NPR News

Goats and Soda
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

How Worried Should We Be About Lassa Fever?

A single Lassa fever virus particle, stained to show surface spikes — they're yellow — that help the virus infect its host cells.
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 3:53 pm

An unidentified New Jersey man died after returning home from West Africa, where he contracted Lassa Fever, a virus that has symptoms similar to that of Ebola. Federal health officials are treating the case with caution because the virus, which commonly is spread by rodents, can occasionally spread from person to person.

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NPR Ed
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

NYU Changes Its Policy On Reviewing Applicants' Criminal Background

New York University announced it will not require the criminal record of prospective students in the first round of the admissions process.
Jpellgen Flickr

Students applying for college supply all sorts of information — financial records, letters of recommendation, the personal essay — the list goes on.

One big question they face: Do you have a criminal record?

The question appears on the Common Application — the website that prospective students use to apply to more than 500 schools across the U.S. and abroad.

Most students don't even think about it. But for some applicants, it's a reason not to apply.

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Sports
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

As The NBA Conference Finals Wind Down, LeBron James Remains Dominant

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 3:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

'Journey To Jihad' Tells Story Of Belgian Teenager Who Joined Islamic State

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 3:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Federal Appeals Court Lets Stand Blockage Of Obama Immigration Actions

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 3:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Before Cleveland, About 30 Police Departments Entered DOJ Agreements

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 3:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Technology
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

One Man's Mission To Keep AOL's Legacy Alive

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Charter Communications To Buy Time Warner Cable For $55 Billion

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
3:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Blind Waiters Give Diners A Taste Of 'Dinner In The Dark' In Kenya

At the "Dinner in the Dark" restaurant that's just opened in Nairobi, a blind waiter leads guests to their table. The photo was taken during a training session — that's why the lights are on.
Courtesy of is Eatout.co.ke

Ignatius Agon practices his greeting: "OK, good evening ladies and gentlemen. My name is Ignatius and I am going to guide you into the dark."

It's Monday, and the first day of training for a new restaurant opening this month in Kenya. Diners will be served in the dark. They'll have to find their food with their forks and eat it in a pitch black room.

And the waiters are blind.

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It's All Politics
3:20 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

What Will The Next President Face On #Day1?

The next president to occupy the Oval Office will confront four seemingly intractable problems: stagnant wages, cybersecurity, violent extremism and federal debt.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Presidential candidates are doing what they have to do at this point in the campaign season — they're raising money and strutting their biographies and electoral viability to voters. We haven't heard much yet about policy papers or what they would actually do if they win. But those policy issues will matter — as the campaign picks up steam and especially once the next president steps into the Oval Office on Day 1.

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U.S.
3:10 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

California's Drought Makes It Rain Big Bucks For Local Businesses

Los Angeles started offering a $3.75 rebate on every square foot of grass replaced with a drought-friendly landscape. The drought is a boost in business for local conservation entrepreneurs.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 3:43 pm

When people call up Leigh Jerrard, founder of Greywater Corps, they're greeted with a recorded message: "Note that we are overwhelmed with inquiries right now, so it may be a while before we get back to you. But have faith."

Jerrard's company helps homeowners with the complicated process of installing their own Greywater systems. The system takes drainage from showers or washing machines and uses it to water lawns.

It sounds like a great idea now but six years ago, when Jerrard started the company, few people were interested.

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NPR Story
2:29 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Department Of Justice Unveils Settlement To Reform Cleveland Police

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder holds a roundtable meeting with law enforcement, local officials, and community leaders to discuss the U.S. Department of Justice's report on excessive police force and violence in Cleveland, Dec. 4, 2014. Today, Cleveland waits for the Department of Justice's police statement. (Tony Dejak/AP)

The Department of Justice is announcing a settlement to reform the Cleveland police department’s policing tactics, months after a scathing DOJ report found unnecessary and excessive use of force by patrol officers.

The settlement is expected just days after the acquittal of a white Cleveland police officer accused of manslaughter in the deaths of two unarmed black suspects in 2012.

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NPR Story
2:29 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Bounce Houses: The Dangers Lurking Within

(jaarons/Flickr)

If you thought bouncy houses were completely safe, think again. Here & Now has reported on the children’s play houses taking flight before, and on Monday three children in Florida were injured when a waterspout came ashore and lifted the inflatable house they were in.

NPR Story
2:29 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Simon Rich's 'Spoiled Brats'

If you’re looking for light fun read for an upcoming vacation, Simon Rich‘s collection of short stories “Spoiled Brats” is out in paperback today.

Rich is a former writer for Saturday Night Live, and he’s also the creator of the FXX series “Man Seeking Woman,” which has been renewed for a second season. Though he’s had a lot of success in television, he still enjoys writing short stories.

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It's All Politics
2:23 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Despite An Economy On The Rise, American Paychecks Remain Stuck

Seattle Space Needle elevator operator Michael Hall says despite the success of the attraction, his pay hasn't budged in four years.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 3:33 pm

As candidates hit the campaign trail, NPR looks at four major issues the next president will face from Day 1 in office.

For seven years, Michael Hall has been guiding tourists to the top of Seattle's Space Needle and back. It's a unique vantage point from which to watch the ups and downs of Americans' paychecks.

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All Tech Considered
2:23 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Higher-Tech Fake Eggs Offer Better Clues To Wild Bird Behavior

One of these things is not like the other: A 3-D printed model of a beige cowbird egg stands out from it's robin's egg nestmates, though their shape and heft are similar.
Ana Lopez/Courtesy of Mark Hauber

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 3:07 pm

Since the 1960's, biologists have made fake eggs for some studies of bird behavior. But Mark Hauber of Hunter College in New York says this kind of scientific handicraft is not exactly his forte.

"I'm a terrible craftsperson," he admits.

That's why Hauber is pioneering the use of 3-D printing technology to quickly produce made-to-order fake eggs, taking a bit of old-school science into the 21st century.

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The Two-Way
2:14 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Photographer Mary Ellen Mark Dies At 75

Photographer Mary Ellen Mark attends the Leica Los Angeles grand opening on June 20, 2013. Mark died Monday. She was 75.
Todd Williamson Invision for Leica

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 3:53 pm

Mary Ellen Mark, the influential photographer known mostly for her humanist work, has died. She was 75.

Mark died Monday, a representative said Tuesday. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that she died in New York.

Mark's work appeared in Life, New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair. Her photo essay on runaway children in Seattle became the basis of Streetwise, an Academy Award-nominated film that was directed by her husband, Martin Bell.

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The Two-Way
2:00 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Prolific Fantasy And Science Fiction Writer Tanith Lee Has Died

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 3:09 pm

British science fiction and fantasy writer Tanith Lee has died, according to her publisher. Lee, 67, was a prolific author who also worked in radio and television; her dozens of books include Don't Bite The Sun and Death's Master -- the latter of which was part of her popular Flat Earth series.

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The Two-Way
1:12 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Federal Appeals Court Leaves Hold On Obama's Immigration Orders

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 2:51 pm

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals will not lift a hold that has stalled President Obama's plan to shield millions of undocumented immigrants from deportation. The president sought to give temporary protection to people who were brought to the U.S. as children, and to the parents of people who live in the U.S. legally.

The decision blocks a executive action the White House issued late last year and leaves in place a hold that was issued in February by District Judge Andrew Hanen in South Texas.

Update at 4:35 p.m. ET: White House Evaluating Options

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Shots - Health News
12:54 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

A Neurosurgeon Reflects On The 'Awe And Mystery' Of The Brain

Thomas Dunne Books

Neurosurgeon Henry Marsh has opened heads, cut into brains and performed the most delicate and risky surgeries on the part of the body that controls everything — including breathing, movement, memory and consciousness.

"What is, I think, peculiar about brain surgery is it's so dangerous," Marsh tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "A very small area of damage to the brain can cause catastrophic disability for the patient."

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All Tech Considered
12:50 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Got A Voice For Radio? The Algorithm Speaks

iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 1:28 pm

Nearly a thousand of you heeded our call on All Tech Considered to submit a voice sample. The idea: Let a computer algorithm decide if you have a voice for radio.

Now, we've got the results.

Actor Wilbur Fitzgerald rated highly (surprise, surprise):

But most of you who responded are not actors. And it turns out, you don't need professional training to impress man or machine.

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Music Reviews
12:39 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Revisiting The Crystal Clarity Created By The 'Decca Sound' Revolution

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 12:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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The Two-Way
12:23 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

British Pub Ye Olde Fighting Cocks Is Asked To Change Its Name

England's historic Ye Olde Fighting Cocks pub has been asked to change its name to celebrate "intelligent, sensitive chickens."
Google Maps

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 3:55 pm

It's believed to be the oldest pub in England — but now Ye Olde Fighting Cocks is facing a call to change its name. Citing modern society's compassion for the birds, the UK's People for Ethical Treatment of Animals suggests an alternate name: Ye Olde Clever Cocks.

From PETA:

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Shots - Health News
10:06 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping May Benefit Children Years Later

The World Health Organization has endorsed waiting to clamp the umbilical cord for at least one minute after a baby is born.
Sebastien Desarmaux/Godong Science Source

A couple extra minutes attached to the umbilical cord at birth may translate into a small boost in neurodevelopment several years later, a study suggests.

Children whose cords were cut more than three minutes after birth had slightly higher social skills and fine motor skills than those whose cords were cut within 10 seconds. The results showed no differences in IQ.

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NPR History Dept.
8:58 am
Tue May 26, 2015

When 'Petting Parties' Scandalized The Nation

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 9:55 am

To some social observers, petting parties of the 1920s were a natural, post-First World War outgrowth of a repressed society. To others, the out-in-the-open hug-and-kissfests were blinking neon signposts on the Road to Perdition.

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The Two-Way
8:41 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Iranian Court Begins Espionage Trial Of 'Washington Post' Reporter

A 2013 photo shows Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian and his wife, Yeganeh Salehi, a correspondent for the Abu Dhabi-based newspaper The National. Both of them were in an Iranian court Tuesday.
Vahid Salemi AP

More than 10 months after Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian was detained on vaguely defined espionage charges, his trial began Tuesday in a closed court in Tehran. Rezaian is a citizen of both Iran and the U.S.

Noting the trial's start, Iran's Islamic Republic News Agency notes that Rezaian, 39, "is accused of espionage for the US government and activity against the Islamic Republic of Iran."

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Shots - Health News
8:24 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Second Opinions Are Often Sought, But Their Value Isn't Clear

Actress Rita Wilson arrives at the premiere of the documentary Fed Up in West Hollywood, Calif., in May 2014.
Gus Ruelas Reuters/Landov

Actress Rita Wilson, who was diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent a double mastectomy, told People magazine in April that she expects to make a full recovery "because I caught this early, have excellent doctors and because I got a second opinion."

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The Two-Way
8:24 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Cleveland, Justice Department Reach Agreement Over Police Conduct

Police officers are illuminated by patrol car lights during a protest against the acquittal of Michael Brelo on Saturday in Cleveland.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 12:55 pm

Updated at 2:55 p.m. ET

The city of Cleveland has reached an agreement with the Justice Department over allegations that the city's police department engaged in a pattern of using excessive force, violating the civil rights of its residents.

U.S. Attorney Steven Dettelbach of the Northern District of Ohio said the agreement, once approved, "will not only serve as a roadmap for reform in Cleveland but as a national model for any police department ready to escort a great city to the forefront of the 21st Century."

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Europe
6:07 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Italy's Berlusconi Discovers Social Media As A Campaign Tool

Former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi finished serving a tax fraud conviction in March.
Luca Bruno AP

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 1:47 pm

Italy holds regional elections Sunday, and one politician trying to make a comeback is the scandal-plagued former prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi.

Taking his cue from Italy's digitally savvy young Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, Berlusconi has opened an Instagram account, posting more than 60 photos on the first day alone.

We see the 78-year-old media tycoon holding trophies of his soccer team, A.C. Milan; addressing rallies; and posing with his 29-year-old girlfriend, Francesca Pascale — as well as hugging his white poodle Dudu.

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The Two-Way
5:24 am
Tue May 26, 2015

At Least 10 Dead As Storms, Flooding Ravage Texas, Oklahoma

Forrest Huggleston and Alex Huff watch flooding at Shoal Creek after days of heavy rain in Austin, Texas, on Monday.
Drew Anthony Smith Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 2:38 pm

Updated at 4:38 p.m. ET

Storms continued to move through Texas and Oklahoma, bringing tornadoes and dumping torrential rains that led to deadly flooding.

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