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Sports

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(SOUNDBITE OF TRIBECA'S SONG, "GET LARGE")

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Lance Armstrong has cycled back into the headlines. But first, this refresher.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And now it's time for sports.

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Recipe For New Sports? Just Add A Drone

Feb 16, 2017

You may have heard of drone racing, but people keep coming up with new ways to enjoy these flying machines.

One of the latest twists on drone sports comes from Latvia.

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With Politics, NBA Speaks Its Mind

Feb 15, 2017

Athletics as escapism makes sense. A recent New York Times op-ed writer reminded us that that talking sports offers a "way for people who have diametrically opposed politics to share a beer at a bar."

Well, if you enjoy sports only as an escape from political give and take, there's some bad news: You can no longer enjoy the NBA.

Pushing their win streak to a new level — triple digits — the University of Connecticut's women's basketball team achieved a milestone Monday, beating No. 6 South Carolina, 66-55, for their 100th win.

No other basketball team, male or female, has neared the mark in the NCAA.

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President Trump played golf this weekend, but he wanted to make it clear that he was not just kicking back and relaxing.

"The President enjoyed hosting Prime Minister Abe on the golf course today, which was both relaxing and productive," the White House said in a statement. "They had great conversations on a wide range of subjects."

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe joined Trump at his Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Fla., for the weekend, and the two played a round with South African golfer Ernie Els at the Trump National Golf Club in Jupiter, Fla., on Saturday.

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The rosters are all set for next weekend's NBA All-Star Game.

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UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER #1: Live from New Orleans.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Finally, time for sports.

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Mike Ilitch, founder of Little Caesars Pizza and a former minor-league baseball player who went on to own the Detroit Tigers and Red Wings, has died, reports WDET's Pat Batcheller.

Ilitch, born in Detroit to Macedonian immigrants, opened his first pizza store with his wife, Marian, in the Detroit suburb of Garden City in 1959, Pat reports; today Little Caesars' parent company says it's the world's largest carryout pizza chain.

The Big 12 Conference decided Wednesday to impose a multi-million dollar sanction on Baylor University after another recent round of stinging revelations about the extent and nature of the university's problems with alleged sexual assaults by former members of its football team.

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Track and field's world governing body decided Monday to maintain Russia's suspension from international competition.

During a meeting of the International Association of Athletics Federations, or IAAF, the governing body's president, Sebastian Coe, told the AFP that Russia "could not be reintegrated into the sport before November."

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A coin toss is a 50-50 proposition, unless you're talking about the New England Patriots.

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The New England Patriots don't always win the Super Bowl. Tom Brady isn't always the face staring at you on Snack Digesting Monday, the traditional follow-up to Super Bowl Sunday. But it can sure feel that way.

How could the first Super Bowl of the Trump era escape politics?

It couldn't.

If you were just watching the game on TV, the politics were mostly subtle. Sure, there were the political ads. There were ads for everyone from NASCAR to Airbnb, which has taken on President Trump's travel ban.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Did you watch the Super Bowl?

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Yeah, come on. You know my need for sleep far outweighed my desire to cheer against the Patriots.

GREENE: I like that.

MARTIN: (Laughter).

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

After three quarters, this game looked for all the world like a rout by the Atlanta Falcons. They were up 28-9. Their quarterback Matt Ryan, who just won the regular season MVP on Saturday night, was playing like an unstoppable Super Bowl MVP, too.

Then, something unbelievable happened: The New England Patriots came back.

The Politics Of The Super Bowl

Feb 5, 2017

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LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

It's Super Bowl Sunday, as if you didn't know. More than 100 million people are expected to watch the Atlanta Falcons with quarterback Matt Ryan face off against the New England Patriots and superstar quarterback Tom Brady. And you thought this would be an escape from politics?

In case you haven't heard, a few dozen guys are planning to play a football game in Houston on Sunday. It's kind of a big deal.

Finally, today, they will play football.

The Atlanta Falcons take on the New England Patriots in Super Bowl 51.

After an NFL season of sagging TV ratings, it's expected today's game, in Houston, will do what Super Bowls always do — turn 60 minutes of football into a national holiday.

Barbershop: When Sports Meet Politics

Feb 4, 2017

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Now it's time for sports.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

As concerns over player safety mount, the national governing body for youth and high school football is considering a version of the game that could look radically different from what football fans might expect.

It's a leaner, less contact-inclined game, focused on fostering well-rounded athletes and cutting down on the kinds of bone-rattling, open-field hits that can leave parents cringing in the bleachers.

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