq, among its dry, scrubby landscape, there's a surreal sight: a wide, shimmering blue lake, held back by the concrete and steel of a dam. It's on the Tigris River, near the city of Mosul.

Brig. Gen. Mohammad Ali Mughdeed, the commander of the soldiers guarding this dam, says even a small attack on the dam could have major repercussions: flooding, power cuts.

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The Two-Way
6:34 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Ebola Patient Will Be Treated In Atlanta Hospital

Red Cross volunteers prepare to bury the body of an Ebola victim in Pendembu, Sierra Leone, early this month.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 4:59 am

An isolation unit at Emory University's hospital in Atlanta will be used in the coming days to house and treat a patient infected with Ebola, the virus that has killed more than 700 people in a recent outbreak in West Africa.

Announcing the pending transfer of the patient Thursday, Emory, which like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is based in Atlanta, issued a statement saying it will use "a specially built isolation unit set up in collaboration with the CDC to treat patients who are exposed to certain serious infectious diseases."

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The Two-Way
5:07 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Most Of California Reported To Be In 'Extreme Drought'

A dried-out lawn is seen in the city of Glendora, east of Los Angeles, this week. About 58 percent of California is now under the most extreme drought conditions, a new report says.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

The latest Drought Monitor report from U.S. agriculture and weather experts finds 58 percent of California in the worst of its four drought levels, in conditions normally seen only once every 50-100 years.

For our Newscast unit, Nathan Rott reports:

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The Two-Way
4:20 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Israel And Hamas Agree To 3-Day Cease-Fire, U.N. Says

Flares light up the night sky over Gaza City early Friday, Aug. 1. Leaders of Hamas and Israel have agreed to begin a cease-fire Friday at 8 a.m. local time, the U.N. says.
Dusan Vranic AP

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 12:05 am

A temporary peace will begin Friday morning in Gaza, as Israel and Hamas agree to an "unconditional humanitarian ceasefire," according to a statement by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Secretary of State John Kerry.

The truce is set to begin at 8 a.m. local time Friday and last for 72 hours. U.N. Special Coordinator Robert Serry says he's been assured by officials from both Israel and Hamas that they will abide by the truce. The envoys will also travel to Cairo to negotiate a possible longer peace deal, in talks hosted by Egypt.

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Goats and Soda
4:19 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

As Ebola Surges, CDC Sends Aid And Warns Against Travel

Red Cross volunteers prepare to bury the body of an Ebola victim in Pendembu, Sierra Leone, early this month.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 31, 2014 4:44 pm

For the second time this week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has raised the travel alert for three West African countries, as the death toll in the Ebola outbreak increased at an alarming rate.

"The bottom line is that the multiple outbreaks in West Africa are worsening right now," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden told NPR on Thursday. "This is the biggest, most complex and the most difficult outbreak of Ebola that we've had to deal with."

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Around the Nation
4:03 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Three Years On, Utah's Immigrant Guest Worker Law Still Stalled

This statue is located in Utah's Capitol building, beneath a mural of Brigham Young and the first Mormon pioneers traveling out west. "Utah is a place that understands the value of immigration," says Utah's speaker of the House, Becky Lockhart.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Thu July 31, 2014 6:28 pm

At the Utah State Capitol, a mural of Brigham Young and the first Mormon pioneers brings some color to the building's spartan rotunda. Beneath it is a more modern sculpture — a woman walking forward with her son, who's holding a globe.

Underneath the statue are the words "Immigration and Settlement." The symbolism isn't lost on state House Speaker Becky Lockhart.

"Utah is a place that understands the value of immigration, the value of peoples coming to find a better life," she says, pointing up at the sculpture.

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The Salt
3:45 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

When China Spurns GMO Corn Imports, American Farmers Lose Billions

A corn purchaser writes on his account in northwest China in 2012. In November 2013, officials began rejecting imports of U.S. corn when they detected traces of a new gene not yet approved in China.
Peng Zhaozhi Xinhua/Landov

For a while there, China was the American farmer's best friend. The world's most populous nation had so many pigs and chickens to feed, it became one of the top importers of U.S. corn and soybeans almost overnight.

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Global Health
3:03 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Sierra Leone Declares Quarantine, As Ebola Outbreak Worsens

Originally published on Thu July 31, 2014 6:07 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Music News
3:03 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Making The Label Matter: A Record Company's Return From Obscurity

Originally published on Thu July 31, 2014 6:07 pm

Today, there's so much music being released that it can be hard to know what to check out, let alone buy. Mark Rye says that when he worked at a record label in the 1970s, the process was easier — in part because you could often guess what a record would sound like if you knew who released it.

"At that time, it was very much an identifier for the kind of music," he says. "So you would go into a record shop and you would look for what the new releases on certain labels were because those records were probably the kind of music that you would like."

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NPR Story
2:30 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Wisconsin's Collective Bargaining Limits Survive Legal Challenges

Originally published on Thu July 31, 2014 6:07 pm

Wisconsin's Supreme Court has upheld Governor Scott Walker's signature law restricting public employee union bargaining rights. The law has already been upheld twice in federal court, but, as Wisconsin Public Radio's Shawn Johnson reports, the new decision in state court effectively ends legal challenges to the law.

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Middle East
2:26 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

On Either Side Of Gaza, Leaders' Gain Support — But Blame Game Awaits

Originally published on Thu July 31, 2014 7:19 pm

Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians. For more on the changes to public opinion, Ari Shapiro speaks with Camil Fuchs of Tel Aviv University and Khalil Shikaki of the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research in Ramallah.

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Shots - Health News
2:20 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Amid Smoking Decline, Look Who's Still Lighting Up

Tobacco giant Reynolds American is buying Lorillard and acquiring Newport, a popular menthol cigarette. In a shrinking market, Newport is one of the few U.S. brands gaining market share. It is particularly popular among African-American smokers.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 31, 2014 6:07 pm

Robin Koval is making a career of her changed tobacco habit.

"I'm a child of a smoker — my father was a heavy smoker," Koval says. "Really typical to the way the story goes, I started smoking when I was 15."

Now she is president and CEO of Legacy, a foundation devoted to preventing tobacco use.

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Politics
2:15 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

With Prosecutors Circling, Ethics Questions Get Serious For N.Y. Governor

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is surrounded by the media in Freeport, N.Y., on Wednesday, Cuomo was on Long Island to announce a new program to help victims of Superstorm Sandy but ended up fielding questions about the Moreland Commission.
Frank Eltman AP

Originally published on Thu July 31, 2014 6:07 pm

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo swept into office promising to clean up a state government so corrupt he once described it as "a joke." But now Cuomo himself has become the punch line, facing scrutiny over reports that his administration interfered with its own anti-corruption commission.

"Basically, Cuomo formed a commission promising you could even look at me. And then when they looked at him, he said, you looking at me?" joked Jon Stewart, summing up the scandal for The Daily Show.

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Economy
2:15 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

In Debt Duel, It Was Argentina V. Paul Singer

Originally published on Thu July 31, 2014 6:07 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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