NPR News

The Two-Way
6:14 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Actor Harrison Ford Injured In Plane Crash; Son Says He's OK

Actor Harrison Ford attends the 12th Annual "Living Legends of Aviation" at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on in January.
Alberto E. Rodriguez Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 6:28 pm

The actor Harrison Ford crash-landed a small vintage plane on a golf course in the Los Angeles area on Thursday, TMZ, the Los Angeles Times and Variety are reporting.

The Times reports that Ford was taken from the scene by ambulance.

During a televised press briefing, Asst. Chief Patrick Butler, of the Los Angeles Fire Department, said the man on the plane suffered "moderate trauma" but was "alert and conscious."

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The Two-Way
5:23 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Argentine Prosecutor Was 'Without A Doubt' Murdered, Says Family

Argentine federal judge Sandra Arroyo Salgado, ex-wife of Argentine late prosecutor Alberto Nisman, offers a press conference on the results of the parallel investigation she ordered into his death, in San Isidro, Buenos Aires, on Thursday.
Juan Mabromata AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 5:43 pm

An Argentine prosecutor who died under mysterious circumstances was "without a doubt" murdered, his family says.

Sandra Arroyo Salgado, Alberto Nisman's ex wife, said the family had ordered an independent forensic investigation into his death that revealed a "scientifically verifiable truth."

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Shots - Health News
4:27 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Colorado Debates Whether IUDs Are Contraception Or Abortion

An interauterine device provides long-term birth control.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 4:55 pm

A popular contraception program in Colorado is receiving criticism from conservative lawmakers who say that the program's use of intrauterine devices, or IUDs, qualify as abortions.

More than 30,000 women in Colorado have gotten a device because of the state program, the Colorado Family Planning Initiative. An IUD normally costs between $500 and several thousand dollars. Through the program women could receive one for free.

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Law
4:27 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Many Question Lack Of Plea Deal In Boston Bombing Case

The dramatic admission of guilt by Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's defense team in its opening statement Wednesday has generated questions about the trial now underway. Many are wondering why the government wouldn't accept a plea deal in exchange for life in prison, or why Tsarnaev wouldn't want to plead guilty to avoid graphic and disturbing testimony that he's not even contesting.

Youth Radio
3:10 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Transgender Students Learn To Navigate School Halls

Eight-year-old Tomás Rocha, a third grader at Malcolm X Elementary School in Berkeley, Calif., is among a handful of gender non-conforming students at the school.
Brett Myers Youth Radio

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 4:55 pm

The first time I learned that gender could be fluid was in sex ed in the ninth grade. I remember the teacher mumbling under her breath that some people don't identify their gender with the biological sex they were born with.

At the time it didn't faze me because I'd never known anyone who'd talked about it or felt that way. But now, three years later, I have a 16-year-old classmate who's transgender. His name is Jace McDonald.

"That is the name I have chosen," Jace says. "It's what my parents would have named me if I was born biologically male."

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Animals
3:06 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Animal-Rights Advocates Cheer End Of Elephants In Circus

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 3:22 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
2:57 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Eat Your Veggies! Even The Ones From Fukushima

Farmer Magoichi Shigihara checks on his cucumber farm in Nihonmatsu in Fukushima prefecture, about 31 miles west of the Fukushima nuclear power plant, in May 2011. Testing shows radiation in foods grown and raised in Fukushima is back to pre-accident levels.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 6:27 pm

Nearly four years after the Fukushima nuclear disaster, people in Japan are still hesitant to eat foods grown around the site of the accident. They worry that anything grown in the region will contain dangerous levels of radioactive elements, increasing their risk of cancer.

Sometimes, food from Fukushima will bear a photo of the farmer who grew it or a number to dial to learn more about each bag of rice or vegetables, just to ease customers' concerns.

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Goats and Soda
2:56 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Arsenic Antidote Hidden In Our Genes

At more than 12,000 feet above sea level, the town of San Antonio de los Cobres, Argentina, sits on volcanic bedrock, which leaches arsenic into the drinking water.
Guigue/Wikimedia

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 4:59 pm

For centuries, arsenic was the go-to poison for murder.

If you wanted to knock off an heir to the throne or speed up the arrival of your inheritance, all you had to do was add a dollop of rat poison to your rival's food. They wouldn't see or taste it. And the police wouldn't detect it — at least not until a chemist developed a test for the element in the early 19th century.

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Law
2:47 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

DOJ Report Condemns Ferguson Police Department's Practices

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 3:22 pm

NPR's Robert Siegel interviews Phillip Atiba Goff, president of the Center for Policing Equity and a visiting scholar at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, about his reaction to the Justice Department's investigation into the Ferguson, Mo., Police Department. Goff says in all his time working on issues of race and policing, he's never seen a report that so thoroughly criticizes a department's patterns and practices.

NPR Ed
2:46 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Why Some Parents Are Sitting Kids Out Of Tests

GIRLRAY Flikr Creative Commons

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 4:55 pm

Meet Jenni Hofschulte, the 35-year-old mom who's one of the parents leading the charge against testing in Milwaukee.

"I have two children in Milwaukee Public Schools," Hofschulte says over coffee at a cafe near her home. "The oldest one is in eighth grade." She's interrupted by her fidgety 5-year-old son, Brock.

Hofschulte quiets him down, furrows her brow and begins again.

Hofschulte says that when she found out her son would have to take a diagnostic test required of all Wisconsin kindergartners, all kinds of red flags went up.

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NPR Story
2:36 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

4 Recipes For Beet Lovers

(chrisandjenni/Flickr)

Growing up, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst hated beets. But now she’s become a beet convert, using them in salads and even beet hummus. Kathy shares recipes for her favorite beet dishes with hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson.

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NPR Story
2:36 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Philadelphia Police Commissioner On Policing And Ferguson

Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey (right) listens while U.S. President Barack Obama makes a statement to the press, after meeting with members of his Task Force on 21st Century Policing, March 2, 2015 in Washington, D.C. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

After months of anticipation, the United States Justice Department has released a scathing report on the Ferguson Police Department, following the death last year of a young unarmed black man by a white police officer.

The report comes just a few days after the White House Task Force on 21st Century Policing presented guidelines for law enforcement across the country.

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Around the Nation
2:36 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

The Racist History Behind The Iconic Selma Bridge

In this Sunday, Jan. 18, 2015, file photo, marchers hold up a their cellular phones to record the rapper Common and singer-songwriter John Legend performing at the foot of the Edmund Pettus Bridge.
Brynn Anderson AP

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 4:55 pm

The 1965 Voting Rights March from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., became known as Bloody Sunday because it ended in state troopers beating nonviolent protesters as they tried to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

In photos from that day you see the marchers being struck and trampled, and just above them are the bridge's big arches, with the name Edmund Pettus emblazoned across the steel beam.

The bridge has become one of the most hallowed places in America's civil rights history, but who was Edmund Pettus?

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Parallels
2:36 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Boko Haram Takes A Page From ISIS Propaganda Playbook

The most recent propaganda videos from Boko Haram have higher production values than in the past and other similarities to ISIS-produced videos.
Boko Haram Sendvid

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 4:55 pm

In its latest video, Islamist extremists from the Nigerian group Boko Haram display the bodies of two men accused of spying. They have been beheaded.

Gone are Boko Haram's occasional grainy videos, replaced by slick productions apparently inspired by the self-proclaimed Islamic State.

It's a development that may indicate a shift in allegiance by Boko Haram away from al-Qaida.

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NPR Story
2:36 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Kentucky Driver Stranded 19 Hours With No End In Sight

Seth Slifer tweeted this photo with the note, "It's been 15 hours now and we haven't moved. It's a wonderful start to my vacation, and I should've brought a buddy." (Seth Slifer/Twitter)

In Kentucky, hundreds of people have been stranded in their cars and trucks since last night because of a storm that dumped over 20 inches in parts of the state. The stranded drivers are primarily on I-65 and I-24.

Seth Slifer from Franklyn, Tenn., is among those stranded on I-65. He spoke with Here & Now’s Robin Young by cellphone about the scene and how he’s holding up.

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The Two-Way
2:19 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Cardinal Egan, Ex-Archbishop Of New York, Dies

Cardinal Edward Egan, the former Roman Catholic archbishop of New York, has died. He was 82. The cause was cardiac arrest, the Archdiocese of New York said in a statement.

Egan, who was archbishop during the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, died this afternoon at NYU Langone Medical Center.

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The Two-Way
2:01 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Thousands Reportedly Flee Battle In Tikrit

A Shiite fighter sits on a military vehicle in the town of Hamrin in Salahuddin province on Thursday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 2:49 pm

Thousands of refugees have fled fighting in Tikrit, according to the U.N., as Iraqi forces backed by Shiite militias and Kurdish peshmerga battle to expel extremists from the self-declared Islamic State from the city.

Meanwhile, Reuters reports that ISIS militants have set fire to oil wells in Iraq's north in an effort to slow government forces.

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Code Switch
12:39 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Study: At 'Rate My Professors,' A Foreign Accent Can Hurt A Teacher's Score

The biggest gaps overall were in the South.
Kat Chow/NPR

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 5:21 pm

"So-and-so is really, really hard to understand." Or: "His accent is so distracting." I remember hearing off-the-cuff remarks like this a few times in college, complaints by classmates about teaching assistants and instructors, almost all of them of Asian descent and non-native English speakers.

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Music
12:09 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

On 'Collective Portrait,' Eddie Henderson Is Still Taking Risks At 74

Jazz trumpet and flugelhorn player Eddie Henderson was in his 30s when he debuted on record with Herbie Hancock. Before that he'd become a medical doctor, who went on to specialize in psychiatry, because it left his nights free to play the horn. With Henderson's new album, Collective Portrait, Fresh Air jazz Critic Kevin Whitehead says that decision is still paying off for him.

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The Salt
12:03 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Snow Is Delicious. But Is It Dangerous To Eat?

When foraging for delicious bites of snow, steer clear of plowed piles and manure, researchers say.
Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 1:45 pm

Many people will see the snow that's currently blanketing much of the Eastern seaboard of the U.S. as a nuisance coating sidewalks and roads. Others are celebrating it as an excuse to spend the day swooshing down a hill.

As for me, I like to think of snow as food.

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Law
11:51 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Ferguson Police Begin Reform Following DOJ Report, Mayor Says

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 12:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
11:04 am
Thu March 5, 2015

U.S. Appeals Court Overturns Gag Order In Mine Disaster Case

Former Massey Energy Company Chairman and CEO Don Blankenship, seen in July 2010, has pleaded not guilty to conspiracy charges associated with the 2010 West Virginia mine explosion that killed 29 men.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

A federal appeals court has vacated a sweeping gag order in the criminal case involving former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship and the 2010 Upper Big Branch coal mine disaster.

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Shots - Health News
10:54 am
Thu March 5, 2015

State Lawmakers Keep Busy While Supreme Court Weighs Obamacare

Latoya Watson of Washington, D.C., cheers during a rally outside the Supreme Court on Wednesday, when the justices heard arguments in King v. Burwell.
Andrew Harnik AP

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 12:03 pm

As the nation awaits a Supreme Court ruling on Obamacare, lawmakers in many states are moving ahead with a range of Affordable Care Act bills, some of which seek to bolster the law and others that are bent on derailing it.

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The Two-Way
10:01 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Plane Skids Off Runway At New York's LaGuardia; 6 Injured

A Delta jet which skidded off the runway at LaGuardia airport is attended by emergency personnel in New York City, on Thursday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 1:35 pm

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

A Delta flight carrying 130 passengers and crew skidded off a snow-covered runway at New York's LaGuardia Airport on Thursday, slamming through a fence on the side of the tarmac. Six people were hurt, an official says.

Authorities initially reported no injuries from the accident. Port Authority spokesman Joe Pentangelo later said that six people had been injured, but that none of the injuries was life-threatening.

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The Two-Way
9:56 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Michael Brown's Family Will File Civil Suit Over His Death

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 11:01 am

The family of Michael Brown, the unarmed black man who was slain by Ferguson, Mo., police last August, say they will file a civil lawsuit over his death. Brown, 18, was shot and killed by Officer Darren Wilson, who is no longer with the city's police force.

The family's legal team "said the City of Ferguson and former Officer Darren Wilson will be named in the suit," The Associated Press reports.

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The Two-Way
9:38 am
Thu March 5, 2015

India Threatens BBC Over Decision To Air Rape Documentary In U.K.

British filmmaker Leslee Udwin addresses a news conference on her documentary India's Daughter on Tuesday. The film, which has been banned in India, was broadcast Wednesday in the U.K. — a decision that has angered the Indian government.
Altaf Qadri AP

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 2:36 pm

Updated at 4:26 p.m. ET

India says it will take action against the BBC for broadcasting a documentary in the U.K. about the fatal 2012 gang rape of a young woman in New Delhi. The government, which has banned the Indian media from broadcasting India's Daughter or even showing clips from it pending an investigation, also ordered YouTube to take down the film.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Thu March 5, 2015

At Boston Marathon Bombing Trial, 'Graphic And Grueling' Testimony

In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is depicted sitting in federal court for a pretrial hearing in Boston on Dec. 18. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 bombing that killed three people and injured more than 260. He could face the death penalty if convicted.
Jane Flavell Collins AP

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 4:32 pm

Updated at 5:18 p.m. ET

Jurors in Boston heard more harrowing testimony today in the trial of Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the accused Boston Marathon bomber. Survivors, as well as police and first responders, recounted often-disturbing accounts of their suffering.

NPR's Tovia Smith, who was at the trial, called the testimony "excruciatingly graphic and grueling." Here's part of her reporting on today's All Things Considered:

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History
8:10 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Billionaire's Research Team Discovers Japanese World War II Battleship

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
8:02 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Winter's Final Punch? Forecasters Say Maybe

Snow begins to fall Thursday morning along the National Mall, in Washington, D.C. The federal government closed its offices because of a new round of winter weather.
Andrew Harnik AP

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 5:01 pm

Tired of winter? It could be the season's last gasp or just wishful thinking: an area ranging all the way from Texas to the Mid-Atlantic was under a weather alert, with as much as 10 inches of new snow possible in the northern reaches.

The Weather Channel says:

"All told, roughly 83 million people were under some kind of warning or advisory for winter weather.

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The Two-Way
7:52 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Singapore Court Sentences 2 Germans To Caning And Jail Over Graffiti

Andreas Von Knorre (right), one of two German nationals arrested for vandalism in Singapore, arrives in a police car at the state court on Nov. 22, 2014. Both men were sentenced Thursday to a prison term and caning.
Roslan Rahman AFP/Getty Images

Two young German men who broke into a train depot in Singapore to spray-paint graffiti on a commuter train car have been sentenced to nine months in prison and three strokes from a cane. They were tracked down and arrested in Malaysia last November.

Andreas Von Knorre, 22, and Elton Hinz, 21, had been working in Australia when they traveled to Singapore and broke into the depot. They soon became the subject of an international pursuit.

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