NPR News

Shots - Health News
12:59 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

A Rural Police Chief Asks Citizens To Help Pick Up Used Syringes

Volunteer Patrick Pezzati searches yards in Turners Falls, Mass., for discarded heroin needles.
Karen Brown WFCR

Patrick Pezzati walks briskly through downtown Turners Falls in western Massachusetts with a hard plastic bottle in one pocket of his shorts and a pair of latex gloves in the other.

He stops to peer down steps leading to a basement. Later, he peers under a chunk of carpet lying outside.

The local record store owner is scouring the back alleys of this picturesque former mill town for used needles.

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NPR Story
12:33 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Indianapolis: Tensions Stir As Murder Rate Surges

Indianapolis Police Chief Rick Hite blames the murders on the same kind of drug crimes that New York and other major cities went through in the 1980s. (Peter O'Dowd)

Police in Indianapolis are struggling to contain a surge in murders. Last year police counted 138 homicides – a 44 percent jump from 2012.

Patrol Officer Lona Douglas works on the city’s west side in one of six neighborhoods designated as a high-crime area. On a recent afternoon, I was with her as she responded to a potential burglary.

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NPR Story
12:33 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

David Breashears Describes Devastation At Everest Base Camp

This photo provided by Azim Afif, shows the scene at Everest Base Camp, Nepal on Tuesday, April, 28, 2015. On Saturday, a large avalanche triggered by Nepal's massive earthquake slammed into a section of the Mount Everest mountaineering base camp, killing a number of people and left others unaccounted for. Afif and his team of four others from the Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) all survived the avalanche. (Azim Afif via AP)

David Breashears is an American filmmaker and climber who’s well aware of the dangers of Mount Everest.

He’s summited five times, and he was on the mountain filming in May 1996 when a sudden blizzard killed eight climbers, among them his friends. His film about that event, the first IMAX movie shot on the mountain, aired in 1998.

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NPR Story
12:25 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Recipes: Healthy Salads With Spring Produce

Fresh ramps, greens and radishes from the farmer's market. (Kathy Gunst)

From asparagus and fava beans to ramps and radishes, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst is reveling in spring produce and thinking of ways to turn it into healthy salads. She shares her ideas with hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, along with these four recipes:

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

'Go Home. Please': 'Wire' Creator David Simon Urges Calm In Baltimore

David Simon, creator of The Wire, is urging calm in Baltimore.
Chris Pizzello AP

David Simon, creator of The Wire, the HBO show that chronicled the story of Baltimore's police department and its gangs, has appealed for calm in the wake of violence following the funeral Monday of Freddie Gray, the 25-year-old black man who died April 19 after he suffered a serious spine injury while in police custody.

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The Two-Way
12:07 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Supreme Court Hears Challenge To 4 States' Same-Sex-Marriage Ban

Sue Wedda from Boston holds a flag outside of the Supreme Court on Tuesday.
Emily Jan NPR

The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing arguments Tuesday about whether states have the power to ban same-sex marriage. A dozen couples are challenging the bans in Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky and Tennessee.

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The Two-Way
11:56 am
Tue April 28, 2015

'Criminals' Taking Advantage Of Situation In Baltimore, Obama Says

President Obama is condemning the unrest in Baltimore, saying a handful of "criminals" are taking advantage of the situation following the April 19 death of Freddie Gray.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 1:08 pm

President Obama is condemning the unrest in Baltimore, saying that a handful of "criminals" are taking advantage of the situation following the April 19 death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man who suffered a serious spine injury while in police custody.

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Parallels
11:34 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Measuring Earthquakes With More Than Just One Scale

An elderly Japanese woman carries water past a home destroyed several days earlier on Jan. 17, 1995, by a powerful earthquake centered in Kobe, Japan. More than 6,000 people were killed and destruction was widespread, but the city was rapidly rebuilt.
Lois Bernstein AP

When a major earthquake pummeled Kobe, Japan, in 1995, more than 6,000 people were killed, many buried as their traditional wooden homes collapsed under the weight of heavy, unstable tile roofs.

The quake's power was extraordinary and demonstrated Japan wasn't as prepared as it thought it was. Still, it was no match for Japanese resilience.

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NPR Story
10:50 am
Tue April 28, 2015

"Ain't no way you can sit here and be silent"

A woman faces a line of Baltimore police officers in riot gear.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 11:31 am

"With everything that we've been through, ain't no way you can sit here and be silent in the face of injustice," — Rev. Jamal H. Bryant's eulogy for Freddie Gray at the New Shiloh Baptist Church

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The Two-Way
10:35 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Tensions Running High In Baltimore After Night Of Rioting

A man on a bicycle greets Maryland state troopers on Tuesday in the aftermath of rioting in Baltimore.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 12:41 pm

UPDATED 2:30 PM:

Hundreds of National Guard troops were positioned across parts of Baltimore a day after riots that left at least 20 police officers injured and more than a dozen buildings damaged, destroyed or looted. One of the police officers is in critical condition from injuries sustained in a fire, says Captain John Kowalczyk with the Baltimore Police.

Thousands of police officers have been deployed to "hot spots" in the city, according to Kowalczyk. He added that the National Guard are positioned in "strategic areas".

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The Salt
9:56 am
Tue April 28, 2015

How Newbie Gardeners Can Safely Grow Food On Urban Land

Graze the Roof is a community-produced garden that grows vegetables on the rooftop of a church in San Francisco.
Sergio Ruiz/Flickr

A version of this story was first published on April 5, 2015. It has been updated.

The majority of Americans now live in cities and have very little to do with the production of their food.

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It's All Politics
9:45 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Panned When It First Came Out, The Clinton Logo Is Saying Something Now

Like the Empire State Building in New York, Clinton's logo is changing appearance to say something about the topics of the day or to tailor to key constituencies.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 9:47 am

Hillary Clinton's new logo has been much maligned. A simple, rightward-pointing "H" with a red arrow through it that looks like it could have been made in "Paint."

Red, the color of the other team. How could she? some Democrats wondered. It seemed so amateurish, some design experts lamented.

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NPR History Dept.
9:43 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Nazi Summer Camps In 1930s America?

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 11:43 am

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Goats and Soda
9:41 am
Tue April 28, 2015

A 10-Year-Old's View Of The Nepal Earthquake

Journalist Donatella Lorch broke her no-motorcycle rule so she and her 10-year-old son, Lucas, could survey earthquake damage.
Donatella Lorch for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 1:13 pm

When the earthquake hit, my son, Lucas, and I were in the car and he was trying to find "The Piano Guys" on my iPhone to blast through the car speakers. He didn't realize anything was amiss until the car jolted violently up on two wheels then slammed back down. I stepped on the brake and yelled, "Earthquake!"

Lucas knew from his school, his parents and of course YouTube to "drop, cover, and hold." And so he immediately did what he calls the airplane brace position: forehead on knees and hands on top of your head.

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It's All Politics
9:26 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Did You Know It's Legal In Most States To Discriminate Against LGBT People?

Danny DeBelius NPR

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 10:43 am

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court hears arguments on same-sex marriage, which is now legal in about three dozen states.

But it's also legal in most states to discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people in the areas of employment, housing and public accommodation.

So in many states, a person could marry someone of the same gender and then get fired for being gay.

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The Two-Way
6:34 am
Tue April 28, 2015

'Bali 9' Pair Reportedly Killed By Firing Squad, After Last Appeals Denied

A composite image of file photos shows Australians Myuran Sukumaran (left) and Andrew Chan in Denpasar district court in Bali. Indonesia has rejected appeals for clemency in their cases. The two will reportedly be executed early Wednesday.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 12:15 pm

Update at 1:45 p.m. ET: Executions Reportedly Take Place; Filipina Is Spared

Eight prisoners have been put to death, according to Jakarta Post. The news comes after Australian media who have journalists on the prison island where the executions were to take place said that the condemned prisoners had been taken to the island's firing range.

The Post cites an official with the attorney general's office, as well as a local funeral director.

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Delinquent. Dropout. At-Risk. When Words Become Labels

Sidney Poitier (right) and Glenn Ford (standing) in the 1955 film, Blackboard Jungle.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 9:17 am

Much of our recent reporting, especially from New Orleans, has focused on young people who are neither in school, nor working. There are an estimated five and a half million of them, ages 16 to 24, in the United States.

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Around the Nation
4:24 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Charred 'Easy Mac' Forces Iowa Capitol To Evacuate

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 6:09 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Law
4:03 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Defense Team Urges Jury To Send Boston Bomber To Prison For Life

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 11:46 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In a few words, here is the defense for the Boston Marathon bomber. He was drawn into the deadly plot by his older brother.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Asia
3:55 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Quake's Effects Compounded By Poor Infrastructure, Political Issues

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 6:09 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
3:03 am
Tue April 28, 2015

On The Streets Of Baltimore, Trying To Understand The Anger

A police officer watches a corner market burn in the west side of Baltimore.
Eyder Peralta NPR

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 4:17 am

In the early morning, as the cold set in, Anaya Maze stood next to the charred remains of a CVS store.

Holding a sign, she was the only protester left in front of a line of police officers dressed in riot gear. She is petite. Still, she faced the police officers, looking at them intently.

A few steps away were the charred skeletons of two police vehicles, the victims of an unbridled anger that burned its way through the west side of Baltimore.

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It's All Politics
3:01 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Record Number Of Amicus Briefs Filed In Same-Sex-Marriage Cases

The stack of amicus briefs filed as of April 9 reached past the knee of NPR legal affairs intern Anthony Palmer. The briefs cost, on average, an estimated $25,000 to $50,000.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 7:25 am

This week's same-sex-marriage cases at the Supreme Court brought in a record number of friend-of-the-court briefs — 148 of them, according to the court, beating the previous record of 136 in the 2013 Obamacare case.

These briefs, known formally by their Latin name, amicus briefs, are filed by groups, individuals, and governments that have an interest in the outcome.

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Parallels
1:53 am
Tue April 28, 2015

On Its Own, The Afghan Army Takes The Fight To The Taliban

An artillery gun fires a round at Taliban fighters in the hills of Nangahar Province.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 11:48 am

The call comes into the Afghan battalion headquarters, a small concrete building that once housed American Green Berets. The Taliban are attacking a police checkpoint under construction in the foothills of Nangahar Province in eastern Afghanistan, a short distance from the border with Pakistan.

The Afghan soldiers gather in a line, lifting their palms and praying for a safe mission. They hop in their trucks and head up a winding dirt road. The unfinished checkpoint can be seen in the hazy distance.

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Back At Base
1:52 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Flight Attendant On Saigon Evacuation: You Wanted 'To Help Every Child'

Children aboard this World Airways DC-8 jet were evacuated from Vietnam on April 2, 1975, shortly before the fall of Saigon and just two days before the first official Operation Babylift flight. Among the children was Thanh Jeff Ghar (center, lying by a window), 12.
Photo as exhibited at the Presidio's Operation Babylift: Perspectives & Legacies exhibition at the Officers' Club, courtesy of the AP

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 12:30 pm

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base."

It was known as Operation Babylift.

In the days before the fall of Saigon on April 30, 1975, Vietnamese children were taken out of the country and flown to the U.S.

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Parallels
1:51 am
Tue April 28, 2015

The Past Haunts The Present For Japan's Shinzo Abe

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Boston on Monday.
Dominick Reuter AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 12:17 pm

As Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe tours the U.S. this week, he has a state dinner at the White House and will be the first Japanese prime minister to address a joint meeting of Congress. But while he prepares to lay out a vision for the future, not all is well in his own East Asian neighborhood, where the past remains a huge source of tension.

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The Two-Way
11:43 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

Nepal Death Toll Tops 5,000; At Least 1.4 Million Need Food Aid

A man prays Tuesday morning next to rubble of a temple destroyed in Saturday's earthquake in Kathmandu, Nepal.
Adnan Abidi Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 10:29 am

Updated at 8:55 a.m. ET

More than 5,000 people are confirmed dead from Saturday's earthquake just outside Kathmandu, Nepal. Nearly 11,000 more were injured, according to Nepal's National Emergency Operation Center.

From Kathmandu, NPR's Kirk Siegler reports that strong tremors are continuing:

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Around the Nation
6:14 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

Baltimore Mayor Condemns Violent Protesters At Press Conference

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 8:24 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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All Tech Considered
6:02 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

How Tech Firms Are Helping People In The Nepal Earthquake Zone

A Nepalese man checks his cellphone as people stay on open ground from fears of earthquake tremors in Kathmandu, Nepal, on Monday.
Niranjan Shrestha AP

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 9:16 am

The feeling that tech giants such as Facebook and Google know exactly where we are and what we're doing can be uncomfortable. Targeted advertisements or suggestions based on our location can feel like an invasion of privacy.

But the collection of our digital data has an upside in certain circumstances, and the aftermath of the massive earthquake in Nepal provides a good example.

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It's All Politics
5:07 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

Fact Check: Is The Clinton Foundation 'The Most Transparent'?

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks at the Clinton foundation's Clinton Global Initiative conference with her husband, Bill, and daughter, Chelsea, looking on.
Michael Loccisano Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 6:14 pm

During the early phase of her presidential run, Hillary Clinton has been dogged by scrutiny of her family's foundation, the Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation. The Clintons have pushed back, calling the foundation among the most transparent foundations in the world.

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All Tech Considered
4:58 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

When The Sharing Economy Brings Unexpected Experiences

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 6:21 pm

Thanks to the fast-growing sharing economy, anyone can make money renting out his home or car — or by becoming a personal chef.

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