NPR News

History
3:32 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Rejection Of Flag Exposes Larger Truths About The Confederacy

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Code Switch
3:32 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Coping While Black: A Season Of Traumatic News Takes A Psychological Toll

Raymond Smith of Charleston kneels in prayer the front of the Emanuel AME Church before a worship service, Sunday, June 21, 2015, in Charleston, S.C.
Stephen B. Morton AP

Can racism cause post-traumatic stress? That's one big question psychologists are trying to answer, particularly in the aftermath of the shooting at the historically black Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C., and the recent incidents involving police where race is a factor.

What's clear is that many black Americans experience what psychologists call "race-based trauma," says Monnica Williams, director of the Center for Mental Health Disparities at the University of Louisville.

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Around the Nation
3:32 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Busy Travel Weekend Raises Concerns About Transportation Infrastructure

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

National Security
3:32 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Deputy Secretary Of State: Iran Needs Nuclear Deal 'More Than We Do'

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
3:31 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Maria Leaves Sesame Street After 44 Years On The Block

Gordon (played by Roscoe Orman), Maria (played by Sonia Manzano), and The Count on Sesame Street's 42nd season. Manzano is closing out a Sesame Street career that began in 1971.
Zach Hyman Sesame Street

For the last 44 years, you could ask Maria how to get to Sesame Street, but not any more. Sonia Manzano, the actress who has played the character since 1971, is retiring and won't be part of the next season.

Manzano, 65, announced the news earlier this week at the American Library Association Annual Conference.

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U.S.
3:24 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

New Rules Could Create A New Class Of Overtime Workers

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 3:32 pm

As President Obama promised, a new rule would make 5 million more Americans eligible for overtime pay.

Many workers say it's a welcome change. But businesses say employees could see negative, unintended consequences.

Barrett Zenger has managed a music store in Corpus Christi, Texas, for the last seven years, where he oversees two dozen employees, stocks inventory and fills in for sales clerks who call in sick.

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Business
3:08 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Man Offers Cheap Housing In Silicon Valley By Renting Out Backyard Tent

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Beyond A Voice And A Sad Story, 'Amy' Listens To A Life

Amy Winehouse
A24

Booze, drugs, Svengalis galore, rampant co-dependence: The bare bones of a crash-and-burn rocker bio-pic poke through Asif Kapadia's richly absorbing documentary about the short, sharp life of Amy Winehouse. Here and there Amy flirts with prurience, but prurience is hard to avoid with a young woman who, willy-nilly, lived her private life in public. And if ever there was an artist whose life and work fed one another for better and worse, it was Winehouse.

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It's All Politics
3:01 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

5 Things You Should Know About Jim Webb

Former Senator Jim Webbspeaking at the National Sheriffs' Association annual conference last month in Baltimore.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

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Politics
3:00 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Obama Touts New Federal Overtime Pay Rule In Wisconsin

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Television
2:45 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Sonia Manzano, Who Played Maria On 'Sesame Street,' To Retire

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Economy
2:45 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

So Far, So Good For The Economy. But What About The Second Half?

A worker welds parts in fans for industrial ventilation systems at the Robinson Fans Inc. plant in Harmony, Pa., in February. Hourly wages in the U.S. remained unchanged last month.
Keith Srakocic AP

Maybe it seems like just yesterday that you were storing away your holiday decorations.

Maybe it actually was yesterday because life gets busy and tasks get put off, and before you know it, half the year is over and you're scrambling to catch up.

So in case you have been too busy to pay close attention, here's what we now know about the just-ended half of this year's economy:

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Parallels
2:43 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

In Data Breach, Reluctance To Point The Finger At China

Adm. Michael Rogers, NSA director and head of the U.S. Cyber Command, has avoided singling out China for blame in the OPM hack, which may affect as many as 18 million federal workers.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 3:32 pm

Adm. Michael Rogers is among the American officials most likely to know which country perpetrated the Office of Personnel Management's massive data breach, possibly the biggest hack ever of the U.S. government. He's not only director of the National Security Agency, but also heads the U.S. Cyber Command.

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Book Reviews
2:30 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Book Review: 'The Uses Of The Body,' Deborah Landau

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Environment
2:30 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

BP Settlement To Address Ecosystem Damage Caused By Oil Spill

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
2:27 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Professor Says Jefferson Davis Statue Should Be Removed, Preserved

A statue of Jefferson Davis is seen on the University of Texas campus in Austin, Texas.(Eric Gay/AP)

Confederate flags are coming down across the South as governments and institutions respond to calls to remove symbols of a racist past. At the University of Texas at Austin, thousands of students have petitioned the school to remove a statue of Jefferson Davis, who was president of the Confederate States of America during the Civil War.

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Parallels
2:26 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

In Secular French Schools, One Group Wants To Talk Religion

A student attends a course on religion at a middle school in Metz, in eastern France, on June 5. French schools teach basics, like the history of religion, but discourage any displays of religious identity.
Jean-Christophe Verhaegen AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 3:13 pm

For the past several years, the group Coexister has been going into secular French schools to break down religious stereotypes in the classroom.

Since January's attacks on satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and a kosher supermarket, the demand for their interventions has skyrocketed.

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The Two-Way
2:24 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

ISIS Reportedly Destroys Ancient Statue In Captured City Of Palmyra

The self-declared Islamic State has released photos purportedly of its fighters destroying an ancient artifact in the Syrian city of Palmyra weeks after the Islamist extremists captured the city.

A "priceless" 2,000-year-old statue of a lion dating from the city's Roman heritage is seen being smashed in what Syrian antiquities director Maamoun Abdelkarim tells Agence-France Press is "the most serious crime [ISIS has] committed against Palmyra's heritage."

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Science
2:13 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Checking DNA Against Elephants Hints At How Mammoths Got Woolly

Mammoths had a distinctive version of a gene known to play a role in sensing outside temperature, moderating the biology of fat, and regulating hair growth. That bit of DNA likely helped mammoths thrive in cold weather, scientists say.
Courtesy of Giant Screen Films, 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC/Penn State University

Scientists say they've found a bit of DNA in woolly mammoths that could help explain how these huge beasts were so well-adapted to live in the cold of the last ice age.

Woolly mammoths had long shaggy fur, small tails and ears to minimize frostbite, and a lot of fat to help stay warm as they roamed the tundra over 12,000 years ago.

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Shots - Health News
1:10 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Don't Get Your Kids' Genes Sequenced Just To Keep Up

You can now order genetic tests off the Internet and get your child's genome sequenced for less than the cost of a new car. The question is, should you?

Almost certainly not, according to the American Society for Human Genetics, which released a position paper Thursday intended to give parents some help navigating the dizzying world of genetic tests.

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The Two-Way
12:58 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Former Sen. Jim Webb Announces Run For Democratic Nomination

Former Sen. Jim Webb, D-Va., speaks at the National Sheriffs' Association presidential forum in Baltimore on Tuesday. Webb announced Thursday that he is running for president.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 2:21 pm

Former U.S. Sen. Jim Webb has become the fifth Democrat to announce he is seeking the party's nomination for president.

"[Our] country needs a fresh approach to solving the problems that confront us and too often unnecessarily divide us," Webb said in a statement. "We need to shake the hold of these shadow elites on our political process."

Webb, 69, joins former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and former Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee in the 2016 contest.

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The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Afghan Court Commutes Death Sentences In Mob Killing Of Woman

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 3:19 pm

An appeals court in Afghanistan has overturned the death sentences handed to four men who were part of a mob that attacked and killed a 28-year-old woman falsely accused of burning the Quran.

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It's All Politics
12:28 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Bernie Sanders Just Drew A Huge Crowd. How Does It Measure Up?

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 U.S. presidential candidate, speaks during a campaign rally in Madison, Wis., on Wednesday.
Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Call it the latest sign of "Bernie-mentum" — Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders' latest event in Madison, Wis., on Wednesday drew an estimated 10,000 supporters. He packed the arena at Veterans Memorial Coliseum in the liberal college town.

Sanders said last month that he was "stunned" by the large crowds showing up for him. Organizers were once shocked by 300 in Iowa, then 5,000 in Minnesota.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

How The 'Modern Family Effect' Is Changing Public Opinion About Gay Rights

ABC's "Modern Family" has won five Emmy Awards, and was renewed for its seventh season on May 7. (ABC)

Last Friday the Supreme Court made a landmark decision for gay rights. But another institution has also played a significant role in changing American public opinion about this issue: Hollywood.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans talks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about the “Modern Family effect” and how television has changed the way Americans think about gay relationships.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

DJ Session: Sounds For The Holiday Weekend

Bilal is a classically trained vocalist from Philadelphia, and was swept up into the neo-soul movement in the early-2000s. He released his newest album, "In Another Life," on June 30. (Courtesy)

For the upcoming holiday weekend, this week’s edition of the Here & Now DJ Sessions features KCRW’s Anthony Valadez, with new music from the artist Bilal, a trained opera singer who has now gone in a very different direction. He also shares songs from U.K. artist LA Priest, Canadian singer and musician Mocky and Argentine DJ/producer Chancha Via Circuito.

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The Two-Way
11:54 am
Thu July 2, 2015

Taiwan Airliner's Black Box Shows Pilot May Have Shut Off Wrong Engine

The mangled fuselage of a TransAsia Airways commercial plane is dragged to the river bank after it crashed in Taipei, Taiwan, in February.
AP

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 12:59 pm

"Wow, pulled back wrong side throttle."

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Politics
11:47 am
Thu July 2, 2015

Was The Most Current Supreme Court Session 'A Liberal Term For The Ages'?

A man holds an American and a rainbow flag outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC after the court legalized gay marriage nationwide.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 1:09 pm

The Supreme Court term that just ended included historic rulings in support of same-sex marriage and the Affordable Care Act. Adam Liptak, the Supreme Court correspondent at The New York Times, tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "Political scientists will say that this is a liberal term for the ages."

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Movie Reviews
11:47 am
Thu July 2, 2015

Not All Sequels Are Equal: Following Up To 'Terminator', 'Magic Mike'

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:14 am
Thu July 2, 2015

Russian Rocket Poised For Crucial Supply Run To Space Station

On Friday, a Russian Soyuz rocket will send an unmanned cargo ship with more than 3 tons of food, water and fuel for astronauts aboard the International Space Station.
Russian Federal Space Agency

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 2:30 pm

The stakes are high for a routine cargo mission to the International Space Station, after a string of failures has left the orbiting outpost running somewhat low on supplies.

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Shots - Health News
10:09 am
Thu July 2, 2015

Sweeping Or Skydiving? When Counting Calories It's All The Same

Skydiving and vacuuming burn the same number of calories. So what'll it be, thrills or a clean carpet?
Mary McLain NPR

Sure, playing in the women's World Cup burns a lot more energy than watching the women's World Cup. But the number of calories expended in sports and daily activities isn't always so obvious.

To figure it out, we dove into this database compiled by Arizona State University. It charts the energy expenditure for hundreds of activities, from mainstream ("bicycling, leisure, 5.5 mph") to obscure ("caulking, chinking log cabin").

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