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Sports

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Bullying And Stereotypes In The WNBA

4 hours ago

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What Makes Mira Rai Run?

6 hours ago

Mira Rai is perched on the edge of a couch in Kathmandu in a bright yellow Salomon windbreaker and track pants. The 29-year-old is recovering from knee surgery but looks as if she needs to jump off the couch and burn energy on a mountain trail.

Trail running is, in fact, what the Nepali athlete is known for — along with her unlikely journey from school dropout in a remote Nepali village to Maoist child soldier to national sports hero featured in children's books and depicted in murals.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Now it's time for sports.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Today, two table tennis pros met at the Qatar Open and ended up locked in a staggering 10-minute, 766-shot rally.

The International Table Tennis Federation, which runs the event, said in an Instagram video that it "has got to be the longest rally ever in modern table tennis history!"

In baseball, if a pitcher wants to intentionally walk a batter, he has to actually lob the four pitches outside the strike zone. It's a technique often used to bypass a particularly strong batter, or to set up a double play.

But that rule now appears poised to change.

The Major League Baseball commissioner's office has proposed a rule change to have the pitcher forgo actually throwing four balls — instead, the bench would simply signal to the umpire that the batter will be intentionally walked.

Lined up at a row of computers, five Ohio State University students stare intently at their screens amid the clatter of keyboards and mouse clicks. They're keeping in shape — so to speak.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

All right. The NBA returns to work on Thursday after this past weekend's All-Star game - the traditional mid-season break for Pro Basketball. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman hardly ever takes a break. And he's back with us. Hi, Tom.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Lance Armstrong has cycled back into the headlines. But first, this refresher.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And now it's time for sports.

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Recipe For New Sports? Just Add A Drone

Feb 16, 2017

You may have heard of drone racing, but people keep coming up with new ways to enjoy these flying machines.

One of the latest twists on drone sports comes from Latvia.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

With Politics, NBA Speaks Its Mind

Feb 15, 2017

Athletics as escapism makes sense. A recent New York Times op-ed writer reminded us that that talking sports offers a "way for people who have diametrically opposed politics to share a beer at a bar."

Well, if you enjoy sports only as an escape from political give and take, there's some bad news: You can no longer enjoy the NBA.

Pushing their win streak to a new level — triple digits — the University of Connecticut's women's basketball team achieved a milestone Monday, beating No. 6 South Carolina, 66-55, for their 100th win.

No other basketball team, male or female, has neared the mark in the NCAA.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

President Trump played golf this weekend, but he wanted to make it clear that he was not just kicking back and relaxing.

"The President enjoyed hosting Prime Minister Abe on the golf course today, which was both relaxing and productive," the White House said in a statement. "They had great conversations on a wide range of subjects."

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe joined Trump at his Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Fla., for the weekend, and the two played a round with South African golfer Ernie Els at the Trump National Golf Club in Jupiter, Fla., on Saturday.

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LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

The rosters are all set for next weekend's NBA All-Star Game.

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UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER #1: Live from New Orleans.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Finally, time for sports.

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Mike Ilitch, founder of Little Caesars Pizza and a former minor-league baseball player who went on to own the Detroit Tigers and Red Wings, has died, reports WDET's Pat Batcheller.

Ilitch, born in Detroit to Macedonian immigrants, opened his first pizza store with his wife, Marian, in the Detroit suburb of Garden City in 1959, Pat reports; today Little Caesars' parent company says it's the world's largest carryout pizza chain.

The Big 12 Conference decided Wednesday to impose a multi-million dollar sanction on Baylor University after another recent round of stinging revelations about the extent and nature of the university's problems with alleged sexual assaults by former members of its football team.

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Track and field's world governing body decided Monday to maintain Russia's suspension from international competition.

During a meeting of the International Association of Athletics Federations, or IAAF, the governing body's president, Sebastian Coe, told the AFP that Russia "could not be reintegrated into the sport before November."

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

A coin toss is a 50-50 proposition, unless you're talking about the New England Patriots.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The New England Patriots don't always win the Super Bowl. Tom Brady isn't always the face staring at you on Snack Digesting Monday, the traditional follow-up to Super Bowl Sunday. But it can sure feel that way.

How could the first Super Bowl of the Trump era escape politics?

It couldn't.

If you were just watching the game on TV, the politics were mostly subtle. Sure, there were the political ads. There were ads for everyone from NASCAR to Airbnb, which has taken on President Trump's travel ban.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Did you watch the Super Bowl?

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Yeah, come on. You know my need for sleep far outweighed my desire to cheer against the Patriots.

GREENE: I like that.

MARTIN: (Laughter).

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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