NPR News

Parallels
7:33 am
Fri May 22, 2015

A Wedding And A Challenge: Lebanese Couples Fight For Civil Marriage

Kholoud Sukkariyeh (right) and Nidal Darwish, who got married in defiance of Lebanon's ban on civil unions, walk past Beirut's landmark Pigeon Rock in 2013.
Joseph Eid AFP/Getty Images

Like lots of young married couples, Kholoud Succariyeh and Nidal Darwish love to show their wedding video. They go all misty-eyed remembering that day two years ago.

"Very beautiful," says Succariyeh. "Everything is nice."

Their wedding was special, not only as a personal milestone for the couple. It was a political milestone, as well.

Darwish says their union was a challenge to the state: It was Lebanon's first civil marriage.

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The Two-Way
7:04 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Pipeline Operator: Possibly Months Before Cause Of Calif. Spill Found

A bird covered in oil flaps its wings at Refugio State Beach, north of Goleta, Calif., on Thursday. More than 9,000 gallons of oil has been raked, skimmed and vacuumed from a spill that stretched across 9 miles of California coast, just a fraction of the sticky, stinking goo that escaped from a broken pipeline, officials said.
Jae C. Hong AP

It could be months before investigators can determine what caused a pipeline leak that has fouled a stretch of coast in southern California, the company that operates the oil conduit says.

Since the leak was discovered earlier this week, more than 9,000 gallons of oil have been raked, skimmed or vacuumed from a 9-mile stretch of California shoreline north of Los Angeles, officials say.

"We have not even uncovered the pipe yet," said Patrick Hodgins, senior director of safety for Plains All American, according to The Associated Press.

The AP reports:

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The Two-Way
6:20 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Islamic State Reportedly Seizes Last Syria-Iraq Border Crossing

In this photo released Thursday by a website run by Islamic State militants, damaged Syrian helicopters sit at Palmyra air base, which was captured by ISIS after a battle with the Syrian government forces earlier this week.
Uncredited AP

Fighters of the self-declared Islamic State have seized the last border crossing in Syria, where they control half of the country, according to a British-based monitoring group.

Syrian government forces withdrew from al-Tanf, known as al-Waleed in Iraq, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The border crossing lies at the extreme northwest of Iraq's border with Syria.

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Fri May 22, 2015

An Irreplaceable Replacement, This Sub Gets The Job Done

Substitute teacher Josephine Brewington receives the substitute teacher of the year award.
Courtesy of Kelly Services

One of the toughest jobs in education is the substitute teacher. The pay is low, schedules are unpredictable and respect can be hard to come by. But because the average teacher missed 11 days of school in 2012-2013, a sub like Josephine Brewington ends up playing a crucial role.

And this week — Brewington was rewarded for her efforts — winning the 2015 Substitute Teacher of the Year award.

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The Two-Way
5:39 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Irish Voters Decide Whether To Legalize Same-Sex Marriage

Nuns vote on a referendum to legalize same-sex marriage, at a polling station in County Dublin, Ireland, on Friday.
Peter Morrison AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 6:42 am

Voters in Ireland are deciding today whether the country will amend its constitution to make same-sex marriage legal.

The vote follows months of debate in the heavily Catholic country. Opinion polls suggest the referendum will pass and Ireland become the first country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage in a national vote.

But, as NPR's Ari Shapiro points out, "polls in this part of the world have been totally wrong in the past.

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Goats and Soda
5:36 am
Fri May 22, 2015

How Do You Motivate Kids To Stop Skipping School?

Hanna Barczyk for NPR

It seems like a no-brainer: Offer kids a reward for showing up at school, and their attendance will shoot up. But a recent study of third-graders in a slum in India suggests that incentive schemes can do more harm than good.

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Television
5:32 am
Fri May 22, 2015

CBS Trashes David Letterman's 'Late Show' Set

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Animals
5:32 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Stuffed Tiger, Camera-Stealing Elephant Get Attention

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
3:09 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Congressional Stalemate Threatens To Kill Phone Data Program

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:32 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:01 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Boy Scouts' National President Says It's Time To Accept Gay Adult Leaders

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:32 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:01 am
Fri May 22, 2015

State Department Envoy Defends Administration's Efforts Against ISIS

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:32 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
2:01 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Korean Air 'Nut Rage' Executive Freed From Jail

Former Korean Air executive Cho Hyun-Ah, after being released by a Seoul appeals court.
Jung Yeon-je AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:51 am

Former Korean Air executive Cho Hyun-ah, or Heather Cho, is out of jail after a four-month stay. If her name and alias don't ring a bell for you, the reason why she was in jail might.

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Heroin In The Heartland
1:57 am
Fri May 22, 2015

In America's Heartland, Heroin Crisis Is Hitting Too Close To Home

Sabas Sanchez Jr. was better known among his neighbors in Madison, Neb., as "Gordo" — Spanish for chubby. He also had an oversized personality. His father keeps this tattered photo in his wallet.
Bobby Caina Calvan Heartland Reporting Project

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 6:08 am

Heroin, today, is killing more and more people in rural America.

One Mexican cartel has seeded low-cost heroin around rural towns in the Southwest and Midwest, selling it cheap and easy, almost like pizza.

Madison, Neb. — population 2,500 — is just a speck of a town, a two-hour drive from the big-city bustle of Omaha. But it's not far enough away to avoid the growing impact of heroin.

"The world's gotten smaller," says Police Chief Rod Waterbury. "If drugs can make it to Chicago, they can make it here."

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The Salt
1:55 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Census Reveals Universe Of Marine Microbes At Bottom Of The Food Chain

Plankton collected in the Pacific Ocean with a 0.1mm mesh net. Seen here is a mix of multicellular organisms — small zooplanktonic animals, larvae and single protists (diatoms, dinoflagellates, radiolarians) — the nearly invisible universe at the bottom of the marine food chain.
Christian Sardet/CNRS/Tara Expeditions

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:32 am

What's at the bottom of the bottom of the food chain? Well, think small ... smaller than you can see.

Microbes in the ocean!

There are (and scientists have done the math) trillions of microorganisms in the ocean: plankton, bacteria, krill (they're maybe bigger than "micro," but not by much), viruses, protists and archaea (they're like bacteria, but they aren't bacteria).

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The Two-Way
1:51 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Uneasy Rider: The Origins Of Motorcycle Gangs And How They Remain A Force

Police officers observe the scene at Twin Peaks restaurant in Waco, Texas, the site of the recent motorcycle gang-related shooting.
Jerry Larson AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 6:35 am

The shootout involving motorcycle gangs last weekend in Waco, Texas, resulted in 170 arrests and put a spotlight on the gangs' history, which dates back to the 1940s.

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The Salt
1:50 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Adios, Trans Fats: FDA Poised To Phase Out Artery-Clogging Fat

Various food items that contained trans fats in November 2013. That month, the Food and Drug Administration first announced plans to ban partially hydrogenated vegetable oils from all food products. A final rule is expected any day now.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:32 am

The case against trans fats is not new. For years, health experts have been telling us to avoid them.

And as retailing behemoths such as Wal-Mart have committed to the removal of all remaining, industrially produced trans fats in the products they sell, the food industry has stepped up its pace to reformulate its offerings.

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The Two-Way
8:11 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

Millions Of Dollars In Speech Fees Support Clinton Foundation

Former President Bill Clinton speaks earlier this month at a conference in Marrakesh, Morocco, sponsored by the Clinton Foundation.
Abdeljalil Bounhar AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:17 am

Hillary, Bill and Chelsea Clinton brought in millions of dollars for their charitable foundation through paid speeches. They gave the honorarium to the organization. This is the latest release of information about the foundation's funding, as a result of Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign.

Last week, the campaign filed a financial disclosure showing that since January of 2014, Bill and Hillary Clinton made more than $25 million dollars in paid speeches. Thursday's release from the Clinton Foundation begins to complete the picture.

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Michel Martin, Going There
4:50 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

#MotorCityDrive: Is Detroit's Economic Engine Roaring Back To Life?

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 6:29 pm

For generations of Americans, Detroit was the place where people made things: powerful cars, amazing architecture, beautiful music. But now Detroit is entering a new chapter. After months of often tense and difficult negotiations, Detroit is now formally out of bankruptcy. Millions of dollars of contributions from private foundations and corporations helped the city preserve its acclaimed art collection. A new generation of artists and entrepreneurs, doers and makers is calling Detroit home. So we'd like to ask, what's next? What will drive Detroit's future now?

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The Two-Way
3:41 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

Grand Jury Indicts 6 Baltimore Officers In Freddie Gray's Death

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 4:48 pm

A grand jury has returned indictments against all six Baltimore Police Department officers charged in connection with the death last month of Freddie Gray, the state's attorney in Baltimore says.

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The Two-Way
3:41 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

Maryland Joins States That Won't Test New Drivers For Parallel Parking

A dying art? Maryland has stopped testing new drivers for parallel parking. Here, a car is seen in Baltimore.
Google Maps

Saying that it tests parallel parking skills in other ways, Maryland's Motor Vehicle Administration is phasing out the portion of its test that has intimidated new drivers for generations.

Maryland is joining the list of states that have stopped making new drivers prove that they can maneuver a car into a parallel parking spot. Virginia, California and Florida are among those that have made the move.

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Law
3:35 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

'Be Guardians, Not Warriors': Training A New Generation Of Police

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 5:07 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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National Security
3:35 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

Bulk Collection Debate Highlights Need To Revise Patriot Act

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 5:07 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Parallels
2:28 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

China Kicks Off 'Great Leap Forward' On The Soccer Field

First-graders take soccer class at the Nandulehe Elementary School in suburban Beijing. The school is one of 20,000 that's launching a national soccer curriculum in the next five years. It's part of a government plan to raise China's soccer skills and eventually, China's leaders hope, host and win a World Cup.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 5:07 pm

At an elementary school outside the Chinese capital, Beijing, first-graders practice controlling soccer balls under the instruction of American coach Tom Byer.

"When I clap, everybody's going to dribble to the circle, pull it back and go to the right. Go!" he says.

Regular soccer balls would practically come up to the kids' knees, so they practice with miniature ones instead.

But Byer, a native of New York, argues that even at age 6 or 7, the children are already late to the game.

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The Salt
2:28 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

Chew On This: The Science Of Great NYC Bagels (It's Not The Water)

Steaming-hot bagels are scooped out of the water in which they were boiled and dumped onto a stainless steel drain board at a bagel bakery in Queens, New York City, 1963. Traditionally, bagels were boiled, but bakers who use the modern method skip this step.
Dan Grossi AP

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 4:30 pm

One of the first life lessons I picked up in college was this: The secret to the shiny crust and chewy bite prized in New York bagels is boiling. Any other way of cooking them, my Brooklyn born-and-raised, freshman-year roommate told me, is simply unacceptable.

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The Two-Way
2:18 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

White House Ban On Militarized Gear For Police May Mean Little

Police in riot gear stand around an armored vehicle as smoke fills the streets of Ferguson, Mo., in November 2014.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 5:09 pm

When riots erupted last fall on the streets of Ferguson, Mo., police in riot gear fanned out armed with assault rifles and armored vehicles made for the battlefield.

Analysts said at the time it was just another symptom of the continued militarization of local police forces.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

Jailed Journalist Goes On Trial In Iran Next Week

In this photo taken on April 11, 2013, Jason Rezaian, right, an Iranian-American correspondent for the Washington Post, and his wife Yeganeh Salehi, an Iranian correspondent for the Abu Dhabi-based daily newspaper The National, smile as they attend a presidential campaign of President Hassan Rouhani in Tehran, Iran. (Vahid Salemi/AP)

For nearly a year, The Washington Post’s Tehran bureau chief Jason Rezaian has been held in custody. He goes on trial next week, and the trial may not be open to the public or his family.

Rezaian’s lawyer says Iran accuses him of spying, but his editor at The Washington Post defends Rezaian and says he was merely doing his job as a journalist.

Douglas Jehl, foreign editor of The Washington Post, joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

YouTube Sensation Publishes Her First Cookbook

YouTube cooking sensation Maangchi is out with her first cookbook, "Maangchi's Real Korean Cooking." (maangchi.com)

Kwangsook Kim was always interested in food and cooking, first in her native South Korea, then later in Canada and the United States.

In 2007, her son suggested she take up a new hobby: posting videos on YouTube of her making Korean dishes. She did, adopting the name “Maangchi” that she used in her other hobby, online gaming.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

Rookie Drivers Get A Pass On Parallel Parking In Maryland

"Driver education" sticker on the back of a car. (minidriver/Flickr)

The Maryland Motor Vehicle Department has eliminated the parallel parking requirement on its driving test. A spokesman says it’s about redundancy. The test still requires a “reverse two-point turnabout.”

But driving instructors in Maryland say that too many people were failing the test, and the right of passage in driving is still an important skill to learn. Georgena Ewing, owner of Perry Hall Driving School in Nottingham, MD., shares her view with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

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The Two-Way
1:29 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

Head Of Boy Scouts Says Group's Ban On Gay Adults 'Unsustainable'

Robert Gates, president of the Boy Scouts of America, warned that failure to make changes quickly could spell "the end of us as a national movement."
Thierry Roge Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 2:40 pm

Robert Gates, the president of the Boy Scouts of America, says the organization must reassess its ban on gay adults, saying, "We must deal with the world as it is, not as we might wish it to be."

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The Two-Way
1:20 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

More Than 100 Charged In Mob Killing Of Christian Couple In Pakistan

Pakistani human rights activists condemn the killing of the Christian couple for alleged blasphemy during a demonstration in Islamabad, Pakistan, in November.
B.K. Bangash AP

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 2:53 pm

Prosecutors in Pakistan's Punjab province have charged 106 people in connection with the gruesome mob killing of a Christian couple who were incinerated in a brick kiln for allegedly desecrating a copy of the Quran.

In November, Sajjad Mesih and his wife, Shama — who was pregnant when the couple in their 20s was killed — were beaten and thrown into the kiln they tended as laborers.

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