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The Miami Marlins ace pitcher José Fernández died in a boating accident early Sunday morning. He was 24 years old.

"The Miami Marlins organization is devastated by the tragic loss of José Fernández," the team posted in a statement on Twitter. "Our thoughts and prayers are with his family at this very difficult time. Today's game against the Atlanta Braves has been cancelled." Neither the team nor the league announced when the game would be rescheduled.

Yahoo has revealed that it suffered a massive cyber breach in late 2014, which the company believes resulted in theft of information about the accounts of at least 500 million users.

The Internet responded in stride — as it has to all recent Yahoo-related news — with the regular tide of jokes about Yahoo's dinosaur status.

Week 2 of the NFL season is now complete, and what once would have been unimaginable is now becoming commonplace.

I'm talking about protests — player protests — visible, controversial, much-talked-about displays during the playing of the national anthem, before NFL games, in stadiums, around the country.

These protests began nearly a month ago when San Francisco 49ers backup quarterback Colin Kaepernick chose to sit rather than stand while The Star-Spangled Banner was being played during a preseason game.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

William Patrick Kinsella, the Canadian author whose award-winning book Shoeless Joe was adapted into the beloved film Field of Dreams, had died at the age of 81.

His literary agent Carolyn Swayze issued a statement Friday confirming his death, calling him "a unique, creative and outrageously opinionated man."

And as NPR's Rose Friedman tells our Newscast unit, the most famous line he ever wrote was whispered – "If you build it, he will come," in 1982's Shoeless Joe.

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What happens when two talented 36-year-olds face off against 30 8-year-olds on a soccer field? We now know the answer to that question, thanks to the LA Galaxy's Robbie Keane and midfielder Steven Gerrard.

The match was the finale in the LA Galaxy's "Ridiculous Soccer Challenge" series; we also found it to be good fun as we reach the end of a week's worth of serious news.

What's The Secret To India's Paralympics Success?

Sep 16, 2016

Deepa Malik was about to make history. Seated in a custom-made chair on a hot day in Rio, Malik — paralyzed from the chest down — held a 6.5-pound shot put between her neck and right shoulder. She took a deep breath and hurled the shot 15 feet across the throwing circle. The throw got Malik a silver at the Paralympic Games in Brazil this past Monday — and made her the first Indian woman to win a Paralympics medal.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Years ago, I worked as a radio sportscaster and admired those who did it well. Westwood One's Kevin Harlan did on Monday when a pro football game was disrupted.

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In a move that mirrors the NCAA's decision to pull championship events from North Carolina, the Atlantic Coast Conference says it is relocating all upcoming major championships, citing the state's HB2 law that limits civil rights protections for LGBT people.

With the move, the Greensboro, N.C.-based ACC is taking its marquee events out of the state in which it was founded back in the 1950s.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The World Anti-Doping Agency says a Russian cyber-espionage group named the Tsar Team, also known as APT28 or Fancy Bear, broke into its database and accessed athlete's data. The hackers saw confidential medical data and have released some of the information, WADA says.

Some of the data listed athletes' therapeutic use exemptions, which allow banned substances to be taken if they're deemed to be necessary for an athlete to cope with an illness or medical condition.

The NCAA announced Monday evening that it would relocate seven championship sporting events out of North Carolina during this school year, citing the state's HB2 law limiting civil rights protections for LGBT individuals, WUNC's Dave DeWitt reports.

The events moving out of state include first and second rounds of the Division I Men's Basketball Championship — part of the Road to the Final Four — originally slated to be in Greensboro, DeWitt reports.

Stan Wawrinka is the first to acknowledge he hasn't always been the most consistent player — or the strongest mentally. That's why, when he shows his mettle during a match, he likes to point his right index finger to his temple.

That signature gesture got a lot of use in the U.S. Open final Sunday, when Wawrinka surprisingly managed to wear down Novak Djokovic and beat the defending champion 6-7 (1), 6-4, 7-5, 6-3 for his first U.S. Open title and third Grand Slam trophy overall.

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Early in what would become a tight test of a U.S. Open final, Angelique Kerber sprinted forward to somehow reach a drop shot and scoop a down-the-line winner to a corner.

The Arthur Ashe Stadium crowd roared, and Kerber celebrated by raising her right hand and wagging her index finger in the air, as if to remind opponent Karolina Pliskova — and everyone else — "I'm No. 1!"

Yes, she is. And a two-time Grand Slam champion, too.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

The Week In Sports

Sep 10, 2016
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It took two decades to arrange a college football game at Bristol Motor Speedway — and just 19 days to set up for it.

On Saturday night, Tennessee and Virginia Tech are facing off in what's been dubbed the "Battle at Bristol." The Associated Press reports the showdown at the speedway — about halfway between the two schools — has been discussed for 20 years, and was announced in 2013.

The Rio Olympics are in the rear-view mirror. Thousands of athletes have returned home to resume their lives. But for many, this post-Olympic period can be a rough one, with depression and anxiety haunting them after the games.

That depression can affect both stars and lesser-known athletes alike.

Swimmer Michael Phelps, the most decorated Olympian of all time, has talked candidly about his downward spiral after the 2012 London games that led to a DUI arrest and time in rehab.

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