NPR News

The Two-Way
5:00 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Ferguson Update: Holder Writes Op-Ed; City Calls For Nighttime Calm

Protesters walk on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Mo., on Tuesday. Protests have been going on for more than a week after the police shooting of unarmed teen Michael Brown.
Michael B. Thomas AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:26 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder has made a pledge to Ferguson, Mo., where 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer on Aug. 9.

"Our investigation into this matter will be full, it will be fair, and it will be independent," he wrote in an op-ed for the St. Louis Dispatch. He added, "Long after the events of Aug. 9 have receded from the headlines, the Justice Department will continue to stand with this community."

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The Two-Way
4:23 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Gov. Perry Gets Booked At Texas Courthouse After Indictment

Texas Gov. Rick Perry arrives at the Blackwell Thurman Criminal Justice Center on Tuesday in Austin, Texas.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:03 pm

Texas Gov. Rick Perry went to a courthouse to be booked after being indicted by an Austin grand jury on Friday for alleged abuse of power.

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The Two-Way
3:33 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Man With A Knife Fatally Shot By Police In St. Louis, Officials Say

People raise their arms while chanting, "Hands up. Don't shoot," near where St. Louis police say officers shot and killed a 23-year-old man who was wielding a knife and refused to drop it on Tuesday.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:07 pm

St. Louis Metropolitan Police shot and killed a man about 4 miles from the suburb of Ferguson, where people have been rallying since the fatal shooting of Michael Brown by a police officer on Aug. 9.

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News
3:29 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Amid The Chaos In Ferguson, Another Police Shooting

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Middle East
3:29 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Blocked At The Border, Gaza Man's Hopes Of Escape Fade

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This Week's Must Read
3:22 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

'This Fight Begins In The Heart': Reading James Baldwin As Ferguson Seethes

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 3:55 pm

It is early August. A black man is shot by a white policeman. And the effect on the community is of "a lit match in a tin of gasoline."

No, this is not Ferguson, Mo. This was Harlem in August 1943, a period that James Baldwin writes about in the essay that gives its title to his seminal collection, Notes of a Native Son.

The story begins with the death of Baldwin's father, a proud, severe preacher who viewed all white people with suspicion, even the kindly schoolteacher who encouraged his son's writings.

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Goats and Soda
3:22 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Doctors Without Borders: What We Need To Contain Ebola

Dr. Joanne Liu (left), international president of Doctors Without Borders poses with a member of the MSF medical team at the organization's Ebola treatment center in Kailahun, Sierra Leone.
P.K. Lee Courtesy of Doctors Without Border

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:51 pm

With the continuous uptick in the number of cases and deaths in the current Ebola outbreak, the few agencies that are on ground are stretched thin.

That includes Doctors Without Borders, also known as MSF. It's one of the main health care providers in West Africa, where there are more than 2,000 cases of Ebola and 1,200 deaths. Even with roughly 1,000 volunteers spread among the three Ebola-stricken countries, the agency says that still isn't enough.

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Goats and Soda
3:17 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Ebola In The Skies? How The Virus Made It To West Africa

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:37 pm

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the most explosive in history. One reason the virus spread so fast is that West Africa was blindsided. Ebola had never erupted in people anywhere close to West Africa before.

The type of Ebola causing the outbreak — called Zaire — is the deadliest strain. Until this year, it had been seen only in Central Africa, about 2,500 miles away. That's about the distance between Boston and San Francisco.

So how did it spread across this giant swath of land without anybody noticing?

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Ferguson Teachers Use Day Off As Opportunity For A Civics Lesson

Teachers with the Jennings School District pick up trash Tuesday on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Mo., the scene of nightly police clashes. Jennings and the neighboring Ferguson school district have canceled class due to ongoing unrest.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:30 pm

Chaos and unrest overnight have kept the National Guard in the suburban town of Ferguson, Mo., for a second day, and the local school district has canceled classes for the week. After two nights of violent clashes this week, neighboring Jennings School District is out of class, too.

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The Salt
2:21 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Specialty Food And Agriculture Startups Are Ripening In Greece

Ilias Smirlis (left) runs a small family farm in Kalamata, Greece. Before he met entrepreneur Sotiris Lymperopoulos, who runs the food service Radiki, he struggled to sell his produce outside Athens. "The demand for excellent products will always exist," Smirlis says. "The challenge is to find a market."
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Most mornings, Sotiris Lymperopoulos walks the craggy shoreline of the western Peloponnese, foraging for salty wild greens.

In his straw hat and shorts, snipping wild chicory, garlic and sea asparagus with a kitchen knife, he hardly looks like a poster boy for Greece's nascent startup culture. But the 35-year-old Athenian, who trained as an economist, found a viable niche in the country's post-crisis economy.

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Race
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Study Shows Sharp Racial Divide In Reaction To Ferguson

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 8:06 pm

A recent study by the Pew Research Center finds that there are stark racial divisions in reactions to the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Audie Cornish talks to Carroll Doherty, director of political research at Pew, for more.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

A Milestone Marked In Disposal Of Syria's Chemical Weapons

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Civilian Convoy Comes Under Attack In Ukraine

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 3:08 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Latin America
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Once An Object Of Reverence, Brazilian Soccer's A Punchline

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 5:38 pm

It's been over a month since the World Cup ended in Brazil, but the shame of the country's blowout loss remains. Once, Brazilians were welcomed in other countries with talk of Brazil's soccer dominance; now, everyone merely speaks of their historic defeat against Germany.

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A Closer Look At Sexual Assaults On Campus
2:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

As Kids Head To Campus, Parents Broach The Subject Of Sexual Assault

Onaja Waki (left) is about to start college in California, but she and her mother, Oneida Cordova, have been talking openly for years about the dangers of sexual assault.
Teresa Chin Youth Radio

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 3:16 pm

Rachel Swinehart has commandeered her family's living room in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. It's filled with large plastic tubs containing stuff like pink bedding and a coffee maker.

Rachel, 18, is about to head off to Shenandoah College, a small arts school in Virginia, where she'll study harp performance. In many ways, organizing her stuff is the easy part. Talking about the risks of college life — that's a bit harder.

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The Two-Way
2:15 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Think Tank Apologizes For 'Unconscionable' Tweet To Amnesty

Twitter

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 4:31 pm

Amnesty International and a Washington think tank have "kissed and made up" after a tweet posted Monday night from the Center for Strategic and International Studies told Amnesty to "suck it."

CSIS called the tweet "unconscionable," saying an intern thought he was using his personal account when he sent the response.

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NPR Story
1:37 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Man Dead After Officer-Involved Shooting In St. Louis

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 1:53 pm

Authorities in St. Louis say a man has been shot dead by police after brandishing a knife at officers. The shooting took place in the north St. Louis area, a few miles from the suburb of Ferguson, where there have been protests for more than a week following the shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a police officer.

The Wall Street Journal’s Ben Kesling tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that it’s not clear if the shooting today has any connection to the protests in Ferguson.

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The Two-Way
1:19 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

3 Of Pope's Family Members Die In Traffic Accident In Argentina

Pope Francis celebrates a Mass of reconciliation in Seoul's main cathedral on Monday. The wife and children of Francis' nephew have died after a car accident in Argentina, the Vatican reports.
Gregorio Borgia AP

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 2:35 pm

Three of Pope Francis' family members have died in a traffic accident in Argentina. The wife of the pope's nephew and her two young children were killed, and the pope's nephew was "seriously injured," according to Vatican Radio.

Pope Francis said he was "profoundly saddened" by the news and asked that "all those who share in his grief join him in prayer."

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Remembrances
12:59 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

'Fresh Air' Remembers Former Vermont Sen. James Jeffords

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 1:17 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

SINGING SENATORS: (Singing) God bless America, land that I love. Stand beside her and guide her through the night with the light from above. From the mountains to the prairies, to the...

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Music
12:59 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

With Both Farce And Feeling, Currentzis' 'Figaro' Succeeds Magnificently

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 1:17 pm

There are many recordings of Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro. Do we need another? In the case of this new recording led by the young Greek conductor Teodor Currentzis, Fresh Air classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz says, "Absolutely."

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

How Flight Changed The World - And What Might Be Next

First flight of the Wright Flyer I, December 17, 1903, Orville piloting, Wilbur running at wingtip. (John T. Daniels/Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 1:53 pm

Today is National Aviation Day, the date chosen in part because it’s the birthday of Orville Wright, who flew the very first airplane in 1903, with his brother Wilbur Wright.

Astronaut Neil Armstrong carried at piece of wood and some fabric from the Wright brothers’ 1903 flyer to the moon, connecting the first airplane flight to space exploration.

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

California Tries To Lure Film Industry Back Home

California has watched its dominance over the film and TV industry wane as other states, and even other countries, offer producers lucrative tax incentives. This has cost the state thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in lost economic output.

Now California is fighting back. A bill is moving through the state legislature that would quadruple the amount of tax incentives available to TV and movie makers each year.

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Home Construction Jumps, Even As Housing Market Cools

New data from the Commerce Department on home construction shows new construction climbed more than 15 percent in July from the previous month, and applications for building permits jumped 8 percent.

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The Two-Way
10:46 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Castro's Niece Casts Rare 'No' Vote In Parliament, Citing Gay Rights

In what could be a first, Mariela Castro (center), daughter of Cuban President Raul Castro, voted against legislation in the country's parliament. In May, she marched in a parade for the International Day Against Homophobia in Havana.
Franklin Reyes AP

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 1:18 pm

Cuba's parliament isn't big on dissent. Most legislation that makes it to a vote is endorsed unanimously, as a matter of course. But Mariela Castro, the daughter of President Raul Castro — and the niece of Fidel Castro — is making waves by voting "no" on a workers' rights bill, saying it didn't protect people with unconventional gender identities.

It seems that before the December 2013 vote was publicized recently in a Cuban blog, no one could recall anyone voting against a measure in Cuba's legislature. Some say a dissenting vote has simply never happened in Havana.

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Shots - Health News
10:35 am
Tue August 19, 2014

How To Make Sense Of Health Insurance Alphabet Soup

There must be an HMO in here somewhere.
iStockphoto

What's in a name? When it comes to health plans sold on the individual market, these days it's often less than people think.

The lines that distinguish HMOs, PPOs, EPOs and POS plans from one another have blurred, making it hard to know what you're buying by name alone, assuming you're one of the few people who know what an EPO is in the first place.

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Code Switch
10:23 am
Tue August 19, 2014

In Ferguson, Mo., A City Meets The Spotlight

Demonstrators protesting the shooting death of Michael Brown listen to rapper Nelly speak.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 12:55 pm

Ferguson, Mo., Etefia Umana says, is in some ways "a media fiction."

We're sitting in the offices of Better Family Life, an organization that provides social services to people in the area. Umana chairs its board and lives in Ferguson.

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Goats and Soda
9:53 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Out, Out, Damned Ebola: Liberia Is Obsessed With Hand Washing

NPR's Ebola coverage team brought a lot of cleaning equipment — not because they planned to go into risky places but because you can never be too careful. The boots are very handy and can be washed with chlorine. Wearing surgical gloves reminds our correspondent not to touch her face.
Ryan Kellman NPR

"I feel like Lady MacBeth, constantly scrubbing my hands," says Nurith Aizenman, global health correspondent for NPR. She arrived in Liberia this week as part of a team covering the Ebola outbreak. In the capital of Monrovia, hand washing is an obsession, not just for her but for many of the city's nearly one million residents.

So you've told me that you're hearing lots of hand washing stories.

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The Protojournalist
9:32 am
Tue August 19, 2014

What Exactly Is That Birdlike Thing?

The hummingbird moth — Hemaris thysbe.
Courtesy of Elena Tartaglia

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 1:36 pm

For years I was convinced that there exists among us a strange, unidentified species of animal — something between bug and bird — jetting around gardens and flowers and trees.

Not too long ago one of these natural UFOs buzzed past me in broad daylight. Too big to be a bee, too itty-bitty to be a bird. Slow enough to glimpse, but too fast to identify.

Not exactly a hummingbird ...

Nor a bumblebee ...

What the heck was it?

The mystery was finally solved when a friend told me about ...

... the hummingbird moth.

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The Two-Way
7:47 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Wreck Of World War II-Era U.S. Ship Dubbed 'Galloping Ghost' Is Found

Deputy Chief of Mission (Jakarta, Indonesia) Kristen Bauer (top left), Capt. Richard Stacpoole (top right), and Marine Lt. Col. Miguel Avila pass a wreath to sailors assigned to Mobile Diving Salvage Unit One, during a wreath-laying ceremony for the sunken Navy vessel USS Houston.
Mass Communication Spc. 3rd Class Christian Senyk U.S. Navy

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 1:52 pm

The USS Houston sank during World War II after being hit by the Japanese, killing 700 sailors and Marines. Now, more than 70 years later, U.S. and Indonesian divers have confirmed that a sunken vessel in the Java Sea was the wreck of the ship dubbed "The Galloping Ghost of the Java Coast."

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The Two-Way
6:33 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Israel Resumes Gaza Strikes After Rocket Attacks

Smoke is seen after what witnesses said was an Israeli airstrike in Gaza City on Tuesday. Israel launched attacks in the Gaza Strip and recalled its negotiators from truce talks in Cairo after saying three Palestinian rockets had hit southern Israel, hours before a cease-fire was due to expire.
Suhaib Salem Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 2:05 pm

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

Israel said today that it had resumed targeting "terror sites" across the Gaza Strip after renewed rocket attacks on the Jewish state. The resumption of violence casts doubts about the future of indirect talks in Cairo between Israel and the Palestinians to stop the fighting between the two sides.

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