NPR News

Goats and Soda
11:57 am
Tue September 2, 2014

When A Home Poses Health Risks, The Floor May Be The Culprit

Gravel helps keep the floor level and prevents moisture from seeping up. The floor installers are Jean Pierre (left), a mason, and Daniel Shenyi, operations manager for EarthEnable.
Courtesy of EarthEnable

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 12:24 pm

Most of us overlook the ground beneath our feet. But when Gayatri Datar, 28, looks at the floor, she sees an opportunity to improve public health.

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Islamic State Claims It Has Beheaded Second American Journalist

American journalist Steven Sotloff (left) talks with Libyan rebels on the Al Dafniya front line on June 2, 2011, in Misrata, Libya. Sotloff was kidnapped in August 2013 near Aleppo, Syria.
Etienne de Malglaive via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 1:00 pm

An Islamic radical group released a video on Tuesday that purportedly shows the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff.

The Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL, had threatened Sotloff's life when it released a video showing the beheading of American journalist James Foley two weeks ago.

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The Two-Way
11:06 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Celebrity Photo Leak Puts Spotlight On The Cloud, And Security

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 1:32 pm

The FBI and Apple are looking into how private photos of Jennifer Lawrence and other celebrities were stolen, in an apparent breach of security that is raising new questions about storing personal information online.

"This is a flagrant violation of privacy," Lawrence's spokeswoman said Sunday, after nude images of the actress and others began to emerge online. Some of the celebrities have denied the photos are of them; others, such as Mary Elizabeth Winstead, say they deleted the images long ago.

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All Tech Considered
10:10 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Using Technology To Counter Police Mistrust Is Complicated

Members of the Ferguson Police Department wear their new body cameras during a rally Saturday in Ferguson, Mo.
Aaron P. Bernstein Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 11:17 am

Outfitting police officers with body cameras seems to be the most concrete solution to come out of the police misconduct accusations in Ferguson, Mo. And the push for cameras extends far beyond the suburban Missouri police department — more than 153,000 people have signed a "We the People" petition to create a "Mike Brown Law" that would require all police to wear cameras.

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The Two-Way
9:53 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Ending Decades Of Family Leadership, 'Washington Post' Names New Publisher

The Washington Post announced Tuesday that Frederick J. Ryan Jr. would take over as publisher.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 1:18 pm

Ending decades of family leadership, Washington Post owner Jeffrey Bezos announced on Tuesday that Frederick J. Ryan Jr. would be taking over as publisher of the venerable journalism institution.

Ryan, a former Reagan administration official and founding member of the website Politico, will take over for Katharine Weymouth.

The Post reports:

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The Two-Way
9:06 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Kremlin Disputes Veracity Of Putin's 'I Can Take Kiev In Two Weeks' Quote

Russian President Vladimir Putin in 2013.
Alexei Druzhinin AP

The Kremlin is disputing the context of a controversial quote attributed to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

As Italy's La Repubblica reported, Putin allegedly issued a defiant warning to European Commission President José Manuel Barros during a phone call.

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The Two-Way
7:48 am
Tue September 2, 2014

After Just Two Years, Huge Atlantic City Casino Shuts Down

A woman gathers shells along the ocean near the Revel Casino Hotel in Atlantic City, N.J., early Tuesday. The casino resort has closed, a little over two years after opening with the promise of helping to renew Atlantic City.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 10:24 am

After operating for only two years, the Revel Casino Hotel has closed down, part of a trend that will reportedly shutter a third of Atlantic City's big gambling halls by the end of September. It cost $2.4 billion to build the Revel facility.

"It's a tragedy," massage therapist Lori Bacum, who worked at the resort's spa, tells NJ.com. "There were some warnings, but none of us thought it would happen. We felt so safe, because this was the place that was going to take (the city) to a new level."

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Shots - Health News
7:04 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Sharing Risk Can Help Tame The Cost Of Infertility Treatment

Getting to this point can be very expensive if in vitro fertilization is involved.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 11:58 am

Infertility treatment is a numbers game in some respects: How many treatments will it take to conceive a child? And how much can you afford?

Even as insurance plans are modestly improving their coverage of such treatments, clinics and others are coming up with creative ways to cover the costs to help would-be parents reduce their risk for procedures that can run tens of thousands of dollars. Some even offer a money-back guarantee if patients don't conceive, while one online program lets people pool some funding.

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The Two-Way
5:45 am
Tue September 2, 2014

32 Teens Escape From Nashville-Area Detention Center

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 1:20 pm

Police near Nashville spent the night raking the city with dogs and helicopters in search of 32 teens who escaped from a detention center in Bordeaux, Tenn.

Blake Farmer of NPR member station WPLN tells our Newscast unit that 17 of them are still on the loose. Blake sent this report:

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Politics
5:01 am
Tue September 2, 2014

The Politics Of Calling In Sick

Women are more likely to take time off to care for a sick child or elderly adult, making mandatory paid sick leave a hot partisan topic.
Shutterstock

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 11:23 am

Got the flu? Or a new baby? Perhaps a little one with chicken pox? In most countries, your employer must pay your wages if you stay home sick or to care for others. Not in America.

But a growing grass-roots movement aims to change that — starting with paid sick leave.

Already the movement has met some success. This past weekend, California became the second state in the country to mandate sick leave for employees.

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The Two-Way
4:50 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Targeting Al-Shabab Leadership, U.S. Launches Airstrikes In Somalia

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 1:23 pm

The United States conducted airstrikes in Somalia late Monday, targeting the leadership of the al-Qaida affiliate al-Shabab.

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Around the Nation
4:03 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Man Who Tried To Shut Down Boy's Lemonade Stand Investigated

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 5:24 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
3:56 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Officials Try To Lure Birds Away From Blast Site

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 5:24 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:07 am
Tue September 2, 2014

A Photographic Tour Of A Country That Doesn't Like Cameras

The Arirang mass festival re-enacts the history of North Korea. The flag depicted in the background was created by audience members holding up cards.
Julia Leeb teNeues

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 1:15 pm

German photojournalist Julia Leeb made two trips inside North Korea in 2012 and 2013, and she took photos that offer a glimpse into perhaps the most isolated and mysterious country in the world.

She's collected some of what she saw in a new book of photographs called North Korea: Anonymous Country. She hoped to capture life as best she could, given the restrictions on her travel.

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NPR Story
3:07 am
Tue September 2, 2014

Journalist Charles Bowden Dies At 69

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 5:24 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Parallels
1:28 am
Tue September 2, 2014

As The U.S. Draws Down, Afghan Fighting Is Heating Up

An Afghan policeman searches a man at a checkpoint where a NATO soldier was stabbed to death in Kabul on Aug. 20. As U.S. and NATO troops are drawing down in Afghanistan, the Taliban have been stepping up attacks this summer.
Shah Marai AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 8:16 am

As U.S. and NATO troops draw down in Afghanistan, Taliban fighters are growing bolder. They have been massing in larger and larger numbers and taking on Afghan forces across the country.

NPR producer Sultan Faizy and I spent a recent day making calls to ordinary Afghan citizens in some of the country's hot spots.

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The Two-Way
8:49 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

NATO To Create New 'Spearhead' Force For Eastern Europe

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen on Monday.
Yves Logghe AP

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 5:12 am

NATO leaders are expected to set up a rapid-response force to deploy quickly to eastern Europe to defend against potential Russian aggression at their meeting in Wales later this week.

The force of about 4,000 troops will be ready to move on 48 hours notice from a station in a member country close to Russia, The New York Times reported.

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NPR Story
8:18 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

Erratic Schedules A Challenge For Part-Time Workers

Starbucks has announced it's revising its policies to end irregular schedules for its 130,000 baristas. (Stephen Chernin/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 12:02 pm

There are 27 million part-time workers in America today. To get more bang for their buck, some businesses are using sophisticated “just in time” scheduling software that allows them to call in workers when they’re most needed. But where does this last-minute and irregular scheduling leave part-timers?

On this Labor Day, NPR’s Marilyn Geewax talks to Here & Now’s Robin Young about the scheduling problems part-time workers face across the country and how lawmakers and some companies are looking to help.

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NPR Story
8:18 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

Detroit Defends Bankruptcy Plan

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 12:02 pm

After a long and painful year of negotiations, officials for the city of Detroit head to court tomorrow to defend the city’s plan to exit bankruptcy.

Detroit has struggled to find a way to pay off the $18 billion it owes to various entities and individuals, including city retirees, who once feared they’d lose up to a third of their pensions.

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NPR Story
8:18 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

Breastfeeding Gets A Boost From Philadelphia Hospitals

Dr. Dan Guilfoil, director of labor and delivery at Hahnemann, says the hospital has taken a number of steps to encourage breastfeeding, including a ban on goodie bags from formula companies. (Emma Lee/WHYY)

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 8:35 am

All of Philadelphia’s major birthing hospitals have now stopped giving out discharge bags filled with formula to new moms. The city joins about a quarter of hospitals nationwide in going “bag free” as part of a broader push to encourage breastfeeding.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Elana Gordon at WHYY’s “The Pulse” reports.

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Politics
8:17 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

Guns Boom In 2014 Campaign Ads

Image from Montana congressional hopeful Matt Rosendale's campaign ad, in which he shoots what he calls a government drone out of the sky.
YouTube

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 8:53 am

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First Listen
8:17 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

First Listen: Robert Plant, 'Lullaby And... The Ceaseless Roar'

Robert Plant's new album, lullaby and... The Ceaseless Roar, comes out Sept. 9.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 11:01 am

The Irish poet William Butler Yeats once famously evoked the drift of time through the image of old men gazing at their own watery reflections. "Everything alters, and one by one we drop away," Yeats' elders say as they themselves sit solidly at the shore.

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Europe
2:36 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

Analyst: Response To Russian Incursion Will Be 'Defining Moment' For NATO

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Africa
2:36 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

Economic Impact Of Ebola Crisis Spreads Across Africa

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Radio Diaries
2:36 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

40 Years After 'Working,' A View From The Driver's Seat

Studs Terkel circa 1970.
Courtesy of Studs Terkel Radio Archive/WFMT

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 8:04 am

In the early 1970s, radio host and oral historian Studs Terkel went around the country with a tape recorder, interviewing people about their jobs. He collected more than 130 conversations with a variety of people, including a waitress, a car parker, a jockey, a baseball player, a farm worker, a press agent and a sports team owner.

The result was Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do. When it was published in 1974 it became a best-seller — something unprecedented for an oral history collection.

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Around the Nation
2:36 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

Golf Course Provides Oasis For Low-Income Kids

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

CORNISH: All summer, dozens of lower-income kids in Providence, Rhode Island learned golf. They spent their days on a nine-hole course, an oasis in a gritty neighborhood.

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Music Reviews
2:36 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

On Final Recording, Joe Beck Exposes Possibilities Of The Guitar

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
1:18 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

3 Americans Detained In North Korea Urge U.S. To Secure Their Release

Kenneth Bae, an American tour guide and missionary serving a 15-year sentence in North Korea, speaks to The Associated Press on Monday. Bae and two other detained Americans urged the U.S. to send a high-level emissary to secure their release.
Wong Maye-E AP

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 5:11 pm

Three Americans who have been detained in North Korea appealed today to the U.S. to send a senior representative to secure their release.

In interviews with CNN and The Associated Press, Kenneth Bae, Jeffrey Fowle and Matthew Miller detailed the conditions of their imprisonment and urged a quick resolution of their situations.

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The Salt
12:25 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

These 5 Crops Are Still Hand-Harvested, And It's Hard Work

At left, a woman holds the saffron crocus during the saffron harvest in Herat, Afghanistan. At right, saffron flowers are collected in Saint Hippolyte, eastern France. Since the stigmas need to be picked from the flowers by hand, saffron is the world's most expensive spice.
Majid Saeedi/Getty Images; Maxppp /Landov

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 12:41 pm

Mechanization has made the farming of many crops — lettuce and tomatoes among them — a lot less labor intensive. But some crops are still tended and harvested by hand, and it can be painstaking work.

How do you measure the labor intensity of crops? We thought there would be an easy answer to that, but there isn't. Some agricultural economists talk about labor input in terms of hours per acre, but that may not take into account the difficulty of the labor.

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The Two-Way
12:23 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

The Flight Of The Passenger Pigeon, Now 100 Years Extinct

Martha (right), an extinct passenger pigeon, at the Smithsonian's Natural history Museum in Washington. The passenger pigeon was once the world's most plentiful bird. Sept. 1 is the centenary of the bird's extinction.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 12:56 pm

The Cincinnati Zoo held a commemorative event; the London Zoo stopped the clock outside its bird house at noon. The object of their memorials: Martha, the last passenger pigeon, who died exactly a century ago at the Cincinnati Zoo.

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