NPR News

The Two-Way
6:57 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

U.S. Marine In Mexican Jail Is Now Free, Mexican Judge Orders

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 7:10 pm

A U.S. Marine held in a Mexican jail since March was ordered free by a Mexican judge on Friday.

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The Two-Way
4:58 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

On Eve Of Promotion, NYPD's Top Uniformed Official Resigns

On the eve of a promotion that would have made him the second in command of the New York Police Department, Chief Philip Banks III handed in his resignation.

On Twitter, Banks said:

The New York Times reports that the resignation comes as a surprise especially because of the timing. The paper adds:

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This Week's Must Read
4:34 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

A 19th Century Novel Explains Quantitative Easing

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:56 pm

Anthony Trollope was one of England's, and maybe the world's, greatest 19th century novelists. I say that even though I'm not especially a fan. Trollope's prose is determinedly, insistently flat and neutral. Reading him you sometimes get the impression that if he came upon a particularly brilliant phrase or image, he would take it out, on the basis that it distracted from the story.

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Parallels
4:21 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

With Mexican Students Missing, A Festive Holiday Turns Somber

Three large crosses lean against the burned out facade of Iguala's City Hall. Masked protesters angry about the disappearance of 43 students — attacked on orders of Iguala's mayor, according to Mexican federal authorities — burned the building last week.
Carrie Kahn NPR

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 6:30 pm

Mexican families are celebrating the Day of the Dead this weekend, a festive holiday, where relatives remember deceased loved ones with grand, floral memorials in their homes as well as at cemeteries.

But in the southern state of Guerrero, the mood is decidedly different. Authorities there are still searching for 43 students abducted last month by police working for drug traffickers and crooked politicians in the town of Iguala.

In front of Iguala's City Hall, Maria de Jesus Rodriguez, 68, slowly sweeps the patio.

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Shots - Health News
4:10 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

Payments Start For N.C. Eugenics Victims, But Many Won't Qualify

Debra Blackmon (left) was sterilized by court order in 1972, at age 14. With help from her niece, Latoya Adams (right), she's fighting to be included in the state's compensation program.
Eric Mennel WUNC

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:41 pm

Debra Blackmon was about to turn 14 in January 1972, when two social workers came to her home.

Court and medical documents offer some details about what happened that day. Blackmon was "severely retarded," they note, and had "psychic problems" that made her difficult to manage during menstruation.

Her parents were counseled during the visit, and it was deemed in Blackmon's best interest that she be sterilized.

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Music Interviews
4:08 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

'Anything That Connects': A Conversation With Taylor Swift

Taylor Swift's new album is titled 1989.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:41 pm

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Goats and Soda
3:51 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power Sees Signs Of Hope In West Africa

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power had her temperature taken as she arrived in Freetown, Sierra Leone.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:41 pm

Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, just returned from a four-day trip to all three of West Africa's Ebola-stricken countries. Speaking with Melissa Block of All Things Considered, she said she saw promising signs of recovery but had also gained a sense of just how much work must still be done.

In Liberia, Power was struck by the gratitude expressed to the United States for "rescuing these countries in their hour of greatest need."

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Goats and Soda
3:51 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

How Liberia Is Starting To Beat Ebola, With Fingers Crossed

Children play in the West Point neighborhood of Monrovia last week. West Point has been hit hard by Ebola. So local leaders formed their own Ebola task force, which goes door to door looking for cases.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:41 pm

If you want the inside scoop about what's happening with the Ebola outbreak, then just hang out at the Mamba Point Hotel in Monrovia.

It's packed with scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, international reporters and a bunch of guys and gals in camouflage from the U.S. Army.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

Former Band Member Found Guilty In FAMU Hazing Case

Dante Martin waits for jury selection on Monday, as he stood trial in Orange County, Fla.
George Skene AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 4:48 pm

A Florida jury found former Florida A&M University marching band member Dante Martin guilty of manslaughter for his role in the fatal hazing of drum major Robert Champion.

As NPR's Greg Allen reported from Orlando earlier this week, prosecutors said Martin was the ringleader of what they called a dark hazing tradition in which Champion was beaten to death. Martin's lawyer argued that the tradition of walking through a bus while getting beaten started way before Martin was in the band.

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Shots - Health News
1:46 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

A Field Of Medicine That Wants To Know Where You Live

A map of toxic waste sites can be combined with maps of waterways and cities to reveal potential health risks.
Bill Davenhall Esri

In 1854, an English doctor named John Snow pinpointed an outbreak of cholera in London to a single contaminated water pump.

A pioneer of modern epidemiology, Snow used information about where the sick people lived to deduce that they were drinking tainted water from that source.

And while using clues about peoples' locations is an important tool in public health, it's now set to make individual health care even more personal.

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Goats and Soda
1:31 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

Why Is North Korea Freaked Out About The Threat Of Ebola?

North Korean medical workers wore protective suits at Pyongyang's Sunan International Airport this week.
Wong Maye-E AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:25 pm

North Korea has a number of serious public health woes: malnutrition, tuberculosis and cardiovascular disease, just to name a few. Ebola isn't one of them. The disease hasn't hit anywhere in Asia, much less this isolated and rarely visited Northeast Asian nation.

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NPR Story
12:37 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

I Am A Teenage Witch

Youth Radio’s Akemi Weaver is a self-described "teen witch." (Screenshot from Youth Radio)

With Halloween upon us, images of witches abound. But for some, witching is a year-round thing. Youth Radio’s Akemi Weaver sent us this story to explain why.

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NPR Story
12:37 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

Ghost Stories From Around The World

The popobawa is a shape-shifting demon that stalks the Tanzanian island of Pemba. (Phoebe Boswell/NPR)

Are you afraid of ghosts, vampires and witches? What about Hanako-san, a little girl who waits to drag her victims to hell in the third stall of the third-floor bathroom of schools in Japan? There’s also La Llorona, a woman who drowned her children then herself and roams around, wailing in anguish.

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NPR Story
12:37 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

Defense Department Invests In Brain Implants For Depression, PTSD

Liss Murphy, who had surgery to implant Deep Brain Stimulation for depression in 2006 and got much better, on Cape Cod in summer, 2014, with husband Scott, son Owen and sheepdog Ned. (Courtesy)

More than 100,000 people have electrical stimulation devices implanted in their brains to treat Parkinson’s disease. The implants block the abnormal nerve signals that cause Parkinson’s symptoms like tremor and stiffness.

Now the Department of Defense is putting up $70 million to develop a new generation of brain implants to target depression and PTSD. These devices would detect and correct abnormal brain activity in real time.

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Music
12:32 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

'Merry Widow' Operetta: Stage Versus Screen

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 2:21 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

With Reports Of Doping, World Marathon Majors Postpones Awards Ceremony

Rita Jeptoo of Kenya crosses the finish line to win the Women's Elite division of the 118th Boston Marathon on April 21.
Timothy Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 2:09 pm

The World Marathon Majors has put its awards ceremony on hold because one of the sport's star athletes has reportedly tested positive for a banned substance.

The Majors, which was going to crown a champion on Sunday, wrote on its Facebook page that it was "disappointed to learn that Rita Jeptoo has apparently had an A test that proved positive for a banned substance under IAAF rules."

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Shots - Health News
10:20 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Seeing Red During Breast Cancer Awareness Month

The lump first surfaced in my breast in 1989, when I was 36 years old.

To many young women, a small lump like that wouldn't be cause for alarm because most breast lumps are benign. But there's a long history of breast cancer in my family, so I immediately consulted a renowned breast surgeon. "It's nothing to worry about," she said. My mammogram was completely normal. She thought the lump was merely normal breast tissue.

But four years later I was diagnosed with early stage breast cancer.

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Music
9:52 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Taylor Swift: The Peppiest Pop Star We Have Right Now

Taylor Swift's fifth album is called 1989, the year she was born. For the past few years, she's been the young queen of country music, by far its biggest-selling artist. But 1989 sidesteps country music entirely to become Swift's first pure pop album. Fresh Air rock critic Ken Tucker has a review.

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The Two-Way
9:04 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Maine Judge Rejects State's Bid To Restrict Nurse's Movements

Nurse Kaci Hickox and her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur, take delivery of a pizza at their home in Fort Kent, Maine, on Thursday. A judge has ruled that the state cannot compel Hickox to remain in isolation if she's not showing signs of Ebola infection.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 12:40 pm

Updated at 12:55 p.m. ET

A judge in Maine has turned down a request by state officials seeking authority to compel nurse Kaci Hickox to remain in her home for the duration of a 21-day incubation for Ebola. Since returning from West Africa, where she treated Ebola patients, Hickox has refused to accept a voluntary quarantine.

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The Two-Way
9:03 am
Fri October 31, 2014

No Joke: French Town Cracks Down On Clown Costumes After Attacks

He's not welcome in Vendargues. The French town has banned people from dressing up as clowns for the next month following violent incidents across the country.
Hannibal Hanschke Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 10:36 am

It's not quite coulrophobia, but the French town of Vendargues has banned people from dressing up as clowns for a month starting on Halloween.

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Code Switch
8:10 am
Fri October 31, 2014

The Creepiest Ghost And Monster Stories From Around The World

Popobawa promo.
Phoebe Boswell for NPR

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 2:32 pm

It's Halloween — a time for Frankenstein monsters and vampires and werewolves. But many of us have our own monsters from different cultures, and When we threw out a call to our readers asking what ghost stories and folktales they grew up with in their own traditions, we got back stories of creatures stalking the shadows of Latin American hallways and vengeful demons from South Asia with backwards feet. (And that's before we get to the were-hyenas and the infernal bathroom stalls.) Below are some of the best we've found or that were told to us from Code Switch readers.

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The Two-Way
7:59 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Israel Reopens Disputed Religious Site In Jerusalem To Worshippers

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 9:33 am

Israel reopened Jerusalem's Temple Mount today, a day after it closed the disputed religious site for the first time since 2000 following the attempted assassination of a right-wing Jewish activist.

More than 1,000 security personnel were deployed following clashes Thursday between Palestinians and riot police.

NPR's Emily Harris reported on the reopening for our Newscast unit. She said:

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The Two-Way
7:02 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Burkina Faso's Military Takes Power After President Resigns

Protesters shout out as they go on a rampage near on Thursday outside the Parliament building in Burkina Faso's capital, Ouagadougou.
Theo Renaut AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 1:56 pm

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

Burkina Faso's military appears to have taken control of the African nation shortly after longtime President Blaise Compaore, who had ruled since staging a coup in 1987, agreed to resign as part of what he said was a plan to hold elections in 90 days.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports that the country's armed forces chief, Gen. Honore Traore, announced on Friday that he was taking charge, but it wasn't clear whether his role would be as interim leader or something more permanent.

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The Two-Way
5:49 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Lava Flow In Hawaii Spares Homes, But Threatens To Cut Off Community

Lava near the leading edge of the flow oozes over a concrete slab and toward a tangerine tree before solidifying near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii earlier this week.
U.S. Geological Survey AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 9:30 am

Officials in Hawaii are sending National Guard troops to the town of Pahoa on the Big Island, where a lava flow is creeping toward a main road, threatening to cut off the community.

Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira said 83 troops have been sent to the town of fewer than 1,000 to help provide security. They are to aid in a road block and with other safety issues, The Associated Press says.

"These are local troops, people from the community. They'll be here working to take care of their family and friends," Oliveira said.

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NPR Ed
5:03 am
Fri October 31, 2014

50 Great Teachers: A Celebration Of Great Teaching

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 1:23 pm

Anne Sullivan was a great teacher. Famously, she was the "Miracle Worker," who taught a blind and deaf girl named Helen Keller to understand sign language and, eventually, to read and write.

Socrates ... now there was a great teacher. More than 2,000 years after he gave his last pop quiz, we still know him for the teaching style named after him, the Socratic method. And through the writings of his most famous pupil, Plato.

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The Two-Way
5:01 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Alleged Cop-Killer Arraigned After Arrest Ends Extensive Manhunt

Eric Frein is escorted by police into the Pike County Courthouse for his arraignment in Milford, Pa., on Friday. Frein was captured by police on Thursday after a seven-week manhunt.
Rich Schultz AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 12:36 pm

Updated at 10:05 a.m. ET

Eric Frein, the man who allegedly shot and killed a police officer and wounded another before leading authorities on a massive 48-day manhunt through rural Pennsylvania, appeared in court today appearing thin and bruised from his weeks on the run.

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Digital Life
4:22 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Selfies With Bears Prompt Warning From Park Rangers

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:42 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Research News
4:19 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Less Than Jubilant Genes: Why The Brits Keep Calm

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 5:42 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
3:44 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Three Cheers For The Instant Replay

Madison Bumgarner and Buster Posey of the San Francisco Giants celebrate winning Game 7 of baseball's World Series against the Kansas City Royals.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 2:25 pm

The Giants challenged a call in Game 7 of the World Series Wednesday night. It took the umpiring crew — in conference with the umpires holed up in the video monitoring station in New York City's Chelsea district — almost three minutes to overturn the on-field decision. They called the runner out at first, giving the Giants a potentially game-changing double play.

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The Salt
2:57 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Cash For Halloween Candy? Dentists' Buyback Program Is Booming

Dr. Curtis Chan, a dentist in Del Mar, Calif., loads up a truck with 5,456 pounds of candy to deliver to Operation Gratitude during the Halloween Candy Buyback on Nov. 8 last year. Chan personally collected 3,542 pounds of candy from patients.
Courtesy of Curtis Chan

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 7:34 am

If your little ghosts and goblins dump their candy on the living room floor tonight, go ahead: Let them at it. They can sort, then trade, and gorge on their favorites.

But if you're like many parents, by tomorrow morning you may want to get rid of some of this candy glut.

One possible solution? Check out the Halloween Candy Buyback program, which was founded by dentist Chris Kammer in Wisconsin. Kammer's office offers $1 a pound to buy back candy collected by the young trick-or-treaters in his practice.

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