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Fake classes, inflated grades and one academic department that facilitated it all. Those are all detailed in a newly released report on grade-fixing at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

The scandal came to light in 2011, but the report out Wednesday offers the most wide-sweeping look yet at how some school staff members boosted the grades of more than 3,000 students — nearly half of them athletes — over nearly 20 years.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

After the Royals' postseason winning streak was snapped Tuesday and the Giants led off Wednesday's game with a home run, one could excuse Royals fans for thinking the glow around this season was finally dimming.

But Kansas City quickly recovered, and had the game even, 2-2, before tearing through Giants pitcher after Giants pitcher in the sixth inning and handing the ball to their dominant bullpen. The 7-2 win evened the World Series at one win per team.

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Nothing in sport reflects the changing demographics of the country more than college football — most especially the decline of the Big Ten Conference and the ascendance of the Southeastern Conference.

Big Ten territory represents steel mills and coal mines, blue collars and black smoke, where America's pigskin heroes used to be weaned on frozen fields. But the SEC, in the growing Sun Belt, has completely taken over. Mississippi State is the No. 1 team in the country. Excuse me: Mississippi State? This is like Antiques Roadshow soaring to the top of television ratings.

Updated at 1:45 a.m. ET, Oct. 22.

Madison Bumgarner continued his dominant run through the playoffs, giving up just three hits and striking out five in seven innings Tuesday, as the San Francisco Giants clobbered the Kansas City Royals in Game 1 of the World Series.

A two-run home run by outfielder Hunter Pence staked the Giants to a 3-0 lead in the top of the first inning, and that would be more than enough as the Royals managed nothing more than a solo home run by catcher Salvador Perez in the seventh inning.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Millions of baseball fans and two cities 1,500 miles apart are getting ready for tonight's big game in Kansas City, Mo. The Royals are in their first World Series in nearly three decades. They face the San Francisco Giants, who are back again after missing their chance at the series last year.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The San Francisco Giants are in Kansas City tonight to play the Royals. It's game one of a best-of-seven series. NPR's Tom Goldman is there. Hi, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Edward Munoz grew up a soccer phenom and his family invested in making him a success. School suffered, so he quit playing two years ago but only recently talked with his father about that decision.

This story is from Radio Rookies, a program at member station WNYC, and was produced by Andrew Mambo and edited by Kaari Pitkin.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Two Wildcard Teams Meet In World Series

Oct 18, 2014

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

BJ Leiderman writes our theme music. Want to hear it?

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And speaking of flights of fantasy, meet our next guest.

MICHAEL SNIVELY: Full-time, I design speakers, but part-time and on weekends, I am a skydiving instructor.

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

As the San Francisco Giants and the St. Louis Cardinals entered the bottom of the ninth inning tied 3-3 on Thursday night, all but one run had been the result of balls smacked into the stands.

Giants leftfielder Travis Ishikawa sent a fastball from Michael Wacha into the right-field bleachers to end the game, and the National League Championship Series, in San Francisco's favor. It's the third time in five years the team has reached the World Series.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And now this - the Kansas City Royals still have not lost a playoff baseball game since 1985. Of course, for 28 consecutive seasons since that World Series victory in '85, they did not have any post-season games at all.

The Kansas City Royals, who had not seen the playoffs since 1985, have swept the Baltimore Orioles, winning the American League pennant and securing a spot in the World Series.

As The New York Times puts it, right now, the Royals can do no wrong. The team has yet to lose a playoff game, stringing together eight straight victories, a feat no other team has accomplished.

Today, they perfected that run by beating Baltimore 2-1.

For me, 45 years ago today — Oct. 15, 1969 — was one of those rare days, a day you remember all your life. It was Game 4 of the World Series. Mets vs. Orioles. My Mets were up two games to one. And I was at Shea Stadium.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

That familiar old preface we so often hear — usually from long-winded people — is: "To make a long story short." I've noticed lately that that expression has become more common, but, to make a long story short, it's been shortened to just "long story short." I'll even bet it's gotten initialed in the text universe to LSS.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

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