NPR News

The Salt
6:54 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Local Libyan Honey Is Sweet, But Is It Good For What Ails Us?

A jar of roadside honey from the Green Mountains in Libya.
John W. Poole NPR

NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is taking a Revolutionary Road trip from Tunisia to Cairo to see how the countries that staged revolutions last year are remaking themselves.

He's also sharing with us here at The Salt what he's been eating.

Dear Salt,

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The Two-Way
6:36 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Egypt Braces As Court Says Former Mubarak Aide May Stay In Race

An Egyptian protester chants slogans as he holds a ripped poster of presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq outside the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo today.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 12:25 pm

Rulings by Egypt's highest court to dissolve the country's parliament and keep a former aide to Hosni Mubarak on the presidential runoff ballot have thrown that country's already shaky democracy into chaos.

Much is still unclear about what was happening.

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson tells our Newscast Desk that:

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The Two-Way
5:43 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Russian Helicopters Heading To Syria May Not Be New

The attack helicopters heading to Syria from Russia likely aren't new purchases, The New York Times reports this morning.

Rather, they're "helicopters that Syria had sent to Russia a few months ago for routine repairs and refurbishing" that are now being returned, administration officials tell the Times.

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The Two-Way
5:12 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Fandemonium! Pitcher Cain Tosses Perfect Game And Giants Fans Go Nuts

Matt Cain: His no-no (a perfect game) is in the record books.
Jason O. Watson Getty Images

Let's put the serious stuff aside for a moment to celebrate something fun.

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Strange News
5:07 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Study: Shoes Tell A Lot About A Person

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. They say to understand a man, walk a mile in his shoes. Research from the University of Kansas suggests you don't even need to do that. The new study found judgments based on simply looking at someone's shoes, were right 90 percent of the time.

Shoes can reveal age, income, emotional state and political preference. Liberals really do wear shabby shoes and extroverts, flashy ones. Oddly, those in uncomfortable shoes tended to be calm.

Commentary
5:03 am
Thu June 14, 2012

My Kinky Relationship With The Teeny Weenie Afro

A couple of weeks after this latest chop, I experimented with a Billie Holiday look.
Alex Cavoulacos The Daily Muse

I cut most of my hair off eight weeks ago. And yes, I meant to do it. I love my new kinky curliness and now, as I walk down the street, I feel like I see natural hair — twists, coils, dreadlocks, afros — everywhere.

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Strange News
4:57 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Gym Manager Booby-Traps Locker To Catch Thief

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 5:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR Story
4:36 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Yemen Works To Reclaim Al-Qaida's Territory

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 5:07 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Law
3:06 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Michigan Finally Eyeing Changes To Lawyers For Poor

Edward Carter's conviction for a 1974 crime was vacated by a judge after it was shown that Carter was innocent — and after he had spent 35 years in Michigan prisons.
Brakkton Booker NPR

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 10:05 am

Lawyers on all sides agree the system enshrined nearly 50 years ago that gives all defendants the right to a lawyer is not working. The Justice Department calls it a crisis — such a big problem that it's been doling out grants to improve how its adversaries perform in criminal cases.

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Middle East
3:05 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Iran's Nuclear Fatwa: A Policy Or A Ploy?

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad delivers a speech under a portrait of Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, on June 2. The supreme leader has said repeatedly that nuclear weapons are un-Islamic and Iran will not pursue them. But in the West, many are skeptical.
Atta Kenare AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 6:25 pm

It's been an article of faith for nearly a decade that Iran's supreme leader issued a fatwa — a religious edict — that nuclear weapons are a sin and Iran has no intention of acquiring them.

President Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton recently made references to this religious commitment from Iran's leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

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Sports
3:05 am
Thu June 14, 2012

A Minor Leaguer's Life: Bats, Games And A Nickname

Tyler Saladino, 22, makes a throw from second base during warm-ups with the AA Birmingham Barons.
Russell Lewis NPR

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 9:51 am

Tyler Saladino plays baseball in the minor leagues in Birmingham, Ala. A prospect in the Chicago White Sox system, he was sent to the AA Birmingham Barons after spending part of spring training with the major league club.

And when he arrived in Alabama, Saladino's first task was to find a place to live, as he tells Morning Edition's David Greene. He settled on sharing an apartment.

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Revolutionary Road Trip
3:04 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Divided Politics, Creaky Economy Put Egypt On Edge

The Khan el-Khalili market in downtown Cairo. Election posters for the two candidates in Egypt's presidential runoff election are hanging above the street.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 9:06 am

NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is nearing the end of his Revolutionary Road Trip, a journey of some 2,500 miles across North Africa to see how the countries that staged revolutions last year are remaking themselves. Steve and his team have traveled from Tunisia's ancient city of Carthage across the deserts of Libya and have now reached the third and final country, Egypt.

On the road eastward from the Libyan border, the Egyptian desert became a blur. Then we started to run low on fuel.

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American Dreams: Then And Now
3:00 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Immigration Law Slows A Family's March Forward

U.S.-born Angel Luis Cruz, the son of Dominican immigrants, owns an insurance company in South Carolina. He says anti-illegal immigration laws have hurt his business.
Kathy Lohr NPR

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 8:33 am

Immigrant success stories are closely woven into the concept of the American dream. In South Carolina, two generations of an immigrant family have worked hard to live out their dreams, but anti-illegal immigration laws have put even legal immigrants like them on edge.

Working Upon Arrival

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The Record
12:48 am
Thu June 14, 2012

My American Dream Sounds Like Prince

Prince performing at the Fabulous Forum in Inglewood, Calif., in 1985.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 1:00 pm

I was born in 1970, sprung from one of the most aspirational generations America has ever produced: The Hip-Hop Nation. With decades of rap music anthems dedicated to our fantastical transition from poverty to prosperity, we rarely celebrate our wealth without looking back on our meager beginnings. The American Dream, for us, always represents the possibility of success and affluence on our own terms — with a watchful eye toward our hardscrabble origins.

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The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

Henry Hill, Mobster Portrayed In 'Goodfellas,' Dies

Henry Hill sits in the dining room of the Firefly restaurant in North Platte, Neb. in 2005.
Nati Harnik AP

Henry Hill, the mobster whose life became world famous after it was chronicled in the film Goodfellas, has died at a Los Angeles hospital after a long illness.

NPR's Mandalit Del Barco filed this obituary for our Newscast unit:

"The story of Hill — how he worked for a New York mafia family, murdering enemies and burying bodies — was first chronicled in the book Wiseguy.

"The book became a movie in 1990, directed by Martin Scorcese.

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The Two-Way
4:50 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

An Unexpected Discovery: A Tropical Methane Lake On Saturn's Titan

Scientists said it was an "unexpected" discovery: There's a liquid methane filled lake near the equator of Saturn's moon Titan.

Scientists had seen lakes on Titan before, but they didn't expect them near the equator because they believed the intensity of the sun at those latitudes would evaporate the liquid.

"This discovery was completely unexpected because lakes are not stable at tropical latitudes," planetary scientist Caitlin Griffith of the University of Arizona, who led the discovery team, told the AP.

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Parallel Lives
3:56 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

Romney As Governor: Confrontation, One Big Deal

Mitt Romney, then the governor-elect of Massachusetts, walks into the House chambers during inaugural ceremonies at the Statehouse in Boston, on Jan. 2, 2003.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 11:30 am

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Sports
3:56 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

New Doping Charges Filed Against Lance Armstrong

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 5:32 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. There's news today that the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, or USADA, has brought formal doping charges against seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong. USADA is the body that fights performance-enhancing drug use in Olympic sports.

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The Two-Way
3:43 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

Alleged Victim Says Sandusky Issued Threats To Keep Him Quiet

On the third day of the trial against former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, jurors heard more graphic testimony.

One of the alleged victims identified as "Victim 10," testified that after Sandusky had sexually abused him when he was in the seventh grade, he threatened him.

MSNBC reports:

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The Two-Way
3:16 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

VIDEO: Airborne Launch Sends X-Ray Observatory Into Earth Orbit

This artist's illustration shows what NuSTAR should look like in orbit after its 30-foot-long mast deployed.
JPL-Caltech NASA

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 7:30 pm

A NASA mission aimed at surveying black holes and supernovae, among other things, launched successfully today at noon ET from beneath the belly of a wide-body jet flying approximately 40,000 feet above a darkened Pacific Ocean.

The 772-pound NuSTAR X-ray observatory was carried into an equatorial orbit about 400 miles above the Earth by a Pegasus rocket, which fired its three-stage motor for 13 minutes after being dropped by the L-1011 jet.

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It's All Politics
3:01 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

Romney, Obama: When Wooing Female Voters, Check Marital Status First

A voter casts her ballot in Stow, Ohio, during the March 6 primary.
David Maxwell EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 8:20 am

What do women want, electorally speaking?

We know that women, like men, are "not some monolithic bloc," to quote the current occupant of the White House.

But as a group they are reliably influential voters, more risk-averse than men, and — pollsters tell us — generally more likely than the opposite sex to vote for Democrats, oppose the use of military force and support government programs.

In 2008, unmarried women, one of the nation's fastest-growing demographic groups, were a key to Barack Obama's presidential win.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:52 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

Surgery Restores Sexual Function In Women With Genital Mutilation

French surgeon Pierre Foldes in his Paris office in 2004. Foldes performs reconstructive surgery on women who have undergone genital mutilation. He recently authored a study on the long-term effects of the surgery.
Jean Ayissi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 10:58 pm

Female genital mutilation is still remarkably common — mainly in Africa, but also in some countries in Asia and the Middle East and in immigrant communities in Europe and the U.S.

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Europe
2:49 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

French First Lady Sets Country A-Twitter

French President Francois Hollande's companion, Valerie Trierweiler (left), has sparked a political uproar in France, with a tweet in support of a candidate running against Segolene Royal (right), Hollande's former partner and the mother of his four children.
Philippe Desmazes AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 6:16 pm

Europe may be in major financial and political turmoil, but in France, it's a tweet that has the country in an uproar.

The political storm erupted Tuesday when first lady Valerie Trierweiler tweeted her support for a candidate running in Sunday's parliamentary elections.

That may sound harmless, but the candidate she encouraged is running to unseat prominent politician Segolene Royal, the former partner of President Francois Hollande and the mother of his four children.

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The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

US Anti-Doping Agency Brings Formal Charges Against Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong arrives at a training session during a rest day of the 2010 Tour de France.
Nathalie Magniez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 4:22 pm

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has brought formal doping charges against cyclist Lance Armstrong.

The Washington Post, which broke the story, reports that as a result "Armstrong has been immediately banned from competition in triathlons."

The Post adds:

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The Two-Way
2:08 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

Justice Department Is Dropping Case Against Edwards

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 2:49 pm

The Justice Department is walking away from its case against John Edwards.

Federal prosecutors have announced they will not retry the former Democratic presidential candidate on campaign finance charges. The decision comes soon after jury was unable to reach a verdict.

Government lawyers asked Judge Catherine Eagles to dismiss the case with prejudice, meaning they will not take another bite at the apple and try to resurrect their high profile case.

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It's All Politics
2:07 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

Fla. Gov. Rick Scott Defends Efforts To Clear Noncitizens From Voter Rolls

"Not one U.S. citizen has been eliminated from the voter rolls," Florida Gov. Rick Scott tells NPR's Michel Martin. "Not one."
Chris O'Meara AP

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 4:48 pm

Florida Gov. Rick Scott is defending his effort to prevent non-U.S. citizens from voting in his state after the Justice Department filed a lawsuit to stop him on Tuesday.

Scott told NPR's Michel Martin on Tell Me More Wednesday that after learning his state didn't verify the citizenship status of registered voters, he's trying to ensure that the ballots of U.S. citizens aren't diminished:

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World Cafe
1:49 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

Sense Of Place: Ani DiFranco's Fresh Perspective On New Orleans

As part of the Roots of Music Program in New Orleans, kids have access to music education not provided in schools. Ani DiFranco sits on the Program's Board of Directors.
Bob Giardini

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 12:42 pm

This week, World Cafe invites listeners to discover the music of New Orleans with the series Sense of Place.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:48 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

Finally, A Map Of All The Microbes On Your Body

Ayodhya Ouditt NPR

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 8:30 am

Scientists Wednesday unveiled the first catalog of the bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms that populate every nook and cranny of the human body.

Researchers hope the advance marks an important step towards understanding how microbes help make humans human.

The human body contains about 100 trillion cells, but only maybe one in 10 of those cells is actually — human. The rest are from bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms.

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The Two-Way
1:29 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

'That's A Clown Question, Bro' Or The Rhetorical Comeback Rounding Twitter

Washington Nationals' Bryce Harper prepares to bat during a baseball game with the New York Mets on June 5 in Washington.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 6:04 pm

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The Two-Way
11:54 am
Wed June 13, 2012

CNN Is Canceling Politics Show 'John King, USA'

Moderator from CNN John King speaks to the crowd before a Republican presidential debate.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 1:01 pm

CNN, which has been battered in the ratings game, announced today that it was canceling its politics show "John King, USA."

Wolf Blitzer's "The Situation Room" will expand to three hours at the end of this month to cover the gap.

The New York Times reports:

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