NPR News

The Two-Way
6:14 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Lawmakers Reach Deal Intended To Fix VA System In Crisis

House Veterans' Affairs Committee Chairman Jeff Miller, a Republican from Florida.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Lawmakers in Washington have reached a deal to overhaul the embattled Department of Veterans Affairs, multiple news organizations are reporting.

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Business
6:12 am
Mon July 28, 2014

The Ice Cream Sandwich That Wouldn't Melt

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
4:58 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Conflict In Gaza: Here's What You Need To Know Today

Palestinian Saeb Afana, 12, stands on the edge of a large crater from an Israeli missile strike that destroyed several graves, as he carries flowers at a cemetery in Gaza City,on Monday.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

In a resolution overnight, the United Nations Security Council called for an "immediate and unconditional" cease-fire in Gaza.

As USA Today reports, the Security Council called on both Israel and Hamas to "to accept and fully implement the humanitarian cease-fire into the Eid period and beyond."

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Middle East
4:09 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Israelis Broadly Support Military's Operation In Gaza

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
4:09 am
Mon July 28, 2014

More Than Half Of Spaniards In Their 20s Are Unemployed

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Latin America
4:09 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Locked In U.S. Hedge Fund Battle, Argentina Faces Default

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
4:09 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Colorado Rockies Hand Out Free Jerseys — With A Typo

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S.
4:09 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Calif. Gets A Lesson In Succession: 4 Governors In 4 Days

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
3:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Rust Devastates Guatemala's Prime Coffee Crop And Its Farmers

A worker dries coffee beans at a coffee plantation in Santiago Atitlan, Guatemala, in February 2013.
Moises Castillo AP

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 4:40 am

Outside the northern Guatemalan town of Olopa, near the Honduran border, farmer Edwin Fernando Diaz Viera stands in the middle of his tiny coffee field. He says it was his lifelong dream to own a farm here. The area is renowned for producing some of the world's richest Arabica, the smooth-tasting beans beloved by specialty coffee brewers.

"My farm was beautiful, it was big," he says.

But then, a plant fungus called coffee rust, or roya in Spanish, hit his crop.

"Coffee rust appeared and wiped out everything," he says.

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Shots - Health News
3:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

People Who Feel They Have A Purpose In Life Live Longer

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 4:09 am

We know that happiness and social connection can have positive benefits on health. Now research suggests that having a sense of purpose or direction in life may also be beneficial.

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Science
3:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Shifts In Habitat May Threaten Ruddy Shorebird's Survival

Guided by biologists, volunteers briefly catch, band and release some of Delaware's visiting red knots each spring to monitor the health of the species.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 4:09 am

An intrepid bird called the red knot migrates from the southern tip of South America to the Arctic and back every year. But changes in climate along its route are putting this ultramarathoner at risk.

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Shots - Health News
3:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Why We Think Ignorance Is Bliss, Even When It Hurts Our Health

Lucinda Schreiber for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 4:09 am

Medical tests are rarely a pleasant experience, especially if you're worried that something could be seriously wrong. That's true even though we know that regular screenings and tests often help doctors catch issues early.

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Shots - Health News
3:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

New York Debates Whether Housing Counts As Health Care

Lissette Encarnacion in her apartment at The Brook, a supportive housing complex in the Bronx.
Natalie Fertig WNYC

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 4:09 am

Standing outside her sixth-floor apartment in the Bronx, Lissette Encarnacion says she sometimes forgets the place belongs to her.

"I'm thinking I'm at somebody else's [house]," she says. "I'm ringing my own doorbell."

Encarnacion used to have a career in banking, and lived in a real home with her son and husband. Then one night everything changed, she says, when her husband came home drunk and angry and threw her off a balcony.

"He came home, pulled me from the hair, and just started beating the hell out of me," she says.

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NPR Story
3:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Fighting In Ukraine Continues; Russia Dismisses Threat Of Sanctions

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 4:09 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

The Week In Politics: Progress On Upgrading VA Health System

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 4:09 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Men In America
3:17 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

Lessons In Manhood: A Boys' School Turns Work Into Wonders

At East Bay School for Boys, sometimes the sparks of inspiration result in, well, actual sparks.
Courtesy East Bay School for Boys

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 5:22 pm

This summer, All Things Considered has been taking a look at the changing lives of men in America. And that means talking about how the country educates boys.

In Berkeley, Calif., a private, non-profit middle school called the East Bay School for Boys is trying to reimagine what it means to build confident young men. In some ways, the school's different approach starts with directing, not stifling, boys' frenetic energy.

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Iraq
3:14 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

Violence Spikes Anew In Iraq, As Islamic State Looks To Expand

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 5:23 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
3:14 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

What Makes This Fight In Gaza Different From The Others?

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 4:52 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
3:14 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

On The Eve Of Ramadan's End, Fighting Resumes In Gaza

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
3:14 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

Handmade Signs From Homeless People Lead To Art, Understanding

Artist Willie Baronet has been collecting signs from the homeless since 1993.
Tanya Conovaloff

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 4:52 pm

Artist Willie Baronet is on a 24-city, 31-day trek from Seattle, Wash. to New York City looking for supplies.

He's been buying handmade signs from homeless people for an art project called We Are All Homeless. Those signs are little more than a peripheral blur for many people. Baronet wants us to slow down, read them and understand.

"It really started because of my discomfort, my guilt, the way I felt, whenever I encountered a homeless person on the corner," he tells NPR's Eric Westervelt.

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Law
1:08 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

With Judges Overriding Death Penalty Cases, Alabama Is An Outlier

Courtney Lockhart is appealing a death penalty sentence that a judge gave him in 2011, which overrode the jury's recommendation of life in prison.
Dave Martin AP

When Courtney Lockhart was tried for murder in Alabama, the jury unanimously recommended a life sentence, but the judge overrode that recommendation and sentenced Lockhart to death instead. Now the convicted murderer is asking the state Supreme Court to examine Alabama's unique process of judicial override.

Alabama is an outlier. It's the only state in which judges routinely override jury decisions not to impose the death penalty.

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The Two-Way
12:08 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

Vincenzo Nibali First Italian In 15 Years To Win Tour De France

Italy's Vincenzo Nibali, wearing the overall leader's yellow jersey, passes the Arc de Triomphe during the twenty-first and last stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 85.4 miles with start in Evry and finish in Paris, France.
Christophe Ena AP

Vincenzo Nibali has officially won this year's Tour de France, becoming the first Italian cyclist to do so since 1998 with a ride past fans lining Paris' Champs-Elysees.

As we reported on Saturday, Nibali, riding for Astana Pro Team, had worn the yellow jersey through most of the three-week competition that had been marked by bad weather and the relatively quick elimination of some of the favorites.

On an overcast Sunday in the French capital, Nibali rode past the Arc de Triomphe on his way to the winner's podium.

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The Two-Way
10:58 am
Sun July 27, 2014

U.S.: Satellite Images Show Russian Rockets Hitting Ukraine

Image released by the U.S. State Department showing what it says is evidence of Russia firing artillery into eastern Ukraine.
U.S. State Department

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 2:48 pm

Update at 4:05 p.m. ET.

The U.S. State Department has released satellite images it says back up the assertion by Washington and Kiev that Russian forces are firing artillery into eastern Ukraine in support of separatists.

In a four-page document titled Evidence of Russian Shelling into Ukraine, released Sunday, blast marks from rocket launches in Russia and craters in Ukraine can be seen, the State Department says.

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The Two-Way
10:29 am
Sun July 27, 2014

Judges Overturns D.C. Ban On Handguns In Public

A federal judge has overturned a District of Columbia ban on carrying handguns in public, concluding that the Second Amendment protects a person's right to firearms outside the home.

In a 19-page ruling that was written on Thursday, but only released late Saturday, Judge Frederick J. Scullin Jr. ordered the city to allow residents to carry handguns — a milestone in a case that has been dragging on for five years.

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The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Sun July 27, 2014

Smartsongs: Refrains The Brain Retains

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 1:54 pm

Now that Weird Al week is long past, we can mull over the merits — and demerits — of Al Yankovic's new mishmash of novelty music: Mandatory Fun.

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Sun July 27, 2014

Birth Of 100-Millionth Person In Philippines Greeted With Joy, Concern

Filipino Clemente Sentino Jr (L), 45 and Dailin Cabigayan (R), 27 holds their 6 lbs newborn baby girl marking the "100 million population of the Philippines."
Ritchie B. Tongo EPA/Landov

The Philippines on Sunday welcomed its 100-millionth citizen — a baby girl named Chonalyn who was born at a hospital in the capital, Manila.

Juan Antonio Perez III, executive director of the Commission on Population, announced the official milestone after the birth at Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital, which has one of the busiest maternity wards in the world. The 6-pound Chonalyn arrived shortly after midnight Manila time.

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Science
8:33 am
Sun July 27, 2014

How Our Story About A Child's Science Experiment Sparked Controversy

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 8:52 am

A story that ran last Sunday on All Things Considered about a sixth-grader's science fair project has elicited not just criticism but controversy.

Since the student's project built on the work of scientists, she's been accused this week of being a "plagiarist" who "ripped off" earlier work.

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The Two-Way
7:04 am
Sun July 27, 2014

Libyan Conflict Rages After U.S. Shuts Embassy

The entrance of the compounds of the U.S. embassy is pictured in Tripoli on Saturday. Fighting continues to rage after the U.S. evacuated the diplomatic facility.
Hani Amara Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 12:53 pm

Updated at 12:05 p.m. ET.

Clashes between renegade Libyan army troops and Islamist-led militias have killed at least 38 people, including civilians, in and around the eastern city of Benghazi. The fighting comes a day after the U.S. temporarily shuttered its embassy in Tripoli and evacuated diplomatic personnel to neighboring Tunisia, citing security concerns.

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It's All Politics
6:12 am
Sun July 27, 2014

Time Running Short For Congress To Agree On Border Bill

Immigrants run to jump on a train in Ixtepec, Mexico, during their journey toward the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama wants nearly $4 billion in emergency funds to deal with the tens of thousands of children from Central America who've been crossing the border.
Eduardo Verdugo AP

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 9:26 am

Congress is set to disband later this week for a summer break stretching past Labor Day. That leaves lawmakers only a few more days to act on an urgent request from President Obama.

The president wants nearly $4 billion in emergency funds to deal with the tens of thousands of children from Central America who've been illegally crossing the U.S.-Mexico border in recent months. The GOP-led House may act on just a fraction of that request, setting up a clash with the Democratic-led Senate.

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Parallels
6:12 am
Sun July 27, 2014

News Anchor On Losing Side Of China's Anti-Corruption Campaign

China Central Television anchor Rui Chenggang is the latest high-profile person to be arrested in China's massive anti-corruption drive.
Michel Euler AP

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 10:16 am

Chinese often complain that corruption is endemic in every sector of their society. So it may come as no surprise that a government anti-corruption drive has swept up 25,000 officials in the first half of this year.

The drive's victims include everyone from lowly local functionaries to, this month, a young celebrity news anchor named Rui Chenggang.

Authorities showed up at China Central Television headquarters earlier this month, and took away Rui, the 36-year-old news anchor on CCTV's finance channel, watched by millions of viewers.

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